F-Fan - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
FABLED............2
There!- as the fabled fair Hesperian tree, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 82
Still was more plenty than the fabled horn The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 35
 
FABRIC............1
Until there shone a fabric crystalline, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 628
 
FACE..............92
The melting softness of that face - Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 14
Brightening the half veil'd face of heaven afar: To Hope, Line 45
Bless Cynthia's face , the enthusiast's friend: To Some Ladies, Line 4
The placid features of a human face : To George Felton Mathew, Line 89
And when the moon her pallid face discloses, Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 13
Came up,- a courtly smile upon his face , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 125
And open face of heaven,- to breathe a prayer To one who has been long in city pent, Line 3
While, in my face , the freshest breeze I caught. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 122
In striving from its crystal face to take To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 8
From its fair face , shall bid our spirits fly. To My Brothers, Line 14
That blasphemed the bright Lyrist to his face , Sleep and Poetry, Line 202
'Twere better far to hide my foolish face ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 272
His eyes from her sweet face . Most happy they! Sleep and Poetry, Line 391
The face of Poesy: from off her throne Sleep and Poetry, Line 394
But though her face was clear as infant's eyes, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 199
Come cool and suddenly against his face , This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 6
Stood, wan, and pale and with an awed face , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 191
Something more high perplexing in thy face !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 515
Making me quickly veil my eyes and face : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 603
An arch face peep'd,- an Oread as I guess'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 671
The same bright face I tasted in my sleep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 895
There came upon my face , in plenteous showers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 899
And airy cradle, lowly bow'd his face Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 337
Officiously. Sideway his face repos'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 403
By the most soft completion of thy face , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 757
'Twas with slow, languid paces, and face hid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 872
Able to face an owl's, they still are dight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 10
Has thy fair face within its tranquil ken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 64
Against his pallid face : he felt the charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 105
The fairest face that morn e'er look'd upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 424
Upon a dead thing's face my hand I laid; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 618
And scatter'd in his face some fragments light. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 774
Love's silver name upon the meadow's face . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 700
His lady smiles; delight is in her face ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 803
In Dian's face they read the gentle lore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 833
His hands against his face , and then did rest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 917
And as she spake, into her face there came Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 982
When I behold, upon the night's starr'd face , When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 5
O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 1
Because her face was turn'd to the same skies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 22
And yet they knew it was Lorenzo's face : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 476
Thy face - I sin against thy native skies. On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 14
O horrible! to lose the sight of well remember'd face , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 33
'Tis now free to stupid face , Not Aladdin magian, Line 50
A spacious looking-glass, upon whose face , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 52
Doth not weary? Where's the face Fancy, Line 73
He startled her; but soon she knew his face , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 96
While Porphyro upon her face doth look, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 128
Or look with ruffian passion in her face : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 149
Died palsy-twitch'd, with meagre face deform; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 376
The Dwarf with piteous face began to rhyme. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 21
She smil'd at her own beauteous face again. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 54
Yet for all this - for all her pretty face - When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 55
She thought her pretty face would please the faeries. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 62
Her face was large as that of Memphian sphinx, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 31
But oh! how unlike marble was that face : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 34
Thea, I feel thee ere I see thy face ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 96
Pale wox I, and in vapours hid my face . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 326
More thought than woe was in her dusky face , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 56
And sidelong fix'd her eye on Saturn's face : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 91
Drown both, and press them both against earth's face , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 145
Ponderest high and deep; and in thy face Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 164
My dispossessor? Have ye seen his face ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 233
All eyes were on Enceladus's face , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 346
And in each face he saw a gleam of light, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 352
In whose face was no joy, though all the Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 390
And their eternal calm, and all that face , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 60
A wondrous lesson in thy silent face : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 112
Each one the face a moment whiles to me; Ode on Indolence, Line 22
There is no face I rather would behold Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 44
I'll choose a jailor, whose swart monstrous face Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 91
Twin picture to your face . Erminia! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
That this poor face you deign to praise so much; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 110
My eyes, too long poor exiles from thy face , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
As I am; let me observe you, face to face: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 80
As I am; let me observe you, face to face : Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 80
Forgive me, but he must not see thy face . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 11
Like a young Jove with calm uneager face , Lamia, Part I, Line 218
Her face so long in Corinth, where, she said, Lamia, Part I, Line 311
Muffling his face , of greeting friends in fear, Lamia, Part I, Line 362
Scarce saw in all the room another face , Lamia, Part II, Line 240
In the bride's face , where now no azure vein Lamia, Part II, Line 272
They seek no wonder but the human face ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 163
What image this, whose face I cannot see, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 213
Parted the veils. Then saw I a wan face , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 256
I must not think now, though I saw that face - The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 263
Hung nobly, as upon the face of heaven The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 453
They kiss'd nine times the carpet's velvet face The Jealousies, Line 343
I see the dawning touch'd upon your face ; The Jealousies, Line 481
Pale was his face , he still look'd very ill: The Jealousies, Line 608
Came sudden 'fore my face , and brush'd against my hat. The Jealousies, Line 675
And close into her face , with rhyming clack, The Jealousies, Line 777
 
FACED.............1
With bowed necks, and joined hands, side- faced ; Ode on Indolence, Line 2
 
FACES.............14
Round the wide hall, and show their happy faces ; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 42
To woo sweet kisses from averted faces ,- Sleep and Poetry, Line 106
Some with their faces muffled to the ear Sleep and Poetry, Line 144
Fair dewy roses brush against our faces , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 133
O'er pale faces mourns The Gothic looks solemn, Line 8
Fair faces and a rush of garments white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 124
Of amber 'gainst their faces levelling. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 838
Crown'd with green leaves, and faces all on flame; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 201
I love to mark sad faces in fair weather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 5
Bare your faces of the veil, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 25
The brothers' faces in the ford did seem, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 214
And many hid their faces from the light: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 381
"As flowers turn their faces to the sun, The Jealousies, Line 721
That seem'd throughout with upheld faces paved; The Jealousies, Line 731
 
FACING............3
Out- facing Lucifer, and then had hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 531
Full facing their swift flight, from ebon streak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 496
Then facing right about, he saw the page, The Jealousies, Line 316
 
FACT..............3
From human pastures; or, O torturing fact ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 5
this fact , for it was done in the midst of Greece." Burton's "Anatomy of Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Who raked up ev'ry fact against the dead,) The Jealousies, Line 89
 
FACTION...........1
"Under the flag/ Of each his faction , they to battle bring/ Their Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Epigraph
 
FACTORIES.........1
In torched mines and noisy factories , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 108
 
FACTS.............1
Revolve these facts in your acutest mood, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 35
 
FACULTIES.........2
And hold my faculties so long in thrall, To George Felton Mathew, Line 19
My spirit's faculties ! I'll flatter you Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 93
 
FADDLE............1
And fiddle- faddle standest while you go; The Jealousies, Line 238
 
FADE..............12
Let me not see our country's honour fade : To Hope, Line 32
She came, and thou didst fade , and fade away- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 177
She came, and thou didst fade, and fade away- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 177
Fade away where old time is retreating. Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 4
Where's the cheek that doth not fade , Fancy, Line 69
Porphyro will leave me here to fade and pine.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 329
And with thee fade away into the forest dim: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 20
Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget Ode to a Nightingale, Line 21
She cannot fade , though thou hast not thy bliss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 19
Fade softly from my eyes, and be once more Ode on Indolence, Line 55
Came thy sweet greeting, that if thou shouldst fade Lamia, Part I, Line 269
Throughout, as fearful the whole charm might fade . Lamia, Part II, Line 124
 
FADED.............15
Of heaven and earth had faded : deepest shades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 692
Or ripe October's faded marigolds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 397
Then by the bed-side, where the faded moon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 253
His faded eyes, and saw his kingdom gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 90
Of all Olympus' faded hierarchy! Ode to Psyche, Line 25
Then faded , and to follow them I burn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 23
They faded , and, forsooth! I wanted wings: Ode on Indolence, Line 31
Faded before him, cower'd, nor could restrain Lamia, Part I, Line 137
Approving all, she faded at self-will, Lamia, Part II, Line 142
"Apollo! faded , far flown Apollo! The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 204
Until old Saturn rais'd his faded eyes, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 400
Faded the flower and all its budded charms, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 5
Faded the sight of beauty from my eyes, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 6
Faded the shape of beauty from my arms, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 7
Faded the voice, warmth, whiteness, paradise, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 8
 
FADES.............6
E'en now all tumult from my bosom fades : Sleep and Poetry, Line 315
Struggling, and blood, and shrieks - all dimly fades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 10
Of ocean fades upon him; then, anew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 76
Fades as does its blossoming; Fancy, Line 12
Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades Ode to a Nightingale, Line 75
His phantasy was lost, where reason fades , Lamia, Part I, Line 235
 
FADETH............1
But fadeth at the greeting of the sun: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 27
 
FADING............6
Thy dales, and hills, are fading from my view: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 104
He saw her body fading gaunt and spare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 507
And on thy cheeks a fading rose La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 11
Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 47
Of the soon fading jealous caliphat; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 48
The poor, the fading , brief pride of an hour: To Fanny, Line 50
 
FADINGLY..........1
Sad and fadingly : Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 6
 
FAERIES...........4
And dance and kiss and love as faeries do, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 3
For faeries be as humans, lovers true. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 4
She thought her pretty face would please the faeries . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 62
Of faeries stooping on their wings sublime The Jealousies, Line 98
 
FAERY.............16
Those faery lids how sleek, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 7
Hoodwink'd with faery fancy; all amort, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 70
Hark! 'tis an elfin-storm from faery land, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 343
Know you the three ' great crimes' in faery land? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 24
My top has henceforth slept in faery land. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 32
He fell a snoring at a faery ball. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 35
Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 70
Upon a time, before the faery broods Lamia, Part I, Line 1
That is a doubtful tale from faery land, Lamia, Part II, Line 5
Supportress of the faery -roof, made moan Lamia, Part II, Line 123
A Faery Tale, by Lucy Vaughan Lloyd of China Walk, Lambeth The Jealousies, Subtitle
A faery city, 'neath the potent rule The Jealousies, Line 3
And faery Zendervester overstept; The Jealousies, Line 14
Themselves with what in faery land was sweet, The Jealousies, Line 22
White Provence rose-leaves with her faery tears, The Jealousies, Line 83
O, little faery Pegasus! rear - prance- The Jealousies, Line 637
 
FAERY'S...........3
When they were come unto the Faery's court When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 1
I made a whipstock of a faery's wand; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 26
Picklock'd a faery's boudoir - now no king, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 37
 
FAGGOT............2
The sear faggot blazes bright, Fancy, Line 17
Hast thou no fear of hangmen, or the faggot ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
 
FAGGOTS...........1
Faggots of cinnamon, and many heaps The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 235
 
FAIL..............3
Complete my joy - let not my first wish fail , On Peace, Line 7
But it is done - succeed the verse or fail - Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 157
But, be it what it may, I cannot fail Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52
 
FAIL'D............1
Albert has surely fail'd me! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 61c
 
FAILS.............2
Those twilight eyes? Those eyes!- my spirit fails - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 193
He passeth by; and his weak spirit fails The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 17
 
FAILURE...........1
the conviction that there is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
 
FAIN..............16
Too partial friend! fain would I follow thee To George Felton Mathew, Line 11
Fain would I echo back each pleasant note To George Felton Mathew, Line 13
Into a delphic labyrinth. I would fain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 3
The happy chance: so happy, I was fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 891
To divine powers: from his hand full fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 409
It is a thing I dote on: so I'd fain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 911
Ah! what if I should lose thee, when so fain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 203
Fain would he have commanded, fain took throne Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 290
Fain would he have commanded, fain took throne Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 290
For he is just and noble. Fain would I Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 87
Truth is, the Emperor would fain dismiss Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 16
I would fain Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 17b
And fain would I catch up his dying words, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 42
I fain would see before I sleep,- and Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 112
Fain would I know the great usurper's fate. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 8
You say you love a mortal. I would fain The Jealousies, Line 463
 
FAINT.............37
And their faint cracklings o'er our silence creep To My Brothers, Line 2
And catch soft floatings from a faint -heard hymning; Sleep and Poetry, Line 34
When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 2
With a faint breath of music, which ev'n then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 115
And faint away, before my eager view: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 588
To faint once more by looking on my bliss- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 652
Faint fare-thee-wells, and sigh-shrilled adieus!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 690
When all above was faint with mid-day heat. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 878
This said, he rose, faint -smiling like a star Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 990
One faint eternal eventide of gems. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 225
Rous'd by his whispering footsteps murmured faint : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 268
As plainly in his ear, as the faint charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 356
By tenderest pressure, a faint damask mouth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 405
Faint through his careless arms; content to see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 463
Revive, dear youth, or I shall faint and die; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 766
Save echo, faint repeating o'er and o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1011
Till a faint dawn surpris'd them. Glaucus cried, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 832
Of all his rebel tempests. Dark clouds faint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 953
So faint a kindness, such a meek surrender Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 73
Snuff at its faint extreme, and seem to tire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 365
Descry a favourite hamlet faint and far. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 397
To tell his forehead's swoon and faint when first began decay, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 26
Save wings, for heaven:- Porphyro grew faint : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 224
He stretch'd himself in grief and radiance faint . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 304
Felt faint , and would have sunk among the rest, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 106
Cold as a bubbling well; let faint -lipp'd shells, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 19
Fluttering among the faint Olympians, Ode to Psyche, Line 42
And for the day faint visions there is store; Ode on Indolence, Line 58
For I am sick and faint with many wrongs, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 115
Pout her faint lips anew with rubious health; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
With jeers at me! You tremble - faint at once, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 35
We are all weary - faint - set ope the doors- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 194
Whether to faint Elysium, or where Lamia, Part I, Line 206
By faint degrees, voice, lute, and pleasure ceased; Lamia, Part II, Line 265
Ply well the rowel with faint trembling heels, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 11
I'm faint - a biting sword! A noble sword! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 6
When first for April honey into faint flowers they dive." The Jealousies, Line 261
 
FAINTED...........4
Methought I fainted at the charmed touch, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 637
Fainted away in that dark lair of night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 560
The lady fainted and he thought her dead, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 69
Grew pale as death, and fainted - very nigh! The Jealousies, Line 457
 
FAINTER...........1
Some fainter gleamings o'er his fancy shot; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 178
 
FAINTEST..........3
For not the faintest motion could be seen I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 13
Blush-tinted cheeks, half smiles, and faintest sighs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 619
Without one hope, without one faintest trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 640
 
FAINTING..........7
His fainting recollections. Now indeed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 397
To fainting creatures in a desert wild. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 119
Fainting I fell into a bed of flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 746
That fainting fit was not delayed too late. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 74
And, on the sudden, fainting with surprise, Ode to Psyche, Line 8
Was fainting for sweet food: I look'd thereon The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 233
That shall drive Bertha to a fainting fit! The Jealousies, Line 519
 
FAINTLY...........7
Bronze clarions awake, and faintly bruit, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 791
And stirr'd them faintly . Verdant cave and cell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 678
The Nereids danc'd; the Syrens faintly sang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 889
Or feel but faintly , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 34
The chilly sunset faintly told The Eve of St. Mark, Line 7
[A sennet heard faintly . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 53
A noble nature; and would faintly sketch Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 58
 
FAINTNESS.........1
And brought in faintness solemn, sweet, and slow I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 196
 
FAINTS............5
Faints into sleep, with many a dying tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 950
This shadowy queen athwart, and faints away Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 648
The Princess faints ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 73a
That faints into itself at evening hour: Lamia, Part I, Line 139
She falls, she faints ! while laughter peals The Jealousies, Line 779
 
FAIR..............220
For sure so fair a place was never seen, Imitation of Spenser, Line 23
In melodies that even heaven fair As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 10
And like fair veins in sable marble flow. To Lord Byron, Line 12
Was night to thy fair morning! Thou didst die Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 7
From thy fair name, and waters it with tears! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 14
In Spenser's halls he strayed, and bowers fair , Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 9
When no fair dreams before my "mind's eye" flit, To Hope, Line 3
And frown, to drive fair Cheerfulness away, To Hope, Line 10
From cruel parents, or relentless fair ; To Hope, Line 26
And charm the ear of evening fair , Ode to Apollo, Line 46
Than the present, fair nymphs, I was blest with from you, To Some Ladies, Line 22
Of Armida the fair , and Rinaldo the bold? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 8
Is it a scarf that thy fair lady gave? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 15
And hastest thou now to that fair lady's bower? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 16
On this scroll thou seest written in characters fair On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 21
We will hasten, my fair , to the opening glades, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 5
Ah! no - as I breathe it, I press thy fair knee, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 15
Ah! who can e'er forget so fair a being? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 29
Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 1
Keeping secret what is fair . Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 50
Like those fair stars that twinkle in the heavens. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 44
To see wide plains, fair trees and lawny slope: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 66
Fair as some wonder out of fairy land, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 94
'Tis very sweet to look into the fair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 2
Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 1
Their ladies fair , that in the distance seem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 37
Be lull'd with songs of mine. Fair world, adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 103
That my soft verse will charm thy daughters fair , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 108
Michael in arms, and more, meek Eve's fair slenderness. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 59
Of fair -hair'd Milton's eloquent distress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 11
From its fair face, shall bid our spirits fly. To My Brothers, Line 14
The o'erwhelming sweets, 'twill bring to me the fair Sleep and Poetry, Line 62
That such fair clusters should be rudely torn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 44
Her fair eyes looking through her locks auburne. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 106
Of this fair world, and all its gentle livers; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 117
But the fair paradise of Nature's light? I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 126
Fair dewy roses brush against our faces, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 133
Telling us how fair , trembling Syrinx fled I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 157
And lovely women were as fair and warm, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 219
Then is there nothing in the world so fair ? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 9
And meekly let your fair hands joined be. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 4
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 19
Fair faces and a rush of garments white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 124
Their voices to the clouds, a fair wrought car, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 165
Thou wast to lose fair Syrinx - do thou now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 243
Aye, those fair living forms swam heavenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 315
Fair creatures! whose young children's children bred Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 317
His quick gone love, among fair blossom'd boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 375
The fair -grown yew tree, for a chosen bow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 482
Not - thy soft hand, fair sister! let me shun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 611
A wonder, fair as any I have told- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 894
Of death, for the fair form had gone again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 905
Yes, thrice have I this fair enchantment seen; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 918
To sue her gentle ears for whose fair head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 953
Fair Pastorella in the bandit's den, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 32
Of heaven! Oh Cynthia, ten-times bright and fair ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 170
Through a long pillar'd vista, a fair shrine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 260
Cupids a slumbering on their pinions fair . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 386
Of fondest beauty; fonder, in fair sooth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 394
In nectar'd clouds and curls through water fair , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 512
Of his fair eyes run liquid through their souls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 544
Some fair immortal, and that his embrace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 568
Of flowers, peacocks, swans, and naiads fair . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 620
A naked waist: " Fair Cupid, whence is this?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 713
My lonely madness. Speak, delicious fair ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 748
That the fair visitant at last unwound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 851
Each tender maiden whom he once thought fair , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 892
Fair maid, be pitiful to my great woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 949
Eterne Apollo! that thy sister fair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 42
Has thy fair face within its tranquil ken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 64
How his own goddess was past all things fair , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 190
That love should be my bane! Ah, Scylla fair ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 399
My children fair , my lovely girls and boys! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 547
Were her fair limbs, and like a common weed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 624
The fair assembly wander'd to and fro, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 804
Of one fair palace, that far far surpass'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 847
Fair Scylla and her guides to conference; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 894
Thus the fair goddess: while Endymion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 922
Yet deign, white Queen of Beauty, thy fair eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 976
Spake fair Ausonia; and once more she spake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 15
"Is no one near to help me? No fair dawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 44
Call me his queen, his second life's fair crown! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 70
" Fair damsel, pity me! forgive that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 105
Come hither, lady fair , and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 226
Come hither, lady fair , and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 237
Fair Melody! kind Syren! I've no choice; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 300
I'm giddy at that cheek so fair and smooth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 311
Thine own fair bosom, and I am so near! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 317
Endymion sleepeth and the lady fair . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 404
To that fair shadow'd passion puls'd its way- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 446
Can I prize thee, fair maid, all price above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 473
On me, and on this damsel fair of mine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 662
To sit beneath a fair lone beechen tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 767
Will trespass down those cheeks. Companion fair ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 870
Peona kiss'd, and bless'd with fair good night: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 997
She gave her fair hands to him, and behold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1000
Fair plumed syren, queen of far-away! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 2
And when I feel, fair creature of an hour, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 9
To fair hostess Merriment, Robin Hood, Line 29
I love to mark sad faces in fair weather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 5
Fair and foul I love together; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 7
Morning fair and storm-wreck'd hull; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 13
More soft, more white, and her fair cheek more fair; Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 6
More soft, more white, and her fair cheek more fair ; Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 6
Again on his fair palfrey. Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 16
He chews the honied cud of fair spring thoughts, Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 6
On mists in idleness: to let fair things Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 11
So she held her tongue and lay plump and fair Over the hill and over the dale, Line 15
O who wouldn't hie to Dawlish fair , Over the hill and over the dale, Line 17
To shew this castle in fair dreaming wise Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 31
Fair Isabel, poor simple Isabel! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 1
So said he one fair morning, and all day Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 41
She, to her chamber gone, a ditty fair Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 77
With her two brothers this fair lady dwelt, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 105
Why were they proud? Because fair orange-mounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 123
Fair Isabella in her downy nest? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 138
Yet so they did - and every dealer fair Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 143
Bow'd a fair greeting to these serpents' whine; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 190
Rode past fair Florence, to where Arno's stream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 210
Fair reader, at the old tale take a glance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 389
Her from her own fair youth, and pleasures gay, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 463
Or sue the fair Apollo and he will Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 3
Has any here a daughter fair All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 37
We fair ones show a preference, too blind! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 8
And death to this fair haunt of spring, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 3
God's help! my lady fair the conjuror plays The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 124
And threw warm gules on Madeline's fair breast, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 218
In fancy, fair St. Agnes in her bed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 233
"And now, my love, my seraph fair , awake! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 276
At which fair Madeline began to weep, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 302
To trust, fair Madeline, to no rude infidel. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 342
The city streets were clean and fair The Eve of St. Mark, Line 4
Bertha was a maiden fair The Eve of St. Mark, Line 39
So each Fair reasons - though it oft miscarries. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 61
Pale were the lips I kiss'd, and fair the form As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 13
It holds the zephyr, ere it sendeth fair Character of C.B., Line 4
Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 10
She touch'd her fair large forehead to the ground, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 80
And that fair kneeling Goddess; and then spake, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 92
After the full completion of fair day,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 191
Possess'd for glory, two fair argent wings, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 284
So leant she, not so fair , upon a tusk Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 62
We are such forest-trees, and our fair boughs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 224
When all the fair Existences of heaven Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 337
Together had he left his mother fair Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 31
Saw two fair creatures, couched side by side Ode to Psyche, Line 9
And robs his fair name of its maidenhood; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 4
Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 15
For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair ! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 20
O Attic shape! Fair attitude! with brede Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 41
The first was a fair maid, and Love her name; Ode on Indolence, Line 25
Fair on your Graces fall this early morrow! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 124
Auranthe - heaven preserve her always fair !- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 148
Kiss your fair hand and lady fortune's too. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 16
Come, fair Auranthe, try if your soft hands Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
Thank you, fair lady - Otho!- Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 118
And will be, for I love such fair disgrace. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 85
My fair Auranthe! Yes, I will be there. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 104
Franconia's fair sister, 'tis I mean. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 113
Shall be your fair Auranthe. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 94a
I still must mourn. The fair Auranthe mine! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 140
Fair prisoner, you hear these joyous shouts? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 7
Aye, any thing to me, fair creature. Do, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 38
What means this, fair one? Why in such alarm? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 82
Prythee, fair lady, what chance brought you here? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
Indeed you are too fair : Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 100b
I cannot. Take her. Fair Erminia, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 139
Pray let me lead. Fair lady, forget not Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
Now, Ludolph! Now, Auranthe, daughter fair ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 1
Fair creature, bless me with a single word! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
The promise of fair sail beyond the Rhone, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
To these fair children, stars of a new age? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 22
Is her life nothing? Her fair honour nothing? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 119
Of the world's herbal, this fair lily blanch'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 123
Which now disfigure her fair growing stem, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
There!- as the fabled fair Hesperian tree, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 82
E'en to her chamber-door, and there, fair boy,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
Comes from the pillow'd beauty of that fair Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 35
A blushing fair -eyed purity? A sylph, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 23
I have you! Whither wander those fair eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
A fair bride! A sweet bride! An innocent bride! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 53
And the sweet lady, fair Erminia, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 8
Being gloomy-minded, haters of fair revels,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 57
And wonder at her, friends, she is so fair ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 60
For the sake of my fair newly wedded wife, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 142
But weep, and weep, that they were born so fair ? Lamia, Part I, Line 62
" Fair Hermes, crown'd with feathers, fluttering light, Lamia, Part I, Line 68
Return'd the snake, "but seal with oaths, fair God!" Lamia, Part I, Line 88
Fair , on a sloping green of mossy tread, Lamia, Part I, Line 181
Why this fair creature chose so fairily Lamia, Part I, Line 200
Down through tress-lifting waves the Nereids fair Lamia, Part I, Line 207
"I'm wearied," said fair Lamia: "tell me who Lamia, Part I, Line 371
"Why do you sigh, fair creature?" whisper'd he: Lamia, Part II, Line 40
With other pageants: but this fair unknown Lamia, Part II, Line 110
That royal porch, that high-built fair demesne; Lamia, Part II, Line 155
Will make Elysian shades not too fair , too divine. Lamia, Part II, Line 212
Brow-beating her fair form, and troubling her sweet pride. Lamia, Part II, Line 248
Wander'd on fair -spaced temples; no soft bloom Lamia, Part II, Line 273
Lamia, no longer fair , there sat a deadly white. Lamia, Part II, Line 276
habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
molest him; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
was fair and lovely Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
As if with wings; but the fair trees were gone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 59
As once fair angels on a ladder flew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 135
I mark'd the goddess in fair statuary The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 336
She press'd her fair large forehead to the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 379
And that fair kneeling Goddess at his feet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 403
After the full completion of fair day, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 35
When every fair one that I saw was fair, What can I do to drive away, Line 7
When every fair one that I saw was fair , What can I do to drive away, Line 7
A temperate lily, temperate as fair ; To Fanny, Line 30
For love of mortal women, maidens fair , The Jealousies, Line 5
The hand of his fair daughter Bellanaine; The Jealousies, Line 31
So she was silenced, and fair Bellanaine, The Jealousies, Line 73
Like any drone shut from the fair bee-queen, The Jealousies, Line 132
"Where does she live?" ask'd Hum. "Her fair locks curl The Jealousies, Line 385
Shook with her agony, till fair were seen The Jealousies, Line 395
For pleasure?)- the fair Princess in full view, The Jealousies, Line 592
While that fair Princess, from her winged chair, The Jealousies, Line 740
Their new-blown loyalty with guerdon fair , The Jealousies, Line 742
 
FAIRER............8
Now 'tis a fairer season; ye have breathed Sleep and Poetry, Line 221
Yet I rejoice: a myrtle fairer than Sleep and Poetry, Line 248
Phoebe is fairer far - O gaze no more:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 57
As Heaven and Earth are fairer , fairer far Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 206
As Heaven and Earth are fairer, fairer far Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 206
Fairer than Phoebe's sapphire-region'd star, Ode to Psyche, Line 26
Fairer than these, though temple thou hast none, Ode to Psyche, Line 28
And she is softer, fairer than her name!" The Jealousies, Line 384
 
FAIREST...........17
That in fairest lake had placed been, Imitation of Spenser, Line 20
The image of the fairest form Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 10
Their fairest blossom'd beans and poppied corn; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 255
Of love, that fairest joys give most unrest; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 366
The fairest face that morn e'er look'd upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 424
Only I pray, as fairest boon, to die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 550
Grief born of thee, young angel! fairest thief! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 108
And when he is restor'd, thou, fairest dame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 816
Which of the fairest three Apollo to the Graces, Line 1
Which of the fairest three Apollo to the Graces, Line 4
On the fairest time of June Robin Hood, Line 19
Perhaps her teeth are not the fairest pearl; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 3
She took their cream of beauty, fairest dyes, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 3
What would the fairest -? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 33a
Sad, that the fairest creature of the earth- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 91
Or choose the fairest of her sheaved spears! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 3
Ah, fairest of all human loveliness! The Jealousies, Line 168
 
FAIRIES...........4
Where the fairies are chaunting their evening hymns, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 7
While legion'd fairies pac'd the coverlet, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 168
Out, ye aguish fairies , out! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER,
Of the sweets of Fairies , Peris, Goddesses, Lamia, Part I, Line 329
 
FAIRILY...........2
Numerous as shadows haunting fairily The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 39
Why this fair creature chose so fairily Lamia, Part I, Line 200
 
FAIRLY............2
Of nymphs approaching fairly o'er the sward: Sleep and Poetry, Line 365
And kick'd up her petticoats fairly . Over the hill and over the dale, Line 6
 
FAIRNESS..........4
Were rippling round her dainty fairness now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 939
Than on the marble fairness of old Greece. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 61
All the immortal fairness of his limbs; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 125
That shape, that fairness , that sweet minor zest I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 6
 
FAIRY.............17
The dew by fairy feet swept from the green, To George Felton Mathew, Line 26
Fair as some wonder out of fairy land, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 94
Had taken fairy phantasies to strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 92
So fairy -quick, was strange! Bewildered, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 93
Upon his fairy journey on he hastes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 352
So, fairy -thing, it shall have lullabies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 575
Of happiness, from fairy -press ooz'd out. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 802
Ere it burst open swift as fairy thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 857
Or tiny point of fairy scymetar; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 499
With fairy fishes from the mountain tarn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 693
Never have relish in the fairy power When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 11
Ye tight little fairy , just fresh from the dairy, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 3
Zephyr, blue-eyed fairy , turn Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 31
Love me, blue-eyed fairy true, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 39
I love thee, chrystal fairy true; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 62
Her nostrils, small, fragrant, fairy -delicate; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 70
And now the fairy escort was seen clear, The Jealousies, Line 577
 
FAIRY'S...........4
Though your feet are more light than a fairy's feet, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 5
Full beautiful, a fairy's child; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 14
A fairy's song. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 24
A fairy's hand, and in the waist, why - very small." The Jealousies, Line 477
 
FAITH.............3
Dear madam, I must kiss you, faith I must! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 51
But, calling interest loyalty, swore faith Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
Urging the perfidy of broken faith ,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 148
 
FAITHFUL..........4
And faithful Petrarch gloriously crown'd. Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 14
What promise hast thou faithful guarded since Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 44
Faithful counsel have I given, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 5b
"Commander of the faithful !" answer'd Hum, The Jealousies, Line 361
 
FALCHIONS.........1
And holds our bladed falchions all aloof. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 37
 
FALCON............3
The lustrous passion from a falcon -eye?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 154
Her beauty farther than the falcon spies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 20
Like a stoop'd falcon ere he takes his prey. Lamia, Part I, Line 67
 
FALL..............28
Whene'er I wander, at the fall of night, To Hope, Line 7
When at night- fall among your books we got: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 118
That aye at fall of night our care condoles. To My Brothers, Line 8
If I do fall , at least I will be laid Sleep and Poetry, Line 277
Fall on my head, and presently unmew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 132
Until they came to where these streamlets fall , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 419
Let fall a sprig of yew tree in his path; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 732
The range of flower'd Elysium. Thus did fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 428
Adieu, sweet love, adieu!' - As shot stars fall , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 600
'Twas done: and straight with sudden swell and fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 766
Wilt fall asleep? O let me sip that tear! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 318
Careful and soft, that not a leaf may fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 928
Too apt to fall in love with care All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 39
And fall they must, ere a star wink thrice Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 14
Where asleep they fall betimes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 65
To feel for ever its soft swell and fall , Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 11
Saturn is fallen, am I too to fall ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 234
Fall !- No, by Tellus and her briny robes! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 246
Of son against his sire. I saw him fall , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 322
Sad sign of ruin, sudden dismay, and fall ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 336
We fall by course of Nature's law, not force Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 181
But when the melancholy fit shall fall Ode on Melancholy, Line 11
Fair on your Graces fall this early morrow! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 124
Fall back! Away there! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Other voices, Line 84a
O, that my brother's daughter should so fall ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 149
Yet shall I season high my sudden fall Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 269
'Tis good,- 'tis good; let him but fall asleep, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 49
This is a brag,- be't so,- but if I fall , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 32
 
FALL'N............2
Fall'n beneath the dockyard strokes, Robin Hood, Line 44
Once more for the fall'n King- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 17a
 
FALLEN............26
Fallen on a bed of snow. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 12
Is like a fallen angel: trees uptorn, Sleep and Poetry, Line 242
Where robins hop, and fallen leaves are sere. On The Story of Rimini, Line 14
Had fallen out that hour. The wanderer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 137
Or gazing on the new soft- fallen mask Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 7
By reason of his fallen divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 12
Rumbles reluctant o'er our fallen house; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 61
"This cheers our fallen house: come to our friends, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 150
Saturn is fallen , am I too to fall? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 234
First onwards in, among the fallen tribe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 100
Among these fallen , Saturn's voice therefrom Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 125
Despondence seiz'd again the fallen Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 379
Many a fallen old Divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 8
The fallen leaves, when I have sat alone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 54
Upon your skirts had fallen no tears of mine. Ode on Indolence, Line 50
Have fallen full frequent from our Emperor's lips, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 127
Among his fallen captains on yon plains. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 92
To fallen princes' necks, as to his stirrup, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
That cannot trample on the fallen . But his Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 56
Fallen in jealous curls about his shoulders bare. Lamia, Part I, Line 26
"By all the gloom hung round thy fallen house, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 284
By reason of the fallen divinity The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 316
And with slow pace approach our fallen King, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 334
Rumbles reluctant o'er our fallen house; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 363
Just where her fallen hair might spread in curls, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 380
He must by this have fallen . Baldwin is taken; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 16
 
FALLING...........6
Pours with the lustre of a falling star. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 42
When first my senses caught their tender falling . Sleep and Poetry, Line 330
Where falling stars dart their artillery forth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 642
Spun off a drizzling dew,- which falling chill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 520
Just where her falling hair might be outspread, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 81
"Just upon three o'clock, a falling star The Jealousies, Line 667
 
FALLOW............1
Pick'd like a red stag from the fallow herd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 86
 
FALLS.............5
That falls through the clear ether silently. To one who has been long in city pent, Line 14
Down twenty little falls , through reeds and bramble, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 934
[Staggers and falls into their arms. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 189b
THE CURTAIN FALLS . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D.b to Line 195
She falls , she faints! while laughter peals The Jealousies, Line 779
 
FALSE.............6
'Tis false indeed. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 100a
Gentle Prince, 'tis false indeed. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 117b
Young man, you heard this virgin say 'twas false ,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
'Tis false , I say. What! can you not employ Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 123
Herself, and all her sisterhood. She false ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 129
A rope-ladder for false witness. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 147a
 
FALSEHOOD.........1
This as a falsehood Crafticanto treats; The Jealousies, Line 631
 
FALT'RING.........1
Her falt'ring hand upon the balustrade, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 190
 
FALTERING.........1
O faltering coward! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 113b
 
FAM'D.............4
And wear'st thou the shield of the fam'd Britomartis? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 12
'Tis the far- fam'd , the brave Sir Gondibert, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 122
" Fam'd in funeral minstrelsy. Not Aladdin magian, Line 26
As she is fam'd to do, deceiving elf. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 74
 
FAME..............18
Took happy flights. Who shall his fame impair Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 13
A loving-kindness for the great man's fame , Addressed to Haydon, Line 2
To clear futurity his darling fame ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 359
Seems all this poor endeavour after fame , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 847
Till love and fame to nothingness do sink. When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 14
O smile among the shades, for this is fame ! This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 14
One who was great through mortal days and died of fame unshorn. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 12
For its fame shall not be blown Not Aladdin magian, Line 54
Verse, fame , and beauty are intense indeed, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 13
Fame , like a wayward girl, will still be coy On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 1
I think I have a better fame abroad. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
Her fame has pass'd into the grosser lips Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 150
Albert, you have fame to lose. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 34b
My love of fame , my prided honesty Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 23
Against the spotless nature and clear fame Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 132
My liege, what proof should I have 'gainst a fame Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 216
I have a soldier's friendship for your fame . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 55
Nor till fit time against her fame wage battle. The Jealousies, Line 120
 
FAMED.............5
O eloquent and famed Boccaccio! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 145
His very hair, his golden tresses famed , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 131
Of Emperor Elfinan; famed ev'rywhere The Jealousies, Line 4
In the famed memoirs of a thousand years, The Jealousies, Line 86
This famed for languid eyes, and that for mirth,- The Jealousies, Line 377
 
FAMILIAR..........2
Or the familiar visiting of one Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 172
Or the familiar visitings of one The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 21
 
FAMILIES..........1
Are speeding to the families of grief, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 461
 
FAMILY............2
Alone with her great family Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 11
Each family of rapturous hurried notes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 282
 
FAMISH............1
Let me not famish . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26a
 
FAMISH'D..........2
And shar'd their famish'd scrips. Thus all out-told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 392
A famish'd pilgrim,- saved by miracle. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 339
 
FAMOUS............1
From this so famous field - D'ye hear! be quick! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 47
 
FAN...............8
May fan the cool air gently o'er my rest; Sleep and Poetry, Line 112
Of all the congregated world, to fan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 818
To fan -like fountains,- thine illuminings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 584
Not longer than the May-fly's small fan -horns; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 5
Gurgles through straiten'd banks, and still doth fan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 211
Nimbly fan your fiery spaces, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 9
Nor rested till they stood to cool, and fan , The Jealousies, Line 322
A fan -shaped burst of blood-red, arrowy fire, The Jealousies, Line 663
 
FAN'D.............1
Beneath the green- fan'd cedars, some did shroud The Jealousies, Line 691
 
FANATIC...........1
Fanatic obstinacy! Prodigy! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 201
 
FANATIC'S.........1
Be poet's or fanatic's will be known The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 17
 
FANATICS..........1
Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 1
 
FANCIED...........1
To take a fancied city of delight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 143
 
FANCIES...........6
Inconstant, childish, proud, and full of fancies ; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 2
Of smothering fancies , patiently sat down; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 139
Thus strove by fancies vain and crude to clear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 722
With my own fancies garlands of sweet life, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 750
O may dark fancies err! they surely do; To the Nile, Line 9
petty fancies I was crossed." Wordsworth O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 1
 
FANCIFULLEST......1
And gather up all fancifullest shells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 271
 
FANCY.............31
That e'er my wand'ring fancy spell'd! Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 12
O bright-eyed Hope, my morbid fancy cheer; To Hope, Line 21
For I have long time been my fancy feeding To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 80
Of my delighted fancy ,- I could brood How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 3
And choose each pleasure that my fancy sees; Sleep and Poetry, Line 104
Some fainter gleamings o'er his fancy shot; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 178
And plays about its fancy , till the stings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 621
Leaving us fancy -sick. No, no, I'm sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 853
Tenderly her fancy from its maiden snow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 29
A bud which snares his fancy : lo! but now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 57
Fancy into belief: anon it leads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 234
All fancy , pride, and fickle maidenhood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 742
But my fond ear, in fancy at thy lips, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 10
He hath his lusty spring, when fancy clear Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 3
Fancy is dead and drunken at its goal; This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 8
Ever let the Fancy roam, Fancy, Line 1
Then let winged fancy wander Fancy, Line 5
O sweet Fancy ! let her loose; Fancy, Line 9
Fancy , high-commission'd:- send her! Fancy, Line 27
Oh, sweet Fancy ! let her loose; Fancy, Line 67
Let, then, winged Fancy find Fancy, Line 79
Let the winged Fancy roam, Fancy, Line 93
Hoodwink'd with faery fancy ; all amort, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 70
In fancy , fair St. Agnes in her bed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 233
My fancy to its utmost blisses spreads: Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 10
With all the gardener Fancy e'er could feign, Ode to Psyche, Line 62
Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well Ode to a Nightingale, Line 73
And link'd to a dreaming fancy . What do we here? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 4
I should have Orphean lips, and Plato's fancy , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 23
Perverse, with stronger fancy to reclaim Lamia, Part II, Line 70
Might fancy -fit his brows, silk-pillow'd at his ease. Lamia, Part II, Line 220
 
FANCY'S...........3
Into my fancy's ear Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 10
Of the Fancy's silken leash; Fancy, Line 90
Though Fancy's casket were unlock'd to choose. Lamia, Part I, Line 20
 
FANE..............7
In the very fane of lightness. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 6
In the very fane , the light of Poesy: Sleep and Poetry, Line 276
Of vine leaves. Then there rose to view a fane Sleep and Poetry, Line 363
To what high fane ?- Ah! see her hovering feet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 624
My future days to her fane consecrate." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 888
Yes, I will be thy priest, and build a fane Ode to Psyche, Line 50
If by a chance into this fane they come, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 152
 
FANES.............2
These crystalline pavilions, and pure fanes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 238
Palm-shaded temples, and high rival fanes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 59
 
FANG'D............1
And beard them, though they be more fang'd than wolves and bears." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 153
 
FANGLED...........1
To this new- fangled vice, which seems a burr The Jealousies, Line 107
 
FANN'D............3
Were lifted from the water's breast, and fann'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 114
Our spirits, fann'd away by thy light pinions. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 982
Her tender heart, and its warm ardours fann'd The Jealousies, Line 116
 
FANNING...........2
As though the fanning wings of Mercury I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 24
Fanning away the dandelion's down; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 96
 
FANNINGS..........1
And rose, with spicy fannings interbreath'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 664
 
FANNY.............2
Why this, you'll say - my Fanny !- is not true; To Fanny, Line 33
To one who loves you as I love, sweet Fanny , To Fanny, Line 42
 
FANS..............3
A little breeze to creep between the fans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 764
From happy pieties, thy lucent fans , Ode to Psyche, Line 41
As Jove fans off the clouds. Even now they pass. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 21
 
FANTASTIC.........5
Or to delight thee with fantastic leaping, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 274
Of sapphire columns, or fantastic bridge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 238
Tracing fantastic figures with his spear? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 294
Pillars, and frieze, and high fantastic roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 624
Swift, mad, fantastic round the rocks, and lash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 920
 
FANTASTICALLY.....1
Through tendril wreaths fantastically creeping. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 170


Published @ RC

March 2005