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Keats Concordance
 
FAR...............133
Ah, no! far happier, nobler was his fate! Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 8
And keep that fiend Despondence far aloof. To Hope, Line 12
When lovely Titania was far , far away, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 27
When lovely Titania was far, far away, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 27
'Mong the light skimming gondolas far parted, To George Felton Mathew, Line 15
But 'tis impossible; far different cares To George Felton Mathew, Line 17
Sweeter by far than Hybla's honied roses Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 10
No, no! this is far off:- then how shall I Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 31
And smiles at the far clearness all around, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 7
'Tis the far -fam'd, the brave Sir Gondibert, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 122
Clear was the song from Philomel's far bower; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 154
Mysterious, wild, the far heard trumpet's tone; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 156
The silver clouds, far - far away to leave Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 4
The silver clouds, far - far away to leave Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 4
I thought the garden-rose it far excell'd: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 10
On the far depth where sheeted lightning plays; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 6
Fly from all sorrowing far , far away; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 20
Fly from all sorrowing far, far away; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 20
All that's reveal'd from that far seat of blisses, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 47
But richer far posterity's award. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 68
Far from the narrow bounds of thy dominions. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 106
On heap'd up flowers, in regions clear, and far ; On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 2
Art thou most lovely? When gone far astray To G.A.W., Line 3
To a loud hymn, that sounds far , far away To Kosciusko, Line 13
To a loud hymn, that sounds far, far away To Kosciusko, Line 13
In a green island, far from all men's knowing? Sleep and Poetry, Line 6
'Twere better far to hide my foolish face? Sleep and Poetry, Line 272
Far round the horizon's crystal air to skim, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 17
So haply when I rove in some far vale, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 55
A lamb strayed far a-down those inmost glens, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 69
There shot a golden splendour far and wide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 350
Far off, the shadows of his pinions dark, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 674
Richer entanglements, enthralments far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 798
Far as the slabbed margin of a well, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 870
Stiff-holden shields, far -piercing spears, keen blades, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 9
Who, thus far , discontent, has dared to tread, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 36
A wooded cleft, and, far away, the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 75
Tawny and gold, ooz'd slowly from far lands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 114
I've been thy guide; that thou must wander far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 123
Imagination's struggles, far and nigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 155
My love's far dwelling. Though the playful rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 179
'Twas far too strange, and wonderful for sadness; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 219
Curves hugely: now, far in the deep abyss, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 232
His bosom grew, when first he, far away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 244
To search it inwards; whence far off appear'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 259
But far from such companionship to wear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 291
Disparted, and far upward could be seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 517
Of those dusk places in times far aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 625
A vaulted dome like heaven's, far bespread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 631
Of noises far away?- list!"- Hereupon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 915
Yet few of these far majesties, ah, few! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 34
O Moon! far -spooming Ocean bows to thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 70
Cynthia! where art thou now? What far abode Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 72
Far had he roam'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 119b
How far beyond!" At this a surpris'd start Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 187
He saw far in the concave green of the sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 191
Far as Egyptian Nile. My passion grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 407
Am I, that thou may'st plainly see how far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 450
Thus went that beautiful multitude, nor far , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 818
Of one fair palace, that far far surpass'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 847
Of one fair palace, that far far surpass'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 847
Far as the mariner on his highest mast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 866
Of lucid depth the floor, and far outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 879
Was there far strayed from mortality. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1007
Towards a crystal bower far away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1018
Phoebe is fairer far - O gaze no more:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 57
And thought to leave her far away behind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 175
Far from the earth away - unseen, alone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 350
Descry a favourite hamlet faint and far . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 397
Where those eyes are the brightest far that keep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 541
Some enemy: far forth his bow is bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 598
But when I came to feel how far above Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 741
Far wandering, they were perforce content Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 766
Our friends will all be there from nigh and far . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 835
Far under-ground, a sleeper meets his friends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 894
The vesper hymn, far swollen, soft and full, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 967
They vanish'd far away!- Peona went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1002
Fair plumed syren, queen of far -away! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 2
After some beauty veiled far -away, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 4
Then there's a little wing, far from the sun, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 45
Too far into the sea; where every maw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 94
And so from happiness I far was gone. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 98
The breath of Winter comes from far away, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 250
Light hether-bells may tremble then, but they are far away; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 13
That I have so far panted, tugg'd, and reek'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 2
So far into your bosom - gentle maid Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 36
Held by the finest spirits fitter far Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 56
Wisdom, though fled far away. Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 36
Behind a broad hall-pillar, far beyond The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 94
Alone with her good angels, far apart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 142
The kettle-drum, and far -heard clarionet, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 259
Beyond a mortal man impassion'd far The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 316
Far as the bishop's garden wall, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 43
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 2
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 3
While far within each aisle and deep recess, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 196
Far from her moon had Phoebe wandered; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 30
Not far hence Atlas; and beside him prone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 73
Caught infant-like from the far -foamed sands. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 172
As Heaven and Earth are fairer, fairer far Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 206
So far her voice flow'd on, like timorous brook Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 300
And all the headlong torrents far and near, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 364
To my home, far , far in west, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 45
To my home, far, far in west, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 45
Far in the west where the May-cloud lowers, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 97
O latest born and loveliest vision far Ode to Psyche, Line 24
Yet even in these days so far retir'd Ode to Psyche, Line 40
Far , far around shall those dark-cluster'd trees Ode to Psyche, Line 54
Far, far around shall those dark-cluster'd trees Ode to Psyche, Line 54
Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget Ode to a Nightingale, Line 21
All breathing human passion far above, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 28
So far yourself. But what is this to me Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 56
Yet be that hour far off; and may he live, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 32
Who sung far different notes into mine ears. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 42
I see how far the slander is abroad. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 41
And I, my liege, by far . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 4b
You far outstrip my spleen in this affair. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 99
My evidence cannot be far away; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 161
To pray thee far away! Conrad, go! go!- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 6
These lids, I see far fiercer brilliances,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 44
Mulciber's columns gleam in far piazzian line. Lamia, Part I, Line 212
To thy far wishes will thy streams obey: Lamia, Part I, Line 262
If 'twas too far that night for her soft feet. Lamia, Part I, Line 343
Of scent, not far from roses. Turning round, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 24
Then to the west I look'd, and saw far off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 87
"Apollo! faded, far flown Apollo! The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 204
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 295
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 296
While, far within each aisle and deep recess, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 40
Ravish'd away far from her dear countree; The Jealousies, Line 77
Far in the west a mighty fire broke out- The Jealousies, Line 677
I met, far gone in liquor, that old man, The Jealousies, Line 786
So far so well,- The Jealousies, Line 787b
 
FARCE.............1
A pet-lamb in a sentimental farce ! Ode on Indolence, Line 54
 
FARE..............9
Should he upon an evening ramble fare To My Brother George (epistle), Line 55
And I have many miles on foot to fare . Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 4
Were swelling for summer fare ; God of the golden bow, Line 28
Faint fare -thee-wells, and sigh-shrilled adieus!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 690
He rose in silence, and once more 'gan fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 118
Let us ay love each other; let us fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 626
A dull-eyed Argus watching for a fare ; The Jealousies, Line 249
Eban then paid his fare , and tiptoe went The Jealousies, Line 262
For ever fare thee well!"- and then he fell The Jealousies, Line 611
 
FARED.............2
Enquire of friends and kinsfolk; how they fared Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 18
Over the solitary hills he fared , Lamia, Part I, Line 233
 
FARES.............1
Say, how fares the Prince? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 46b
 
FARETH............1
Now fareth he, that o'er the vast beneath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 240
 
FAREWEL...........7
farewel . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
Bear up against it: so farewel , sad sigh; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 974
But, a poor Naiad, I guess not. Farewel ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 129
Cathedrals call'd. He bade a loth farewel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 626
The eagle landed him, and farewel took. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 669
My head, and kiss death's foot. Love! love, farewel ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 275
Are cloudy phantasms. Caverns lone, farewel ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 651
 
FAREWELL..........24
Just when the sun his farewell beam has darted: To George Felton Mathew, Line 16
And can I ever bid these joys farewell ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 122
And bade the sun farewell , and joy'd his fill. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 80
That it enforc'd me to bid sad farewell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 238
To all my empire: farewell sad I took, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 239
O shadows! 'twas a time to bid farewell ! Ode on Indolence, Line 49
Farewell ! I yet have visions for the night, Ode on Indolence, Line 57
This is to wake in Paradise! farewell , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 90
I bicker not with her,- bid her farewell ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 150
'Twill not be Gersa's fault. Otho, farewell ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
Gersa, farewell ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 157a
From Gersa's tents. Farewell , old Ethelbert. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 199
Farewell ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 115a
Farewell ! and by these tears believe, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 115b
Farewell ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 146b
Nothing, Sigifred. Farewell ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 62b
We'll meet upon our subject. Farewell , Count! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 63
Farewell ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 150a
Take farewell too of worldly vanities. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 173
Farewell ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 10a
Farewell ! For this heaven pardon you! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 10b
Come on! Farewell my kingdom, and all hail King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 9
Farewell ! farewell! and if for ever! still The Jealousies, Line 610
Farewell! farewell ! and if for ever! still The Jealousies, Line 610
 
FARMS.............1
Anger our huntsmen: Breather round our farms , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 283
 
FARRE.............1
In crimpid shroude farre under grounde; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 102
 
FARTHER...........2
Her beauty farther than the falcon spies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 20
No farther than to where old Saturn's feet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 320
 
FARTHEST..........1
Red-Crag, there lies beneath my farthest toe Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 48
 
FARTHING..........1
At every farthing quadrille dance." Not Aladdin magian, Line 55
 
FASHION...........7
To occupy me wholly, and to fashion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 976
Pipes will I fashion of the syrinx flag, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 686
When every childish fashion Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 22
To cutters and to fashion boats, Not Aladdin magian, Line 51
In monkish fashion ! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 84
Cannot I form? Cannot I fashion forth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 142
From forth the loftiest fashion of his sleep The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 3
 
FASHION'D.........2
By thee were fashion'd to the self-same end; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 161
Cheeks fashion'd tenderly on either side, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 66
 
FASHIONABLY.......1
For giving way, so over fashionably , The Jealousies, Line 106
 
FASHIONING........1
A lively prelude, fashioning the way Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 492
 
FAST..............14
Unto our souls, and bound to us so fast , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 31
Even to a moment's filling up, and fast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 489
As hour-glass sand,- and fast , as you might see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 815
Thee the waves awful bow. Fast , stubborn rock, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 946
From the fast mouldering head there shut from view: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 430
But the forgotten eye is still fast wedded to the ground- There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 21
Yet be the anchor e'er so fast , room is there for a prayer There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 45
And 'tween the curtains peep'd, where, lo!- how fast she slept. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 252
Fast withereth too. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 12
Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 47
Than thus fast limed in a cursed snare, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 7
Fast by the springs where she to bathe was wont, Lamia, Part I, Line 17
More grievous torment than a hermit's fast :- Lamia, Part II, Line 4
He'll let me sleep, seeing I fast and pray. The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 14
 
FASTENS...........1
Then each on a leg or thigh fastens . The Gothic looks solemn, Line 18
 
FAT...............4
And plenty of fat deer for parsons; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 15
Not over fat There was a naughty boy, Line 77
By following fat elbows up a court. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 19
Black stain'd with the fat vintage, as it were Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 124
 
FATAL.............1
Left me dead-drifting to that fatal power. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 417
 
FATE..............33
So with the horrors past thou'lt win thy happier fate . On Peace, Line 14
Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate ! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 1
Ah, no! far happier, nobler was his fate ! Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 8
Whene'er the fate of those I hold most dear To Hope, Line 19
Heroic deeds, and sung of fate , Ode to Apollo, Line 4
A fate more pleasing, a delight more true To George Felton Mathew, Line 4
Musing on Milton's fate - on Sydney's bier- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 10
The Poet wept at her so piteous fate , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 201
In ministring the potent rule of fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 366
Severe before me: persecuting fate ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1006
Aye, 'bove the withering of old-lipp'd Fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 29
My life away like a vast sponge of fate , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 349
How have I dwelt in fear of fate : 'tis done- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1023
Your lutes, and gentler fate ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 221
For ever: let our fate stop here - a kid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 633
His fate most goddess-like. Help me, I pray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 844
If it were heaven's will, on our sad fate ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 976
Withheld me first; and then decrees of fate ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 990
When in an eye thou art, alive with fate ! Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 14
I thought some Fate with pleasure or with strife Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 331
O let me then my hapless fate bewail! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 10
Safe on the lowly ground, she bless'd her fate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 73
While Fate seem'd strangled in my nervous grasp? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 105
Against these plagues he strove in vain; for Fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 96
And hither came, to see how dolorous fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 240
I leave it all to fate - to any thing! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 2
Thy fate . Your safety I have bought to-day Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 141
I wait for you with horses. Choose your fate . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 149
'Tis with fate . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 13c
The silent-blessing fate , warm cloister'd hours, Lamia, Part II, Line 148
Fain would I know the great usurper's fate . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 8
That Fate , cross-purposing, should let her be The Jealousies, Line 76
Poor Elfinan! whose cruel fate was such, The Jealousies, Line 125
 
FATE'S............1
And then 'twere pity, but fate's gentle shears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 580
 
FATED.............5
Of Poesy. Ill- fated , impious race! Sleep and Poetry, Line 201
Along his fated way. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 119a
Thou art commission'd to this fated spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 298
And fated to excel us, as we pass Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 214
Thy fated hour. That thou hadst power to do so The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 143
 
FATES.............4
Scowl on, ye fates ! until the firmament Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 120
Endymion said: "Are not our fates all cast? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 901
'Tis true I had no corns - no! thank the fates , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 17
Forestall the fates ; have you not learnt that yet? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 38
 
FATHER............27
Of the omnipotent Father , cleavest the air, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 12
I leave them as a father does his son. Sleep and Poetry, Line 404
Before the serene father of them all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 929
"O Father , I am here the simplest voice, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 252
O Father , and O Brethren, had ye felt Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 296
For lo! 'tis for the Father of all verse. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 13
Yet, for all this, I never saw a father Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 103
A father his son's debtor, or to heal Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 38
How the relationship of father and son Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 98
Father and son each other repossess. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 36
I dare not. 'Twould pollute so good a father ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 99
My father , none! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 105a
You not less a perplexing noble father . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 113
Make not your father blind before his time; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 122
Aye, father ;- but the fire in my sad breast Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 136
Good morrow, holy father ! I have had Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 118
Your blessing, father ! Sweet Erminia, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 145
Yes, Father Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 147b
Holy father , you must not. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Voice, Line 55b
Otho! thou father of the people call'd, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 118
Your generous father , most illustrious Otho, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 61
Thy father ,- almost mine. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 113a
Out of his sight a father whom he loves; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 22
My father keeps away. Good friend - ah! Sigifred?- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 110
For my father ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 138a
Then, father , I will lead your legions forth, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 161
Where is your hand, father ?- what sultry air! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 193
 
FATHER'S..........10
Old ditties sigh above their father's grave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 788
A father's ears with tidings of his son. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 70
As to my father's board I will return. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 153
Curling, like spaniels, round my father's feet. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 82
Who doubly loathes a father's tyranny; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 96
And there it is my father's iron lips Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 115
In your great father's nature, as you were. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 46
Is then a father's countenance a Gorgon? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 12
Certes, a father's smile should, like sunlight, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 117
What is it? By your father's love, I sue Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 152
 
FATHOM............3
Than sighs could fathom , or contentment reach: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 395
Thee heave to airy sleep from fathom dreams- To Ailsa Rock, Line 6
My eyes to fathom the space every way; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 82
 
FATHOMING.........1
Swift as a fathoming plummet down he fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 662
 
FATHOMLESS........1
Of a wide outlet, fathomless and dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 272
 
FATHOMS...........2
Who dives three fathoms where the waters run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 639
She fathoms eddies, and runs wild about Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 87
 
FATIGUED..........3
Fatigued he sinks into some pleasant lair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 6
Her soothed limbs, and soul fatigued away; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 238
And ever watchful with fatigued eye; Ode on Indolence, Line 27
 
FATTED............1
'Stead of one fatted calf, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 129b
 
FATTENING.........1
And fattening his silver gill. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 12
 
FAULT.............1
'Twill not be Gersa's fault . Otho, farewell! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
 
FAULTER...........1
O kindly muse! let not my weak tongue faulter Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 128
 
FAULTERING........1
About his large dark locks, and faultering spake: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 291
 
FAULTS............2
The subtlest excuser of small faults ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 10
Pour'd out a phial of wrath upon my faults ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 50
 
FAULTURE..........1
Seem'd but the faulture of decrepit things The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 70
 
FAUN..............1
"Thou, to whom every faun and satyr flies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 263
 
FAUNS.............5
Then there were fauns and satyrs taking aim Sleep and Poetry, Line 360
To catch a glimpse of Fauns , and Dryades I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 153
Came waggish fauns , and nymphs, and satyrs stark, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 534
Frighted away the Dryads and the Fauns Lamia, Part I, Line 5
Of Satyrs, Fauns , and blear'd Silenus' sighs. Lamia, Part I, Line 103
 
FAVONIAN..........1
Such calm favonian burial! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 11
 
FAVOR.............1
And much in the Emperor's favor . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 17a
 
FAVORED...........1
"That I am favored for unworthiness, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 182
 
FAVORITE..........6
Let the sweet mountain nymph thy favorite be, On Peace, Line 8
No - none of these can from my favorite bear To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 12
Under her favorite bower's quiet shade, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 437
Now I am Otho's favorite , his dear friend, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 43
To admiration. But to be a favorite - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 46
For your right noble names, like favorite tunes, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 126
 
FAVOUR............10
Favour this gentle youth; his days are wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 549
Favour from thee, and so I kisses gave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 739
And now your favour makes me but more humble; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 25
But, as a favour , bid me from thy presence; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 110
Of favour with my sire than I can have. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 29
And ta'en his favour . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 62a
As though my hopes of favour had been whole. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 75
Punish me not with favour . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 103a
The pledge of favour , that he not suspect The Jealousies, Line 191
To scrape a little favour , 'gan to coax The Jealousies, Line 698
 
FAVOURABLE........1
Is a good symptom, and most favourable ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 58
 
FAVOURED..........2
Will put choice honey for a favoured youth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 211
ALBERT, a Knight, favoured by Otho Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 4
 
FAVOURING.........1
When some ethereal and high- favouring donor Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 437
 
FAVOURITE.........1
Descry a favourite hamlet faint and far. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 397
 
FAVOURITE'S.......1
Of sorrow for her tender favourite's woe, Lamia, Part I, Line 291
 
FAVOURS...........1
So keeping up an interchange of favours , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 85
 
FAWN..............2
Anxious as hind towards her hidden fawn . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 43
For loving Conrad, see you fawn on him. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 175
 
FAWNS.............2
From round its gentle stem; let the young fawns , Sleep and Poetry, Line 256
Brows'd by none but Dian's fawns ; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 12
 
FAY...............8
And on his back a fay reclined voluptuously. Imitation of Spenser, Line 18
This canopy mark: 'tis the work of a fay ; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 25
Which every elf and fay had come to see: To George Felton Mathew, Line 28
While little harps were touch'd by many a lyric fay . The Jealousies, Line 36
To a cold dullard fay ,- ah, woe betide! The Jealousies, Line 167
A fay of colour, slave from top to toe, The Jealousies, Line 182
Cut off my ears and hands, or head too, by my fay ! The Jealousies, Line 468
"But how shall I account, illustrious fay ! The Jealousies, Line 533
 
FAYS..............5
The windows as if latch'd by fays and elves- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 50
And be liege-lord of all the Elves and Fays , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 121
Twilight for the fays to sleep. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 55
Cluster'd around by all her starry Fays ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 37
So brightly, they put all our fays to shame!- The Jealousies, Line 386
 
FEALTY............1
Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold. On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 4
 
FEAR..............48
Looks out upon the winds with glorious fear : Sleep and Poetry, Line 128
Shapes of delight, of mystery, and fear , Sleep and Poetry, Line 138
Fresh morning gusts have blown away all fear To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 1
Of virgin bloom paled gently for slight fear . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 189
Made fiercer by a fear lest any part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 845
"O Arethusa, peerless nymph! why fear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 936
A dewy balm upon them!- fear no more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 983
I tried in fear the pinions of my will. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 390
A sight too fearful for the feel of fear : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 496
Of colour'd phantasy; for I fear 'twould trouble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 642
How have I dwelt in fear of fate: 'tis done- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1023
Towards common thoughts and things for very fear ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 896
Has our delaying been; but foolish fear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 989
To be fill'd with worldly fear . God of the meridian, Line 8
A fear in the poor herdsman who doth bring Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 63
Thy hand by unwelcome pressing, would not fear Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 62
With love, and kept all phantom fear aloof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 290
Fear of gout There was a naughty boy, Line 49
Softly tell her not to fear Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 10
So saying, she hobbled off with busy fear . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 181
Noiseless as fear in a wide wilderness, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 250
The Ape for very fear began to dance, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 48
There was a listening fear in her regard, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 37
Amaz'd and full of fear ; like anxious men Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 198
Art thou, too, near such doom? vague fear there is: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 327
Now I behold in you fear , hope, and wrath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 332
Of rage, of fear , anxiety, revenge, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 94
There to remain for ever, as I fear : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 255
Doth fear to meet the sea: but sea it met, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 302
Fear not that your watry hair Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 56
Of fear and weakness, and a hollow state. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 178
Hast thou no fear of hangmen, or the faggot? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
The sleepy thunder? Hast no sense of fear ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 84
For, in the healing of one wound, I fear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 149
My gentle Ludolph, harbour not a fear ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 195
Unseen conduct him to me: but I fear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 23
My echo, my taught parrot! but I fear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 40
I am safe! Coward! why am I in fear ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 102
Go,- I fear thee! I tremble every limb, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 3
I do fear his brain. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 16b
Humour him to the height. I fear to go; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 52
I fear me he is past my skill. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Physician, Line 174a
Set her before me - never fear I can strike. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 182
Muffling his face, of greeting friends in fear , Lamia, Part I, Line 362
There was a listening fear in her regard, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 339
Amaz'd, and full of fear ; like anxious men The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 42
In stouter hearts than nurse's fear and dread: The Jealousies, Line 68
Fear not, quake not, and as good wine recruits The Jealousies, Line 358
 
FEAR'D............3
In sacred custom, that he well nigh fear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 258
At thy fear'd trident shrinking, doth unlock Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 947
Up which he had not fear'd the antelope; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 792
 
FEAR'ST...........1
Fear'st thou not my fury, monk? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 237b
 
FEARED............1
Tremble and quake to death,- he feared less The Jealousies, Line 340
 
FEARFUL...........19
Tells to my fearful breast a tale of sorrow, To Hope, Line 20
And mourn the fearful dearth of human kindness To George Felton Mathew, Line 62
Coming sometimes like fearful claps of thunder, Sleep and Poetry, Line 27
Of flowers, and fearful from its loveliness, Sleep and Poetry, Line 78
The darkness,- loneliness,- the fearful thunder; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 148
Arcadian Pan, with such a fearful dread. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 158
Sickens our fearful ewes; and we have had Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 218
I became loth and fearful to alight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 583
Felt too, I was not fearful , nor alone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 645
Into the fearful deep, to hide his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 217
Those two sad streams adown a fearful dell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1009
A sight too fearful for the feel of fear: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 496
Through the wide forest - a most fearful tone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 323
Some fearful end must be: where, where is it? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 478
Keep fearful and aloof from his last gaze, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13
What fearful whispering!- See, see,- Gersa there! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Lady, Line 13
Her fearful sobs, self-folding like a flower Lamia, Part I, Line 138
Hover'd and buzz'd his wings, with fearful roar, Lamia, Part II, Line 13
Throughout, as fearful the whole charm might fade. Lamia, Part II, Line 124
 
FEARFULLY.........4
Therefore, great bard, I not so fearfully Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 55
Singing alone, and fearfully ,- how the blood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 727
Unless it did, though fearfully , espy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 856
Than the death-day of empires. Fearfully Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 34
 
FEARING...........1
Fearing to move or speak, she look'd so dreamingly. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 306
 
FEARINGLY.........1
He did; not with cold wonder fearingly , Lamia, Part I, Line 247
 
FEARLESS..........4
Like this of mine, then would I fearless turn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 962
Fearless for power of thought, without thine aid?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 361
Awake! arise! my love, and fearless be, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 350
In fearless yet in aching ignorance? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 107
 
FEARS.............14
Above the ingrate world and human fears . Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 12
Its ships, its rocks, its caves, its hopes, its fears ,- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 6
For she's to read a tale of hopes, and fears ; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 97
Yet dry them up, in bidding hence all fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 475
With immortality, who fears to follow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 212
Sent me by sad Vertumnus, when his fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 445
Long time in silence did their anxious fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 733
Doff all sad fears , thou white deliciousness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1000
Cold as my fears . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 187
When I have fears that I may cease to be When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 1
Nurture besides, and life, from human fears , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 429
She hurried at his words, beset with fears , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 352
Ah! dearest love, sweet home of all my fears To Fanny, Line 9
Whereat, to calm their fears , he promised soon The Jealousies, Line 24
 
FEAST.............20
Feast them upon the wideness of the sea; On the Sea, Line 10
Feast on, and meanwhile I will let thee know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 454
My lips to thine, that they may richly feast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 771
Could rouse from that fine relish, that high feast . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 554
"Who, who from Dian's feast would be away? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 563
Sounded tempests to the feast Robin Hood, Line 8
Quickly on this feast -night: by the tambour frame The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 174
The courtliest inviter to a feast ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 9
Of Mars, and all the soldiery shall feast Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 132
To fetch King Gersa to the feast . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 47b
Now all my empire, barter'd for one feast , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 31
In my feast ; my injury is all my own, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 136
Her dream, with feast and rioting to blend; Lamia, Part I, Line 214
The Adonian feast ; whereof she saw no more, Lamia, Part I, Line 320
To share our marriage feast and nuptial mirth?" Lamia, Part II, Line 91
So canopied, lay an untasted feast Lamia, Part II, Line 132
Thus loaded with a feast the tables stood, Lamia, Part II, Line 189
Pour'd on his hair, they all mov'd to the feast Lamia, Part II, Line 195
Of moss, was spread a feast of summer fruits, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 29
Who now, with greedy looks, eats up my feast ? To Fanny, Line 17
 
FEASTED...........1
And, as I feasted on its fragrancy, To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 9
 
FEASTS............2
When 'mid acclaim, and feasts , and garlands gay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 888
Of feasts and music, and all idle shows King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 52
 
FEATHER...........5
Would seem a feather to the mighty prize. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 592
Lethe's weed, and Hermes' feather , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 2
An' light as feather . Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 40
A feather on the sea, To Fanny, Line 37
Shed a quill- feather from my larboard wing- The Jealousies, Line 713
 
FEATHER'D.........10
To that same feather'd lyrist, who straightway, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 432
Of feather'd Indian darts about, as through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 881
Foot- feather'd Mercury appear'd sublime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 331
They stung the feather'd horse: with fierce alarm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 555
Two liquid pulse streams 'stead of feather'd wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 583
Young feather'd tyrant! by a swift decay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 730
Which saves a sick man from the feather'd pall Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 268
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 9
But eagles golden- feather'd , who do tower Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 226
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 313
 
FEATHERS..........13
Or the feathers from a crow, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 11
That on the window spreads its feathers light, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 44
For when no more he spreads his feathers free, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 137
But sip, and twitter, and their feathers sleek; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 89
Of moulted feathers , touchwood, alder chips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 882
His spreaded feathers to the morrow chill, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 389
Their ample feathers , are in slumber dead,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 402
The owl, for all his feathers , was a-cold; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 2
No one to see my Persian feathers toss, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 12
As Hermes once took to his feathers light, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 1
"Fair Hermes, crown'd with feathers , fluttering light, Lamia, Part I, Line 68
The God on half-shut feathers sank serene, Lamia, Part I, Line 123
Those moulted feathers , and so mount once more What can I do to drive away, Line 20
 
FEATHERY..........5
Who from the feathery gold of evening lean;- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 4
Though feathery clouds were floating all along To My Brother George (epistle), Line 10
The eagle's feathery mane God of the golden bow, Line 15
Beside the feathery whizzing of the shaft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 333
To meet his rosy child, with feathery sails, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 379
 
FEATUR'D..........1
And hopeful featur'd . Ha! by heaven you weep! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 85
 
FEATURE...........1
An image, huge of feature as a cloud, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 88
 
FEATURES..........10
The placid features of a human face: To George Felton Mathew, Line 89
And then their features started into smiles Calidore: A Fragment, Line 150
The glorious features of the bards who sung Sleep and Poetry, Line 356
His features were so lifeless. Suddenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 220
When, looking up, he saw her features bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 199
A pallid gleam across his features stern: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 349
Let me look well: your features are the same, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 39
More calm; his features are less wild and flush'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 47
His features :- Lycius! wherefore did you blind Lamia, Part I, Line 373
Whose carved features wrinkled as he fell, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 225
 
FED...............7
Or fed too much with cloying melody- On the Sea, Line 12
A mighty forest; for the moist earth fed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 64
Where fed the herds of Pan: ay great his gains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 78
Still fed by melting ice, he takes a draught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 535
And so she ever fed it with thin tears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 425
Quarrel with the proud forests it hath fed , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 218
A censer fed with myrrh and spiced wood, Lamia, Part II, Line 176
 
FEDDEST...........1
Of supreme darkness which thou feddest on O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 6
 
FEE...............3
Too many sighs give we to them in fee , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 91
More than my love, and these wide realms in fee ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
"Venus won't stir a peg without a fee , The Jealousies, Line 298
 
FEEBLE............8
Gaunt, wither'd, sapless, feeble , cramp'd, and lame. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 638
"Ah! why wilt thou affright a feeble soul? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 154
For I am slow and feeble , and scarce dare The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 176
Some mourning words, which in our feeble tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 49
Look up, and tell me if this feeble shape Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 98
Tell him how feeble is that tyranny, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 97
Some mourning words, which in our feeble tongue The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 351
Weak as the reed - weak - feeble as my voice- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 428
 
FEEBLENESS........2
This crawl'd through life in feebleness , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 31
O, O, the pain, the pain of feebleness . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 429
 
FEEBLEST..........1
In trembling dotage to the feeblest fright Lamia, Part II, Line 283
 
FEEBLY............2
Feebly she laugheth in the languid moon, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 127
Of the sky children."- So he feebly ceas'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 438
 
FEED..............11
Feed upon apples red, and strawberries, Sleep and Poetry, Line 103
Let us feed and feed. Hither, hither, love, Line 4
Let us feed and feed . Hither, hither, love, Line 4
To hear the speckled thrushes, and see feed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 485
And thou shalt feed them from the squirrel's barn. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 694
Though he would ofttimes feed on gillyflowers rare. Character of C.B., Line 18
How to feed fierce the crooked stings of fire, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 329
Go feed on icicles, while we Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 91
For winds to kiss and grateful bees to feed , On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 10
And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes. Ode on Melancholy, Line 20
Even as the worm doth feed upon the nut, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 158
 
FEEDETH...........1
And feedeth still, more comely than itself? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 219
 
FEEDING...........2
For I have long time been my fancy feeding To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 80
Feeding from her white fingers, on the wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 278
 
FEEDS.............4
Delight it; for it feeds upon the burrs, Sleep and Poetry, Line 244
Lifts its sweet head into the air, and feeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 250
The greater on the less feeds evermore:- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 95
Make lean and lank the starv'd ox while he feeds ; What can I do to drive away, Line 41
 
FEEL..............83
Who cannot feel for cold her tender feet, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 14
To feel the beauty of a silent eve, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 3
Gladdening in the free, and airy feel Calidore: A Fragment, Line 139
To feel no other breezes than are blown Happy is England! I could be content, Line 3
Yet do I sometimes feel a languishment Happy is England! I could be content, Line 5
With after times.- The patriot shall feel To My Brother George (epistle), Line 73
Full joy I feel , while thus I cleave the air, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 107
I feel delighted, still, that you should read them. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 118
To feel the air that plays about the hills, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 90
Yet feel I little of the cool bleak air, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 5
What 'tis I mean, and feel his being glow: Sleep and Poetry, Line 44
Upon some mountain-top until I feel Sleep and Poetry, Line 50
Feel all about their undulating home. Sleep and Poetry, Line 380
We feel the safety of a hawthorn glade: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 130
So that we feel uplifted from the world, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 139
So did he feel , who pull'd the boughs aside, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 151
Who feel their arms, and breasts, and kiss and stare, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 229
Still, still they toll, and I should feel a damp, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 9
Takes as a long lost right the feel of May, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 6
I, that do ever feel athirst for glory, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 11
Pan is no longer sought, I feel a free, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 12
I'll feel my heaven anew, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 17
feel sensible are not of such completion as to warrant their passing the press; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Nor do we merely feel these essences Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 25
To feel this sun-rise and its glories old. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 106
He said: "I feel this thine endearing love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 466
Feel we these things?- that moment have we stept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 795
Aye, such a breathless honey- feel of bliss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 903
Yet, in our very souls, we feel amain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 12
To make us feel existence, and to shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 158
The deadly feel of solitude: for lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 284
Look full upon it feel anon the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 543
Yet still I feel immortal! O my love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 686
Why not for ever and for ever feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 744
Full well I feel thou wouldst not leave me. Still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 751
Sweet Arethusa! Dian's self must feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 984
Feel palpitations when thou lookest in: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 53
The while they feel thine airy fellowship. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 55
He might have died: but now, with cheered feel , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 139
Now I begin to feel thine orby power Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 180
I know thine inmost bosom, and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 293
Would let me feel their scales of gold and green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 344
To feel distemper'd longings: to desire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 375
For these I know thou canst not feel a drouth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 395
A sight too fearful for the feel of fear: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 496
Have mercy, Goddess! Circe, feel my prayer!' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 554
I die - I hear her voice - I feel my wing-" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1012
I feel my heart is cut for them in twain." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 97
Thou art my executioner, and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 111
Shall feel the other half so utterly!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 310
Even when I feel as true as innocence? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 474
The grass; I feel the solid ground - Ah, me! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 622
But when I came to feel how far above Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 741
O feel as if it were a common day; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 820
The feel of not to feel it, In drear nighted December, Line 21
The feel of not to feel it, In drear nighted December, Line 21
Because I feel my forehead hot and flush'd- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 34
And when I feel , fair creature of an hour, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 9
Till I feel in the brain Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 9
They could not sit at meals but feel how well Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 5
"I know what was, I feel full well what is, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 313
Thy beauty grows upon me, and I feel Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 319
Blockhead, d'ye hear - Blockhead, I'll make her feel . Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 53
Or feel but faintly, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 34
To feel for ever its soft swell and fall, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 11
Thea, I feel thee ere I see thy face; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 96
O let him feel the evil he hath done; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 332
What sorrow thou canst feel ; for I am sad Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 69
Feel curs'd and thwarted, when the liegeless air Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 92
Not till this moment did I ever feel Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 92
Annuls all feel of kindred. What is son,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 63
And his letter. Caitiff, he shall feel - Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 70
He shall feel what it is to have the hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 271
I feel her gnawing here!- Let her but vanish, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 160
I feel it possible. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 173b
Who feel the giant agony of the world; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 157
That I am none I feel , as vultures feel The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 191
That I am none I feel, as vultures feel The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 191
And let me feel that warm breath here and there What can I do to drive away, Line 52
Feel , feel my pulse, how much in love I am; The Jealousies, Line 400
Feel, feel my pulse, how much in love I am; The Jealousies, Line 400
When the time comes, don't feel the least alarm; The Jealousies, Line 520
About you,- feel your pockets, I command,- The Jealousies, Line 601
 
FEEL'T............1
These lips to feel't on this soft ivory! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 18
 
FEELEST...........1
Amongst them? Feelest not a kindred pain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 62
 
FEELING...........9
Over the genius loving heart, a feeling To George Felton Mathew, Line 9
Is a full harvest whence to reap high feeling ; To Kosciusko, Line 2
produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
punishment: but no feeling man will be forward to inflict it: he will leave me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
To answer; feeling well that breathed words Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 712
Feeling about for its old couch of space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 336
Said he, "will all this gush of feeling pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 681
Old Angela was feeling for the stair, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 191
Feeling , with careful toe, for every stair, The Jealousies, Line 308
 
FEELINGLY.........1
But there were some who feelingly could scan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 178
 
FEELINGS..........3
Trust to my feelings , and write you a letter. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 104
That all her feelings should be set at nought, The Jealousies, Line 78
No, no, you never could my feelings probe The Jealousies, Line 409
 
FEELS.............13
He feels a moisture on his cheek, and blesses Calidore: A Fragment, Line 90
And oftentimes he feels the dewy drops This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 5
It feels Elysian, how rich to me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 315
Endymion feels it, and no more controls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 545
And Tellus feels his forehead's cumbrous load. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 71
Too well awake, he feels the panting side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 440
Of new-born woe it feels more inly smart: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 519
As feels a dreamer what doth most create Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 889
Man feels the gentle anchor pull and gladdens in its strength. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 40
Where even the robin feels himself exil'd, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 6
Which he who breathes feels warning of his death, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 23
Borne upon wings,- and very pleased she feels The Jealousies, Line 593
' Where is his Majesty?' No person feels The Jealousies, Line 781
 
FEET..............66
Sparkled his jetty eyes; his feet did show Imitation of Spenser, Line 16
Which the emerald waves at your feet gladly threw. To Some Ladies, Line 24
There, beauteous Emma, I'll sit at thy feet , O come, dearest Emma!, Line 11
Light feet , dark violet eyes, and parted hair; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 15
The dew by fairy feet swept from the green, To George Felton Mathew, Line 26
Who cannot feel for cold her tender feet , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 14
Made him delay to let their tender feet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 85
While at our feet , the voice of crystal bubbles I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 137
Upheld on ivory wrists, or sporting feet : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 156
To what high fane?- Ah! see her hovering feet , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 624
Our feet were soft in flowers. There was store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 665
To cheer itself to Delphi. Still his feet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 82
Dost thou now lave thy feet and ankles white? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 325
An unseiz'd heaven dying at his feet ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 464
Above, around, and at his feet ; save things Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 121
Of weeds were cold beneath his cold thin feet ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 195
When at my feet emerg'd an old man's hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 669
What! if from thee my wandering feet had swerv'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 716
Such ranges of white feet , and patient lips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 739
At Neptune's feet he sank. A sudden ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1013
And lost in pleasure at her feet he sinks, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 418
And a large flint-stone weighs upon my feet ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 299
New to the feet , although the tale a hundred times be told: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 6
When weary feet forget themselves upon a pleasant turf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 9
While the surges washed his feet Not Aladdin magian, Line 13
Here are the craggy stones beneath my feet ; Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 10
Fell her kirtle to her feet , Fancy, Line 87
O what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 3
Sweet little red feet ! why would you die? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 5
Though your feet are more light than a fairy's feet, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 5
Though your feet are more light than a fairy's feet , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 5
With whispers hush and shuffling feet , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 21
Who as they walk abroad make tinkling with their feet . Character of C.B., Line 27
No further than to where his feet had stray'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 16
Saturn, sleep on! while at thy feet I weep." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 71
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 82
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 88
This passion lifted him upon his feet , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 135
Crept gradual, from the feet unto the crown, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 260
In midst of all lay Themis, at the feet Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 77
Some started on their feet ; some also shouted; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 111
His bright feet touch'd, and there he stay'd to view Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 368
Spurn the green turf as hateful to my feet ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 94
I cannot see what flowers are at my feet , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 41
Curling, like spaniels, round my father's feet . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 82
Thou leadest me,- whether thy white feet press, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
To Otho's feet ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 2a
At whose white feet the languid Tritons poured Lamia, Part I, Line 15
Ah, what a world of love was at her feet ! Lamia, Part I, Line 21
She tastes unseen; unseen her nimble feet Lamia, Part I, Line 96
If 'twas too far that night for her soft feet . Lamia, Part I, Line 343
Ran the dark veins, that none but feet divine Lamia, Part I, Line 385
Whose slender feet wide-swerv'd upon the soft Lamia, Part II, Line 178
By minist'ring slaves, upon his hands and feet , Lamia, Part II, Line 193
Upon the marble at my feet there lay The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 72
At level of whose feet an altar slept, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 89
Cried I, with act adorant at her feet , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 283
No farther than to where old Saturn's feet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 320
Saturn, sleep on, while at thy feet I weep." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 371
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 381
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 387
And that fair kneeling Goddess at his feet . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 403
And seen her enemies havock'd at her feet . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 23
Laid a remonstrance at his Highness' feet , The Jealousies, Line 20
"Certes, monsieur were best take to his feet , The Jealousies, Line 257
At this great Caesar started on his feet , The Jealousies, Line 496
 
FEIGN.............1
With all the gardener Fancy e'er could feign , Ode to Psyche, Line 62
 
FEIGNING..........1
Feigning a sleep; and he to the dull shade Lamia, Part II, Line 104
 
FELICITOUS........1
Of even mould, felicitous and smooth; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 65
 
FELICITY..........3
His soul will 'scape us - O felicity ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 763
Yes, moonlight Emperor! felicity Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 776
Their green felicity - In drear nighted December, Line 4
 
FELICITY'S........1
My strange love came - Felicity's abyss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 176
 
FELL..............42
Which fell profusely from the rose-tree stem! Imitation of Spenser, Line 33
Of those who in the cause of freedom fell ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 66
The hand of Brutus, that so grandly fell To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 71
Be moved for days from whence it sometime fell , On the Sea, Line 7
And then I fell asleep. Ah, can I tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 572
Fell into nothing - into stupid sleep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 678
Fell sleek about him in a thousand folds- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 398
Her shadow fell upon his breast, and charm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 527
Swift as a fathoming plummet down he fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 662
A huntress free in" - At this, sudden fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1008
The penitent shower fell , as down he knelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 289
"That curst magician's name fell icy numb Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 555
All lovers, whom fell storms have doom'd to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 722
Death fell a weeping in his charnel-house. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 788
Behold!"- Two copious tear-drops instant fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 900
Fainting I fell into a bed of flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 746
Fell sick within the rose's just domain, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 34
Fell thin as a young mother's, who doth seek Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 35
By gradual decay from beauty fell , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 256
Where, without any word, from stabs he fell . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 296
Fell her kirtle to her feet, Fancy, Line 87
Rose-bloom fell on her hands, together prest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 220
Upon a Sabbath day it fell ; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 1
He fell a snoring at a faery ball. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 35
But where the dead leaf fell , there did it rest. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 10
That fell , one after one, yet all at once, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 283
With the self-same dews that fell Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 27
The morn was clouded, but no shower fell , Ode on Indolence, Line 45
That silent fury, whose fell scymitar Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 21
Which, being noble, fell to Gersa's lot. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 67
And bid our trumpets speak a fell rebuke Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 163
And fell into a swooning love of him. Lamia, Part I, Line 219
Then from amaze into delight he fell Lamia, Part I, Line 324
Whose carved features wrinkled as he fell , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 225
But where the dead leaf fell there did it rest: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 314
Of boisterous Chester, whose fell truncheon now King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 22
For signature:- somewhere the tempest fell , The Jealousies, Line 179
Fell on the sofa on his royal side. The Jealousies, Line 202
For ever fare thee well!"- and then he fell The Jealousies, Line 611
Too ripe, he fell , being puzzled in his head The Jealousies, Line 629
The Princess fell asleep, and, in her dream, The Jealousies, Line 710
For we have proved the mago never fell The Jealousies, Line 788
 
FELLOW............6
Their fellow huntsmen o'er the wide champaign Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 386
With every friend and fellow -woodlander- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 893
There are who lord it o'er their fellow -men Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1
So fond, so beauteous was his bed- fellow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 448
Good fellow , once again Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 5b
On, fellow soldiers! Earl of Redvers, back! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 34
 
FELLOW'S..........1
That fellow's voice, which plagues me worse than any, The Jealousies, Line 159
 
FELLOWS...........1
"Who love their fellows even to the death; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 156
 
FELLOWSHIP........3
Our ready minds to fellowship divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 778
A fellowship with essence; till we shine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 779
The while they feel thine airy fellowship . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 55
 
FELON.............1
As many a poor felon does not live to tell. The Jealousies, Line 180
 
FELT..............58
I should have felt a sweet relief, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 23
I should have felt "the joy of grief"! Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 24
Between her breasts, that never yet felt trouble, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 91
At times, 'tis true, I've felt relief from pain To My Brother George (epistle), Line 113
Through all that day I've felt a greater pleasure To My Brother George (epistle), Line 115
Which, had I felt , these scribblings might have been To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 107
Then felt I like some watcher of the skies On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 9
And all the clouds, and felt his bosom clean Sleep and Poetry, Line 42
Its gathering waves - ye felt it not. The blue Sleep and Poetry, Line 189
I gazed awhile, and felt as light, and free I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 23
So felt he, who first told, how Psyche went I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 141
What Psyche felt , and Love, when their full lips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 143
One felt heart-certain that he could not miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 374
All I beheld and felt . Methought I lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 578
I felt upmounted in that region Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 641
Felt too, I was not fearful, nor alone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 645
And, at that moment, felt my body dip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 663
Like herded elephants; nor felt , nor prest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 289
And he in loneliness: he felt assur'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 590
The solitary felt a hurried change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 633
The little flowers felt his pleasant sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 677
Thus spake he, and that moment felt endued Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 707
No, he had felt too much for such harsh jars: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 865
Against his pallid face: he felt the charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 105
Before that care-worn sage, who trembling felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 290
Can I admire how crystal-smooth it felt , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 383
Death felt it to his inwards: 'twas too much: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 787
Felt a high certainty of being blest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 795
For the unhappy youth - Love! I have felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 72
On one, and felt himself in spleen to tame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 346
He felt aloof the day and morning's prime- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 374
Felt not more tongue-tied than Endymion. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 444
But few have ever felt how calm and well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 524
Hast thou felt so content: a grievous feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 547
Or felt but a great dream! O I have been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 638
Of joy he might have felt . The spirit culls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 782
His own particular fright, so these three felt : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 890
O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 1
Felt parting and warm meeting every week; To J.R., Line 2
Ah! this is holiday to what was felt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 359
Until her heart felt pity to the core Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 378
At last they felt the kernel of the grave, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 383
And seldom felt she any hunger-pain; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 468
Glow with the muse, but they are never felt Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 12
Though an immortal, she felt cruel pain: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 44
They felt , but heard not, for the solid roar Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 7
Felt faint, and would have sunk among the rest, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 106
So that I felt a movement in my heart Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 267
O Father, and O Brethren, had ye felt Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 296
Those pains of mine; O Saturn, hadst thou felt , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 297
She felt the warmth, her eyelids open'd bland, Lamia, Part I, Line 141
Had felt the cold full sponge to pleasure press'd, Lamia, Part II, Line 192
And not a man but felt the terror in his hair. Lamia, Part II, Line 268
More yearning than on earth I ever felt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 39
So fine, so subtle, felt the tyranny The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 119
And when I clasp'd my hands I felt them not. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 131
Then said the veiled shadow - "Thou hast felt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 141
Though an immortal, she felt cruel pain; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 346
 
FELTON............1
Felton ! without incitements such as these, To George Felton Mathew, Line 72
 
FEMININE..........4
Upon some breast more lily- feminine . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 577
Though feminine , than any of her sons: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 55
Then thus again the brilliance feminine : Lamia, Part I, Line 92
Of accent feminine , so courteous." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 215
 
FEN...............1
Not the discoloured poisons of a fen , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 22
 
FENDS.............1
So still obey the guiding hand that fends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 574
 
FENNEL............1
With fennel green, and balm, and golden pines, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 575
 
FENNY.............1
Winding through palmy fern, and rushes fenny , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 80
 
FENS..............1
Sure of a bloody prey, seeing the fens King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Second Knight, Line 14
 
FERMENT...........3
in a ferment , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
That sullen ferment , which for wondrous ends Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 193
What discord is at ferment in this house? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 273
 
FERMENTS..........1
What in thy brain so ferments to and fro."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 290
 
FERN..............3
Winding through palmy fern , and rushes fenny, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 80
And make the wild fern for a bed do? Over the hill and over the dale, Line 20
Woodlark may sing from sandy fern ,- the sun may hear his lay; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 14
 
FERRET............1
Terrier, ferret them out! Burn - burn the witch! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 138
 
FERTILIZE.........1
Meant but to fertilize my earthly root, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 907
 
FERVENT...........1
Upon the fervent martyrdom; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 116
 
FERVENTLY.........1
To dig more fervently than misers can. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 368
 
FERVID............1
The fervid choir that lifted up a noise Sleep and Poetry, Line 173
 
FERVOUR...........1
With fervour seize their adamantine lyres, Ode to Apollo, Line 5
 
FESTIVAL..........4
That wondrous night: the great Pan- festival : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 897
Of triumph calm, and hymns of festival Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 128
'Tis late; the lights of festival are ever Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 49
Of triumph calm, and hymns of festival The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 433
 
FESTIVALS.........2
And view the glory of their festivals : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 36
Flared, here and there, from wealthy festivals , Lamia, Part I, Line 358
 
FESTIVE...........1
The boisterous, midnight, festive clarion, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 258
 
FESTIVITY.........1
From Cynthia's wedding and festivity ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 566
 
FETCH.............5
To fetch King Gersa to the feast. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 47b
Fetch me a missal, and a string of beads,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 97
Will they fetch from Imaus for my bride? The Jealousies, Line 164
" Fetch me that ottoman, and prithee keep The Jealousies, Line 427
"I fetch her!"- "Yes, an't like your Majesty; The Jealousies, Line 487
 
FETTER'D..........1
Fetter'd , in spite of pained loveliness; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 3
 
FEUD..............6
Bring round the heart an undescribable feud ; On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 10
As bees gorge full their cells. And, by the feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 40
Hast thou felt so content: a grievous feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 547
There is sad feud among ye, and rebellion Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 321
Be cause of feud between us. See! he comes! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 119
In feud with wolves and bears, when no eye saw Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 10
 
FEV'ROUS..........1
Will storm his heart, Love's fev'rous citadel: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 84
 
FEVER.............7
A homeward fever parches up my tongue- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 319
He had a fever late, and in the fit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 101
His eyes to fever out, his voice to cease. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 138
With anguish moist and fever dew, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 10
The weariness, the fever , and the fret Ode to a Nightingale, Line 23
From a man's little heart's short fever -fit; Ode on Indolence, Line 34
A fever of thyself - think of the earth; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 169
 
FEVER'D...........7
The languid sick; it cool'd their fever'd sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 223
My fever'd parchings up, my scathing dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 636
Fever'd his high conceit of such a bride, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 46
Of fever'd sadness, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 64
Is persecuted more, and fever'd more, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 102
How fever'd is the man who cannot look On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 1
Or with one word fever'd you, gentle Prince, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
 
FEVERISH..........2
feverish Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Upon the time with feverish unrest- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 244
 
FEVEROUS..........3
And elbow-deep with feverous fingering Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 54
Shows her a knife.- "What feverous hectic flame Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 348
With sanguine feverous boiling gurge of pulse. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 28
 
FEVERS............1
Sparkle with healthy fevers ,- the Emperor Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 86
 
FEVROUS...........2
Lead me to those fevrous glooms, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 93
O kings and princes of this fevrous world, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 100
 
FEW...............29
A few of them have ever been the food How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 2
For some few hours the coming solitude." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 706
Upon the last few steps, and with spent force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 925
Yet few of these far majesties, ah, few! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 34
Yet few of these far majesties, ah, few ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 34
Few , who with gorgeous pageantry enrobe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 36
O Tartarus! but some few days agone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 269
For moments few , a temperament as stern Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 473
Who in few minutes more thyself shalt see?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 634
Will in a few short hours be nothing to me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 113
But few have ever felt how calm and well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 524
Few are there who escape these visitings- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 13
For some few gasping moments; like a lance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 269
Of heaven, and few ears Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 11
Scanty the hour and few the steps beyond the bourn of care, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 29
Scanty the hour and few the steps, because a longer stay There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 31
continued for a few minutes before he thus began,) Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
Or one of few of that imperial host Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 22
My pictures all Salvator's, save a few Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 67
Your spleens with so few simple words as these? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 321
The nightingale had ceas'd, and a few stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 36
Where palsy shakes a few , sad, last gray hairs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 25
A few days since, I was an open rebel,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 37
May in few hours make pleasures of them all. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 80
So that, in moments few , she was undrest Lamia, Part I, Line 161
To a few paces; not at all surmised Lamia, Part I, Line 346
And a few Persian mutes, who that same year Lamia, Part I, Line 390
Will wither in few years, and vanish so The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 111
At those few words hung vast before my mind, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 307
 
FEZ...............1
From Fez ; and spiced dainties, every one, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 269


Published @ RC

March 2005