Gn-Go - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
GNARLED...........2
As over them a gnarled staff she shook. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 508
Honey from out the gnarled hive I'll bring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 682
 
GNAT..............2
Of grass, a wailful gnat , a bee bustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 450
So act the lion with this silly gnat ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 223
 
GNATS.............2
Quick waterflies and gnats were sporting still, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 135
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn To Autumn, Line 27
 
GNAWING...........4
Clings cruelly to us, like the gnawing sloth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 907
Sense of the gnawing fire at heart and brain. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 272
A gnawing - silent - deadly, quiet death! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 23
I feel her gnawing here!- Let her but vanish, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 160
 
GNOMED............1
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine- Lamia, Part II, Line 236
 
GNOMES............1
Then black gnomes scattering sixpences like rain; The Jealousies, Line 583
 
GO................63
Go glad and smilingly athwart the gloom; Sleep and Poetry, Line 146
That 'tis their sighing, wailing ere they go Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 12
Or " Go "? This very moment I would frown To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 11
Sigh thou mayest, but bid it go Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 3
More suddenly than doth a moment go , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1021
With new-born life! What shall I do? Where go , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 239
Thou shalt not go the way of aged men; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 596
On forest-fruits, and never, never go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 627
See, through the trees, a little river go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 680
That those deceptions which for pleasure go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 851
You may go , with sun or moon, Robin Hood, Line 20
And when maidens go a maying, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 3
But my lady first did go ,- Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 10
Then who would go For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 37
The pipes go shrilly, the libation flows: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 22
Go , shed one tear upon my heather-bloom, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 303
And I should rage, if spirits could go mad; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 314
Through bronzed lyre in tragic order go , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 443
For seldom did she go to chapel-shrift, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 467
And go There was a naughty boy, Line 71
And now I on will go . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 36
No, not a stone, or I shall go in fits- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 39
A vein of sulphur - go , dear Red-Crag, go- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 49
A vein of sulphur - go, dear Red-Crag, go - Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 49
Go thither quick and so complete my joy. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 56
Go , pretty page, and in her ear Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 8
Go , pretty page, and soothly tell,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 12
From wicked men like thee. Go , go!- I deem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 143
From wicked men like thee. Go, go !- I deem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 143
For if thou diest, my love, I know not where to go ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 315
Give me the picklock, sirrah, and go play." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 64
Shall we leave these and go seek Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 68
Go feed on icicles, while we Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 91
No, no, go not to Lethe, neither twist Ode on Melancholy, Line 1
You'll not be perjured! Go to Albert then, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 79
Go , page his dusty heels upon a march, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 81
Albert, go thou and bear him company. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 156
Go - I follow you. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 129b
Your hand - I go ! Ha! here the thunder comes Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 57
But, Ludolph, ere you go , I would enquire Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 118
Shall I go myself? Monstrous wickedness! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 3
[They go in and return. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 68b
From these bright revelries; go , show yourself, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 53
You - go to your sister there and plot again, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 65
Go ! conquer Italy! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 156a
Good, good; he dies. You go , say you? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 181b
Go no further; not a step more. Thou art Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 1
Go ,- I fear thee! I tremble every limb, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 3
To pray thee far away! Conrad, go ! go!- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 6
To pray thee far away! Conrad, go! go !- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 6
Go , go,- no blood! no blood!- go, gentle Conrad! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 9
Go, go ,- no blood! no blood!- go, gentle Conrad! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 9
Go, go,- no blood! no blood!- go , gentle Conrad! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 9
Humour him to the height. I fear to go ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 52
The day is not quite done. Go , bring them hither. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 116
Youngster! Page! go bid them drag her to me! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 178
Who go on to Corinth from Cenchreas' shore; Lamia, Part I, Line 174
No, no, you have dismiss'd me; and I go Lamia, Part II, Line 44
Imperial Elfinan, go hang thyself or drown! The Jealousies, Line 144
"At the same time, Eban, this instant go The Jealousies, Line 187
And evermore thy steps go clatter-clitter; The Jealousies, Line 231
And fiddle-faddle standest while you go ; The Jealousies, Line 238
See, past the skirts of yon white cloud they go , The Jealousies, Line 553
 
GOADED............1
Of the goaded world; and Kosciusko's worn Sleep and Poetry, Line 387
 
GOAL..............5
Its airy goal , haply some bower veils Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 192
The goal of consciousness? Ah, 'tis the thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 283
Fancy is dead and drunken at its goal ; This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 8
Though winning near the goal - yet, do not grieve; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 18
Points level to the goal of victory. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 23
 
GOBI..............1
Above the plains of Gobi ,- desert, bleak; The Jealousies, Line 659
 
GOBLET............10
Hast thou a goblet for dark sparkling wine? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 5
That goblet right heavy, and massy, and gold? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 6
A shell for Neptune's goblet : she did soar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 593
My goblet full of wine - my topmost deed:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 168
Thy venom'd goblet will we quaff until Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 988
A full-brimm'd goblet , dances lightly, sings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 416
While she held the goblet sweet, Fancy, Line 88
Let the red wine within the goblet boil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 18
Fill, fill my goblet ,- here's a Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ludolph, Line 39
In a deep goblet : let me see - what wine? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 120
 
GOBLETS...........3
Their rich brimm'd goblets , that incessant run To My Brother George (epistle), Line 39
And precious goblets that make rich the wine. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
Of cups and goblets , and the store thrice told Lamia, Part II, Line 186
 
GOD...............52
From thee, great God of Bards, receive their heavenly birth. Ode to Apollo, Line 47
God ! she is like a milk-white lamb that bleats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 31
To where the great God lives for evermore. To Kosciusko, Line 14
God of the golden bow, God of the golden bow, Line 1
Our vows are wanting to our great god Pan. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 213
With wine, in honour of the shepherd- god . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 226
Most like a sojourning demi- god , and leave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 724
Where all that beauty snar'd me."- Cruel god , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 952
Yes, every god be thank'd, and power benign, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 253
Shouted the new born god ; "Follow, and pay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 807
God Neptune's palaces!" With noise increas'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 834
God of warm pulses, and dishevell'd hair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 984
Great God of breathless cups and chirping mirth!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 236
And to god Phoebus, for a golden lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 702
God of the meridian! God of the meridian, Line 1
Of madness?- God of Song, God of the meridian, Line 17
God rest her aged bones somewhere- Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 29
Ere the God of Torment taught her Fancy, Line 82
The music, yearning like a god in pain, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 56
Gif thate the modre ( God her blesse) The Eve of St. Mark, Line 105
No god , no demon of severe response, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 2
Knows thee not, thus afflicted, for a God ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 56
The frozen God still couchant on the earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 87
From man to the sun's God ; yet unsecure: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 168
Stood full blown, for the God to enter in. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 212
He might not:- No, though a primeval God : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 292
As thou canst move about, an evident God ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 338
There saw she direst strife; the supreme God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 92
"Titans, behold your God !" at which some groan'd; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 110
Among immortals when a God gives sign, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 118
So ended Saturn; and the God of the Sea, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 167
Have ye beheld the young God of the Seas, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 232
Not savage, for he saw full many a God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 350
Knowledge enormous makes a God of me. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 113
And so become immortal."- Thus the God , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 120
God save illustrious Otho! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 6b
Large as a god speak out, where all is thine. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 135
Thank God for that! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 190a
The God , dove-footed, glided silently Lamia, Part I, Line 42
Return'd the snake, "but seal with oaths, fair God !" Lamia, Part I, Line 88
Then, once again, the charmed God began Lamia, Part I, Line 112
The God on half-shut feathers sank serene, Lamia, Part I, Line 123
But the God fostering her chilled hand, Lamia, Part I, Line 140
Or where God Bacchus drains his cups divine, Lamia, Part I, Line 209
Each shrining in the midst the image of a God . Lamia, Part II, Line 190
Soon was God Bacchus at meridian height; Lamia, Part II, Line 213
To see as a God sees, and take the depth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 304
Knows thee not, so afflicted, for a God ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 358
The frozen God still bending to the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 386
Have chang'd a God into a shaking palsy. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 426
From man to the Sun's God : yet unsecure; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 17
God save the Empress. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 19a
 
GOD'S.............4
A gold-green zenith 'bove the Sea- God's head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 878
From the God's large eyes; he smil'd delectable, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 901
God's help! my lady fair the conjuror plays The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 124
Ever exalted at the God's approach: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 285
 
GODDESS...........29
Dear goddess , help! or the wide-gaping air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 194
Young goddess ! let me see my native bowers! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 331
By telling how the sea-born goddess pin'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 458
Thee, gentle Goddess of my pilgrimage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1014
How his own goddess was past all things fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 190
In human accent: ' Potent goddess ! chief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 539
Have mercy, Goddess ! Circe, feel my prayer!' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 554
The ooze-born Goddess beckoned and drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 893
Thus the fair goddess : while Endymion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 922
Of goddess Cyntherea! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 975
Goddess ! I love thee not the less: from thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 92
His very goddess : good-bye earth, and sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 431
The Latmian started up: "Bright goddess , stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 457
His fate most goddess -like. Help me, I pray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 844
Before his goddess , in a blissful swoon. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 999
She was a Goddess of the infant world; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 26
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 88
And that fair kneeling Goddess ; and then spake, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 92
With solemn step an awful Goddess came, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 46
Goddess ! I have beheld those eyes before, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 59
Goddess benign, point forth some unknown thing: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 95
O tell me, lonely Goddess , by the harp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 108
O Goddess ! hear these tuneless numbers, wrung Ode to Psyche, Line 1
"Leave thee alone! Look back! Ah, Goddess , see Lamia, Part I, Line 257
So threw the goddess off, and won his heart Lamia, Part I, Line 336
This saw that Goddess , and with sacred hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 255
I mark'd the goddess in fair statuary The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 336
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 387
And that fair kneeling Goddess at his feet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 403
 
GODDESSES.........2
Of these, thy brethren and the Goddesses ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 320
Of the sweets of Fairies, Peris, Goddesses , Lamia, Part I, Line 329
 
GODDIS............1
Of Goddis love and Sathan's force The Eve of St. Mark, Line 108
 
GODLIKE...........5
Of godlike hardship tells me I must die On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 4
And buried from all godlike exercise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 107
His voice leapt out, despite of godlike curb, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 226
Delicate, godlike , magic! must I leave Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 84
And buried from all godlike exercise The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 413
 
GODS..............34
Like whispers of the household gods that keep To My Brothers, Line 3
And from all serious Gods ; that our delight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 785
Until the gods through heaven's blue look out!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 268
Yet I would have, great gods ! but one short hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 36
Beheld awake his very dream: the gods Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 436
Tame on thy finger; to the River- gods , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 707
Thank the great gods , and look not bitterly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 807
Be gods of your own rest imperial. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 823
That gods might know my own particular taste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 4
To that large utterance of the early Gods ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 51
There must be Gods thrown down, and trumpets blown Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 127
Unseen before by Gods or wondering men, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 183
Not heard before by Gods or wondering men. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 185
For I have seen my sons most unlike Gods . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 328
Unruffled, like high Gods , ye liv'd and ruled: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 331
Not long delay'd, that scar'd the younger Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 71
The first-born of all shap'd and palpable Gods , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 153
What can I? Tell me, all ye brethren Gods , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 160
Which by just right should come of mighty Gods ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 258
Or to the over-foolish, Giant- Gods ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 310
Despondence seiz'd again the fallen Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 379
Saturn sat near the Mother of the Gods , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 389
In whose face was no joy, though all the Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 390
What men or gods are these? What maidens loth? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 8
Good gods ! not else, in any way, my liege! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 111
Good gods ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 26b
Among the gods !- and silence is as natural. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 30
Good gods ! no innocent blood upon my head! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 54
Of the Wood- Gods , and even the very trees. Lamia, Part I, Line 34
Among the Gods , upon Olympus old, Lamia, Part I, Line 71
Real are the dreams of Gods , and smoothly pass Lamia, Part I, Line 127
Of all the Gods , whose dreadful images Lamia, Part II, Line 279
To that large utterance of the early Gods !- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 353
Unown'd of any weedy-haired gods ; What can I do to drive away, Line 36
 
GODSHIPS..........1
Their godships should pass this into a law; Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 2
 
GOES..............18
Now over them he goes with hasty trip, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 69
Patting against the sorrel as she goes . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 98
A ram goes bleating: Winder of the horn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 281
Onward he goes - he stops - his bosom beats Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 355
The sacrifice goes on; the pontif knife Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 20
Divine by loving, and so goes on And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 5
[To one of his Knights, who goes out. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 37b
Who goes there? Count Sigifred? Ha! ha! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 33
[ Goes to the door, listens, and opens it. Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 106
(as he goes ) Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 177
There goes a spotted soul Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 48b
Goes , step for step, with Thea from yon woods, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 46
Is a philosopher the while he goes What can I do to drive away, Line 16
Whose heart goes fluttering for you every where, To Fanny, Line 43
How like a comet he goes streaming on. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 17
He goes on to expose, with heart and soul, The Jealousies, Line 93
Goes off like lightning,- grains of paradise The Jealousies, Line 295
It goes against your conscience - good! Well, don't. The Jealousies, Line 462
 
GOEST.............1
Who while thou goest ever seem'st to stop, The Jealousies, Line 237
 
GOING.............8
necessarily taste in going over the following pages. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
And, therefore, was just going ; when, behold! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 893
Because he knew not whither he was going . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 551
They all are going . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 605
The maidenheads are going . O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 4
Where be ye going , you Devon maid, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 1
twenty-five years of age, that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
The fire is going out, and no one rings Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 6
 
GOLCONDA..........1
Hast thou from the caves of Golconda , a gem On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 1
 
GOLD..............56
In thy western halls of gold Ode to Apollo, Line 1
That goblet right heavy, and massy, and gold ? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 6
How, from a flower, into a fish of gold To George Felton Mathew, Line 85
Which the glad setting sun in gold doth dress; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 35
Who from the feathery gold of evening lean;- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 4
Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold , On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 1
By drawling out - "Ye are that head of gold !" Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 14
With universal tinge of sober gold , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 56
Buds lavish gold ; or ye, whose precious charge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 203
To take in draughts of life from the gold fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 656
The semblance of gold rocks and bright gold sands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 742
The semblance of gold rocks and bright gold sands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 742
Even with mealy gold the waters clear. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 91
Tawny and gold , ooz'd slowly from far lands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 114
Aye, millions sparkled on a vein of gold , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 226
And coverlids gold -tinted like the peach, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 396
Gold dome, and crystal wall, and turquois floor, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 595
Our gold and ripe-ear'd hopes. With not one tinge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 8
When thy gold breath is misting in the west, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 44
On gold sand impearl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 102b
The sway of human hand; gold vase emboss'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 126
Would let me feel their scales of gold and green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 344
Heaven's gates, and Aethon snort his morning gold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 364
Came gold around me, cheering me to cope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 686
A gold -green zenith 'bove the Sea-God's head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 878
All in its mid-day gold and glimmering. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 681
Of gold , and lines of Naiads' long bright tress. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 709
Across the gold autumn's whole kingdoms of corn? Apollo to the Graces, Line 6
The bosomer of clouds gold , grey, and dun. Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 4
Whose matter in bright gold were best be read; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 94
Of some gold tinge, and plays a roundelay Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 252
Gold , black, and heavy, from the lama brought. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 64
A cloth of woven crimson, gold , and jet:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 256
"O tender spouse of gold Hyperion, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 95
Upon the gold clouds metropolitan, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 129
Bastion'd with pyramids of glowing gold , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 177
With all my jewell'd salvers, silver and gold , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 12
A full-heaped helmet of the purest gold . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 42
Whose words once utter'd pass like current gold ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 210
A scorpion, sprawling on the first gold step, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 15
magnificence, with supper-tables, laden with services of gold and silver. A Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Hangings of heaven's clouds, purple and gold , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 36
A deed to be applauded, 'scribed in gold ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 149
I saw thee sitting, on a throne of gold , Lamia, Part I, Line 70
Days happy as the gold coin could invent Lamia, Part I, Line 313
On libbard's paws, upheld the heavy gold Lamia, Part II, Line 185
In baskets of bright osier'd gold were brought Lamia, Part II, Line 217
gold , described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
A grain of gold upon a mountain's side, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 272
From the gold peaks of heaven's high piled clouds; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 434
Bastion'd with pyramids of glowing gold , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 25
His turban wreath'd of gold , and white, and green, The Jealousies, Line 278
Sherry in silver, hock in gold , or glass'd champagne?" The Jealousies, Line 360
He lifted a bright casket of pure gold , The Jealousies, Line 510
Freckled with red and gold the moving swarm; The Jealousies, Line 575
"Dropp'd my gold watch, and kill'd a kettle-drum- The Jealousies, Line 694
 
GOLDEN............98
Whose silken fins and golden scales light Imitation of Spenser, Line 12
As when a cloud a golden moon doth veil, To Lord Byron, Line 9
Than the shell, from the bright golden sands of the ocean To Some Ladies, Line 23
To those who strove with the bright golden wing To George Felton Mathew, Line 63
O'er pebbly crystal, and o'er golden sands; To George Felton Mathew, Line 92
Has placed a golden cuirass there; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 49
When streams of light pour down the golden west, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 2
The golden lyre itself were dimly seen: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 12
The Poet's eye can reach those golden halls, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 35
To see high, golden corn wave in the light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 92
Give me a golden pen, and let me lean On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 1
A butterfly, with golden wings broad parted, Sleep and Poetry, Line 343
Dry up the moisture from your golden lids, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 49
Or perhaps, to show their black, and golden wings, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 91
So in fine wrath some golden sounds he won, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 203
God of the golden bow, God of the golden bow, Line 1
And of the golden lyre, God of the golden bow, Line 2
And of the golden hair, God of the golden bow, Line 3
And of the golden fire, God of the golden bow, Line 4
Their golden honeycombs; our village leas Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 254
There shot a golden splendour far and wide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 350
To golden palaces, strange minstrelsy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 457
When he doth tighten up the golden reins, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 550
Hast thou a symbol of her golden hair? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 609
Edges them round, and they have golden pits: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 875
And golden keel'd, is left unlaunch'd and dry. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 21
A golden butterfly; upon whose wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 61
Golden , or rainbow-sided, or purplish, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 110
With golden moss. His every sense had grown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 671
To nurse the golden age 'mong shepherd clans: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 896
And make my branches lift a golden fruit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 908
My fine existence in a golden clime. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 455
In prospect,- diamond gleams, and golden glows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 837
Whence could be seen, direct, a golden gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 855
Ripe from hue- golden swoons took all the blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 861
Globing a golden sphere. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 887a
To bring thee nearer to that golden song Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 957
For clamour, when the golden palace door Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 991
He tries the nerve of Phoebus' golden bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 411
And asketh where the golden apples grow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 412
Green-kyrtled Spring, flush Summer, golden store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 422
Young Phoebe's, golden hair'd; and so 'gan crave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 451
For all the golden bowers of the day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 564
With fennel green, and balm, and golden pines, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 575
And to god Phoebus, for a golden lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 702
Answering thus, just as the golden morrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 726
"Why such a golden eve? The breeze is sent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 927
Full golden ; in her eyes a brighter day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 985
Through the golden day will sing. Apollo to the Graces, Line 14
O golden -tongued Romance, with serene lute! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 1
Of golden sunshine, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 14
To rise like Phoebus with a golden quell, Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 7
And a golden ring had she, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 14
Where the golden furze For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 16
A golden galley all in silken trim! Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 56
She fretted for the golden hour, and hung Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 243
She calm'd its wild hair with a golden comb, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 403
Exact in capitals your golden name: Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 2
Golden aisled, built up in heaven, Not Aladdin magian, Line 8
With silver saint in golden rays, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 44
Clear, but for golden fishes in the way, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 29
Moon, keep wide thy golden ears; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 10
Slipt its golden clasp, and down Fancy, Line 86
Tales and golden histories Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 21
And scarce three steps, ere Music's golden tongue The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 20
On golden dishes and in baskets bright The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 272
Broad golden fringe upon the carpet lies: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 285
Among its golden broideries; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 28
Cherubim and golden mice. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 38
With golden star, or dagger bright, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 94
Yes, there must be a golden victory; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 126
Jarr'd his own golden region; and before Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 224
But eagles golden -feather'd, who do tower Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 226
With that new blissful golden melody. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 280
Golden his hair of short Numidian curl, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 371
Apollo is once more the golden theme! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 28
Went trickling down the golden bow he held. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 43
Didst find a lyre all golden by thy side, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 63
His very hair, his golden tresses famed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 131
Of the golden -presenc'd sun. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 47
To make our golden fortune known to you. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 24
Can it be, brother? For a golden crown Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 88
Or hug the golden housings of his steed, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 66
Strength to thy virgin crownet's golden buds, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 28
Accursed, blasted! O, thou golden crown, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 78
Sprinkled with golden crescents, others bright Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 88
His golden throne, bent warm on amorous theft: Lamia, Part I, Line 8
Blush'd into roses 'mid his golden hair, Lamia, Part I, Line 25
Vermilion-spotted, golden , green, and blue; Lamia, Part I, Line 48
Spoilt all her silver mail, and golden brede; Lamia, Part I, Line 158
Whose airy texture, from a golden string, Lamia, Part II, Line 19
His spirit pass'd beyond its golden bourn Lamia, Part II, Line 32
Robes, golden tongs, censer, and chafing dish, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 79
About a golden censer from the hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 197
About a golden censer from her hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 219
By this last temple, by the golden age, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 285
Off Glocester's golden dishes - drinks pure wine, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 28
At five the golden light began to spring, The Jealousies, Line 716
 
GOLDFINCHES.......1
Sometimes goldfinches one by one will drop I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 87
 
GONDIBERT.........2
'Tis the far-fam'd, the brave Sir Gondibert , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 122
Sir Gondibert has doff'd his shining steel, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 138
 
GONDOLAS..........1
'Mong the light skimming gondolas far parted, To George Felton Mathew, Line 15
 
GONE..............71
The widening circles into nothing gone . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 18
Into how sweet a trance his soul was gone , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 83
Art thou most lovely? When gone far astray To G.A.W., Line 3
Into most lovely labyrinths will be gone , Sleep and Poetry, Line 266
Of over thinking had that moment gone Sleep and Poetry, Line 383
Their woes gone by, and both to heaven upflown, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 149
Into some wond'rous region he had gone , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 191
Of their star in the east and gone to worship them. To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 14
He's gone - up bubbles all his amorous breath. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 14
Shed one drop then - it is gone - Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 7
The very music of the name has gone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 36
Were dead and gone , and her caressing tongue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 340
'Mong shepherds gone in eld, whose looks increas'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 358
His quick gone love, among fair blossom'd boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 375
And minstrel memories of times gone by. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 435
Of death, for the fair form had gone again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 905
Are gone in tender madness, and anon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 949
And down some swart abysm he had gone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 376
Thou wilt be gone away, and wilt not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 747
The visions of the earth were gone and fled- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1022
In wakeful ears, like uproar past and gone - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 19
How chang'd, how full of ache, how gone in woe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 80
Of gone sea-warriors; brazen beaks and targe; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 124
Till round his wither'd lips had gone a smile. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 225
But she was gone . Whereat the barbed shafts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 480
Ten hundred years: which gone , I then bequeath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 598
Against that hell-born Circe. The crew had gone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 665
To thee! But then I thought on poets gone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 27
Swifter than sight was gone - even before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 337
Exhal'd to Phoebus' lips, away they are gone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 349
Most like with joy gone mad, with sorrow cloy'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 495
Of heroes gone ! Against his proper glory Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 643
My life from too thin breathing: gone and past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 650
At Vesper's earliest twinkle - they are gone - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 915
Will I, grey- gone in passion, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 24
When through the old oak forest I am gone , On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 11
Souls of poets dead and gone , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 1
Souls of poets dead and gone , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 23
No! those days are gone away, Robin Hood, Line 1
Gone , the merry morris din; Robin Hood, Line 33
Gone , the song of Gamelyn; Robin Hood, Line 34
Gone , the tough-belted outlaw Robin Hood, Line 35
All are gone away and past! Robin Hood, Line 37
Gone mad through olden songs and poesies. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 54
And so from happiness I far was gone . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 98
She, to her chamber gone , a ditty fair Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 77
To honour thee, and thy gone spirit greet; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 158
Ah! Marie, they are all gone hame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 41
He might make tremble many a man whose spirit had gone forth There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 27
The hall door shuts again, and all the noise is gone . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 261
And they are gone : ay, ages long ago The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 370
Pair by pair had gone to rest, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 63
They rang - no one at home - all gone to sport When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 2
His faded eyes, and saw his kingdom gone , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 90
Doth ease its heart of love in. - I am gone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 112
Of stone, or marble swart; their import gone , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 282
And all my knowledge is that joy is gone , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 253
Our by- gone quarrels, I confess my heart Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 22
I am gone . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 78a
But, Conrad, now be gone ; the host is look'd for; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 68
She's gone ! I cannot clutch her! no revenge! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 25
Doth operate quietly when his breath is gone : Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 42
She's gone ! I am content - nobles, good night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 192
(Lycius was gone to summon all his kin) Lamia, Part II, Line 112
As if with wings; but the fair trees were gone , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 59
And look'd around, and saw his kingdom gone , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 401
The day is gone , and all its sweets are gone! The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 1
The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone ! The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 1
Say they are gone ,- with the new dawning light What can I do to drive away, Line 46
"By'r Lady! he is gone !" cries Hum, "and I,- The Jealousies, Line 613
I met, far gone in liquor, that old man, The Jealousies, Line 786
 
GONFRID...........6
THEODORE, GONFRID , Officers Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 6,7
Were Theodore and Gonfrid and the rest Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 72
Enter THEODORE and GONFRID . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 125
[Exeunt THEODORE and GONFRID . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 130
Enter GONFRID , from the Council-room. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 17b
Enter SIGIFRED, GONFRID , and THEODORE, meeting. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
 
GOOD..............98
On earth the good man base detraction bars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 13
Of all that's high, and great, and good , and healing. To George Felton Mathew, Line 10
Sometimes, when the good knight his rest would take, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 19
When the kind voice of good Sir Clerimond Calidore: A Fragment, Line 99
Said the good man to Calidore alert; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 123
Of sparkling Helicon:- small good it were To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 27
Small good to one who had by Mulla's stream To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 33
Again I shake your hand,- friend Charles, good night. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 132
Highmindedness, a jealousy for good , Addressed to Haydon, Line 1
Good Kosciusko, thy great name alone To Kosciusko, Line 1
When some good spirit walks upon the earth, To Kosciusko, Line 10
And friendliness, the nurse of mutual good ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 318
Like good men in the truth of their behaviours. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 86
So scared, he sent for that " good king of cats," Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 5
they if I thought a year's castigation would do them any good ;- it will not: the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Yea, every one attend! for in good truth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 212
For others, good or bad, hatred and tears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 4
And fish were dimpling, as if good nor ill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 136
All human; bearing in themselves this good , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 156
"Arise, good youth, for sacred Phoebus' sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 292
I bade good -morrow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 174
Bacchus, young Bacchus! good or ill betide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 224
His very goddess: good -bye earth, and sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 431
Good -bye to all but love! Then doth he spring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 433
The good -night blush of eve was waning slow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 484
Whither didst melt? Ah, what of that!- all good Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 668
All earthly pleasure, all imagin'd good , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 743
Good visions in the air,- whence will befal, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 830
With thy good help, this very night shall see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 887
Peona kiss'd, and bless'd with fair good night: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 997
High reason, and the lore of good and ill, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 75
Lest I should miss to bid thee a good morrow: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 202
Good bye! I'll soon be back."- "Good bye!" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
Good bye! I'll soon be back."- " Good bye!" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
Burns in thee, child?- What good can thee betide, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 349
And may it taste to you like good old wine, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 19
Of his granny- good - There was a naughty boy, Line 67
Forgive me pray, good people all, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 33
Good heavens, lady, how the gemini Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 30
My wine - O good ! 'tis here at my desire, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 70
And tell me how" - " Good saints! not here, not here; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 107
This very night: good angels her deceive! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 125
Alone with her good angels, far apart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 142
Good Angela, believe me by these tears; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 150
Shamm'd a good snore - the monkey-men descended, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 93
Ever cures the good man's ill. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 14
Conrad! what tidings? Good , if I may guess Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 17
Or my good soldiers, or their ladies' eyes, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 13
More thanks, good Conrad; for, except my son's, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 43
Return with what good speed you may; for soon Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 158
Pray do not prose, good Ethelbert, but speak Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 189
Still it must not be known, good Sigifred; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 10
To have not thy good morrow. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 109a
With good advices; and I here remain, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 10
Its threatening edge against a good king's quiet; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50
This was but half expected, my good sire, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 73
I dare not. 'Twould pollute so good a father! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 99
My crooked deeds show good and plausible, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 109
Good gods! not else, in any way, my liege! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 111
No, my good lord, I cannot say I did. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 121
To my appalling, I saw too good proof Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 146
A trusty soul? A good man in the camp? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 2
Good gods! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 26b
Good morrow, holy father! I have had Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 118
I have good news to tell you, Ethelbert. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 143
Good Franconia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 26b
Good . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 151b
Would it were good ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 151c
Good even! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 176a
Good , good; he dies. You go, say you? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 181b
Good, good ; he dies. You go, say you? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 181b
Good fellow, once again Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 5b
My good Prince, with me Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 4b
'Tis good ,- 'tis good; let him but fall asleep, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 49
'Tis good,- 'tis good ; let him but fall asleep, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 49
Is a good symptom, and most favourable; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 58
Good gods! no innocent blood upon my head! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 54
Patience, good people, in fit time I send Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 75
My father keeps away. Good friend - ah! Sigifred?- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 110
Oh! thou good man, against whose sacred head Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 140
Good Ethelbert, shall I die in peace with you? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 172
Good Prince! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 183b
She's gone! I am content - nobles, good night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 192
And good instructor; but to-night he seems Lamia, Part I, Line 376
Labour for mortal good ? I sure should see The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 159
Will I be kind to thee for thy good will. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 242
Will Stephen's death be mark'd there, my good lord, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 6
From Stephen, my good Prince - Stephen - Stephen- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 29
Fear not, quake not, and as good wine recruits The Jealousies, Line 358
" Good ! good!" cried Hum, "I've known her from a child! The Jealousies, Line 388
"Good! good !" cried Hum, "I've known her from a child! The Jealousies, Line 388
"Ah! good my Prince, weep not!" And then again The Jealousies, Line 424
A sampler hoarded slyly, good as new, The Jealousies, Line 440
It goes against your conscience - good ! Well, don't. The Jealousies, Line 462
What good would that do? And, to be more plain, The Jealousies, Line 466
I say no more." "Or good or ill betide, The Jealousies, Line 526
Good Hum, and let me view this mighty coil." The Jealousies, Line 565
Left it to pay the piper - a good sum- The Jealousies, Line 696
 
GOODBYES..........1
When adieux have grown old and goodbyes Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 3
 
GOODLIEST.........1
Whence Calidore might have the goodliest view Calidore: A Fragment, Line 25
 
GOODLY............4
And many goodly states and kingdoms seen; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 2
In telling of this goodly company, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 129
To goodly vessels; many a sail of pride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 20
Thereby in goodly themes so training him, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 6
 
GOODS.............1
Besides the goods meanwhile thou movest east and west. The Jealousies, Line 243
 
GORDIAN...........2
This fire, like the eye of gordian snake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 494
She was a gordian shape of dazzling hue, Lamia, Part I, Line 47
 
GORDIAN'D.........1
And they were simply gordian'd up and braided, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 614
 
GORGE.............3
As bees gorge full their cells. And, by the feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 40
Squeez'd from the gorge , and all its uncurl'd length Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 46
Do not tempt me to throttle you on the gorge , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 35
 
GORGEOUS..........4
Gorgeous as I would have it - only I see On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 10
Few, who with gorgeous pageantry enrobe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 36
It is a gorgeous room, but somewhat sad; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 48
Of powerful instruments:- the gorgeous dyes, Lamia, Part II, Line 205
 
GORGON............4
Utter a gorgon voice? Does yonder thrush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 129
By things I tremble at, and gorgon wrath. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 754
Is then a father's countenance a Gorgon ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 12
A dose of senna-tea, or nightmare Gorgon , The Jealousies, Line 341
 
GORGONS...........1
Phorcus, the sire of Gorgons . Neighbour'd close Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 74
 
GOSSIP............3
Flit like a ghost away." - "Ah, Gossip dear, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 105
She turn'd, and down the aged gossip led The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 195
The day appear'd, and all the gossip rout. Lamia, Part II, Line 146
 
GOT...............12
When at night-fall among your books we got : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 118
'Twas there I got them, from the gaps and slits Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 876
With syren words - Ah, have I really got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 955
His eyes went after them, until they got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 905
Can't be got without hard money! Robin Hood, Line 48
The guerdon of their murder they had got , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 477
And the rose herself has got Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 15
Where got you this? Where? When? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 65
(Of pastry he got store within the palace,) The Jealousies, Line 218
Whose glass once up can never be got back, The Jealousies, Line 232
(I've got a conscience, maugre people's jokes:) The Jealousies, Line 697
Her Highness' pug-dog - got a sharp rebuff- The Jealousies, Line 699
 
GOTHIC............4
Which linger yet about lone gothic arches, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 33
The Gothic looks solemn, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 1
What, have you convents in that Gothic isle? Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 7
That I should rather love a Gothic waste Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 59
 
GOUD..............1
Ah goud hair'd Marie, yeve I pray Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 5
 
GOURD.............2
Of candied apple, quince, and plum, and gourd ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 265
To swell the gourd , and plump the hazel shells To Autumn, Line 7
 
GOUT..............1
Fear of gout There was a naughty boy, Line 49
 
GOVERNMENT........1
Of the wide kingdom's rule and government , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 12
 
GOVERNS...........1
And still she governs with the mildest sway: Sleep and Poetry, Line 240
 
GOWN..............3
Than the soft rustle of a maiden's gown I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 95
Doth catch at the maiden's gown . For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 18
Slow-stepp'd, and robed in philosophic gown : Lamia, Part I, Line 365


Published @ RC

March 2005