Fo-For - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
FOAM..............10
The patient weeds, that now unshent by foam Sleep and Poetry, Line 379
Down whose green back the short-liv'd foam , all hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 349
Enormous chasms, where, all foam and roar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 601
The curly foam with amorous influence. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 85
Enforced, at the last by ocean's foam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 607
Its deep foundations, hissing into foam . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 948
May rage, and foam , and fret, but never can Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 7
An untumultuous fringe of silver foam Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 91
Shone like the bubbling foam about a keel Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 354
Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Ode to a Nightingale, Line 69
 
FOAM'D............3
With nothing save the hollow vast, that foam'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 120
Have ye beheld his chariot, foam'd along Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 234
Her mouth foam'd , and the grass, therewith besprent, Lamia, Part I, Line 148
 
FOAMED............1
Caught infant-like from the far- foamed sands. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 172
 
FOAMS.............1
Alas, he finds them dry; and then he foams , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 151
 
FOAMY.............1
From thy sea- foamy cradle; or to doff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 699
 
FOE...............2
Thou frownest, and old Eolus thy foe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 951
What is there to plain of? By Titan's foe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 943
 
FOEMAN............1
But ah! I am no knight whose foeman dies; Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 5
 
FOEMAN'S..........1
Awake, with horrid shout, my foeman's ears, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 152
 
FOEMEN............1
Hyena foemen , and hot-blooded lords, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 86
 
FOES..............3
Let my foes choke, and my friends shout afar, Lamia, Part II, Line 62
Than I to meet the torrent of my foes . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 31
A throng of foes ; and in this renew'd strife King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 49
 
FOG...............3
A mad-pursuing of the fog -born elf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 277
Or from old Skiddaw's top, when fog conceals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 394
For a thick fog - the Princess sulky quite- The Jealousies, Line 647
 
FOGGY.............1
And purblind amid foggy , midnight wolds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 636
 
FOIL..............1
Hither, most gentle sleep! and soothing foil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 705
 
FOIL'D............1
Were foil'd , who watch'd to trace them to their house: Lamia, Part I, Line 393
 
FOISTED...........1
Foisted into the canon law of love;- What can I do to drive away, Line 26
 
FOLD..............6
I shall roll on the grass with two- fold ease: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 79
A fold of lawny mantle dabbling swims Sleep and Poetry, Line 374
The clear religion of heaven! Fold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 781
To take a latest glimpse at his sheep- fold , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 995
Their leaves and prickly nuts; a sheep- fold bleat Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 301
And silent was the flock in woolly fold : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 4
 
FOLDED............4
Is folded by the muses; the bright roll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 725
Are folded up, and he content to look Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 10
And Ops, uplifting her black folded veil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 113
His eye not downcast, and his folded arm, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 90
 
FOLDING...........2
And scarcely stays to ope the folding doors: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 70
Her fearful sobs, self- folding like a flower Lamia, Part I, Line 138
 
FOLDINGS..........1
In sombre chariot; dark foldings thrown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 641
 
FOLDS.............4
Open afresh your round of starry folds , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 47
Fell sleek about him in a thousand folds - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 398
Mov'd the thin linen folds that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 196
Stirr'd the thin folds of gauze that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 218
 
FOLIAGE...........1
Pull'd down fresh foliage and coverture Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 930
 
FOLIO.............1
A glorious folio of Anacreon; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 41
 
FOLK..............7
So near those common folk ; did not their shames Sleep and Poetry, Line 211
Some folk of holiday: nor had they waited Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 113
The poor folk of the sea-country I blest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 368
That call'd the folk to evening prayer. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 3
Was fill'd with patient folk and slow, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 20
Is emptied of this folk , this pious morn? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 37
If my domains were emptied of these folk , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67
 
FOLKS.............3
All gentle folks who owe a grudge All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 1
When to the folks thou mad'st a bow All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 23
It went for apoplexy - foolish folks !- The Jealousies, Line 695
 
FOLLOW............31
Too partial friend! fain would I follow thee To George Felton Mathew, Line 11
Should madly follow that bright path of light Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 60
That I will follow with due reverence, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 63
Scarce can his clear and nimble eye-sight follow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 13
Of luxury, and my young spirit follow Sleep and Poetry, Line 59
To follow it upon the open plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 892
With immortality, who fears to follow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 212
Shouted the new born god; " Follow , and pay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 807
' We follow Bacchus! Bacchus on the wing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 222
For wine we follow Bacchus through the earth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 235
Above their heads, and follow them untir'd.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 353
Join this bright throng, and nimble follow whither Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 604
Then follow , my Caius, then follow! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 11
Then follow, my Caius, then follow ! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 11
To follow one's nose There was a naughty boy, Line 55
To follow one's nose to the north! There was a naughty boy, Line 58
Follow me, child, or else these stones will be thy bier." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 108
To follow her; with aged eyes aghast The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 184
So you sometime follow me Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 44
Sprite of Fire! I follow thee Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 79
Then, if she likes it, she will follow you. On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 14
Then faded, and to follow them I burn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 23
Go - I follow you. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 129b
I follow you to Friedburg, - is't not so? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 140
I follow you to Friedburg with all speed. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 153
Albert, wilt thou follow there? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 245b
Follow ;- your presences will much avail Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 280
I follow him. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 178b
Into Elysium!- now I follow thee, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 23
Retraction follow close upon the heels Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 93
We are well breathed,- follow ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 19a
 
FOLLOW'D..........13
That follow'd thine, and thy dear shepherd's kisses: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 240
Follow'd by glad Endymion's clasped hands: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 65
Endymion follow'd - for it seem'd that one Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 927
Follow'd their languid mazes, till well nigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 929
Joyous all follow'd , as the leader call'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 813
And follow'd his nose There was a naughty boy, Line 21
And follow'd his nose There was a naughty boy, Line 24
He follow'd through a lowly arched way, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 109
He follow'd , and she turn'd to lead the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 155
I fled, it follow'd me, and cried ' Apollo!' Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 295
For the Duke Conrad's. Close I follow'd them Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 124
And, as I follow'd , heard my lady speak. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 126
Follow'd his steps, and her neck regal white Lamia, Part I, Line 243
 
FOLLOWED..........4
Up- followed by a multitude that rear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 164
Therefore I eager followed , and did curse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 704
[Enter, from the Castle, AURANTHE, followed by Pages holding Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
Enter LUDOLPH, followed by SIGIFRED and Page. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 22
 
FOLLOWING.........6
necessarily taste in going over the following pages. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
From place to place, and following at chance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 930
Into these regions came I following him, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 268
By following fat elbows up a court. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 19
Servants. ALBERT following . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
[Exeunt OTHO and Nobles; ALBERT following . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 245a
 
FOLLOWS...........2
Is sure enough - and so "here follows prose." Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 113
stage, bowing with respect to LUDOLPH, he frowning on them. CONRAD follows . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
 
FOLLY.............9
Chacing away all worldliness and folly ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 26
Stood stupefied with my own empty folly , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 961
I rush'd into the folly ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 208
Huzza for folly O! Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 2
O folly ! for to bear all naked truths, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 203
O folly ! What is Love? and where is it? Ode on Indolence, Line 32
Monster of folly ! Ghost of a turn'd brain! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 202
A wrathful dew. O folly ! why did I Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 222
The ghost of folly haunting my sweet dreams." Lamia, Part I, Line 377
 
FOLLYING..........1
Such follying before thee - yet she had, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 612
 
FOND..............10
Till the fond , fixed eyes forget they stare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 18
Is looking round about him with a fond , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 141
Their fond imaginations,- saving him Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 393
Who would not be so prison'd? but, fond elf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 461
Such cool and sorrowful offerings, thou art fond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 438
I have a triple soul! O fond pretence- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 95
So fond , so beauteous was his bed-fellow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 448
But my fond ear, in fancy at thy lips, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 10
Too fond of reading novels, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 38
Too, too late for the fond believing lyre, Ode to Psyche, Line 37
 
FONDER............1
Of fondest beauty; fonder , in fair sooth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 394
 
FONDEST...........1
Of fondest beauty; fonder, in fair sooth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 394
 
FONDLED...........2
And this he fondled with his happy cheek Calidore: A Fragment, Line 97
Fondled the maidens with the breasts of cream; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 34
 
FONDLES...........1
Fondles the flower amid the sobbing rain. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 331
 
FONDLING..........2
First touch'd; what amorous, and fondling nips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 144
Fondling and kissing every doubt away; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 735
 
FONDLY............3
So fondly I'll breathe, and so softly I'll sigh, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 13
Most fondly lipp'd, and then these accents came: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 964
"Ah, woe is me! that I should fondly part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 30
 
FONDNESS..........1
Thee thus, and weep for fondness - I am pain'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 822
 
FOOD..............12
Kissing thy daily food from Naiad's pearly hands. To George Felton Mathew, Line 93
A few of them have ever been the food How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 2
Aye, so delicious is the unsating food , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 816
That they are still the air, the subtle food , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 157
And keep me as a chosen food to draw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 264
Of venison? O generous food ! Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 9
Panted, and all his food was woodland air, Character of C.B., Line 17
But for poor Ludolph, he is food for sorrow; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 153
Let me no longer be the wondering food Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 111
Serv'd with harsh food , with scum for Sunday-drink. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 89
Was fainting for sweet food : I look'd thereon The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 233
Eats wholesome, sweet, and palatable food King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 27
 
FOOL..............25
That mortal's a fool who such happiness misses; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 18
Content, O fool ! to make a cold retreat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 465
Had been my dreary death? Fool ! I began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 374
No one to see my Ape, my Dwarf, my Fool , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 13
Ape, Dwarf, and Fool , why stand you gaping there? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 15
Star'd at the Fool , the Fool was all agape; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 19
Star'd at the Fool, the Fool was all agape; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 19
He was a prince, the Fool , a grown up prince, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 33
' Aye every inch a king' - though ' Fortune's fool ,' When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 80
Sole,- in a stiff, fool -hardy, sulky pride; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 102
He is a fool who stands at pining gaze! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 152
Death!- and slow tortures to the hardy fool Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 69
I am no jealous fool to kill you both, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 87
You well may laugh and banter. What a fool Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 40
Wilt thou infuriate me? Proof! Thou fool ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 198
What is this? Auranthe, thou fool , dolt, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 100
Thou liest! Thou, Auranthe's fool ! A wittol! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
A barrier of guilt! I was the fool , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 104
And who the fool ? The entrapp'd, the caged fool, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 106
And who the fool? The entrapp'd, the caged fool , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 106
" Fool !" said the sophist, in an under-tone Lamia, Part II, Line 291
" Fool ! Fool!" repeated he, while his eyes still Lamia, Part II, Line 295
"Fool! Fool !" repeated he, while his eyes still Lamia, Part II, Line 295
That stubborn fool , that impudent state-dun, The Jealousies, Line 160
The Common Council and my fool Lord Mayor The Jealousies, Line 768
 
FOOL'S............1
On some fool's errand: let his latest groan Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 56
 
FOOLISH...........13
'Twere better far to hide my foolish face? Sleep and Poetry, Line 272
Of their dear friends, nigh foolish with delight; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 228
My foolish tongue, and listening, half afraid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 960
From my dear native land! Ah, foolish maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 31
Has our delaying been; but foolish fear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 989
Or to the over- foolish , Giant-Gods? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 310
From adoration, and my foolish tongue Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8
A foolish dream that from my brow hath wrung Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 221
A foolish tongue, that I may bethink me Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 4
Besides, the foolish Prince sends, minute whiles, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 35
His foolish heart from its mad pompousness, Lamia, Part II, Line 114
Not, like a subject, foolish matters mince. The Jealousies, Line 472
It went for apoplexy - foolish folks!- The Jealousies, Line 695
 
FOOLS.............3
Fools ! if some passions high have warm'd the world, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 11
Fools ! make me whole again that weighty pearl And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 15
Contented fools causes for discontent, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 40
 
FOOT..............22
Be jealous that the foot of other wight Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 59
And I have many miles on foot to fare. Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 4
Round every spot where trod Apollo's foot ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 790
My head, and kiss death's foot . Love! love, farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 275
Took silently their foot -prints. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 314a
How every soldier, with firm foot , doth hold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 730
Foot -feather'd Mercury appear'd sublime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 331
The dull of midnight, at her couch's foot Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 274
Yet can I stamp my foot upon thy floor, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 9
Along the margin-sand large foot -marks went, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 15
There standing fierce beneath, he stampt his foot , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 222
Her hair was long, her foot was light, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 15
To fit the naked foot of Poesy; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 6
When here, a monarch, whose proud foot is used Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
My soul for foot -ball at hell's holiday! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 30
Now, when my foot is almost on thy neck, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 197
And not a foot or whisper to be heard. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 119
And rested at the foot of those wild hills, Lamia, Part I, Line 175
One minute before death, my iced foot touch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 132
His running, lying, flying foot -man too,- The Jealousies, Line 53
He rose, he stampt his foot , he rang the bell, The Jealousies, Line 177
But swift of look, and foot , and wing was he,)- The Jealousies, Line 186
 
FOOTED............6
Light- footed damsels move with gentle paces Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 41
Waiting for silver- footed messages. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 51
Web- footed alligators, crocodiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 245
Let not her steeds with drowsy- footed pace Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 33
Tight- footed for the deed! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 167a
The God, dove- footed , glided silently Lamia, Part I, Line 42
 
FOOTFALL..........1
Save now and then the still footfall The Eve of St. Mark, Line 58
 
FOOTING...........4
Their footing through the dews; and to him said, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 180
There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 1
With backward footing through the shade a space: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 154
With damp and slippery footing from a depth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 85
 
FOOTMARKS.........1
Along the margin sand large footmarks went The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 319
 
FOOTPATH..........1
You chang'd the footpath for the grassy plain. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 126
 
FOOTSTEP..........1
Or the light whisper of her footstep soft; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 196
 
FOOTSTEPS.........12
And her first footsteps touch'd a verdant hill; Imitation of Spenser, Line 2
I cannot your light, mazy footsteps attend; To Some Ladies, Line 2
Could hear your footsteps touch the grav'ly floor. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 124
From low-grown branches, and his footsteps slow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 417
Before my heedless footsteps stirr'd, and stirr'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 699
Along whose track the prince quick footsteps told, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 227
Rous'd by his whispering footsteps murmured faint: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 268
Before his footsteps ; as when heav'd anew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 347
It ceased - I caught light footsteps ; and anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 423
Through dangerous winds, had by my footsteps worn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 616
Laws to my footsteps , colour to my cheek, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 714
Trace me their footsteps ! Away! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 139
 
FOOTSTOOL.........3
Would at high Jove's empyreal footstool win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 378
Thy mossy footstool shall the altar be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 711
For my firm-based footstool :- Ah, infirm! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 138
 
FOOTWORN..........1
The chains lie silent on the footworn stones;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 368
 
FOPPERY...........1
Nurtured by foppery and barbarism, Sleep and Poetry, Line 182
 
FORAGING..........1
Foraging for sticks and straw. Fancy, Line 46
 
FORBAD............1
Despair forbad his soul to climb O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 62
 
FORBEAR...........1
Beseech you, sire, forbear . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 36a
 
FORBEARANCE.......1
A kind forbearance , holy abbot. Come, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 6
 
FORBID............2
The heavens forbid that I should not think so. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 7
"Besides, manners forbid that I should pass any The Jealousies, Line 469
 
FORBIDDEN.........2
I may not be thy love: I am forbidden - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 752
This was a crime forbidden by the law; The Jealousies, Line 10
 
FORC'D............2
This sleepy music, forc'd him walk tiptoe: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 358
Forc'd from their quiet cells, are parcell'd out Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 76
 
FORCE.............15
His glories: with a puling infant's force Sleep and Poetry, Line 185
Or thou wilt force me from this secrecy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 780
Upon the last few steps, and with spent force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 925
So it will pleasure thee, and force thee stop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 436
Had been resum'd in spite of hindering force - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 650
Kneel'd down beside it, and with tenderest force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 779
Of Goddis love and Sathan's force The Eve of St. Mark, Line 108
It seem'd no force could wake him from his place; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 22
We fall by course of Nature's law, not force Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 181
By any hindrance, but with gentlest force Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
As griev'd to force it on you so abrupt; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 71
To force himself upon you, and infest Lamia, Part II, Line 166
It seem'd no force could wake him from his place; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 327
Whither I bent her force , What can I do to drive away, Line 13
The heft away with such a vengeful force King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 41
 
FORCES............3
It forces us in summer skies to mourn: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 84
forces . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
[Exeunt Glocester and forces . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 54
 
FORD..............1
The brothers' faces in the ford did seem, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 214
 
FORE..............1
By a fore -knowledge of unslumbrous night! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 912
 
FOREDOOM..........1
Broad leaved fig trees even now foredoom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 252
 
FOREHEAD..........29
He bares his forehead to the cool blue sky, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 6
While 'gainst his forehead he devoutly press'd Calidore: A Fragment, Line 105
With forehead to the soothing breezes bare, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 56
Upon the forehead of the age to come; Addressed to the Same, Line 10
Guarding his forehead , with her round elbow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 416
Upon the forehead of humanity. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 802
Holding his forehead , to keep off the burr Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 138
He had touch'd his forehead , he began to thread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 266
What smoothest air thy smoother forehead woos? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 306
Up to his forehead . Then there was a hum Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 500
Thy forehead , and to Jupiter cloud-borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 654
Furrow'd deep wrinkles in his forehead large, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 223
His rugged forehead in a mantle pale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 395
Because I feel my forehead hot and flush'd- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 34
To every symbol on his forehead high; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 52
When from the sun was thy broad forehead hid? To Ailsa Rock, Line 4
Here is the forehead of an ape, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 79
My forehead low, Spirit here that reignest, Line 6
With forehead 'gainst the window pane; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 49
She touch'd her fair large forehead to the ground, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 80
Forehead to forehead held their monstrous horns; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 12
Forehead to forehead held their monstrous horns; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 12
Show'd her pale cheeks, and all her forehead wan, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 114
A burning forehead , and a parching tongue. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 30
Nor suffer thy pale forehead to be kiss'd Ode on Melancholy, Line 3
Thou, Jove-like, struck'dst thy forehead , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 95
Upon her aching forehead be there hung Lamia, Part II, Line 223
She press'd her fair large forehead to the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 379
And sponge my forehead ,- so my love doth make me pine." The Jealousies, Line 432
 
FOREHEAD'S........2
And Tellus feels his forehead's cumbrous load. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 71
To tell his forehead's swoon and faint when first began decay, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 26
 
FOREHEADS.........5
And on their placid foreheads part the hair. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 230
With uplift hands our foreheads , lowly bending, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 303
Make my horn parley from their foreheads hoar: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 479
He mark'd their brows and foreheads ; saw their hair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 741
And many, even now, their foreheads shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 837
 
FOREIGN...........2
Lorenzo had ta'en ship for foreign lands, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 226
Long toil'd in foreign wars, and whose high deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 26
 
FORELOCK..........1
By old Saturnus' forelock , by his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 956
 
FOREMOST..........1
Charioting foremost in the envious race, Lamia, Part I, Line 217
 
FORESAW...........2
And solve and melt:- 'twas just as he foresaw . Lamia, Part II, Line 162
For ruin and dismay they well foresaw , The Jealousies, Line 12
 
FOREST............56
Softly the breezes from the forest came, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 152
One who, of late, had ta'en sweet forest walks To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 42
That we might look into a forest wide, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 152
'Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 18
A mighty forest ; for the moist earth fed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 64
Now coming from beneath the forest trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 148
Endymion too, without a forest peer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 190
More subtle cadenced, more forest wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 494
By a cavern wind unto a forest old; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 831
And then the forest told it in a dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 832
Of his white palace in wild forest nook, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 890
Could wander in the mazy forest -house Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 468
That out I ran and search'd the forest o'er. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 482
Seated upon an uptorn forest root; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 499
Came quiet to his eyes; and forest green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1029
Behold her panting in the forest grass! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 59
And thou, old forest , hold ye this for true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 77
About the dewy forest , whisper tales?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 131
Sitting beneath the midmost forest tree, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 144
Why have ye left your forest haunts, why left Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 230
Through the wide forest - a most fearful tone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 323
On forest -fruits, and never, never go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 627
His forest wildernesses. I have clung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 636
When through the old oak forest I am gone, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 11
There is no mid- forest laugh, Robin Hood, Line 15
Jesting, deep in forest drear. Robin Hood, Line 18
Once again her forest days, Robin Hood, Line 41
Blue!- gentle cousin to the forest green, Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 9
For they resolved in some forest dim Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 175
Into a forest quiet for the slaughter. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 216
There in that forest did his great love cease; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 218
Lorenzo stood, and wept: the forest tomb Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 275
In the forest ,- and the sodden turfed dell, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 295
How she might secret to the forest hie; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 338
And went into that dismal forest -hearse. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 344
And Pan made sing for thee his forest -hive; To Homer, Line 8
You liv'd alone on the forest tree, I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 7
Full leav'd, the forest had outstript, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 45
Forest on forest hung above his head Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 6
Forest on forest hung above his head Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 6
We are such forest -trees, and our fair boughs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 224
In cool mid- forest . Surely I have traced Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 55
I wander'd in a forest thoughtlessly, Ode to Psyche, Line 7
When holy were the haunted forest boughs, Ode to Psyche, Line 38
And with thee fade away into the forest dim: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 20
With forest branches and the trodden weed; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 43
Are shaded in a forest of tall spears, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 27
For me, with horses by the forest -side Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 180
A part of the Forest . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Setting
Another part of the Forest . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Setting
Hid in the forest , safe from my revenge, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 32
Poor cheated Ludolph! Make the forest hiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Into a forest on the shores of Crete. Lamia, Part I, Line 12
From vales deflower'd, or forest -trees branch-rent, Lamia, Part II, Line 216
Fills forest dells with a pervading air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 405
Along the forest side! Now amber lines The Jealousies, Line 557
 
FOREST'S..........1
Of the forest's whispering fleeces, Robin Hood, Line 9
 
FORESTALL.........2
written with the least atom of purpose to forestall criticisms of course, but Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Forestall the fates; have you not learnt that yet? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 38
 
FORESTED..........1
Art thou now forested ? O woodland Queen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 305
 
FORESTER..........3
O forester divine! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 262
Mourn'd as if yet thou wert a forester ;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 779
A forester deep in thy midmost trees, Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 2
 
FORESTS...........10
About old forests ; while the willow trails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 43
About Arcadian forests ; and will shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 990
Before our forests heard the talk of men; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 6
To stray away into these forests drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 270
These forests , and to thee they safe shall be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 994
The hawks of ship-mast forests - the untired Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 133
Quarrel with the proud forests it hath fed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 218
These words dissolv'd: Crete's forests heard no more. Lamia, Part I, Line 170
Forests , branch-charmed by the earnest stars, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 373
Whose rank-grown forests , frosted, black, and blind, What can I do to drive away, Line 39
 
FORETOLD..........1
"I thought you guess'd, foretold , or prophesied, The Jealousies, Line 325
 
FORFEIT...........1
Of honour forfeit . O, that my known voice King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 7
 
FORGET............28
Till the fond, fixed eyes forget they stare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 18
These lures I straight forget , - e'en ere I dine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 24
Ah! who can e'er forget so fair a being? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 29
Who can forget her half retiring sweets? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 30
And half forget what world or worldling meant. Happy is England! I could be content, Line 8
And can I e'er these benefits forget ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 76
Of luxuries: yet I must not forget Sleep and Poetry, Line 347
I will forget them; I will pass these joys; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 548
Forget -me-not - the blue-bell - and, that queen Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 11
Or else he would forget his mortal nature. Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 14
Though I forget the taste of earthly bliss, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 315
When weary feet forget themselves upon a pleasant turf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 9
Would bar return and make a man forget his mortal way. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 32
Do ye forget the blows, the buffets vile? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 317
Dost thou forget , sham Monarch of the Waves, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 319
Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget Ode to a Nightingale, Line 21
"To the Duke Conrad. Forget the threat you Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 55
made at parting, and I will forget to send the Emperor letters Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
Pray let me lead. Fair lady, forget not Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
Do you forget that even the senseless door-posts Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 30
Each other - forget her!- Our miseries Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 44
Be your word law; forget to-day- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 165a
Half mad - not right here - I forget my purpose. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 176
Or else forget the purpose of the night, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 3
Forget their tea - forget their appetite. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 4
Forget their tea - forget their appetite. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 4
And seeing ne'er forget . No stir of life The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 310
Forget , in the mist of idle misery, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 12
 
FORGET'ST.........1
Turn, thou court-Janus, thou forget'st thyself; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 248
 
FORGETFUL.........2
Forgetful utterly of self-intent; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 386
Awhile forgetful of all beauty save Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 450
 
FORGETFULNESS.....5
A half- forgetfulness in mountain wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 980
Into forgetfulness ; when, stupefied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 681
Enshaded in forgetfulness divine: Sonnet to Sleep, Line 4
Into forgetfulness ; and, for the sage, Lamia, Part II, Line 227
Forgetfulness of every-thing but bliss, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 104
 
FORGETS...........3
Closes up, and forgets all its Lethean care, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 11
Forgets in the new dawn. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 234
That even the dying man forgets his shroud; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 101
 
FORGETTING........3
And thorns of life; forgetting the great end Sleep and Poetry, Line 245
Forgetting the old tale. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 780a
But with a sweet forgetting In drear nighted December, Line 13
 
FORGIVE...........14
Forgive me, Haydon, that I cannot speak To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 1
Forgive me that I have not eagle's wings- To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 3
My sovereign vision.- Dearest love, forgive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 183
"Fair damsel, pity me! forgive that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 105
Alone about the dark - Forgive me, sweet: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 480
Forgive me pray, good people all, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 33
But now my sight is clear; forgive me, lady. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 23
My lord, forgive me that I cannot see Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 30
He will forgive thee, and awake in grief Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 108
Yes, yes, yes, I offend. You must forgive me; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
Forgive me, but he must not see thy face. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 11
Wilt thou forgive me? And thou, holy man, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 171
Is- Love, forgive us!- cinders, ashes, dust; Lamia, Part II, Line 2
And you forgive me." Lycius blush'd, and led Lamia, Part II, Line 169
 
FORGIVEN..........2
Such things deserted me and are forgiven , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 83
Give me thy hand; hast thou forgiven me? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 8
 
FORGIVENESS.......1
Forgiveness : yet he turn'd once more to look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 452
 
FORGIVING.........1
Of thee we now should ask forgiving boon, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 146
 
FORGOT............9
Forgot all violence, and but commun'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 867
Exclaim, How then, was Scylla quite forgot ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 452
And I forgot thee, as the berried holly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 205
And she forgot the stars, the moon, and sun, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 417
And she forgot the blue above the trees, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 418
And she forgot the dells where waters run, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 419
And she forgot the chilly autumn breeze; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 420
To-day! O I forgot you could not know; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 57
Too tight,- the book!- my wand!- so, nothing is forgot ." The Jealousies, Line 549
 
FORGOTTEN.........9
Could all this be forgotten ? Yes, a schism Sleep and Poetry, Line 181
Through his forgotten hands: then would they sigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 181
To tunes forgotten - out of memory: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 316
First heaven, then hell, and then forgotten clear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 374
Was quite forgotten , save of us alone! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 786
With long- forgotten story, and wherein Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 127
By shepherds is forgotten , when, in June, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 206
But the forgotten eye is still fast wedded to the ground- There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 21
Forgotten is the worldly heart - alone, it beats in vain. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 24
 
FORKED............1
On forked lightning, to the deepest deep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 248
 
FORLORN...........17
By horrid suffrance - mightily forlorn . Sleep and Poetry, Line 388
A meek and forlorn flower, with naught of pride, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 172
Whose mellow reeds are touch'd with sounds forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 205
And most forlorn upon that widow'd bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 859
Had watch'd for years in forlorn hermitage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 227
"In the wide sea there lives a forlorn wretch, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 689
From the old womb of night, his cave forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 372
Had he left more forlorn ; for the first time, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 373
And so she pined, and so she died forlorn , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 497
A dove forlorn and lost with sick unpruned wing." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 333
Of Druid stones, upon a forlorn moor, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 35
Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn . Ode to a Nightingale, Line 70
Forlorn ! the very word is like a bell Ode to a Nightingale, Line 71
Of prisoners. Poor prince, forlorn he steps, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 87
Why will you plead yourself so sad forlorn , Lamia, Part II, Line 49
Of painful blindness; leaving thee forlorn , Lamia, Part II, Line 282
And by thy self, forlorn divinity, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 287
 
FORLORNEST........1
Whom thou saw'st step from yon forlornest wood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 333
 
FORM..............22
The image of the fairest form Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 10
Her form seems floating palpable, and near; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 39
Had I a man's fair form , then might my sighs Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 1
It was some glorious form , some splendid weed, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 119
Whence that completed form of all completeness? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 606
Of death, for the fair form had gone again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 905
He caught her airy form , thus did he plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 301
In amorous rillets down her shrinking form ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 945
Of ambitious magic: every ocean- form Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 199
He spake, and walking to that aged form , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 281
His sluggish form reposing motionless. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 389
Pitying each form that hungry death hath marr'd, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 357
And all his warrior-guests, with shade and form The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 373
Pale were the lips I kiss'd, and fair the form As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 13
Cannot I form ? Cannot I fashion forth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 142
In form and shape compact and beautiful, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 209
Or hath that antique mien and robed form Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 51
Thou, silent form , dost tease us out of thought Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 44
Give me my woman's form , and place me where he is. Lamia, Part I, Line 120
Brow-beating her fair form , and troubling her sweet pride. Lamia, Part II, Line 248
Which marries sweet sound with the grace of form , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 443
And make it flare in many a brilliant form , The Jealousies, Line 213
 
FORM'D............2
And form'd a snowy circle on the grass, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 85
Of these new- form'd art thou, oh brightest child! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 319
 
FORMAL............1
Not like the formal crest of latter days: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 3
 
FORMER............4
That thou must shelter in thy former state; On Peace, Line 11
Now turn we to our former chroniclers.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 854
The current of my former life was stemm'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 458
The last in air, the former in the deep- To Ailsa Rock, Line 11
 
FORMLESS..........1
They cut away no formless monster's head, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 394
 
FORMS.............8
Till their stern forms before my mind arise: Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 11
And with these airs come forms of elegance Sleep and Poetry, Line 331
Aye, those fair living forms swam heavenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 315
If he explores all forms and substances Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 699
The room with wildest forms and shades, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 85
O monstrous forms ! O effigies of pain! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 228
To hide themselves in forms of beast and bird. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 72
Whose arms spread straggling in wild serpent forms , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 447
 
FORSAKE...........1
Wilt thou forsake him at his latest hour? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 12
 
FORSAKEN..........1
Who hath forsaken old and sacred thrones Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 77
 
FORSAKEST.........1
Though thou forsakest a deceived thing;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 332
 
FORSOOK...........1
That all his brutishness he quite forsook , In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 7
 
FORSOOTH..........4
They faded, and, forsooth ! I wanted wings: Ode on Indolence, Line 31
Must needs exclaim that I am mad forsooth , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
And pitying forsooth my many wrongs; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 75
Now the dull animal forsooth must be Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 19
 
FORSWORN..........1
Into the noisy world almost forsworn . Lamia, Part II, Line 33
 
FORTH.............62
While from their master's lips pour forth the inspiring words. Ode to Apollo, Line 29
Where falling stars dart their artillery forth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 642
Is friendship, whence there ever issues forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 804
Whence it ran brightly forth , and white did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 936
Some holy bark let forth an anthem sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 81
Had more been heard. Thus swell'd it forth : "Descend, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 202
Arise! awake! Clear summer has forth walk'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 502
What themselves think of it; from forth his eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 540
Forth from a rugged arch, in the dusk below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 639
Came swelling forth where little caves were wreath'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 665
O Moon! old boughs lisp forth a holier din Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 54
A light as of four sunsets, blazing forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 877
Have I put forth to serve thee. What, not yet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 906
Yet wast thou patient. Then sang forth the Nine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 11
Seems to give forth its light in very scorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 24
Through the thick branches, poor ring-doves sleek forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 327
The moon put forth a little diamond peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 497
Some enemy: far forth his bow is bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 598
Before it can put forth its blossoming. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 12
Came forth , and in perfumed leafits spread. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 432
He might make tremble many a man whose spirit had gone forth There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 27
She'll dart forth , and cloudward soar. Fancy, Line 8
While he from forth the closet brought a heap The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 264
And moan forth witless words with many a sigh; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 303
Yet lingeringly did the sad Ape forth draw When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 67
How was it nurtur'd to such bursting forth , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 104
Cannot I form? Cannot I fashion forth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 142
Held struggle with his throat but came not forth ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 252
And now, from forth the gloom their plumes immense Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 286
Found way from forth the thunders round his head! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 325
Crag jutting forth to crag, and rocks that seem'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 10
Have bred forth , not pale solitary doves, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 225
But fierce Enceladus sent forth his eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 382
There those four shouted forth old Saturn's name; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 387
And in the morning twilight wandered forth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 33
Goddess benign, point forth some unknown thing: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 95
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad Ode to a Nightingale, Line 57
Bring forth once more my bullion, treasured deep, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 11
Send forth instantly Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 37b
Sent forth with my commands? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 73a
Who lets him forth again? or dares to give Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 171
Who, driven forth from their religious cells, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 193
After whose spurring heels he sent me forth , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 13
You should be, from a thousand, chosen forth Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 36
I see in thy mute beauty beaming forth ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
The world is all agape to see dragg'd forth Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 68
Thine arms from forth a pulpit of hot fire Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 91
Old abbot, stand here forth . Lady Erminia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 111
A deadly breath went forth to taint and blast Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 154
It gives me pleasant hopes. Please you, walk forth Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 59
A Banquetting Hall, brilliantly illuminated, and set forth with all Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Then, father, I will lead your legions forth , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 161
From his companions, and set forth to walk, Lamia, Part I, Line 231
Forth creeping imagery of slighter trees, Lamia, Part II, Line 140
Full brimm'd, and opposite sent forth a look Lamia, Part II, Line 242
From forth the loftiest fashion of his sleep The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 3
Thrice emptied could pour forth , at banqueting The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 36
Sending forth Maian incense, spread around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 103
Steps forth my lady bright! What can I do to drive away, Line 47
Forth from his hood that hung his neck below, The Jealousies, Line 509
Spitting, from forth its sulphur-baken peak, The Jealousies, Line 662
Came forth to quell the hubbub in the hall. The Jealousies, Line 794
 
FORTHRIGHT........1
He forthright pass'd, and lightly treading went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 431
 
FORTHWITH.........1
Upon its own producer, forthwith touch'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 196
 
FORTIETH..........1
To the second chapter of my fortieth book, The Jealousies, Line 706
 
FORTUNATE.........2
I would I were so over- fortunate , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 68
No scarecrow, but the fortunate star King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 21b
 
FORTUNE...........5
The more the beauty, the more fortune too: When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 59
My ship of fortune furl'd her silken sails,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 5
To make our golden fortune known to you. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 24
What mood is this? Hath fortune touch'd thy brain? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 99
O, Fortune , where will this end! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 99b
 
FORTUNE'S.........2
' Aye every inch a king' - though ' Fortune's fool,' When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 80
Kiss your fair hand and lady fortune's too. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 16
 
FORWARD...........8
And quickly forward spring Ode to Apollo, Line 25
From their sweet thrall, and forward gently bending, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 103
The driver of those steeds is forward bent, Sleep and Poetry, Line 152
punishment: but no feeling man will be forward to inflict it: he will leave me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
But Venus, bending forward , said: "My child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 548
Went forward with the Carian side by side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 311
Leaned forward , with bright drooping hair, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 71
Forward he stoop'd over the airy shore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 356


Published @ RC

March 2005