Fi - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
FICKLE............1
All fancy, pride, and fickle maidenhood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 742
 
FIDDLE............1
And fiddle -faddle standest while you go; The Jealousies, Line 238
 
FIDDLES...........1
When wedding fiddles are a playing, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 1
 
FIE...............3
That bone, fie on't, bears just the shape O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 81
Fie ! Fie! But I will be her guard myself; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 127
Fie! Fie ! But I will be her guard myself; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 127
 
FIELD.............13
Where ye may see a spur in bloody field ? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 40
On one side is a field of drooping oats, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 127
These warrior thousands on the field supine:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 734
Happy field or mossy cavern, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 3
Happy field or mossy cavern, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 25
He might not in house, field , or garden stir, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 11
Thou shalt see the field -mouse peep Fancy, Line 55
Your knights, found war-proof in the bloody field , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 34
Field of Battle. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Setting
Another part of the Field . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Setting
The field of Battle. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Setting
From this so famous field - D'ye hear! be quick! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 47
The Imaian 'scutcheon bright,- one mouse in argent field . The Jealousies, Line 585
 
FIELDS............9
With daring Milton through the fields of air: Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 11
As late I rambled in the happy fields , To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 1
Across the lawny fields , and pebbly water; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 88
On the blue fields of heaven, and then there crept I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 10
Such morning incense from the fields of May, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 470
Couched in thy brightness, dream of fields divine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 58
Adieu to Ganges and their pleasant fields ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 33
No, not a thousand foughten fields could sponge Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 44
For Proserpine return'd to her own fields , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 37
 
FIELDWARD.........1
And glossy bees at noon do fieldward pass, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 309
 
FIEND.............2
And keep that fiend Despondence far aloof. To Hope, Line 12
A woman's secret!- though a fiend she be, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 26
 
FIENDISH..........1
So fiendish - Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 237a
 
FIENDS............1
Fiends keep you company! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 183a
 
FIERCE............26
Amid the fierce intoxicating tones Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 16
Until 'twas too fierce agony to bear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 410
This fierce temptation went: and thou may'st not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 451
That fierce complain to silence: where I stumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 488
It could not be so phantasied. Fierce , wan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 506
Before the fierce witch, speaking thus aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 538
Old Tartary the fierce ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 262
They stung the feather'd horse: with fierce alarm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 555
The Lion's mane's on end: the Bear how fierce ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 596
Adieu! for, once again, the fierce dispute On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 5
Of an eternal fierce destruction, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 97
Still do I that most fierce destruction see, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 102
It came like a fierce potion, drunk by chance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 267
With wings or chariot fierce to repossess Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 123
The Titans fierce , self-hid, or prison-bound, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 161
There standing fierce beneath, he stampt his foot, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 222
He breath'd fierce breath against the sleepy portals, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 266
Thus wording timidly among the fierce : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 251
How to feed fierce the crooked stings of fire, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 329
But fierce Enceladus sent forth his eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 382
As hot as death's is chill, with fierce convulse Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 129
Spoil his salvation for a fierce miscreed? On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 14
Fierce and sanguineous as 'twas possible Lamia, Part II, Line 76
Of that fierce threat, and the hard task proposed. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 120
The Titans fierce , self-hid, or prison-bound, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 10
But a fierce demon 'nointed safe from wounds King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 32
 
FIERCELY..........1
Bent his soul fiercely like a spiritual bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 847
 
FIERCENESS........1
The other's fierceness . Through the air they flew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 347
 
FIERCER...........5
the conviction that there is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
He saw not fiercer wonders - past the wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 249
Made fiercer by a fear lest any part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 845
These lids, I see far fiercer brilliances,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 44
Escapes, makes fiercer onset, the anew King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 13
 
FIERCEST..........1
And where the sun on fiercest phosphor shines Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 58
 
FIERY.............15
In water, fiery realm, and airy bourne; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 31
Its fiery vigil in her single breast; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 242
Martyrs in a fiery blaze, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 31
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 3
Arches, and domes, and fiery galleries; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 180
Over the fiery frontier of my realms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 247
Nimbly fan your fiery spaces, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 9
Portray'd in many a fiery den Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 15
O for a fiery -gloom and thee, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 71
Breathe upon them, fiery sprite! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 89
Young Ludolph, like a fiery arrow, shot Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 276
More than a fiery dragon, and did burn Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 135
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 296
Arches, and domes, and fiery galeries: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 28
With fiery shudder through the bloomed east; The Jealousies, Line 717
 
FIFTY.............2
Wool-woofed carpets: fifty wreaths of smoke Lamia, Part II, Line 179
From fifty censers their light voyage took Lamia, Part II, Line 180
 
FIG...............1
Broad leaved fig trees even now foredoom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 252
 
FIGHT.............3
In yesterday's hard fight , that it has turn'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
So hang upon your spirit. Twice in the fight Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 53
That Saracenic meteor of the fight , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 20
 
FIGHTING..........1
Toe crush'd with heel ill-natured fighting breeds, The Jealousies, Line 772
 
FIGUR'D...........1
Hadst figur'd t' other day, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 22
 
FIGURE............4
Could figure out and to conception bring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 577
And cast a quiet figure in his second floor. The Jealousies, Line 288
At an enormous figure !- stars not sure!- The Jealousies, Line 296
About this time,- a sad old figure of fun; The Jealousies, Line 656
 
FIGURES...........6
Bending their graceful figures till they meet Sleep and Poetry, Line 368
I sat contemplating the figures wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 886
Tracing fantastic figures with his spear? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 294
One morn before me were three figures seen, Ode on Indolence, Line 1
They pass'd, like figures on a marble urn, Ode on Indolence, Line 5
In masque-like figures on the dreamy urn; Ode on Indolence, Line 56
 
FILBERT...........1
A filbert hedge with wild briar overtwined, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 35
 
FILCH.............1
And filch the unpleasant trammels quite away. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 91
 
FILES.............3
Those files of dead, scatter the same around, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 770
Bearing upon their scaly backs, in files , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 246
Compact in steeled squares, and speared files , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 162
 
FILL..............25
By many streams a little lake did fill , Imitation of Spenser, Line 7
Fill for me a brimming bowl, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 1
Fill with superior bliss, or, at desire As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 11
That fill the skies with silver glitterings! To Hope, Line 42
The dying tones that fill the air, Ode to Apollo, Line 45
Nibble their fill at ocean's very marge, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 204
We fill - we fill! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 989
We fill - we fill ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 989
Be careful, ere ye enter in, to fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 573
Thou haply mayst delight in, will I fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 692
Of the empyrean I have drunk my fill . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 857
We will drink our fill Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 13
Four seasons fill the measure of the year; Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 1
But her full shape would all his seeing fill ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 12
And bade the sun farewell, and joy'd his fill . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 80
More warm than those heroic tints that fill a painter's sense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 36
Glower'd about as it would fill The Eve of St. Mark, Line 84
What your quick apprehension will fill up; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 59
Fill , fill my goblet,- here's a Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ludolph, Line 39
Fill, fill my goblet,- here's a Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ludolph, Line 39
It might affright him, fill him with suspicion Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 54
While I am striving how to fill my heart Lamia, Part II, Line 50
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To Autumn, Line 6
To her cold lips, and fill with such a light The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 280
Still suck their fill of light from sun and moon, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 421
 
FILL'D............10
That fill'd the eyes of morn;- the laurel'd peers To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 3
And so they stood, fill'd with a sweet surprise, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 234
Fill'd out its voice, and died away again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 116
To be fill'd with worldly fear. God of the meridian, Line 8
Was fill'd with patient folk and slow, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 20
And a wave fill'd it, as my sense was fill'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 279
And a wave fill'd it, as my sense was fill'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 279
Fill'd with pervading brilliance and perfume: Lamia, Part II, Line 174
Of Saturn fill'd the mossy glooms around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 407
He fill'd a bumper. "Great sire, do not weep! The Jealousies, Line 425
 
FILLED............1
But rather, giving them to the filled sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 402
 
FILLING...........7
An element filling the space between; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 301
From thy blue throne, now filling the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 171
Even to a moment's filling up, and fast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 489
Filling with spiritual sweets to plenitude, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 39
And filling it once more with human soul? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 358
Filling the air, as on we move, with portraiture intense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 35
Filling the chilly room with perfume light.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 275
 
FILLS.............8
Whose congregated majesty so fills Sleep and Poetry, Line 208
The which she fills with visions, and doth dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 485
A desert fills our seeing's inward span; To the Nile, Line 4
Now fills , O Burns, a space in thine own room, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 2
To venture so: it fills me with amaze The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 122
The next our poor Prince fills the arched rooms Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 15
And fills the air with so much pleasant health The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 100
Fills forest dells with a pervading air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 405
 
FILM..............4
How soon the film of death obscur'd that eye, Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 3
While his proud eye looks through the film of death? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 70
There hangs by unseen film , an orbed drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 806
Benign, if so it please thee, my mind's film ." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 146
 
FILMED............1
Builded so high, it seem'd that filmed clouds The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 63
 
FILMS.............1
Before mine eyes thick films and shadows float- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 323
 
FILTHY............2
From this gross, detestable, filthy mesh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 552
"Polluted jarvey! Ah, thou filthy hack! The Jealousies, Line 227
 
FIN...............1
Like silver streaks across a dolphin's fin , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 50
 
FINAL.............1
The final gulphing; the poor struggling souls: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 659
 
FINCH.............1
Full soothingly to every nested finch : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 504
 
FIND..............48
And when thou art weary, I'll find thee a bed, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 9
Ah! surely it must be whene'er I find To George Felton Mathew, Line 36
Would be to find where violet beds were nestling, To George Felton Mathew, Line 49
To find a place where I may greet the maid - To George Felton Mathew, Line 54
Thine ear, and find thy gentle heart; so well Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 3
From little cares:- to find , with easy quest, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 6
Wings to find out an immortality. Sleep and Poetry, Line 84
Where I may find the agonies, the strife Sleep and Poetry, Line 124
All tenderest birds there find a pleasant screen, Sleep and Poetry, Line 252
Find a fresh sward beneath it, overgrown Sleep and Poetry, Line 258
Poor nymph,- poor Pan,- how he did weep to find I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 159
Will find at once a region of his own, On The Story of Rimini, Line 11
My chain of grief: no longer strive to find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 979
And find it is the vainest thing to seek; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 571
As much as here is penn'd doth always find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 847
To find Endymion. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 102a
It flash'd, that Circe might find some relief- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 412
And now I find thee living, I will pour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 433
Visit my Cytherea: thou wilt find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 918
For by one step the blue sky shouldst thou find , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 678
To the void air, bidding them find out love: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 740
Behold I find it! so exalted too! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 880
How could they find out in Lorenzo's eye Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 139
How she might find the clay, so dearly prized, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 339
Yet can I ope thy window-sash to find This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 10
To find a bard's low cradle place about the silent north. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 28
That he may stray league after league some great birthplace to find , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 47
Let, then, winged Fancy find Fancy, Line 79
Teach us, here, the way to find you, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 26
Quoth Porphyro: "O may I ne'er find grace The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 146
Now lost, save what we find on remnants huge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 281
For there thou wilt find Saturn, and his woes. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 346
Can I find reason why ye should be thus: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 131
Can I find reason why ye should be thus: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 149
To wander wherewithal and find its joys? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 223
Leave them, O Muse! for thou anon wilt find Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 7
Didst find a lyre all golden by thy side, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 63
Let us find out, if we must be constrain'd, If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 4
Where! Where! Where shall I find a messenger? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 1
trifle to me; his death you shall find none to yourself." Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 58
What can I find to grace your nuptial day Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 2
To find where this sweet nymph prepar'd her secret bed: Lamia, Part I, Line 30
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find To Autumn, Line 13
That not the quickest eye could find a grain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 112
All else who find a haven in the world, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 150
Useless, could find about its roofed home The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 229
Turn to the copious index, you will find The Jealousies, Line 100
I plunged into the crowd to find him or to die. The Jealousies, Line 783
 
FINDING...........2
But, finding in our green earth sweet contents, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 313
Where, finding sulphur, a quadruple wrath Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 146
 
FINDS.............4
(And blissful is he who such happiness finds ,) To Some Ladies, Line 26
Alas, he finds them dry; and then he foams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 151
Wren or eagle, finds his way to Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 9
My master finds a monstrous horrid bore; The Jealousies, Line 285
 
FINE..............33
From such fine pictures, heavens! I cannot dare Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 19
Past each horizon of fine poesy; To George Felton Mathew, Line 12
Should e'er the fine -eyed maid to me be kind, To George Felton Mathew, Line 35
Who chosen is their queen,- with her fine head To My Brother George (epistle), Line 87
The grand, the sweet, the terse, the free, the fine ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 54
Bubbles a pipe; fine sounds are floating wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 228
So in fine wrath some golden sounds he won, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 203
Oblivion, and melt out his essence fine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 99
Meantime, on shady levels, mossy fine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 312
Of that fine element that visions, dreams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 748
Until thou liftedst up thine eyelids fine : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 152
My fine existence in a golden clime. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 455
Could rouse from that fine relish, that high feast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 554
Have tippled drink more fine Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 5
From pleated lawn-frill fine and thin The Eve of St. Mark, Line 53
Can burst Joy's grape against his palate fine ; Ode on Melancholy, Line 28
The soul's fine palate. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26a
Fine wording, Duke! but words could never yet Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 37
A fine humour- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 32b
Thy girdle some fine zealous-pained nerve Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 95
In such a fine extreme,- impossible! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 104
He must be sav'd by fine contrivances; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 20
These draperies are fine , and, being a mortal, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 31
Finish'd with lashes fine for more soft shade, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 62
Of bridal-mysteries - a fine -spun vengeance! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 131
So through the crystal polish, liquid fine , Lamia, Part I, Line 384
Fine was the mitigated fury, like Lamia, Part II, Line 78
With the fine spell of words alone can save The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 9
No Asian poppy, nor elixir fine The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 47
So fine , so subtle, felt the tyranny The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 119
"Your Majesty's in love with some fine girl The Jealousies, Line 380
The morning's very fine ,- uncommonly! The Jealousies, Line 552
"'Twas twelve o'clock at night, the weather fine , The Jealousies, Line 642
 
FINELY............2
Their scantly leaved, and finely tapering stems, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 5
So finely I esteem you. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 60a
 
FINER.............1
That finer spirits cannot breathe below Lamia, Part I, Line 280
 
FINEST............1
Held by the finest spirits fitter far Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 56
 
FINGER............14
And still, a sleeping, held her finger -tips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 445
Moved on with pointed finger . In this guise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 606
I caught a finger : but the downward weight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 673
Tame on thy finger ; to the River-gods, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 707
Little finger - There was a naughty boy, Line 85
I mean the finger for the ring- All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 43
Press'd her cold finger closer to her lips. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 14
Or with a finger stay'd Ixion's wheel. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 30
With hushing finger , how he means to load Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 119
Which starry Uranus with finger bright Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 134
Or the ripe plum finger its misty bloom, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 6
Press'd her cold finger closer to her lips. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 318
In a finger conversation with my mutes,- The Jealousies, Line 356
Holding it by his thumb and finger full in view. The Jealousies, Line 441
 
FINGER'D..........2
By chilly finger'd spring. "Unhappy wight! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 971
The soft, lute- finger'd Muses chaunting clear, Lamia, Part I, Line 73
 
FINGER'S..........1
A rose leaf round thy finger's taperness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 782
 
FINGERING.........2
By many a summer's silent fingering ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 432
And elbow-deep with feverous fingering Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 54
 
FINGERS...........25
Then o'er the strings his fingers gently move, Ode to Apollo, Line 40
Still scooping up the water with my fingers , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 19
Play with their fingers , touch their shoulders white Sleep and Poetry, Line 107
Careless, and grand - fingers soft and round Sleep and Poetry, Line 333
And reaching fingers , 'mid a luscious heap Sleep and Poetry, Line 362
And taper fingers catching at all things, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 59
Nor with hot fingers , nor with temples bursting: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 226
By thy white fingers , and thy spirit clear. To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 8
Her ringlets round her fingers , saying: "Youth! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 103
With fingers cool as aspen leaves. Sweet love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 804
Feeding from her white fingers , on the wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 278
His fingers went across it - All were mute Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1003
Snapping his lucid fingers merrily!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 569
And with her fingers old and brown Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 21
Poor skull, thy fingers set ablaze, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 43
Numb were the Beadsman's fingers , while he told The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 5
And grasp'd his fingers in her palsied hand, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 97
She staid her vixen fingers for his sake, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 50
Whose strings touch'd by thy fingers , all the vast Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 64
Shutting with careful fingers and benign Sonnet to Sleep, Line 2
And, with thine infant fingers , lift the fringe Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
Her arms are stiff,- her fingers clench'd and cold! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 188
Her fingers he press'd hard, as one came near Lamia, Part I, Line 363
Some lady's fingers nice in Candy wine; The Jealousies, Line 429
A laughing!- snapp'd his fingers !- shame it is to tell! The Jealousies, Line 612
 
FINISH............1
Obey! This shall finish it! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 179a
 
FINISH'D..........3
All finish'd but some ringlets of her hair; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 39
Finish'd with lashes fine for more soft shade, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 62
When I have finish'd it! Now,- now, I'm pight, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 166
 
FINISHED..........1
See it half finished : but let autumn bold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 55
 
FINISHING.........1
O what a sigh she gave in finishing , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 291
 
FINN'D............1
Vermilion-tail'd, or finn'd with silvery gauze; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 111
 
FINNY.............1
Finny palmers great and small, Not Aladdin magian, Line 32
 
FINS..............1
Whose silken fins and golden scales light Imitation of Spenser, Line 12
 
FIR...............3
Its long lost grandeur: fir trees grow around, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 40
To alleys where the fir -tree drops its cone, On The Story of Rimini, Line 13
With silvery oak apples, and fir cones brown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 276
 
FIRE..............52
When the fire flashes from a warrior's eye, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 24
With lofty periods when my verses fire him, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 79
Round my fire -side, and haply there discover Sleep and Poetry, Line 72
And of the golden fire , God of the golden bow, Line 4
O breathe a word or two of fire ! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 21
For 'twas the morn: Apollo's upward fire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 95
Of teeming sweets, enkindling sacred fire ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 224
With speed of fire -tailed exhalations; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 367
To lose, at once, all my toil breeding fire , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 537
Cheats us into a swamp, into a fire , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 279
Fire -branded foxes to sear up and singe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 7
His magian fish through hated fire and flame? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 265
This fire , like the eye of gordian snake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 494
The which, in disentangling for their fire , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 929
Dying to embers from their native fire ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 366
Of earth's splenetic fire , dully drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 399
I'll kneel to Vesta, for a flame of fire ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 701
But, when I am consumed in the fire , On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 13
Fire -wing'd, and make a morning in his mirth: Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 8
Sense of the gnawing fire at heart and brain. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 272
Soars for ever; holy fire Not Aladdin magian, Line 42
Fire them and ram them in the dragon's nest; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 59
In a flame of fire , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 34
Had come young Porphyro, with heart on fire The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 75
Spaces of fire , and all the yawn of hell.- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 120
Blazing Hyperion on his orbed fire Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 166
And gave a roar, as if of earthly fire , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 215
The planet orb of fire , whereon he rode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 269
Of element, earth, water, air, and fire ,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 140
As fire with air loud warring when rain-floods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 144
How to feed fierce the crooked stings of fire , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 329
Happy, happy glowing fire ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 1
Happy, happy glowing fire , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 5
Spirit of Fire - away, away! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 23
Spirit of Fire - away, away! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 29
Spirit of Fire - away, away! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 30
Sprite of Fire ! I follow thee Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 79
Touch the very pulse of fire Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 84
Sprite of Fire ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 94
Holy the air, the water, and the fire ; Ode to Psyche, Line 39
Aye, father;- but the fire in my sad breast Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 136
Fire of hell! Auranthe - lewd demon! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 64
Thine arms from forth a pulpit of hot fire Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 91
Furious fire ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102b
Upon her crest she wore a wannish fire Lamia, Part I, Line 57
The fire is going out, and no one rings Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 6
Even so that lofty sacrificial fire , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 102
Blazing Hyperion on his orbed fire The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 15
And gave a roar, as if of earthly fire , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 59
Light flags stream out like gauzy tongues of fire ; The Jealousies, Line 572
A fan-shaped burst of blood-red, arrowy fire , The Jealousies, Line 663
Far in the west a mighty fire broke out- The Jealousies, Line 677
 
FIRES.............5
Whose cords are solid rays, and twinkle radiant fires . Ode to Apollo, Line 6
As earthly fires from dull dross can be cleans'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 41
And spouting exhalations, diamond fires , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 46
His ignominy up in purging fires ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 136
While, like held breath, the stars drew in their panting fires . Lamia, Part I, Line 300
 
FIRESIDE..........3
Himself from fireside joys, and Lydian airs, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 7
Warm from their fireside orat'ries, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 16
From her fireside she could see The Eve of St. Mark, Line 41
 
FIRM..............3
How every soldier, with firm foot, doth hold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 730
For my firm -based footstool:- Ah, infirm! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 138
Wrench'd with an iron hand from firm array, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 5
 
FIRMAMENT.........6
Full in the smile of the blue firmament . To one who has been long in city pent, Line 4
A firmament reflected in a sea; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 300
Who now, ere Phoebus mounts the firmament , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 330
From eve to morn across the firmament . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 146
Scowl on, ye fates! until the firmament Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 120
Orbing along the serene firmament Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 79
 
FIRS..............1
The sable-pointed heads of firs and pines The Jealousies, Line 555
 
FIRST.............84
And her first footsteps touch'd a verdant hill; Imitation of Spenser, Line 2
Complete my joy - let not my first wish fail, On Peace, Line 7
And when thou first didst in that mirror trace To George Felton Mathew, Line 88
Deaf to the nightingale's first under-song; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 61
A fresh-blown musk-rose; 'twas the first that threw To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 6
The sun, when first he kist away the tears To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 2
That you first taught me all the sweets of song: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 53
Taste their pure fountains. First the realm I'll pass Sleep and Poetry, Line 101
When first my senses caught their tender falling. Sleep and Poetry, Line 330
So felt he, who first told, how Psyche went I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 141
First touch'd; what amorous, and fondling nips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 144
What first inspired a bard of old to sing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 163
attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Time's sweet first -fruits - they danc'd to weariness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 321
His bosom grew, when first he, far away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 244
First heaven, then hell, and then forgotten clear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 374
The first long kiss, warm firstling, to renew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 491
Of these first minutes? The unchariest muse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 532
Who first were on the earth; and sculptures rude Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 131
And buoyant round my limbs. At first I dwelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 384
Then, like a new fledg'd bird that first doth shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 388
But first a little patience; first undo Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 755
But first a little patience; first undo Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 755
They led on first , bent to her meek surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 810
Like callow eagles at the first sunrise. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 859
O first -born on the mountains! by the hues Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 2
Before the first of Druids was a child;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 7
For the first time, since he came nigh dead born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 371
Had he left more forlorn; for the first time, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 373
His first touch of the earth went nigh to kill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 614
For at the first , first dawn and thought of thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 734
For at the first, first dawn and thought of thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 734
Truth the best music in a first -born song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 773
By which he took his first soft poppy dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 786
Withheld me first ; and then decrees of fate; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 990
But my lady first did go,- Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 10
And cannot speak it. The first page I read Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 87
First Willie on his sleek mare came Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 17
First with the whales, last with the eagle skies; To Ailsa Rock, Line 12
First the soft bag-pipe mourn'd with zealous haste; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 5
To tell his forehead's swoon and faint when first began decay, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 26
White-plum'd lilies, and the first Fancy, Line 49
The first , alas! poor Dwarf, I understand- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 25
First at herself and at him and then When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 53
Upon the first toll of his passing-bell, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 173
I saw my first -born tumbled from his throne! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 323
First onwards in, among the fallen tribe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 100
Not in the legends of the first of days, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 132
The first -born of all shap'd and palpable Gods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 153
In murmurs, which his first -endeavouring tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 171
And first , as thou wast not the first of powers, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 188
And first, as thou wast not the first of powers, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 188
Light, the first fruits of that intestine broil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 192
Then thou first -born, and we the giant-race, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 200
That first in beauty should be first in might: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 229
That first in beauty should be first in might: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 229
From the young day when first thy infant hand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 73
Gentle Breama! by the first Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 41
Is shifted round, the first seen shades return; Ode on Indolence, Line 8
The first was a fair maid, and Love her name; Ode on Indolence, Line 25
Cry a reward, to him who shall first bring Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 40
In my first cup, that Arab! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 51a
For the first glimpse of such a son return'd; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 18
To-day, for the first day, I am a king, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 106
Whom I have known from her first infancy, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
From the first shoot till the unripe mid-May, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 134
Our ear is open. First we here denounce Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 113
A minute first . It cannot be - but may Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 156
A scorpion, sprawling on the first gold step, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 15
First I would hear what music is prepared Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 78
But first 'tis fit to tell how she could muse Lamia, Part I, Line 202
Thoughtless at first , but ere eve's star appeared Lamia, Part I, Line 234
For the first time through many anguish'd days, Lamia, Part I, Line 303
For the first time, since first he harbour'd in Lamia, Part II, Line 30
For the first time, since first he harbour'd in Lamia, Part II, Line 30
Between the tree-stems, marbled plain at first , Lamia, Part II, Line 138
At first , for scarcely was the wine at flow; Lamia, Part II, Line 202
And saw, what first I thought an image huge, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 298
Upon the first toll of his passing bell: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 22
Aye, even on the first of the new moon, The Jealousies, Line 26
When first for April honey into faint flowers they dive." The Jealousies, Line 261
Although her story sounds at first a little queer." The Jealousies, Line 405
First wily Crafticant, the chamberlain, The Jealousies, Line 580
To the first landing, where, incredible! The Jealousies, Line 785
 
FIRSTLING.........1
The first long kiss, warm firstling , to renew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 491
 
FISH..............15
Vieing with fish of brilliant dye below; Imitation of Spenser, Line 11
How, from a flower, into a fish of gold To George Felton Mathew, Line 85
Of dying fish ; the vermeil rose had blown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 696
To melting pulp, that fish would have bright mail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 837
To Amphitrite; all my clear-eyed fish , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 109
And fish were dimpling, as if good nor ill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 136
Fish -semblances, of green and azure hue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 884
To its huge self; and the minutest fish Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 207
His magian fish through hated fire and flame? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 265
With daily boon of fish most delicate: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 369
Of fish and mice and rats and tender chick. To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 8
Of fish a pretty kettle There was a naughty boy, Line 88
Of fish a pretty kettle There was a naughty boy, Line 90
Ne cared he for fish , or flesh, or fowl, Character of C.B., Line 11
Of men, and beasts, and fish , and apes, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 14
 
FISHER............2
There the king- fisher saw his plumage bright Imitation of Spenser, Line 10
I was a fisher once, upon this main, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 318
 
FISHES............3
With fairy fishes from the mountain tarn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 693
He kept little fishes There was a naughty boy, Line 61
Clear, but for golden fishes in the way, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 29
 
FISHES'...........1
Lashed from the crystal roof by fishes' tails. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 111
 
FISHING...........1
And they shall bring thee taper fishing -rods Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 708
 
FIST..............3
Destroy'd the work of every fist O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 15
Secure! Methinks I have her in my fist , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 108
Doubled into a common fist , went grand, The Jealousies, Line 350
 
FISTS.............3
And doubling over head their little fists Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 509
Thy tail's tip is nicked off - and though the fists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 11
And fists in the short ribs keep up the yell and pother. The Jealousies, Line 774
 
FIT...............38
Fit for the silv'ring of a seraph's dream; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 38
And little fit to please a classic ear; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 24
Of dolts to smooth, inlay, and clip, and fit , Sleep and Poetry, Line 197
for verses fit to live. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
The squatted hare while in half sleeping fit ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 265
I wasted, ere in one extremest fit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 379
Writhing with pity, and a cursing fit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 664
Can mingle music fit for the soft ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 974
And then 'twas fit that from this mortal state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 991
That fainting fit was not delayed too late. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 74
Like three fit wines in a cup, Fancy, Line 38
He had a fever late, and in the fit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 101
Made a fit roofing to this nest of woe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 14
To fit the naked foot of Poesy; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 6
But when the melancholy fit shall fall Ode on Melancholy, Line 11
From a man's little heart's short fever- fit ; Ode on Indolence, Line 34
Daughter, your hand; Ludolph's would fit it best. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 201
And therefore fit to calmly put a close Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 211
Till we determine some fit punishment. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 239
Condoling with Prince Ludolph. In fit time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 72
Fit time be chosen to administer. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 5
To give fit salutation. Methought I heard, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 26
Patience, good people, in fit time I send Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 75
When move in a sweet body fit for life, Lamia, Part I, Line 39
But first 'tis fit to tell how she could muse Lamia, Part I, Line 202
Fit appellation for this dazzling frame? Lamia, Part II, Line 89
The misery in fit magnificence. Lamia, Part II, Line 116
Might fancy- fit his brows, silk-pillow'd at his ease. Lamia, Part II, Line 220
No syllable of a fit majesty The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 230
That he, as a fit penance for his crimes, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 26
Glocester has fit rewards - nay, I believe King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 47
Of a fit mould and beauty, ripe and rare, The Jealousies, Line 7
Nor till fit time against her fame wage battle. The Jealousies, Line 120
That 's Majesty was in a raving fit ." The Jealousies, Line 326
His mouth being held conveniently fit The Jealousies, Line 421
That shall drive Bertha to a fainting fit ! The Jealousies, Line 519
Back to your palace, where I wait for guerdon fit ." The Jealousies, Line 522
From twelve to half-past - wings not fit to fly The Jealousies, Line 646
 
FITFUL............3
Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 1
And fitful whims of sleep are made of, streams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 749
Will shade us with their wings. Those fitful sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 981
 
FITS..............2
No, not a stone, or I shall go in fits - Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 39
Myself, as fits one wailing her own death,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 94
 
FITTED............1
All that was for our human senses fitted . Sleep and Poetry, Line 80
 
FITTER............1
Held by the finest spirits fitter far Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 56
 
FITTING...........2
And the rich notes to each sensation fitting ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 114
fitting myself Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
FIVE..............8
The chuckling linnet its five young unborn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 256
Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 1
A Tragedy in Five Acts Otho the Great, Subtitle
twenty- five years of age, that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
"Ring the repeater, gentle Hum!" "'Tis five ," The Jealousies, Line 478
" Five minutes before one - brought down a moth The Jealousies, Line 649
" Five minutes thirteen seconds after three, The Jealousies, Line 676
At five the golden light began to spring, The Jealousies, Line 716
 
FIVES.............1
Or stand in courtly talk by fives and sevens: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 43
 
FIX'D.............10
Your eyes are fix'd , as in poetic sleep, To My Brothers, Line 6
Before they fix'd upon a surest way Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 171
Fix'd on the floor, saw many a sweeping train The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 58
And sidelong fix'd her eye on Saturn's face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 91
sake, will be dumb as the grave. Erminia has my shame fix'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 60
Pray what day has his Highness fix'd upon? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 55
His eyes are fix'd still on the open doors, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 64
Her eyes in torture fix'd , and anguish drear, Lamia, Part I, Line 150
Had fix'd his eye, without a twinkle or stir Lamia, Part II, Line 246
Still fix'd he sat beneath the sable trees, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 446
 
FIXED.............4
Till the fond, fixed eyes forget they stare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 18
But in the self-same fixed trance he kept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 403
The whole world chaff to me. Your doom is fixed . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
The unchanging gloom, and the three fixed shapes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 391
 
FIXEDLY...........1
Which kept as fixedly as rocky marge, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 224
 
FIZZ..............1
Then will the dragons fry and fizz their best, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 60


Published @ RC

March 2005