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GRACE.............17
For thee, she will thy every dwelling grace , To George Felton Mathew, Line 74
While the young warrior with a step of grace Calidore: A Fragment, Line 124
Though with their grace I was not oversmitten, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 102
I shall as soon pronounce which Grace more neatly To G.A.W., Line 13
Dusk for our loves, yet light enough to grace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 676
With the glory and grace of Apollo! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 16
Quoth Porphyro: "O may I ne'er find grace The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 146
As down she knelt for heaven's grace and boon; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 219
Why then should man, teasing the world for grace , On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 13
What pleas'd your Grace to say? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 141a
With such a tender grace ; nor are her wings Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
What can I find to grace your nuptial day Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 2
Of all her milder-mooned body's grace ; Lamia, Part I, Line 156
The glowing banquet-room shone with wide-arched grace . Lamia, Part II, Line 121
Which marries sweet sound with the grace of form, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 443
To grace a banquet. The high city gates King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 26
Shall I put out the candles, please your Grace ?" The Jealousies, Line 482
 
GRACED............1
In placid sandals, and in white robes graced : Ode on Indolence, Line 4
 
GRACEFUL..........8
Into many graceful bends: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 14
But bending in a thousand graceful ways; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 4
So graceful , that it seems no mortal hand, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 5
Its sweets upon the summer: graceful it grew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 7
Bending their graceful figures till they meet Sleep and Poetry, Line 368
Bearing a fruit more precious! graceful thing, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 83
Then the great Emperor full graceful set The Jealousies, Line 566
And lighted graceful on the window-sill; The Jealousies, Line 605
 
GRACEFULLY........2
To admire the visor arched so gracefully Calidore: A Fragment, Line 130
As gracefully descending, light and thin, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 49
 
GRACES............6
Thy winning graces ; - to be thy defender Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 11
Will I call the Graces four. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 40
The Graces all answer Apollo to the Graces, S.D. to Line 7
Fair on your Graces fall this early morrow! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 124
If either of their two Archbishops' graces The Jealousies, Line 537
Congees and scape- graces of every sort, The Jealousies, Line 759
 
GRACIOUS..........4
In its ripe warmth this gracious morning time." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 68
He has not yet return'd, my gracious liege. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 35
My gracious Prince, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 44b
More than that, most gracious Queen, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 29b
 
GRADUAL...........9
Above a cloud, and with a gradual swim I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 114
The gradual sand that through an hour glass runs- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 13
Bursts gradual , with a wayward indolence. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 350
Increasing gradual to a tempest rage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 523
Still onward; still the splendour gradual swell'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 840
By gradual decay from beauty fell, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 256
Save from one gradual solitary gust Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 76
Crept gradual , from the feet unto the crown, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 260
Save from one gradual solitary gust, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 375
 
GRADUALLY.........1
Lay dormant, mov'd convuls'd and gradually Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 499
 
GRADUATE..........1
Sweet days a lovely graduate , still unshent, Lamia, Part I, Line 198
 
GRAIN.............6
Juno's proud birds are pecking pearly grain : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 410
Hold like rich garners the full ripen'd grain ; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 4
Watch'd her, as anxious husbandmen the grain , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 133
With more bad bitter grain , too difficult Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 175
That not the quickest eye could find a grain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 112
A grain of gold upon a mountain's side, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 272
 
GRAINS............1
Goes off like lightning,- grains of paradise The Jealousies, Line 295
 
GRANARY...........3
The squirrel's granary is full, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 7
Choak not the granary of thy noble mind Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 174
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor, To Autumn, Line 14
 
GRAND.............9
Whence may be seen the castle gloomy, and grand : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 65
The grand , the sweet, the terse, the free, the fine; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 54
Disturbing the grand sea. A drainless shower Sleep and Poetry, Line 235
Careless, and grand - fingers soft and round Sleep and Poetry, Line 333
Cat! who hast past thy grand climacteric, To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 1
Doubled into a common fist, went grand , The Jealousies, Line 350
Live!- O! at Canterbury, with her old grand -dame." The Jealousies, Line 387
She waved her handkerchief. "Ah, very grand !" The Jealousies, Line 596
To watch our grand approach, and hail us as we pass'd. The Jealousies, Line 720
 
GRANDCHILD........1
When will he take that grandchild in his arms, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 119
 
GRANDEUR..........7
Minion of grandeur ! think you he did wait? Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 5
Stare at the grandeur of the ballancing? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 30
Its long lost grandeur : fir trees grow around, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 40
Who found for me the grandeur of the ode, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 62
In the calm grandeur of a sober line, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 127
That mingles Grecian grandeur with the rude On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 20
 
GRANDLY...........1
The hand of Brutus, that so grandly fell To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 71
 
GRANITE...........2
Streams subterranean tease their granite beds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 602
It was Hyperion:- a granite peak Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 367
 
GRANNY............1
Of his granny -good- There was a naughty boy, Line 67
 
GRANT.............7
O grant that like to Peter I O grant that like to Peter I, Line 1
Could grant in benediction: to be free Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 377
Grant thou a pardon here, and then the tale Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 153
And pardon you will grant , that, at this hour, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 126
Your dukedom's privilege will grant so much. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 55
Then grant me loving pardon,- but not else,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 110
If thou wilt, as thou swearest, grant my boon!" Lamia, Part I, Line 111
 
GRAPE.............5
A bitter coolness; the ripe grape is sour: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 35
By nightshade, ruby grape of Proserpine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 4
Can burst Joy's grape against his palate fine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 28
Or pale Calabrian? or the Tuscan grape ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 122
And grape stalks but half bare, and remnants more, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 33
 
GRAPES............2
And bloomy grapes laughing from green attire; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 136
Clusters of grapes , the which they raven'd quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 511
 
GRASING...........1
But the Mule grasing on the herbage green. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 74
 
GRASP.............10
O Poesy! for thee I grasp my pen Sleep and Poetry, Line 53
The hearty grasp that sends a pleasant sonnet Sleep and Poetry, Line 319
That toiling years would put within my grasp , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 524
It melted from his grasp : her hand he kiss'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 509
While Fate seem'd strangled in my nervous grasp ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 105
Iapetus another; in his grasp , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 44
Give me your hand, and let this kindly grasp Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 121
Ere, by one grasp , this common hand is made Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 86
And was ascending quick to put cold grasp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 124
One hour, the next shall see him in my grasp , The Jealousies, Line 195
 
GRASP'D...........6
The Thunderer grasp'd and grasp'd, God of the golden bow, Line 13
The Thunderer grasp'd and grasp'd , God of the golden bow, Line 13
Even to the trees. He rose: he grasp'd his stole, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 230
I knelt with pain - reached out my hand - had grasp'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 671
And grasp'd his fingers in her palsied hand, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 97
The Princess grasp'd her switch, but just in time When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 20
 
GRASPABLE.........1
Flew a delight half- graspable ; his tread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 673
 
GRASPING..........3
And his tremendous hand is grasping it, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 25
Grasping this scroll, and this same slender wand. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 670
Of earnest grasping , would, if it were cold This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 2
 
GRASS.............44
Of delicate birch trees, or long grass which hems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 51
Of wavy grass , and reads a debonair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 7
Or, on the wavy grass outstretch'd supinely, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 7
And form'd a snowy circle on the grass , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 85
Stretch'd on the grass at my best lov'd employment To My Brother George (epistle), Line 120
I shall roll on the grass with two-fold ease: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 79
Of Flora, and old Pan: sleep in the grass , Sleep and Poetry, Line 102
And over me the grass shall be smooth shaven; Sleep and Poetry, Line 279
And let long grass grow round the roots to keep them I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 32
To the o'erhanging sallows: blades of grass I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 67
Meekly upon the grass , as those whose sobbings This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 13
To warm their chilliest bubbles in the grass ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 103
Of grass , a wailful gnat, a bee bustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 450
Himself along the grass . What gentle tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 96
Lay, half asleep, in grass and rushes cool, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 134
Cool grass , nor tasted the fresh slumberous air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 290
When on the pleasant grass such love, lovelorn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 466
Behold her panting in the forest grass ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 59
The grass ; I feel the solid ground - Ah, me! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 622
On the damp grass myriads of lingering leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 934
And my couch a low grass tomb. Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 33
Couch'd in the teeming grass , Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 7
With its spear grass harsh- For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 20
And kiss on a grass green pillow. Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 16
So she sat on the grass debonnairly. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 8
She lay on the grass debonnairly. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 12
Runnels may kiss the grass on shelves and shallows clear, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 15
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 3
Of fruits, and flowers, and bunches of knot- grass , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 210
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 9
And then upon the grass I sit, and moan, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 90
In deepest grass , beneath the whisp'ring roof Ode to Psyche, Line 10
They lay calm-breathing on the bedded grass ; Ode to Psyche, Line 15
The grass , the thicket, and the fruit-tree wild; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 45
My head cool-bedded in the flowery grass ; Ode on Indolence, Line 52
And lick the soiled grass ? No, no, my friend, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 70
Leave traces in the grass and flowers sweet; Lamia, Part I, Line 97
Her mouth foam'd, and the grass , therewith besprent, Lamia, Part I, Line 148
Let spear- grass and the spiteful thistle wage Lamia, Part II, Line 228
For empty shells were scattered on the grass , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 32
Upon the grass I struggled hard against The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 53
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 313
As the moist scent of flowers, and grass , and leaves The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 404
As daisies lurk'd in June- grass , buds in treen; The Jealousies, Line 347
 
GRASSES...........1
The taller grasses and full-flowering weed, Lamia, Part I, Line 44
 
GRASSHOPPER'S.....2
That is the Grasshopper's - he takes the lead On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 5
The Grasshopper's among some grassy hills. On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 14
 
GRASSHOPPERS......1
Of grasshoppers against the sun. She weeps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 715
 
GRASSY............6
You chang'd the footpath for the grassy plain. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 126
Nought more untranquil than the grassy slopes Sleep and Poetry, Line 263
The Grasshopper's among some grassy hills. On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 14
At brim of day-tide, on some grassy lea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 366
How happy once again in grassy nest! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1032
These grassy solitudes, and seen the flowers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 57
 
GRATE.............1
The clarion sounds; and from a postern grate Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 61
 
GRATED............1
Grated the quaystones with her brazen prow Lamia, Part I, Line 224
 
GRATEFUL..........2
Grateful the incense from the lime-tree flower; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 155
For winds to kiss and grateful bees to feed, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 10
 
GRATITUDE.........1
To bow for gratitude before Jove's throne. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 150
 
GRATULATE.........1
More than that I am glad? I gratulate you. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 57
 
GRAV'LY...........1
Could hear your footsteps touch the grav'ly floor. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 124
 
GRAVE.............11
Old ditties sigh above their father's grave ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 788
The spite of hell is tumbling to its grave . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 760
Sudden from his turfed grave , Robin Hood, Line 39
That paleness warms my grave , as though I had Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 316
At last they felt the kernel of the grave , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 383
Or may I never leave my grave among the dead." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 180
And wish'd with silent curses in my grave , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 122
sake, will be dumb as the grave . Erminia has my shame fix'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 60
Suck'd to my grave amid a dreary calm! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 27
When this warm scribe my hand is in the grave . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 18
Like sculpture builded up upon the grave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 383
 
GRAVEL............1
Work through the clayey soil and gravel hard, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 355
 
GRAVEN............1
And there shall be a kind memorial graven . Sleep and Poetry, Line 280
 
GRAVES............2
With common thousands, into shallow graves . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 129
To see them sprawl before me into graves . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 210
 
GRAY..............7
And their hours are old and gray , Robin Hood, Line 2
More tame for his gray hairs - Alas me! flit! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 104
Sat gray -hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 4
Names, deeds, gray legends, dire events, rebellions, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 114
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 25
With curl'd gray beard, sharp eyes, and smooth bald crown, Lamia, Part I, Line 364
Corinthians! look upon that gray -beard wretch! Lamia, Part II, Line 287
 
GRAZING...........1
As grazing ox unworried in the meads; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 67
 
GREAT.............108
Give thy kings law - leave not uncurbed the great ; On Peace, Line 13
Great Liberty! how great in plain attire! To Hope, Line 38
Great Liberty! how great in plain attire! To Hope, Line 38
From thee, great God of Bards, receive their heavenly birth. Ode to Apollo, Line 47
The thought of this great partnership diffuses To George Felton Mathew, Line 8
Of all that's high, and great , and good, and healing. To George Felton Mathew, Line 10
Therefore, great bard, I not so fearfully Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 55
The voice of waters - the great bell that heaves How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 11
What are this world's true joys,- ere the great voice, To My Brothers, Line 13
A loving-kindness for the great man's fame, Addressed to Haydon, Line 2
Great spirits now on earth are sojourning; Addressed to the Same, Line 1
Good Kosciusko, thy great name alone To Kosciusko, Line 1
Thy name with Alfred's and the great of yore To Kosciusko, Line 11
To where the great God lives for evermore. To Kosciusko, Line 14
For his great Maker's presence, but must know Sleep and Poetry, Line 43
The morning sun-beams to the great Apollo Sleep and Poetry, Line 60
Made great Apollo blush for this his land. Sleep and Poetry, Line 183
And thorns of life; forgetting the great end Sleep and Poetry, Line 245
Of man: though no great minist'ring reason sorts Sleep and Poetry, Line 288
Great Alfred's too, with anxious, pitying eyes, Sleep and Poetry, Line 385
For great Apollo bids I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 50
soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
the conviction that there is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Where fed the herds of Pan: ay great his gains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 78
When the great deity, for earth too ripe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 142
Who stood therein did seem of great renown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 168
Our vows are wanting to our great god Pan. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 213
Great bounty from Endymion our lord. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 219
Hear us, great Pan! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 246
Great son of Dryope, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 290
Restraint! imprisoned liberty! great key Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 456
About the great Athenian admiral's mast? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 23
That wondrous night: the great Pan-festival: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 897
Such tenderness as mine? Great Dian, why, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 937
Fair maid, be pitiful to my great woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 949
For great enfranchisement. O weep no more; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 299
And the great Sea-King bow'd his dripping head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 890
On barren souls. Great Muse, thou know'st what prison, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 20
Yet I would have, great gods! but one short hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 36
While the great waters are at ebb and flow.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 94
Great God of breathless cups and chirping mirth!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 236
"Over wide streams and mountains great we went, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 239
Great Brahma from his mystic heaven groans, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 265
Or felt but a great dream! O I have been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 638
When all great Latmos so exalt will be? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 806
Thank the great gods, and look not bitterly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 807
Behind great Dian's temple. I'll be yon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 914
Hast thou, as a mere shadow?- But how great , Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 13
The sun, with his great eye, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 1
My sudden adoration, my great love! Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 7
Great bliss was with them, and great happiness Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 71
Great bliss was with them, and great happiness Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 71
And Isabella's was a great distress, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 100
Great wits in Spanish, Tuscan, and Malay. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 136
There in that forest did his great love cease; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 218
Because of some great urgency and need Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 227
Leaving great verse unto a little clan? Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 8
Great love in me for thee and Poesy. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 5
I have oft honoured thee. Great shadow, hide On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 13
Alone with her great family Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 11
My head is light with pledging a great soul, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 6
One who was great through mortal days and died of fame unshorn. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 12
That he may stray league after league some great birthplace to find, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 47
By the great Oceanus; Not Aladdin magian, Line 28
Finny palmers great and small, Not Aladdin magian, Line 32
The great sea shall war it down, Not Aladdin magian, Line 53
Know you the three ' great crimes' in faery land? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 24
Naked and bare of its great diadem, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 101
Until he reach'd the great main cupola; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 221
Which is its own great judge and searcher out, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 130
How we can war, how engine our great wrath! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 161
Of thunder, or of Jove. Great Saturn, thou Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 182
On sands, or in great deeps, vermillion turn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 20
At a very great price- Two or three posies, Line 16
OTHO THE GREAT , Emperor of Germany Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 1
No, nor great , nor mighty; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 76b
To you, great Duke- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 140a
Most mighty Otho? Will not my great host Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
I know how the great basement of all power Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 175
From our great Emperor; to you, I doubt not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 123
Great honour to the Prince! The Emperor, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 18
In your great father's nature, as you were. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 46
Of my great love for thee, my supreme child! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 125
Too great a boon! I pr'ythee, let me ask Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 141
Great Otho, I claim justice- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 90a
I ask, great judge, if you to-day have put Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 157
Me the great pain of telling. You must know. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 121
Of his great summoner, and made retreat Lamia, Part I, Line 11
passions, though not this of love, tarried with her a while to his great Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
To the great world? Thou art a dreaming thing; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 168
By great Apollo, thy dear foster child, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 286
Make great Hyperion ache. His palace bright, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 24
Winging along where the great water throes? What can I do to drive away, Line 17
Iced in the great lakes, to afflict mankind; What can I do to drive away, Line 38
And great unerring Nature once seems wrong. What can I do to drive away, Line 43
A theme! a theme! Great Nature! give a theme; To Fanny, Line 5
Fain would I know the great usurper's fate. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 8
He's Elfinan's great state-spy militant, The Jealousies, Line 52
Before her marriage with great Elfinan; The Jealousies, Line 111
Which to the oil-trade doth great scaith and harm, The Jealousies, Line 215
It was indeed the great magician, The Jealousies, Line 307
He fill'd a bumper. " Great sire, do not weep! The Jealousies, Line 425
Plenty of posies, great stags, butterflies The Jealousies, Line 449
Great Emperor! to adventure, like a lover true." The Jealousies, Line 486
At this great Caesar started on his feet, The Jealousies, Line 496
Then the great Emperor full graceful set The Jealousies, Line 566
Princess turn'd dainty, to our great surprise, The Jealousies, Line 652
Of darkness, a great mountain (strange to speak), The Jealousies, Line 661
 
GREATER...........6
Through all that day I've felt a greater pleasure To My Brother George (epistle), Line 115
Cynthia! I cannot tell the greater blisses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 239
The greater on the less feeds evermore:- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 95
A greater love through all my essence steal." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 320
Known only to his troop, hath greater plea Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 28
To make a greater . His young Highness here Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 150
 
GREATEST..........2
Eyed them with joy from greatest to the least, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 194
Imagine not that greatest mastery Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 6
 
GREATLY...........3
At which I wondered greatly , knowing well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 556
Greatly they wonder'd what the thing might mean: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 460
Yes, sister, but it does regard you greatly , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
 
GREATNESS.........1
The charters of man's greatness , at this hour Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 15
 
GRECIAN...........3
That mingles Grecian grandeur with the rude On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
Were richer than the songs of Grecian years?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 126
Seek, as they once were sought, in Grecian isles, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 6
 
GREECE............4
mythology of Greece , and dulled its brightness: for I wish to try once more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
For Greece and England. While astonishment Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 254
Than on the marble fairness of old Greece . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 61
this fact, for it was done in the midst of Greece ." Burton's "Anatomy of Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
GREEDIEST.........1
There was wide wand'ring for the greediest eye, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 15
 
GREEDY............4
My ear is open like a greedy shark, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 27
The moments, by some greedy help that seem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 658
My greedy thirst with nectarous camel-draughts; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 479
Who now, with greedy looks, eats up my feast? To Fanny, Line 17
 
GREEK.............4
Greek busts and statuary have ever been Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 55
Tipping the wink to him was heathen Greek ; Character of C.B., Line 20
The strong Iberian juice? or mellow Greek ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 121
While fluent Greek a vowel'd undersong Lamia, Part II, Line 200
 
GREEN.............107
Bright as the humming-bird's green diadem, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 3
The dew by fairy feet swept from the green , To George Felton Mathew, Line 26
In dark green ivy, and among wild larches? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 34
Than the pure freshness of thy laurels green . Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 54
And turns for calmness to the pleasant green Calidore: A Fragment, Line 9
Green tufted islands casting their soft shades Calidore: A Fragment, Line 46
All the green leaves that round the window clamber, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 136
The ocean with its vastness, its blue green , To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 5
Ocean's blue mantle streak'd with purple, and green . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 132
Of lovely Laura in her light green dress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 13
In a green island, far from all men's knowing? Sleep and Poetry, Line 6
Or a green hill o'erspread with chequered dress Sleep and Poetry, Line 77
Will set a green robe floating round her head, Sleep and Poetry, Line 114
And now I see them on a green -hill's side Sleep and Poetry, Line 134
A silent space with ever sprouting green . Sleep and Poetry, Line 251
Petrarch, outstepping from the shady green , Sleep and Poetry, Line 389
"Places of nestling green for Poets made." Story of Rimini I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Epigraph
Of all the shades that slanted o'er the green . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 14
Moist, cool and green ; and shade the violets, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 33
That with a score of light green brethren shoots I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 39
And moisture, that the bowery green may live: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 84
And bloomy grapes laughing from green attire; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 136
With the green world they live in; and clear rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 16
Is growing fresh before me as the green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 38
My uncertain path with green , that I may speed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 61
Her naked limbs among the alders green ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 513
That flowers would bloom, or that green fruit would swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 836
Through the green evening quiet in the sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 71
But, finding in our green earth sweet contents, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 313
Down whose green back the short-liv'd foam, all hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 349
All tendrils green , of every bloom and hue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 410
For their sweet queen: when lo! the wreathed green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 516
Large honey-combs of green , and freshly teem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 667
Fish-semblances, of green and azure hue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 884
From the green sea up to my hidden source Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 989
Through mossy rocks; where, 'mid exuberant green , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 992
The comfortable green and juicy hay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 4
Of green or silvery bower doth enshrine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 73
No woods were green enough, no bower divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 151
He saw far in the concave green of the sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 191
Her voice I hung like fruit among green leaves: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 271
Would let me feel their scales of gold and green , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 344
My skiff along green shelving coasts, to hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 358
But could not: therefore all the billows green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 654
A gold- green zenith 'bove the Sea-God's head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 878
Came quiet to his eyes; and forest green , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1029
His head through thorny- green entanglement Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 41
From his green prison, and here kneeling down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 69
He sprang from his green covert: there she lay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 101
As that thou speakest of? Are not these green nooks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 127
Crown'd with green leaves, and faces all on flame; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 201
Green -kyrtled Spring, flush Summer, golden store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 422
With fennel green , and balm, and golden pines, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 575
Prone to the green head of a misty hill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 613
Into the vallies green together went. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 765
His head upon a mossy hillock green , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 918
Their green felicity- In drear nighted December, Line 4
With those bright languid segments green and prick To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 4
On the green of the hill, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 12
He doth his green way beguile Robin Hood, Line 28
Honour to the Lincoln green ! Robin Hood, Line 53
Green rushes like our rivers, and dost taste To the Nile, Line 12
The pleasant sun-rise; green isles hast thou too, To the Nile, Line 13
Blue!- gentle cousin to the forest green , Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 9
Married to green in all the sweetest flowers- Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 10
With its green thin spurs For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 17
And the green bud's as long as the spike end. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 36
And kiss on a grass green pillow. Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 16
A white sail shews above the green -head cliff, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 23
Upon a lampit rock of green sea weed Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 88
Who hath not loiter'd in a green church-yard, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 353
Whence thick, and green , and beautiful it grew, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 426
Why she sat drooping by the basil green , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 458
The thing was vile with green and livid spot, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 475
And precipices show untrodden green , To Homer, Line 10
Where mantles grey have rustled by and swept the nettles green : There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 4
Why not live sweetly as in the green trees? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 10
At sweet life leaving, and these arbours green ,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 17
Of unmatur'd green vallies cold, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 8
Of the green thorny bloomless hedge, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 9
But the Mule grasing on the herbage green . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 74
Those green -rob'd senators of mighty woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 73
Can it deny the chiefdom of green groves? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 220
Rejoice, O Delos, with thine olives green , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 24
Though scarcely heard in many a green recess. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 41
Spurn the green turf as hateful to my feet? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 94
I to green -weed rivers bright! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 4
Of beechen green , and shadows numberless, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 9
Tasting of Flora and the country green , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 13
To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 32
And hides the green hill in an April shroud; Ode on Melancholy, Line 14
Which, lifting sweet abroad its timid green , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
From rushes green , and brakes, and cowslip'd lawns, Lamia, Part I, Line 6
Vermilion-spotted, golden, green , and blue; Lamia, Part I, Line 48
From weary tendrils, and bow'd branches green , Lamia, Part I, Line 98
Of both the guarded nymph near-smiling on the green . Lamia, Part I, Line 125
Into the green -recessed woods they flew; Lamia, Part I, Line 144
Fair, on a sloping green of mossy tread, Lamia, Part I, Line 181
Spread a green kirtle to the minstrelsy: Lamia, Part I, Line 188
His silent sandals swept the mossy green ; Lamia, Part I, Line 239
Garlands of every green , and every scent Lamia, Part II, Line 215
From the green turf to heaven.- "Holy Power," The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 136
His turban wreath'd of gold, and white, and green , The Jealousies, Line 278
Of glossy silk, soft, smooth, and meadow- green , The Jealousies, Line 344
Shaded his deep green eyes, and wrinkles brown The Jealousies, Line 507
Beneath the green -fan'd cedars, some did shroud The Jealousies, Line 691
Buds gather'd from the green spring's middle-days, The Jealousies, Line 727
 
GREEN'D...........2
Green'd over April's lap? No howling sad Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 217
Had swollen and green'd the pious charactery, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 790
 
GREENEST..........2
With airs delicious. In the greenest nook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 668
Stay! though the greenest woods be thy domain, Lamia, Part I, Line 263
 
GREENING..........1
Of Jove's large eye-brow, to the tender greening Sleep and Poetry, Line 170
 
GREENS............1
Of all her sapphires, greens , and amethyst, Lamia, Part I, Line 162
 
GREET.............9
To find a place where I may greet the maid - To George Felton Mathew, Line 54
And mailed hand held out, ready to greet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 126
If human souls did never kiss and greet ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 842
Warbling the while as if to lull and greet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 560
To honour thee, and thy gone spirit greet ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 158
And greet thee morn and even in the skies." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 336
To stop and greet them. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 16
I come to greet you as a loving son, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 78
Louted full low, and hoarsely did him greet : The Jealousies, Line 256
 
GREETED...........3
Greeted , as he had known them long before. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 33
The sweet-lipp'd ladies have already greeted Calidore: A Fragment, Line 135
Poor Cynthia greeted him, and sooth'd her light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 104
 
GREETING..........8
To meet her glorious brother's greeting beam. To George Felton Mathew, Line 83
Bow'd a fair greeting to these serpents' whine; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 190
Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 1
And sweet is the voice in its greeting , Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 2
But fadeth at the greeting of the sun: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 27
Not a word of greeting , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 93b
Came thy sweet greeting , that if thou shouldst fade Lamia, Part I, Line 269
Muffling his face, of greeting friends in fear, Lamia, Part I, Line 362
 
GREETINGS.........1
But I have other greetings than mine own Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 134
 
GREETS............2
The Empress greets - King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 9d
She greets most noble Glocester from her heart, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 24
 
GRENE.............1
Idling in the " grene shawe"; Robin Hood, Line 36
 
GREW..............35
Near to a little island's point they grew ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 24
Its sweets upon the summer: graceful it grew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 7
To regions where no more the laurel grew ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 216
E'er grew in Paphos, from the bitter weeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 249
Full palatable; and a colour grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 767
His bosom grew , when first he, far away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 244
In a long whispering birth enchanted grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 346
To make a coronal; and round him grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 409
Grew strong within me: wherefore serve me so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 971
And as I grew in years, still didst thou blend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 162
Grew a new heart, which at this moment plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 306
Far as Egyptian Nile. My passion grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 407
Poisonous about my ears, and louder grew , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 491
Grew drunken, and would have its head and bent. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 797
And garlanding grew wild; and pleasure reign'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 934
He could not help but kiss her: then he grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 449
With every morn their love grew tenderer, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 9
So said, his erewhile timid lips grew bold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 69
Grew , like a lusty flower in June's caress. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 72
Whence thick, and green, and beautiful it grew , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 426
And Jove grew languid.- Break the mesh Fancy, Line 89
But soon his eyes grew brilliant, when she told The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 132
Save wings, for heaven:- Porphyro grew faint: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 224
Their heads appear'd, and up their stature grew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 87
Grew up like organ, that begins anew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 126
Thus grew it up - "Not in my own sad breast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 129
Benumb'd my eyes; my pulse grew less and less; Ode on Indolence, Line 17
Pale grew her immortality, for woe Lamia, Part I, Line 104
Nor grew they pale, as mortal lovers do. Lamia, Part I, Line 145
Then sudden it grew hot, and all the pains Lamia, Part II, Line 252
Grew hush; the stately music no more breathes; Lamia, Part II, Line 263
Grew stifling, suffocating, at the heart; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 130
When he had lost his realms."- Whereon there grew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 302
And every day by day methought I grew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 395
Grew pale as death, and fainted - very nigh! The Jealousies, Line 457
 
GREY..............17
Such as ay muster where grey time has scoop'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 649
How tiptoe Night holds back her dark- grey hood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 831
With pity, for the grey -hair'd creature wept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 283
Will I, grey -gone in passion, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 24
The bosomer of clouds gold, grey , and dun. Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 4
A coming down by craggis grey Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 3
Or when grey clouds are thy cold coverlid? To Ailsa Rock, Line 8
Has any here an old grey mare All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 9
Where mantles grey have rustled by and swept the nettles green: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 4
Locks shining black, hair scanty grey , and passions manifold. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 38
Aye, Conrad, it will pluck out all grey hairs; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 7
Those grey lids wink, and thou not know it, monk! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
Grey -growing. To thee only I appeal, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 177
Peers with disrelish, grey , barren, and cold! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
Not grey -brow'd like the poisonous Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
Of grey cathedrals, buttress'd walls, rent towers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 67
Balanced upon his grey -grown pinions twain, The Jealousies, Line 581
 
GREYLY............1
Spread greyly eastward, thus a chorus sang: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 231
 
GRIEF.............40
I could e'en Dido of her grief beguile; Imitation of Spenser, Line 21
Amid the gloom of grief and tears. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 24
I should have felt "the joy of grief "! Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 24
Wherefore does any grief our joy impair? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 14
The while he tells of grief , around a funeral pyre. Ode to Apollo, Line 17
A laughing school-boy, without grief or care, Sleep and Poetry, Line 94
Or maiden's sigh, that grief itself embalms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 402
So all have set my heavier grief above Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 527
Of secret grief , here in this bowery nest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 539
Its own sweet grief at parting. Overhead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 939
My chain of grief : no longer strive to find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 979
O sovereign power of love! O grief ! O balm! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1
Alas! 'tis his old grief . For many days, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 47
An unknown time, surcharg'd with grief , away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 292
Endymion: woe! woe! is grief contain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 823
Endymion awoke, that grief of hers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 855
And in that agony, across my grief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 411
He must pursue this task of joy and grief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 702
O pardon me, for I am full of grief - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 107
Grief born of thee, young angel! fairest thief! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 108
Speak not of grief , young stranger, or cold snails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 132
Who lives beyond earth's boundary, grief is dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 620
Shall be my grief , or twinkle me to pleasure. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 719
Of grief , to last thee to my kiss again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 810
We miscal grief , bale, sorrow, heartbreak, woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 942
And grief unto my darling joys dost bring. Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 14
That I may speak my grief into thine ear; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 58
Spirits in grief , lift up your heads, and smile; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 437
Spirits of grief , sing not your "Well-a-way!" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 485
He stretch'd himself in grief and radiance faint. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 304
In men who die.- This is the grief , O Son! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 335
At war with all the frailty of grief , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 93
Full of calm joy it was, as I of grief ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 265
Of joy and grief at once. Grief overcame, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 289
Of joy and grief at once. Grief overcame, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 289
Thy lips, and antheming a lonely grief . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 6
He will forgive thee, and awake in grief Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 108
Yet, one day, you must know a grief , whose sting Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 72
He is so full of grief and passionate wrath; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 18
Are speeding to the families of grief , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 461
 
GRIEFS............6
Delightful: thou thy griefs dost dress To Lord Byron, Line 7
Of buried griefs the spirit sees, but scarce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 517
For, never since thy griefs and woes began, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 546
And press it so upon our weary griefs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 66
When thou dost shed a tear: explain thy griefs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 70
For all his calming of my childish griefs , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 42
 
GRIESLY...........1
Half seen through deepest gloom, and griesly gapes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 629
 
GRIEV'D...........7
Whether they wept, or laugh'd, or griev'd , or toy'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 494
Nor unto Tempe, where Jove griev'd a day, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 8
Yet I am griev'd at it, to the full height, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 74
I ever griev'd for you, as who did not? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 225
As griev'd to force it on you so abrupt; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 71
Then came the griev'd voice of Mnemosyne, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 331
And griev'd I hearken'd. "That divinity The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 332
 
GRIEVE............8
My soul is to its doom: I would not grieve Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 61
O what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 3
And all night kept awake, for sinners' sake to grieve . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 27
But let me laugh awhile, I've mickle time to grieve ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 126
Though winning near the goal - yet, do not grieve ; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 18
I rather would grieve with you than upbraid. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 36
I grieve , my lord, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 89b
I think, nay I am sure, you will grieve much Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 113
 
GRIEVED...........3
Until their grieved bodies 'gan to bloat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 525
Of all these lovers, and she grieved so Lamia, Part I, Line 105
Sorely she grieved , and wetted three or four The Jealousies, Line 82
 
GRIEVES...........2
Endymion! unhappy! it nigh grieves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 770
And with them shall I die; nor much it grieves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 935
 
GRIEVING..........4
I had been grieving at this joyous hour. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 302
To lose in grieving all my maiden prime. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 278
And I have thought it died of grieving ; I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 2
I hasten'd back, your grieving messenger, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 117
 
GRIEVOUS..........2
Hast thou felt so content: a grievous feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 547
More grievous torment than a hermit's fast:- Lamia, Part II, Line 4
 
GRIEVOUSLY........1
Grievously are we tantalised, one and all; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 1
 
GRIFFIN...........1
A griffin , wheeling here and there about, The Jealousies, Line 680
 
GRIM..............2
To wild uncertainty and shadows grim . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 273
When, meeting Artegall and Talus grim , In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 8
 
GRIN..............1
And grin and look proudly, God of the golden bow, Line 33
 
GRIND.............1
Against me, who would sooner crush and grind Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 163
 
GRINN'D...........1
And grinn'd as all his ugliness did ache, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 49
 
GROAN.............12
For skies Italian, and an inward groan Happy is England! I could be content, Line 6
Myself to thee. Ah, dearest, do not groan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 779
Often with more than tortured lion's groan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 861
She fled ere I could groan for mercy. Stung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 601
With many a scalding tear and many a groan , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 668
Founded with many a mason-devil's groan . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 48
O Titans, shall I say ' Arise!'- Ye groan : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 157
Shall I say ' Crouch!'- Ye groan . What can I then? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 158
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 24
Would groan for pity. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 258a
On some fool's errand: let his latest groan Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 56
Groan for the old allegiance once more, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 11
 
GROAN'D...........5
Groan'd one and all, as if some piercing trial Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 516
And so he groan'd , as one by beauty slain. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 98
And every night in dreams they groan'd aloud, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 263
Groan'd for the old allegiance once more, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 162
"Titans, behold your God!" at which some groan'd ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 110
 
GROANINGS.........1
I came to a dark valley.- Groanings swell'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 490
 
GROANS............7
O'erwrought with symbols by the deepest groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 198
She lifted up the charm: appealing groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 518
Shrieks, yells, and groans of torture-pilgrimage; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 524
Great Brahma from his mystic heaven groans , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 265
The key turns, and the door upon its hinges groans . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 369
Could glimmer on their tears; where their own groans Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 6
Let me hear other groans , and trumpets blown The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 432
 
GROSS.............1
From this gross , detestable, filthy mesh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 552
 
GROSSER...........1
Her fame has pass'd into the grosser lips Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 150
 
GROSSLY...........1
I cannot, in plain terms, grossly assault Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 57
 
GROT..............6
Of awfuller shade, or an enchanted grot , Sleep and Poetry, Line 76
Said I, low voic'd: ' Ah, whither! 'Tis the grot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 943
Among the conchs and shells of the lofty grot , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 921
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 4
She took me to her elfin grot , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 29
Should darken her pure grot with muddy gloom; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 8
 
GROTESQUE.........2
Fountains grotesque , new trees, bespangled caves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 458
Than vase grotesque and Siamesian jar; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 57
 
GROTS.............1
Whether to silver grots , or giant range Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 237
 
GROTTO............2
A virgin light to the deep; my grotto -sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 113
It was a sounding grotto , vaulted, vast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 878
 
GROTTOS...........1
Echoing grottos , full of tumbling waves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 459
 
GROUND............19
Aye dropping their hard fruit upon the ground . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 41
Some idly trailed their sheep-hooks on the ground , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 145
Along the ground they took a winding course. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 926
Towards the ground ; but rested not, nor stopt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 334
The grass; I feel the solid ground - Ah, me! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 622
Through the old garden- ground of boyish days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 784
Far under- ground , a sleeper meets his friends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 894
That the ground There was a naughty boy, Line 97
But the forgotten eye is still fast wedded to the ground - There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 21
lips when she dashed it to the ground , for the mountain began to grumble; which Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
Safe on the lowly ground , she bless'd her fate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 73
And slept there since. Upon the sodden ground Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 17
She touch'd her fair large forehead to the ground , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 80
He ground severe his skull, with open mouth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 51
Here is no quiet depth of hollow ground . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 47
I could now sit upon the ground , and shed Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 89
And so he rested, on the lonely ground , Lamia, Part I, Line 32
Degraded, cold, upon the sodden ground The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 322
Uplift her from the ground , and swiftly flit The Jealousies, Line 521
 
GROUNDE...........1
In crimpid shroude farre under grounde ; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 102
 
GROUNDS...........1
That come a swooning over hollow grounds , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 286
 
GROUPED...........1
grouped Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
 
GROVE.............8
Nought comforts then the leafless grove Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 19
Near to a cypress grove , whose deadly maw, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 906
Walk'd towards the temple grove with this lament: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 926
Until that grove appear'd, as if perchance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 949
Though Dido silent is in under- grove , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 99
Sophist and sage, from no Athenian grove , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 168
No shrine, no grove , no oracle, no heat Ode to Psyche, Line 34
Thy shrine, thy grove , thy oracle, thy heat Ode to Psyche, Line 48
 
GROVELING.........1
Laughing, and wailing, groveling , serpenting, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 501
 
GROVES............5
Of idleness in groves Elysian: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 177
Into those holy groves , that silent are Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 913
Groves , meadows, melodies, and arbour roses; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 939
Can it deny the chiefdom of green groves ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 220
Tell me why thus I rave, about these groves ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 110
 
GROW..............15
Its long lost grandeur: fir trees grow around, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 40
To mark the time as they grow broad, and shorter; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 89
And let long grass grow round the roots to keep them I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 32
Into oblivion;- that fresh flowers will grow , Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 13
How quiet death is. Where soil is men grow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 159
I saw grow up from the horizon's brink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 647
And asketh where the golden apples grow : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 412
Cresses that grow where no man may them see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 684
Grow impious." So he inwardly began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 961
Pangs are in vain - until I grow high-rife Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 29
And of thy lilies, that do paler grow Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 149
Paining me through: those sounds grow strange to me, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 311
Upon the murderous spot she seem'd to grow , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 365
Where lions tug adverse, if love grow not Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 100
To grow pale from the waves at dull midnight. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 458
 
GROWING...........7
Where oaks, that erst the Druid knew, are growing , To George Felton Mathew, Line 39
Growing , like Atlas, stronger from its load? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 63
Is growing fresh before me as the green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 38
Which now disfigure her fair growing stem, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
Grey- growing . To thee only I appeal, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 177
Her soft look growing coy, she saw his chain so sure: Lamia, Part I, Line 256
Growing within, I ate deliciously; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 40
 
GROWLING..........2
A lion into growling , loth retire- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 536
Of honour 'mid the growling wilderness. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 12
 
GROWN.............23
Shewing like Ganymede to manhood grown ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 170
From low- grown branches, and his footsteps slow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 417
The fair- grown yew tree, for a chosen bow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 482
In frightful scarlet, and its thorns out- grown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 697
With golden moss. His every sense had grown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 671
When adieux have grown old and goodbyes Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 3
On his neck his well- grown locks, Not Aladdin magian, Line 16
You may have grown from convent libraries, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 2
Hedge- grown primrose that hath burst; Fancy, Line 50
He was a prince, the Fool, a grown up prince, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 33
There is a roaring in the bleak- grown pines Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 116
Such noise is like the roar of bleak- grown pines; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 122
On the May- grown asphodel. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 28
Where branched thoughts, new grown with pleasant pain, Ode to Psyche, Line 52
Nay open speech, rude mockery grown common, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
Sister, you have grown sensible and wise, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
Perhaps grown wearied of their Corinth talk: Lamia, Part I, Line 232
Love, jealous grown of so complete a pair, Lamia, Part II, Line 12
His passion, cruel grown , took on a hue Lamia, Part II, Line 75
And full- grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; To Autumn, Line 30
Whose rank- grown forests, frosted, black, and blind, What can I do to drive away, Line 39
Just when your knighthood is grown ripe and full King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 37
Balanced upon his grey- grown pinions twain, The Jealousies, Line 581
 
GROWS.............5
Grows lush in juicy stalks, I'll smoothly steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 46
Thy beauty grows upon me, and I feel Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 319
Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 26
Who vails its snowy wings and grows all pale- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
The remedy grows hopeless! Here he comes,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 20
 
GROWTH............4
Came not by common growth . Thus on I thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 564
New growth about each shell and pendent lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 928
'Twixt growth and waning. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 28
Should be more common than the growth of weeds. And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 14
 
GRUDGE............2
All gentle folks who owe a grudge All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 1
Quiet and plodding, thou dost bear no grudge The Jealousies, Line 250
 
GRUFF.............2
Skulks to his cavern, 'mid the gruff complaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 952
Gruff with contempt; which a death-nighing moan Lamia, Part II, Line 292
 
GRUMBLE...........1
lips when she dashed it to the ground, for the mountain began to grumble ; which Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
 
GUARANTEE.........1
Generously, without more certain guarantee , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 109
 
GUARANTEED........1
That, while it smote, still guaranteed to save. Lamia, Part I, Line 339
 
GUARD.............3
Whose care it is to guard a thousand flocks: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 197
Fie! Fie! But I will be her guard myself; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 127
Kept reconnoitring us - doubled our guard - The Jealousies, Line 681
 
GUARDED...........5
What promise hast thou faithful guarded since Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 44
They guarded silence, when Oceanus Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 245
Enter GERSA, in chains, and guarded . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 93
back scene, guarded by two Soldiers. Lords, Ladies, Knights, Gentlemen, etc., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Of both the guarded nymph near-smiling on the green. Lamia, Part I, Line 125
 
GUARDING..........1
Guarding his forehead, with her round elbow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 416
 
GUARDS............3
Ho! Ho, there! Guards ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 144
My guards , ho! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 245a
[Enter Guards . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 250
 
GUERDON...........3
The guerdon of their murder they had got, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 477
Back to your palace, where I wait for guerdon fit." The Jealousies, Line 522
Their new-blown loyalty with guerdon fair, The Jealousies, Line 742
 
GUESS.............18
Guess where the jaunty streams refresh themselves. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 22
But, a poor Naiad, I guess not. Farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 129
With an eye- guess towards some pleasant vale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 396
Cursing those crimes he scarce could guess , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 33
Came open-eyed to guess what we would speak:- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 338
Which he with eager guess began to read Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 48
But, in embalmed darkness, guess each sweet Ode to a Nightingale, Line 43
Conrad! what tidings? Good, if I may guess Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 17
You guess aright. And, sister, slurring o'er Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 21
But can you give a guess where Ludolph is? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 65
I cannot guess . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 70a
Your lady sister, if I guess aright, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 171
And for your absence may I guess the cause? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 67
Stay there! No - guess ? More princely you must be Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 68
I guess his purpose! Indeed he must not have Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 100
How long I slumber'd 'tis a chance to guess . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 57
To-night, if I may guess , thy beauty wears To Fanny, Line 11
"Show him a mouse's tail, and he will guess , The Jealousies, Line 55
 
GUESS'D...........4
An arch face peep'd,- an Oread as I guess'd . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 671
And if I guess'd not so, the sunny beam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 577
Sweet paining on his ear: he sickly guess'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 856
"I thought you guess'd , foretold, or prophesied, The Jealousies, Line 325
 
GUESSES...........2
Than to make guesses at me. 'Tis enough. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 69
Guesses at heaven: pity these have not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 4
 
GUESSING..........1
Ane minute's guessing - Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 6
 
GUEST.............5
There will I be, a most unwelcome guest , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 94
The herd approach'd; each guest , with busy brain, Lamia, Part II, Line 150
Lycius," said he, "for uninvited guest Lamia, Part II, Line 165
When in an antichamber every guest Lamia, Part II, Line 191
Of every guest ; that each, as he did please, Lamia, Part II, Line 219
 
GUESTS............6
Were glowing to receive a thousand guests : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 33
And all his warrior- guests , with shade and form The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 373
Even as you list invite your many guests ; Lamia, Part II, Line 98
When dreadful guests would come to spoil her solitude. Lamia, Part II, Line 145
Kept up among the guests , discoursing low Lamia, Part II, Line 201
her, to whose wedding, amongst other guests , came Apollonius; who, by some Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
GUIDE.............8
Went swift beneath the merry-winged guide , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 83
I've been thy guide ; that thou must wander far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 123
Had not a heavenly guide benignant led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 377
Whisper'd the guide , stuttering with joy, "even now." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 745
His poor guide hurried back with agues in her brain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 189
Of Saturn, and his guide , who now had climb'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 84
Dear daughter, you shall guide me. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 149a
"Tis Apollonius sage, my trusty guide Lamia, Part I, Line 375
 
GUIDED............1
By thee, sprite, will I be guided ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 74
 
GUIDES............1
Fair Scylla and her guides to conference; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 894
 
GUIDING...........3
Peona guiding , through the water straight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 427
So still obey the guiding hand that fends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 574
Stretching across a void, then guiding o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 600
 
GUILELESS.........2
This guileless lady? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 155a
One-thoughted, never wand'ring, guileless love, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 3
 
GUILT.............6
Methinks 'twould be a guilt - a very guilt- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 134
Methinks 'twould be a guilt - a very guilt - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 134
A noon-day proof of bad Auranthe's guilt . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 191
Behind a barrier of engender'd guilt ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 95
A barrier of guilt ! I was the fool, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 104
A sentence something worthy of his guilt . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 21
 
GUILTY............4
While I, least guilty , am an outcast still, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 84
Away, thou guilty thing! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 63b
'Tis not so guilty - Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 29a
Hear, he pleads not guilty ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 29b
 
GUINEAS...........1
And two or three guineas Two or three posies, Line 8
 
GUISE.............2
Moved on with pointed finger. In this guise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 606
Her shadow in uneasy guise The Eve of St. Mark, Line 73
 
GUITAR............1
A guitar -ribband - and a lady's glove Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 36
 
GULES.............1
And threw warm gules on Madeline's fair breast, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 218
 
GULF..............3
In gulf or aerie, mountains or deep dells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 94
And leaves a gulf austere God of the meridian, Line 7
And every gulf , and every chasm old, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 360
 
GULL..............3
And the broad winged sea- gull never at rest; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 136
An innocent lady, gull an emperor, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 165
Begone! I pity thee; thou art a gull , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 101
 
GULL'D............1
Men shall confess,- this prince was gull'd and cheated, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 133
 
GULLS.............1
The sea- gulls not more constant; for I had Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 321
 
GULP..............2
Yet can I gulp a bumper to thy name,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 13
Shall I gulp wine? No, that is vulgarism, What can I do to drive away, Line 24
 
GULPH.............5
Will gulph me - help!" - At this with madden'd stare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 195
To these founts Protean, passing gulph , and dell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 627
Of that dark gulph he wept, and said: "I urge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1013
And hurl'd me down the illimitable gulph Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 5
I am near hustled to a dangerous gulph , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 115
 
GULPH'D...........2
And then were gulph'd in a tumultuous swim: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 571
Has dived to its foundations, gulph'd it down, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 351
 
GULPHING..........2
The gulphing whale was like a dot in the spell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 205
The final gulphing ; the poor struggling souls: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 659
 
GULPHS............1
Gulphs in the morning light, and scuds along Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 956
 
GUMMED............1
Thy hour glass, if these gummed leaves be burnt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 116
 
GUMMY.............1
And gummy frankincense was sparkling bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 229
 
GUMS..............1
Ready to melt between an infant's gums : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 451
 
GURDIES...........1
He pass'd the hurdy- gurdies with disdain, The Jealousies, Line 222
 
GURGE.............1
With sanguine feverous boiling gurge of pulse. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 28
 
GURGLED...........1
'Mong which it gurgled blythe adieus, to mock Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 938
 
GURGLES...........1
Gurgles through straiten'd banks, and still doth fan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 211
 
GURGLING..........2
Gurgling in beds of coral: for anon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 640
And emptied on't a black dull- gurgling phial: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 515
 
GUSH..............4
Whence gush the streams of song: in happy hour To George Felton Mathew, Line 78
Gush ever and anon with silent creep, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 100
Said he, "will all this gush of feeling pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 681
A living death was in each gush of sounds, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 281
 
GUSH'D............2
For them his ears gush'd blood; for them in death Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 115
Gush'd with more pride than do a wretch's tears?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 122
 
GUSHES............2
Silv'ring the untainted gushes of its rill; Imitation of Spenser, Line 4
Mark the clear tumbling crystal, its passionate gushes , To Some Ladies, Line 7
 
GUST..............5
I must embrace you with my dearest gust ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 52
Where in the gust , the whirlwind, and the flaw As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 10
Save from one gradual solitary gust Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 76
Save from one gradual solitary gust , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 375
Losing its gust , and my ambition blind. I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 14
 
GUSTS.............6
Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 1
Fresh morning gusts have blown away all fear To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 1
When last the wintry gusts gave over strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 920
Beset with plainful gusts , within ye hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 529
Like hoarse night- gusts sepulchral briars among. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 288
'Tis dark: the iced gusts still rave and beat: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 327
 
GUSTY.............2
Thus the tradition of the gusty deep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 853
And the long carpets rose along the gusty floor. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 360
 
GYGES.............1
Coeus, and Gyges , and Briareus, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 19


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Published @ RC

March 2005