Fos-Fz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
FOSTER............4
And all ye gentle girls who foster up Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 209
O thou could'st foster me beyond the brink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 306
Thou foster -child of silence and slow time, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 2
By great Apollo, thy dear foster child, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 286
 
FOSTER'D..........2
One that I foster'd in my youthful years: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 98
These raven horses, though they foster'd are Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 398
 
FOSTERING.........1
But the God fostering her chilled hand, Lamia, Part I, Line 140
 
FOSTERS...........1
That fosters the droop-headed flowers all, Ode on Melancholy, Line 13
 
FOUGHT............4
And fought in an amorous nipping. O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 12
Where patriot battle has been fought , when glory had the gain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 2
That, after such a merry battle fought , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 14
The solitary warfare, fought for love Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 11
 
FOUGHTEN..........2
No, not a thousand foughten fields could sponge Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 44
Foughten long since by giant hierarchy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 223
 
FOUL..............8
Fair and foul I love together; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 7
Him any mercy, in that mansion foul , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 89
Too cheerful for these foul pernicious days. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 121
Foul barbarian, cease; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 72b
Foul , poisonous, malignant whisperings; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 130
The earth would shudder at so foul a deed! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52
"Begone, foul dream!" he cried, gazing again Lamia, Part II, Line 271
Any foul play, or awkward murdering, The Jealousies, Line 192
 
FOULEST...........2
His memory, your direst, foulest shame? Lines Written on 29 May, Line 2
A long life in the foulest sink o' the world! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
 
FOUND.............42
Had found white coursers prancing in the glen: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 57
Who found for me the grandeur of the ode, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 62
Sometimes I lost them, and then found again; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 125
That in a little cottage I have found ; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 10
Oft may be found a "singleness of aim," Addressed to Haydon, Line 6
Through its lone vales; and where I found a spot Sleep and Poetry, Line 75
They will be found softer than ring-dove's cooings. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 64
In some delicious ramble, he had found I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 165
Often 'tis in such gentle temper found On the Sea, Line 5
Through a dim passage, searching till he found Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 709
I found me; by my fresh, my native home. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 608
For each their old love found . A murmuring rose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 824
On things for which no wording can be found ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 962
These brethren having found by many signs Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 161
And they had found Lorenzo's earthy bed; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 351
There he found There was a naughty boy, Line 96
As palmer's that with weariness mid-desert shrine hath found . There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 22
Child, I see thee! Child, I've found thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 27
He found him in a little moonlight room, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 112
Though I have found , I will not rob thy nest The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 340
Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found .- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 355
Found way unto Olympus, and made quake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 146
Found way from forth the thunders round his head! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 325
But for the main, here found they covert drear. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 32
Till on the level height their steps found ease: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 88
Found ourselves ruling new and beauteous realms. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 201
She found me roots of relish sweet, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 25
And I awoke and found me here La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 43
Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Ode to a Nightingale, Line 65
I found it in the tent, among some spoils Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 66
Your knights, found war-proof in the bloody field, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 34
Hard penalties against thee, if't be found Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
It seems then, sir, you have found out the man Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 45
I found the stairs all dark, the lamps extinct, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 118
In vain; the sweet nymph might nowhere be found , Lamia, Part I, Line 31
Until he found a palpitating snake, Lamia, Part I, Line 45
Too gentle Hermes, hast thou found the maid?" Lamia, Part I, Line 80
Or found them cluster'd in the corniced shade Lamia, Part I, Line 360
Supported him - no pulse, or breath they found , Lamia, Part II, Line 310
conjectures, found her out to be a serpent, a lamia; and that all her furniture Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
What eyes are upward cast. As I had found The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 271
With liquor and the staircase: verdict - found stone dead. The Jealousies, Line 630
 
FOUNDATIONS.......3
foundations are too sandy. It is just that this youngster should die away: a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Has dived to its foundations , gulph'd it down, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 351
Its deep foundations , hissing into foam. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 948
 
FOUNDED...........1
Founded with many a mason-devil's groan. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 48
 
FOUNT.............4
To take in draughts of life from the gold fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 656
Into those regions? The Morphean fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 747
The dashing fount pour'd on, and where its pool Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 133
Around thine aged top, and thy clear fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 722
 
FOUNTAIN..........2
When it flutters in sun-beams that shine through a fountain ? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 4
An endless fountain of immortal drink, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 23
 
FOUNTAIN'D........1
O fountain'd hill! Old Homer's Helicon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 717
 
FOUNTAIN'S........2
Until it reached a splashing fountain's side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 84
In the fountain's pebbly margin, and she stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 99
 
FOUNTAINS.........13
Of nymphs in woods, and fountains ; and the shade Sleep and Poetry, Line 67
Taste their pure fountains . First the realm I'll pass Sleep and Poetry, Line 101
Fountains grotesque, new trees, bespangled caves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 458
Of a thousand fountains , so that he could dash Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 604
Will stagnate all thy fountains :- tease me not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 954
In courteous fountains to all cups outreach'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 926
To fan-like fountains ,- thine illuminings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 584
And fountains There was a naughty boy, Line 40
An' mossie fountains ? Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 4
With the noise of fountains wond'rous, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 7
To the torrid spouts and fountains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 81
And panting fountains quivering with deep glows! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 47
In neighbourhood of fountains , by the noise The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 22
 
FOUNTAINS'........1
Is, the clear fountains' interchanging kisses, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 48
 
FOUNTS............3
To these founts Protean, passing gulph, and dell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 627
Why were they proud? Because their marble founts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 121
The rugged founts of the Peraean rills, Lamia, Part I, Line 176
 
FOUR..............20
Four laurell'd spirits, heaven-ward to intreat him. To George Felton Mathew, Line 58
Will I call the Graces four . Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 40
O'er which bend four milky plumes Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 53
Is made of the four seasons - manifest Sleep and Poetry, Line 295
His snorting four . Now when his chariot last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 552
Four lily stalks did their white honours wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 408
With turrets crown'd. Four maned lions hale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 643
A light as of four sunsets, blazing forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 877
Are visible above: the Seasons four ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 421
Four seasons fill the measure of the year; Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 1
Four seasons are there in the mind of man. Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 2
And straight she'll run on four . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 12
From morning, four o'clock, to twelve at noon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 10
Should look through four large windows, and display Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 28
Her silver seasons four upon the night, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 84
There those four shouted forth old Saturn's name; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 387
With kisses four . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 32
Sorely she grieved, and wetted three or four The Jealousies, Line 82
Bivouac'd for four minutes on a cloud- The Jealousies, Line 686
At half-past four the morn essay'd to beam- The Jealousies, Line 708
 
FOURSCORE.........1
That fourscore There was a naughty boy, Line 107
 
FOURTH............2
"Philostratus, in his fourth book de Vita Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
April the twenty- fourth ,- this coming day, The Jealousies, Line 501
 
FOWL..............1
Ne cared he for fish, or flesh, or fowl , Character of C.B., Line 11
 
FOWLER............1
Henry the Fowler pass'd the streets of Prague. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 16
 
FOWLS'............1
Give answer by thy voice, the sea fowls' screams! To Ailsa Rock, Line 2
 
FOX...............1
Startles the wild bee from the fox -glove bell. O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 8
 
FOXES.............2
Fire-branded foxes to sear up and singe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 7
Of squirrels, foxes shy, and antler'd deer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 469
 
FOXES'............1
And to the windings in the foxes' hole, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 409
 
FOXGLOVES.........1
Large dock leaves, spiral foxgloves , or the glow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 49
 
FRA...............2
Fra wind and raining- Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 26
Fra happy wedding, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 42
 
FRAGILE...........3
A fragile dew-drop on its perilous way Sleep and Poetry, Line 86
There they discours'd upon the fragile bar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 360
Thy fragile bones to unknown burial. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 599
 
FRAGMENT..........2
For what poor mortals fragment up, as mere Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 845
A Fragment of a Tragedy King Stephen Subtitle
 
FRAGMENTS.........2
And scatter'd in his face some fragments light. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 774
Showering those powerful fragments on the dead. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 784
 
FRAGRANCE.........5
Mingled with fragrance from her rarest flowers: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 32
The inward fragrance of each other's heart. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 76
In fragrance soft, and coolness to the eye, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 210
Of fragrance , quietness, and trees, and flowers. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 264
In silken tents, and 'mid light fragrance dozed, The Jealousies, Line 692
 
FRAGRANCY.........1
And, as I feasted on its fragrancy , To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 9
 
FRAGRANT..........16
A fragrant wild, with Nature's beauty drest, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 7
Bay leaves were crackling in the fragrant pile, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 228
Of those same fragrant exhalations bred, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 435
Loosens her fragrant boddice; by degrees The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 229
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 219
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 18
Fragrant air! Delicious light! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 2
To my fragrant pallaces, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 49
'Mid hush'd, cool-rooted flowers, fragrant -eyed, Ode to Psyche, Line 13
Her nostrils, small, fragrant , fairy-delicate; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 70
And fragrant oils with ceremony meet Lamia, Part II, Line 194
Among the fragrant husks and berries crush'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 52
From whose white fragrant curtains thus I heard The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 106
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 55
Of fragrant curtain'd Love begins to weave The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 11
About the fragrant plaitings of thy dress, The Jealousies, Line 170
 
FRAIL.............4
Would come in these like accents; O how frail Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 50
"Too frail of heart! for this lost nymph of thine, Lamia, Part I, Line 93
Inhabited her frail -strung heart as his. Lamia, Part I, Line 309
Would come in this-like accenting; how frail The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 352
 
FRAILTY...........1
At war with all the frailty of grief, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 93
 
FRAME.............4
Give me your patience, sister, while I frame Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 1
A tambour frame , with Venus sleeping there, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 38
Quickly on this feast-night: by the tambour frame The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 174
Fit appellation for this dazzling frame ? Lamia, Part II, Line 89
 
FRAMER............1
Sounds which will reach the Framer of all things, Sleep and Poetry, Line 39
 
FRANCONIA.........2
CONRAD, Duke of Franconia Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 3
Good Franconia , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 26b
 
FRANCONIA'S.......1
Franconia's fair sister, 'tis I mean. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 113
 
FRANCONIAN........1
Aye, and those turreted Franconian walls, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 102
 
FRANK.............1
Frank , open, generous; Albert I may trust. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 23
 
FRANKINCENSE......1
And gummy frankincense was sparkling bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 229
 
FRANKNESS.........1
Is frankness , and a true tongue to the world; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 176
 
FRANTIC...........3
That often must have seen a poet frantic ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 38
And frantic gape of lonely Niobe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 338
And I was stopping up my frantic ears, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 290
 
FRATERNAL.........1
A gentle empire o'er fraternal souls. To My Brothers, Line 4
 
FRAUGHT...........1
A trumpet's silver voice. Ah! it was fraught Calidore: A Fragment, Line 55
 
FRAY..............1
Descried an orbed diamond, set to fray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 245
 
FRAY'D............1
She comes, she comes again, like ring-dove fray'd and fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 198
 
FRAYS.............1
Thy gentle mew - and tell me all thy frays To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 7
 
FREAK.............2
Then off at once, as in a wanton freak : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 90
Were I of ample strength for such a freak . To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 8
 
FREAKFUL..........1
For by some freakful chance he made retire Lamia, Part I, Line 230
 
FREAKS............2
The freaks , and dartings of the black-wing'd swallow, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 14
And blushing for the freaks of melancholy. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 962
 
FRECKLE...........1
Freckle -wing'd and lizard-sided! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 73
 
FRECKLED..........4
Their freckled wings; yea, the fresh budding year Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 259
Freckled nest-eggs thou shalt see Fancy, Line 59
Striped like a zebra, freckled like a pard, Lamia, Part I, Line 49
Freckled with red and gold the moving swarm; The Jealousies, Line 575
 
FRECKLES..........1
And freckles many; ah! a careless nurse, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 7
 
FRECKLINGS........1
Made gloom of all her frecklings , streaks and bars, Lamia, Part I, Line 159
 
FREE..............44
Keep thy chains burst, and boldly say thou art free ; On Peace, Line 12
In his immortal spirit, been as free Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 3
Gladdening in the free , and airy feel Calidore: A Fragment, Line 139
For when no more he spreads his feathers free , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 137
For down they rush as though they would be free , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 13
Because my thoughts were never free , and clear, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 23
The grand, the sweet, the terse, the free , the fine; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 54
For over them was seen a free display Sleep and Poetry, Line 392
I gazed awhile, and felt as light, and free I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 23
Pan is no longer sought, I feel a free , To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 12
Full alchemiz'd, and free of space. Behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 780
Of music's kiss impregnates the free winds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 784
Free from the smallest pebble-bead of doubt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 149
A huntress free in" - At this, sudden fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1008
Could grant in benediction: to be free Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 377
And I was free of haunts umbrageous; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 467
Among cool clouds and winds, but that the free , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 351
Then it is free to him; and from an urn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 534
Free -voic'd as one who never was away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 821
Unknown of any, free from whispering tale. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 86
The real of beauty, free from that dead hue On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 10
'Tis now free to stupid face, Not Aladdin magian, Line 50
She knelt, so pure a thing, so free from mortal taint. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 225
Is making free when they are not at home. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 29
At least, unhappy Prince, I may be free - When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 77
And many else were free to roam abroad, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 31
In will, in action free , companionship, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 210
Free from cold and every care Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 21
So, if we may not let the muse be free , If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 13
Can manage those hard rivets to set free Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
(sets him free ). Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 116b
Enough, most noble Gersa. You are free Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 130
And then depart, if I may be so free , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 79
Well! you shall have free passport through the gates. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 114
Almost with pleasure. Let them be set free Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 231
And you could free me; but remember, sir, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 62
You have escap'd me, free as the dusk air, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
Free as the air, invisibly, she strays Lamia, Part I, Line 94
Her loveliness invisible, yet free Lamia, Part I, Line 108
Free from all pain, if wonder pain thee not." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 248
What can I do to kill it and be free What can I do to drive away, Line 5
Then, loveliest! keep me free To Fanny, Line 47
Till from this hated match I get a free release. The Jealousies, Line 63
(I own it,)- have made too free with his wine; The Jealousies, Line 614
 
FREED.............1
And every soul from human trammels freed , Lamia, Part II, Line 210
 
FREEDOM...........7
Her pride, her freedom ; and not freedom's shade. To Hope, Line 34
Of those who in the cause of freedom fell; To George Felton Mathew, Line 66
The freedom of three steeds of dapple brown: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 167
Freedom as none can taste it, nor dost waste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 311
Giving it universal freedom . There Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 839
'Twas freedom ! and at once I visited Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 391
Ah! when a soul doth thus its freedom win, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 219
 
FREEDOM'S.........2
Her pride, her freedom; and not freedom's shade. To Hope, Line 34
The social smile, the chain for freedom's sake: Addressed to the Same, Line 6
 
FREEING...........2
A dove-like bosom. In truth there is no freeing Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 36
Prince Gersa's freeing Abbot Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 7
 
FREELY............1
Imagination cannot freely fly Sleep and Poetry, Line 164
 
FREES.............1
Of all its wreathed pearls her hair she frees ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 227
 
FREEZE............3
In this cold region? Will he let me freeze , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 259
The sculptur'd dead, on each side, seem to freeze , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 14
It doth make me freeze . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 118b
 
FREEZES...........1
And freezes utterly unto the bone Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 373
 
FREEZING..........2
And the black-elm tops 'mong the freezing stars, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 3
Charm'd into ever freezing , lay an old The Jealousies, Line 512
 
FREIGHT...........1
Those towering horses and their mournful freight . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 359
 
FREIGHTED.........1
I' the morning, freighted with a weight of woe, The Jealousies, Line 239
 
FREQUENT..........2
The frequent chequer of a youngling tree, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 38
Have fallen full frequent from our Emperor's lips, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 127
 
FRESH.............43
Of whitest cassia, fresh from summer showers: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 96
A fresh -blown musk-rose; 'twas the first that threw To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 6
Small, busy flames play through the fresh laid coals, To My Brothers, Line 1
Like a fresh sacrifice; or, if I can bear Sleep and Poetry, Line 61
Fresh garlands: for sweet music has been heard Sleep and Poetry, Line 223
Find a fresh sward beneath it, overgrown Sleep and Poetry, Line 258
And fresh from the clear brook; sweetly they slept I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 9
Of a fresh woodland alley, never ending; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 20
From their fresh beds, and scattered thoughtlessly I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 45
Into oblivion;- that fresh flowers will grow, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 13
Fresh morning gusts have blown away all fear To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 1
Fresh for the opening of the morning's eye. On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 8
Is growing fresh before me as the green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 38
Their freckled wings; yea, the fresh budding year Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 259
Into a shady, fresh , and ripply cove, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 430
Cool grass, nor tasted the fresh slumberous air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 290
Together intertwin'd and trammel'd fresh : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 411
Whose silent wheels, fresh wet from clouds of morn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 519
Thy shepherd vest, and woo thee mid fresh leaves. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 700
Fresh breezes, bowery lawns, and innocent floods, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 967
Is coming fresh upon me: O be kind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 181
Stole through its verdurous matting of fresh trees. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 420
I found me; by my fresh , my native home. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 608
Pull'd down fresh foliage and coverture Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 930
Fresh crush of leaves. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 937a
Our pillows; and the fresh to-morrow morn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 23
Ye tight little fairy, just fresh from the dairy, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 3
She gaz'd into the fresh -thrown mould, as though Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 361
But every morn of woodbine fresh Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 17
Again the Stranger sighings fresh did waste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 8
Again thou stranger gav'st me fresh alarm- Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 12
O'er fresh transgression. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 30
Of Haydon's in its fresh magnificence. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 69
Just fresh from the banquet of Comus! Spirit here that reignest, Line 20
So on our heels a fresh perfection treads, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 212
Fresh hatch'd in my ambition's eagle-nest; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 41
Empurple fresh the melancholy blood: Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 182
Like crannied vermin,- no! but fresh , and young, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 84
Erminia's fresh puppet! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 102a
Fresh anchor'd; whither he had been awhile Lamia, Part I, Line 226
He might have given the moral a fresh frown, Lamia, Part II, Line 8
Fresh carved cedar, mimicking a glade Lamia, Part II, Line 125
Among the fresh arrivals in our empery. The Jealousies, Line 189
 
FRESHENING........4
The quaintly carv'd seats, and freshening shades; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 6
Saving when, with freshening lave, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 31
O think how sweet to me the freshening sluice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 326
To taste the gentle moon, and freshening beads, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 110
 
FRESHER...........2
Fresher than berries of a mountain tree? Sleep and Poetry, Line 20
Wheel downward come they into fresher skies, Sleep and Poetry, Line 131
 
FRESHEST..........1
While, in my face, the freshest breeze I caught. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 122
 
FRESHET...........1
To one so friendless the clear freshet yields Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 34
 
FRESHETS..........1
Keeps head against the freshets . Sick and wan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 213
 
FRESHLY...........6
Of bean blossoms, in heaven freshly shed. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 96
That freshly terminate in open plains, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 116
The honied lines do freshly interlace, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 2
With streams that deepen freshly into bowers. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 48
Large honey-combs of green, and freshly teem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 667
To Corinth from the shore; for freshly blew Lamia, Part I, Line 222
 
FRESHNESS.........6
Than the pure freshness of thy laurels green. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 54
And sips its freshness from the little rills; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 91
Catches his freshness from archangel's wing: Addressed to the Same, Line 4
The while they cool themselves, they freshness give, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 83
The freshness of the space of heaven above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 85
And take the flattering freshness of the air, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 2
 
FRESHNESSES.......1
To where the hurrying freshnesses aye preach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 70
 
FRET..............9
Had brought me a gem from the fret -work of heaven; To Some Ladies, Line 18
To fret at myriads of earthly wrecks. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 776
At which we start and fret ; till in the end, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 809
May rage, and foam, and fret , but never can Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 7
O fret not after knowledge - I have none, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 9
O fret not after knowledge - I have none, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 11
The shafted arch and carved fret O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 3
The weariness, the fever, and the fret Ode to a Nightingale, Line 23
Caught up his little legs, and, in a fret , The Jealousies, Line 201
 
FRETFUL...........2
"No one at home!" the fretful Princess cry'd, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 9
The little thunder of your fretful tongue, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 60
 
FRETS.............1
Of flesh and bone, curbs, and confines, and frets Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 21
 
FRETTED...........4
And that bright lance, against the fretted wall, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 37
Islands, and creeks, and amber- fretted strands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 743
She fretted for the golden hour, and hung Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 243
The fretted splendour of each nook and niche. Lamia, Part II, Line 137
 
FRETTING..........1
They stay their crystal fretting , In drear nighted December, Line 14
 
FRETWORK..........1
His diamond path with fretwork , streaming round Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 608
 
FRIAR.............3
With random friar , or rake upon his tour, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 21
To-night I'll have my friar ,- let me think Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 24
And I must sit to supper with my friar . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 71
 
FRIARS............1
And what the friars bade him bring, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 87
 
FRIEDBURG.........6
The Castle of Friedburg , its vicinity, and the Hungarian Camp Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, SCENE
How is Friedburg honoured! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 184b
Let us to Friedburg castle. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 132
I follow you to Friedburg , - is't not so? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 140
Command an escort to the Friedburg lines. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 150
I follow you to Friedburg with all speed. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 153
 
FRIEND............26
Bless Cynthia's face, the enthusiast's friend : To Some Ladies, Line 4
Too partial friend ! fain would I follow thee To George Felton Mathew, Line 11
And warm thy sons!" Ah, my dear friend and brother, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 109
By this, friend Charles, you may full plainly see To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 21
Again I shake your hand,- friend Charles, good night. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 132
Of poesy, that it should be a friend Sleep and Poetry, Line 246
With every friend and fellow-woodlander- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 893
I am a friend to love, to loves of yore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 300
"I would have thee my only friend , sweet maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 849
TO A FRIEND Robin Hood, Epigraph
Unto my friend , while sick and ill he lies. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 32
This morn, my friend , and yester evening taught To J.R., Line 13
Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 48
SIGIFRED, an Officer, friend of Ludolph Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 5
Now I am Otho's favorite, his dear friend , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 43
For that I am your friend . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 149a
My friend had held poor Ludolph's honour dear. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 63
And lick the soiled grass? No, no, my friend , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 70
Why should he be so earnest? Come, my friend , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 131
Or friend ,- or brother,- or all ties of blood,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 64
For old serge hangings,- me, your humble friend , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 36
I am your friend ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 44b
My father keeps away. Good friend - ah! Sigifred?- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 110
Had not a friend . So being left alone, Lamia, Part II, Line 111
"Alas, my friend ! your coat sits very well: Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 18
Close bosom- friend of the maturing sun; To Autumn, Line 2
 
FRIENDES..........1
Whanne thate hir friendes thinke hem bound The Eve of St. Mark, Line 101
 
FRIENDLESS........1
To one so friendless the clear freshet yields Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 34
 
FRIENDLINESS......4
Whisper'd of peace, and truth, and friendliness unquell'd. To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 14
For I am brimfull of the friendliness Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 9
And friendliness , the nurse of mutual good; Sleep and Poetry, Line 318
And with a sort of lackeying friendliness King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 42
 
FRIENDLY..........5
And can I e'er repay the friendly debt? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 77
I turn full hearted to the friendly aids Sleep and Poetry, Line 316
Of friendly voices had just given place Sleep and Poetry, Line 351
Some friendly monster, pitying my sad state, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 350
What then! No tidings of my friendly Arab? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 36
 
FRIENDS...........20
With you, kindest friends , in idea I muse; To Some Ladies, Line 6
Friends very dear to him he soon will see; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 58
Of their dear friends , nigh foolish with delight; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 228
His friends , the dearest. Hushing signs she made, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 409
The poet's harp - the voice of friends - the sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 165
Our friends will all be there from nigh and far. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 835
Far under-ground, a sleeper meets his friends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 894
To all his friends , and they believe him not. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 66
"This cheers our fallen house: come to our friends , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 150
Are huddling undistinguish'd, my dear friends Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 128
Enquire of friends and kinsfolk; how they fared Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 18
And wonder at her, friends , she is so fair; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 60
Muffling his face, of greeting friends in fear, Lamia, Part I, Line 362
Let my foes choke, and my friends shout afar, Lamia, Part II, Line 62
Or friends or kinsfolk on the citied earth, Lamia, Part II, Line 90
"I have no friends ," said Lamia, "no, not one; Lamia, Part II, Line 92
Of younger friends ; yet must I do this wrong, Lamia, Part II, Line 168
On the high couch he lay!- his friends came round- Lamia, Part II, Line 309
Dungeoner of my friends , that wicked strand What can I do to drive away, Line 32
But we must plague him in the flank,- hey, friends ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 18
 
FRIENDSHIP........3
Is made of love and friendship , and sits high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 801
Is friendship , whence there ever issues forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 804
I have a soldier's friendship for your fame. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 55
 
FRIEZE............1
Pillars, and frieze , and high fantastic roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 624
 
FRIGHT............15
Should sad Despondency my musings fright , To Hope, Line 9
And fright him as the morning frightens night! To Hope, Line 18
And my slain spirit, overwrought with fright , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 559
By Daphne's fright , behold Apollo!-" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 611a
His own particular fright , so these three felt: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 890
From fright of dim espial. Safe at last, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 185
Fright and perplex, so also shuddered he- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 170
Should fright her silken casements, and dismay Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 4
A word to fright the proudest spirit here!- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 68
That Lycius could not love in half a fright , Lamia, Part I, Line 335
In trembling dotage to the feeblest fright Lamia, Part II, Line 283
Fright and perplex, so also shudders he: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 19
Would fright a Dryad; whose harsh herbaged meads What can I do to drive away, Line 40
Could reach your dastard ears and fright you more! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 8
What is the monstrous bugbear that can fright King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 20
 
FRIGHT'NING.......1
The thorny sharks from hiding-holes, and fright'ning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 89
 
FRIGHTED..........1
Frighted away the Dryads and the Fauns Lamia, Part I, Line 5
 
FRIGHTEN..........2
That ought to frighten into hooded shame Addressed to Haydon, Line 7
Frighten the wolves! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 57a
 
FRIGHTEN'D........2
O, I am frighten'd with most hateful thoughts! Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 1
And as she would be frighten'd wide awake The Jealousies, Line 488
 
FRIGHTENING.......1
The trade of frightening ; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 70
 
FRIGHTENS.........1
And fright him as the morning frightens night! To Hope, Line 18
 
FRIGHTFUL.........3
And straightway into frightful eddies swoop'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 648
In frightful scarlet, and its thorns out-grown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 697
Than with a frightful scream she vanished: Lamia, Part II, Line 306
 
FRILL.............2
From pleated lawn- frill fine and thin The Eve of St. Mark, Line 53
Frill -rumpling elbows brew up many a bother, The Jealousies, Line 773
 
FRING'D...........1
What leaf- fring'd legend haunts about thy shape Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 5
 
FRINGE............3
An untumultuous fringe of silver foam Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 91
Broad golden fringe upon the carpet lies: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 285
And, with thine infant fingers, lift the fringe Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
 
FRINGED...........3
Pointed its beak over the fringed bank; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 424
Those same full fringed lids a constant blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 563
Pointed each fringed lash; the smeared loam Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 405
 
FRINGES...........1
Hid in the fringes of your eyelids white- On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 3
 
FRISKY............1
At swelling apples with a frisky leap Sleep and Poetry, Line 361
 
FRO...............8
And long he travers'd to and fro , to acquaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 269
The fair assembly wander'd to and fro , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 804
Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 2
From hurry to and fro . Soon, up aloft, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 30
Sway'd here and there, commanded to and fro , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 2
What in thy brain so ferments to and fro ."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 290
Swayed to and fro by every wind and tide? To Fanny, Line 38
For all corn! thou snail-creeper to and fro , The Jealousies, Line 236
 
FRONT.............5
About her majesty, and front death-pale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 642
And it hath furrow'd that large front : yet now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 961
Peers like the front of Saturn. Who had power Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 102
But now you have, with such a brazen front , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 226
If shame can on a soldier's vein-swoll'n front King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 1
 
FRONTED...........1
Why pierce high- fronted honour to the quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 759
 
FRONTIER..........1
Over the fiery frontier of my realms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 247
 
FROST.............7
On a lone winter evening, when the frost On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 10
Who came unmaimed from the Russian frost . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 23
She will bring, in spite of frost , Fancy, Line 29
Solution sweet: meantime the frost -wind blows The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 322
Frost or flame, or sparks, or sleet Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 76
A frost upon his summer! King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 57a
So that his frost -white eyebrows, beetling low, The Jealousies, Line 506
 
FROSTED...........3
Frosted the springing verdure of his heart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 188
His rosary, and while his frosted breath, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 6
Whose rank-grown forests, frosted , black, and blind, What can I do to drive away, Line 39
 
FROSTY............2
In Autumn's sickle, Winter frosty hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 423
Frosty creatures of the sky! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 88
 
FROTH.............2
Large froth before me, while there yet remain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 613
And see the spangly gloom froth up and boil: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 326
 
FROTHY............1
Or to tread breathless round the frothy main, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 270
 
FROWN.............13
And frown , to drive fair Cheerfulness away, To Hope, Line 10
Convuls'd and headlong! Stay! an inward frown Sleep and Poetry, Line 304
At nothing; just as though the earnest frown Sleep and Poetry, Line 382
Or "Go"? This very moment I would frown To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 11
A vulture from his towery perching; frown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 535
And, while beneath the evening's sleepy frown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 140
How to frown and how to chide; Fancy, Line 83
That was before our brows were taught to frown , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 339
My lord, I was a vassal to your frown , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 24
Or the mad-fumed wine-? Nay, do not frown , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 35
He might have given the moral a fresh frown , Lamia, Part II, Line 8
He said, smack'd his moist lips, and gave a pleasant frown . The Jealousies, Line 423
Then the magician solemnly 'gan frown , The Jealousies, Line 505
 
FROWN'D...........3
The Thunderer frown'd and frown'd; God of the golden bow, Line 14
The Thunderer frown'd and frown'd ; God of the golden bow, Line 14
She frown'd ; a monstrous owl across us flies The Jealousies, Line 655
 
FROWNEST..........1
Thou frownest , and old Eolus thy foe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 951
 
FROWNING..........3
Oft have you seen a swan superbly frowning , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 1
stage, bowing with respect to LUDOLPH, he frowning on them. CONRAD follows. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
Talks off the mighty frowning from his brow, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 43
 
FROWNS............3
To smiles and frowns ; they seem a lifted mound Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 39
And two or three frowns Two or three posies, Line 22
And ev'ry passer in he frowns upon, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 65
 
FROZE.............2
Pure as the ice-drop that froze on the mountain? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 2
A voice, he had been froze to senseless stone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 200
 
FROZEN............10
Frozen in that old tale Arabian. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 406
Dissolve the frozen purity of air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 586
Nor frozen thawings glue them In drear nighted December, Line 7
About the frozen time. In drear nighted December, Line 16
Frozen north, and chilling east, Robin Hood, Line 7
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 3
The frozen God still couchant on the earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 87
Keep ye with your frozen breath, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 65
Melts out the frozen incense from all flowers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 99
The frozen God still bending to the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 386
 
FRUIT.............12
Aye dropping their hard fruit upon the ground. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 41
Budding - fruit ripening in stillness - autumn suns After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 10
That flowers would bloom, or that green fruit would swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 836
And make my branches lift a golden fruit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 908
Her voice I hung like fruit among green leaves: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 271
Hang in thy vision like a tempting fruit , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 442
The bitter-sweet of this Shaksperean fruit . On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 8
The grass, the thicket, and the fruit -tree wild; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 45
Bearing a fruit more precious! graceful thing, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 83
She plucks the fruit unseen, she bathes unseen: Lamia, Part I, Line 99
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To Autumn, Line 4
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To Autumn, Line 6
 
FRUITAGE..........2
Their ripen'd fruitage ; yellow girted bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 253
Autumn's red-lipp'd fruitage too, Fancy, Line 13
 
FRUITFUL..........2
We call thee fruitful , and, that very while, To the Nile, Line 3
Art thou so fruitful ? or dost thou beguile To the Nile, Line 6
 
FRUITFULNESS......1
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness , To Autumn, Line 1
 
FRUITLESS.........1
Thinking on rugged hours and fruitless toil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 324
 
FRUITS............10
Into o'erhanging boughs, and precious fruits . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 66
Time's sweet first- fruits - they danc'd to weariness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 321
Ripe fruits , and lonely couch, contentment gave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 968
On forest- fruits , and never, never go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 627
Or are the fruits of Paradise Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 7
Of fruits , and flowers, and bunches of knot-grass, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 210
And at the fruits thereof what shapes they be, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 315
Light, the first fruits of that intestine broil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 192
Of moss, was spread a feast of summer fruits , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 29
"Eban," said he, "as slaves should taste the fruits The Jealousies, Line 353
 
FRY...............1
Then will the dragons fry and fizz their best, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 60
 
FUDDLED...........1
That, being fuddled , he went reeling through The Jealousies, Line 624
 
FULFIL............1
Time's creeping shall the dreary space fulfil : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 706
 
FULL..............137
Full many the glories that brighten thy youth! On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 18
Full many the glories that brighten thy youth; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 42
O come, dearest Emma! the rose is full blown, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 1
Inconstant, childish, proud, and full of fancies; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 2
Full , and round like globes that rise Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 21
Which seem'd full loath this happy world to leave: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 4
Full in the smile of the blue firmament. To one who has been long in city pent, Line 4
Full often dropping a delicious tear, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 13
Full many a dreary hour have I past, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 1
A bunch of violets full blown, and double, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 92
Full joy I feel, while thus I cleave the air, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 107
By this, friend Charles, you may full plainly see To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 21
And full of many wonders of the spheres: On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 12
Is a full harvest whence to reap high feeling; To Kosciusko, Line 2
"As I lay in my bed slepe full unmete/ Was unto me, but why that I Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
More full of visions than a high romance? Sleep and Poetry, Line 10
I turn full hearted to the friendly aids Sleep and Poetry, Line 316
What Psyche felt, and Love, when their full lips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 143
Full of sweet desolation - balmy pain. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 162
Full in the speculation of the stars. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 189
And soothed them into slumbers full and deep. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 224
So that he here and there full hearted stops; This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 4
Let him with this sweet tale full often seek On The Story of Rimini, Line 3
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 5
Therefore, 'tis with full happiness that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 34
Full in the middle of this pleasantness Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 89
A venerable priest full soberly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 149
And in his left he held a basket full Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 155
Echoing grottos, full of tumbling waves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 459
Were full of pestilent light; our taintless rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 694
Full palatable; and a colour grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 767
Full alchemiz'd, and free of space. Behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 780
Full of light, incense, tender minstrelsy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 390
Full soothingly to every nested finch: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 504
Look full upon it feel anon the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 543
Those same full fringed lids a constant blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 563
Full well I feel thou wouldst not leave me. Still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 751
As bees gorge full their cells. And, by the feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 40
How chang'd, how full of ache, how gone in woe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 80
My goblet full of wine - my topmost deed:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 168
O, I am full of gladness! Sisters three, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 251
I bow full hearted to your old decree! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 252
Nor be my desolation; and, full oft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 345
Budded, and swell'd, and, full -blown, shed full showers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 799
Budded, and swell'd, and, full-blown, shed full showers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 799
A full accomplishment! The thing is done, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 18
To what my own full thoughts had made too tender, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 74
O pardon me, for I am full of grief- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 107
Outblackens Erebus, and the full -cavern'd earth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 121
About the crisped oaks full drearily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 295
Their full -veined ears, nostrils blood wide, and stop; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 400
To divine powers: from his hand full fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 409
A full -brimm'd goblet, dances lightly, sings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 416
Full facing their swift flight, from ebon streak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 496
And honeysuckles full of clear bee-wine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 698
The vesper hymn, far swollen, soft and full , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 967
Full golden; in her eyes a brighter day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 985
Dawn'd in blue and full of love. Aye, he beheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 986
Hold like rich garners the full ripen'd grain; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 4
Pines, and lime-trees full in bloom, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 32
But her full shape would all his seeing fill; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 12
Lay full of darts; for them alone did seethe Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 117
He heard a laugh full musical aloft; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 198
"I know what was, I feel full well what is, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 313
When the full morning came, she had devised Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 337
Full hard against the moon. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 16
She died full long agone! Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 30
Full of vowels There was a naughty boy, Line 8
She turn'd her dazed head full oft, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 29
An' every heart is full on flame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 39
For meet adornment a full thousand years; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 2
Full blown, and such warmth for the morning take; Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 22
As she had heard old dames full many times declare. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 45
Full of this whim was thoughtful Madeline: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 55
Sudden a thought came like a full -blown rose, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 136
Full on this casement shone the wintry moon, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 217
By one, and one, the bolts full easy slide:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 367
Full leav'd, the forest had outstript, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 45
And slant book full against the glare. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 72
And touch'd the wards; the door full courteously When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 71
Or nantz, or cherry brandy, drank full meek Character of C.B., Line 22
As thus she quick-voic'd spake, yet full of awe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 149
After the full completion of fair day,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 191
Amaz'd and full of fear; like anxious men Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 198
Stood full blown, for the God to enter in. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 212
He enter'd, but he enter'd full of wrath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 213
To the eastern gates, and full six dewy hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 264
His tongue with the full weight of utterless thought, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 120
Full of calm joy it was, as I of grief; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 265
Too full of joy and soft delicious warmth; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 266
Not savage, for he saw full many a God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 350
Full ankle-deep in lilies of the vale. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 35
The squirrel's granary is full , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 7
Full beautiful, a fairy's child; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 14
And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 30
Singest of summer in full -throated ease. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 10
O for a beaker full of the warm South, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 15
Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 16
Where but to think is to be full of sorrow Ode to a Nightingale, Line 27
The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 49
Have fallen full frequent from our Emperor's lips, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 127
A full -heaped helmet of the purest gold. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 42
Yet I am griev'd at it, to the full height, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 74
Heard his loud laugh, and answer'd in full choir. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 51
You know full well what makes me look so pale. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 112
He is so full of grief and passionate wrath; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 18
His heart is full , it can contain no more, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 23
Skies full of splendid moons, and shooting stars, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 45
Indeed full time we slept; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 51b
Full and majestic; it is well enough, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 83
Pensive, and full of painful jealousies Lamia, Part I, Line 33
The taller grasses and full -flowering weed, Lamia, Part I, Line 44
And full of silver moons, that, as she breathed, Lamia, Part I, Line 51
Full of adoring tears and blandishment, Lamia, Part I, Line 135
A full -born beauty new and exquisite? Lamia, Part I, Line 172
And still the cup was full ,- while he, afraid Lamia, Part I, Line 253
Had felt the cold full sponge to pleasure press'd, Lamia, Part II, Line 192
Full brimm'd, and opposite sent forth a look Lamia, Part II, Line 242
Full on the alarmed beauty of the bride, Lamia, Part II, Line 247
And full -grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; To Autumn, Line 30
Drank. That full draught is parent of my theme. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 46
After the full completion of fair day, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 35
Amaz'd, and full of fear; like anxious men The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 42
Of stifling numbers ebbs from my full breast. To Fanny, Line 4
The streets are full of music- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 28a
Spleen-hearted came in full career at him. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 43
Just when your knighthood is grown ripe and full King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 37
Full soldier as he is, and without peer King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 31
His limbs upon a sofa, full of spleen, The Jealousies, Line 134
Louted full low, and hoarsely did him greet: The Jealousies, Line 256
A thimble- full of old Jamaica rum." The Jealousies, Line 363
Holding it by his thumb and finger full in view. The Jealousies, Line 441
Then the great Emperor full graceful set The Jealousies, Line 566
The morn was full of holiday; loud bells The Jealousies, Line 568
For pleasure?)- the fair Princess in full view, The Jealousies, Line 592
This room is full of jewels as a mine,- The Jealousies, Line 616
Gentle and tender, full of soft conceits, The Jealousies, Line 633
 
FULLY.............2
Among the throng. His youth was fully blown, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 169
One glance did fully all its secrets tell; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 362
 
FULNESS...........1
How "love doth know no fulness nor no bounds." Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 12
 
FUME..............1
Drows'd with the fume of poppies, while thy hook To Autumn, Line 17
 
FUMED.............1
Or the mad- fumed wine-? Nay, do not frown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 35
 
FUMING............1
Before each lucid pannel fuming stood Lamia, Part II, Line 175
 
FUN...............3
With his delights; for when tired out with fun On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 7
Or is't his custom, in the name of fun ?" The Jealousies, Line 303
About this time,- a sad old figure of fun ; The Jealousies, Line 656
 
FUNERAL...........5
The while he tells of grief, around a funeral pyre. Ode to Apollo, Line 17
Uttering the while some mumblings funeral . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 748
Funeral and steeple-chime; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 11
To see scull, coffin'd bones, and funeral stole; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 356
"Fam'd in funeral minstrelsy. Not Aladdin magian, Line 26
 
FUR...............2
Still is that fur as soft as when the lists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 13
Where the close eye in deep rich fur might trace The Jealousies, Line 345
 
FURBISH...........1
Furbish his jingling baldric while he sleeps, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 82
 
FURIOUS...........1
Furious fire! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102b
 
FURL'D............1
My ship of fortune furl'd her silken sails,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 5
 
FURNACE...........1
Plaited upon his furnace -scorched brow: The Jealousies, Line 508
 
FURNITURE.........1
conjectures, found her out to be a serpent, a lamia; and that all her furniture Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
FURR'D............1
And silken furr'd Angora cat. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 82
 
FURROW............1
Or on a half-reap'd furrow sound asleep, To Autumn, Line 16
 
FURROW'D..........3
Furrow'd deep wrinkles in his forehead large, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 223
This furrow'd visage thou hadst never seen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 448
And it hath furrow'd that large front: yet now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 961
 
FURROWING.........1
No rheumed eyes, no furrowing of age, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 82
 
FURROWS...........1
Where furrows are new to the plough. Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 8
 
FURS..............1
"Mounted on panthers' furs and lions' manes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 251
 
FURTHER...........13
As if for joy he would no further seek; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 98
Yet further off, are dimly seen their bowers, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 43
My wand'ring spirit must no further soar.- I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 242
Art thou wayworn, or canst not further trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 651
One step? Imagine further , line by line, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 733
Enough! why need I further pore? O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 91
No further than to where his feet had stray'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 16
Go no further ; not a step more. Thou art Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 1
Indeed, indeed I cannot trace them further . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 17
Of her high phrase: perhaps no further dare. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 468
"I'll pull the string," said he, and further said, The Jealousies, Line 226
Seeing his servant can no further drive The Jealousies, Line 258
Hark! hark! the bells!" "A little further get, The Jealousies, Line 564
 
FURTHERMORE.......2
To shepherds and their flocks; and furthermore , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 832
And, furthermore , her brethren wonder'd much Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 457
 
FURY..............6
I saw a fury whetting a death-dart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 558
That silent fury , whose fell scymitar Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 21
Prevail against my fury . Damned priest! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 170
Fear'st thou not my fury , monk? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 237b
Fine was the mitigated fury , like Lamia, Part II, Line 78
Sparkling revenge with amorous fury blent. The Jealousies, Line 175
 
FURZE.............2
Blue hare-bells lightly, and where prickly furze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 202
Where the golden furze For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 16
 
FUSS..............1
So without any fuss , any hawing and humming, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 11
 
FUTURE............1
My future days to her fane consecrate." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 888
 
FUTURITY..........2
To clear futurity his darling fame! Sleep and Poetry, Line 359
And mad with glimpses at futurity ! Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 31


Published @ RC

March 2005