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Keats Concordance
 
HA................18
Ha ! ha! Sir Dainty! there must be a nurse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 570
Ha! ha ! Sir Dainty! there must be a nurse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 570
Gave utterance as he entered: " Ha ! I said, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 951
" Ha ! ha!" said she, "I knew not this hard life, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 329
"Ha! ha !" said she, "I knew not this hard life, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 329
Ha ! here is "undivulged crime"! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 61
To me! What of me, ha ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 140b
Ha ! till now I thought Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 62b
Your hand - I go! Ha ! here the thunder comes Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 57
Ha ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 93
Who goes there? Count Sigifred? Ha ! ha! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 33
Who goes there? Count Sigifred? Ha! ha ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 33
And hopeful featur'd. Ha ! by heaven you weep! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 85
Ha ! There! there!- He is the paramour!- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8b
Bestir - bestir - Auranthe! Ha ! ha! ha! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 177
Bestir - bestir - Auranthe! Ha! ha ! ha! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 177
Bestir - bestir - Auranthe! Ha! ha! ha ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 177
The serpent - Ha , the serpent! certes, she Lamia, Part II, Line 80
 
HABERGEON.........1
Voltaire with casque and shield and habergeon , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 7
 
HABIT.............2
Made iron-stern by habit ! Thou shalt see Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 148
habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
HABITED...........1
By ladies, habited in robes of lawn Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 87
 
HABITUAL..........1
The journey homeward to habitual self! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 276
 
HACK..............1
"Polluted jarvey! Ah, thou filthy hack ! The Jealousies, Line 227
 
HACKNEY...........1
It swallows chairmen, damns, and hackney coaches. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 15
 
HADST.............15
Hadst caught the tones, nor suffered them to die. To Lord Byron, Line 5
Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 1
O, if thou hadst breathed then, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 35
Hadst thou liv'd when chivalry Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 41
Thou hadst beheld the Hesperean shine To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 13
O Oread-Queen! would that thou hadst a pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 961
Till thou hadst cool'd their cheeks deliciously: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 148
Aye, hadst thou never lov'd an unknown power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 301
This furrow'd visage thou hadst never seen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 448
Thou, Carian lord, hadst better have been tost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 52
Such seeing hadst thou, as it once befel To Homer, Line 13
Hadst figur'd t' other day, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 22
And hadst no more to say, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 24
Those pains of mine; O Saturn, hadst thou felt, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 297
Thy fated hour. That thou hadst power to do so The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 143
 
HAGGARD...........3
In thicket hid I curs'd the haggard scene- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 497
Of haggard seeming, but a boon indeed: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 344
So haggard and so woe-begone? La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 6
 
HAIL..............13
Joyful I hail thy presence; and I hail On Peace, Line 5
Joyful I hail thy presence; and I hail On Peace, Line 5
Between two hills. All hail delightful hopes! Sleep and Poetry, Line 264
And from their treasures scatter pearled hail ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 264
Than shoots the slanted hail -storm, down he dropt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 333
In thine own depth. Hail , gentle Carian! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 545
Of rain and hail -stones, lovers need not tell As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 11
Hail , my sweet hostess! I do thank the stars, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 12
Princely Ludolph, hail ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 26b
Hail , royal Hun! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 81b
Come on! Farewell my kingdom, and all hail King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 9
All hail - I would not truck this brilliant day King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 11
To watch our grand approach, and hail us as we pass'd. The Jealousies, Line 720
 
HAILS.............1
Hails it with tears, her stout defender sent: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 16
 
HAIR..............52
Light feet, dark violet eyes, and parted hair ; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 15
Of thy dark hair that extends Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 13
There stood a knight, patting the flowing hair Calidore: A Fragment, Line 110
Pink robes, and wavy hair , and diamond jar, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 7
Dancing their sleek hair into tangled curls; Sleep and Poetry, Line 150
Than to sing out and sooth their wavy hair . Sleep and Poetry, Line 180
And on their placid foreheads part the hair . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 230
And of the golden hair , God of the golden bow, Line 3
Hast thou a symbol of her golden hair ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 609
And trembles through my labyrinthine hair .' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 969
And shook it on his hair ; another flew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 425
While every eve saw me my hair uptying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 803
O that her shining hair was in the sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 943
And his white hair was awful, and a mat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 194
Their melodies, and see their long hair glisten; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 242
I see thy streaming hair ! and now, by Pan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 279
One hair of thine: see how I weep and sigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 583
The sea-swell took her hair . Dead as she was Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 625
He mark'd their brows and foreheads; saw their hair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 741
God of warm pulses, and dishevell'd hair , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 984
Her long black hair swell'd ampler, in display Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 984
A lock of thy bright hair - Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 36
Had marr'd his glossy hair which once could shoot Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 276
But to throw back at times her veiling hair . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 376
She calm'd its wild hair with a golden comb, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 403
Beside her basil, weeping through her hair . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 472
A hair brush There was a naughty boy, Line 13
His long hair rustled like a flame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 19
Locks shining black, hair scanty grey, and passions manifold. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 38
All finish'd but some ringlets of her hair ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 39
With hair blown back, and wings put cross-wise on their breasts. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 36
And on her hair a glory, like a saint: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 222
Of all its wreathed pearls her hair she frees; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 227
Leaned forward, with bright drooping hair , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 71
Thin in the waist, with bushy head of hair , Character of C.B., Line 2
Achilles by the hair and bent his neck; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 29
Just where her falling hair might be outspread, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 81
Sobb'd Clymene among her tangled hair . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 76
Golden his hair of short Numidian curl, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 371
His very hair , his golden tresses famed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 131
Her hair was long, her foot was light, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 15
Fear not that your watry hair Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 56
Your gait the same, your hair of the same shade, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 40
I would not see thee dragg'd to death by the hair , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 145
Blush'd into roses 'mid his golden hair , Lamia, Part I, Line 25
Her hair in weird syrops, that would keep Lamia, Part I, Line 107
Pour'd on his hair , they all mov'd to the feast Lamia, Part II, Line 195
And not a man but felt the terror in his hair . Lamia, Part II, Line 268
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind; To Autumn, Line 15
Just where her fallen hair might spread in curls, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 380
To spread a rapture in my very hair ,- What can I do to drive away, Line 53
Speed giving to the winds her lustrous hair ; The Jealousies, Line 41
 
HAIR'D............7
Of fair- hair'd Milton's eloquent distress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 11
One of shell-winding Triton's bright- hair'd daughters? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 691
With pity, for the grey- hair'd creature wept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 283
Young Phoebe's, golden hair'd ; and so 'gan crave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 451
And chatter with dack'd hair'd critics, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 39
Ah goud hair'd Marie, yeve I pray Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 5
Sat gray- hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 4
 
HAIRED............1
Unown'd of any weedy- haired gods; What can I do to drive away, Line 36
 
HAIRS.............3
More tame for his gray hairs - Alas me! flit! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 104
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 25
Aye, Conrad, it will pluck out all grey hairs ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 7
 
HALCYON...........1
Knelt to receive those accents halcyon . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 923
 
HALCYON'S.........1
Spread by the halcyon's breast upon the sea- To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 7
 
HALE..............3
With turrets crown'd. Four maned lions hale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 643
Hale strength, nor from my bones all marrow drain'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 614
Sombre Saturn, Momus hale , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 21
 
HALF..............80
A half -blown flower, which cold blasts amate. Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 8
Brightening the half veil'd face of heaven afar: To Hope, Line 45
Who can forget her half retiring sweets? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 30
Cov'ring half thine ivory breast; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 46
And th' half seen mossiness of linnets' nests. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 22
Delighting much, to see it half at rest, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 15
That each at other look'd half staringly; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 149
And half forget what world or worldling meant. Happy is England! I could be content, Line 8
And she her half -discover'd revels keeping. To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 12
And sports with half his tail above the waves. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 52
Among the bushes half leafless, and dry; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 2
And half discovered wings, and glances keen. On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 8
'Tis might half slumb'ring on its own right arm. Sleep and Poetry, Line 237
Sappho's meek head was there half smiling down Sleep and Poetry, Line 381
Watch her half -smiling lips, and downward look; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 102
Along the reedy stream; a half heard strain, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 161
And crept through half closed lattices to cure I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 222
And seems to one in drowsiness half lost, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 13
With half -shut eyes and comfortable cheek, On The Story of Rimini, Line 2
See it half finished: but let autumn bold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 55
A chieftain king's: beneath his breast, half bare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 172
The squatted hare while in half sleeping fit; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 265
Blush-tinted cheeks, half smiles, and faintest sighs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 619
My foolish tongue, and listening, half afraid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 960
A half -forgetfulness in mountain wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 980
Lay, half asleep, in grass and rushes cool, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 134
Half -happy, by comparison of bliss, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 371
Curses upon his head.- I was half glad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 472
Half seen through deepest gloom, and griesly gapes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 629
Flew a delight half -graspable; his tread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 673
Half lost, and all old hymns made nullity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 794
Half seeing visions that might have dismay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 874
His wandering steps, and half -entranced laid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 108
"One morn she left me sleeping: half awake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 477
Met palsy half way: soon these limbs became Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 637
One half of the witch in me. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 645a
To which the leaders sped; but not half raught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 856
Schooling its half -fledg'd little ones to brush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 130
Do gently murder half my soul, and I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 309
Shall feel the other half so utterly!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 310
Where lone Echo gives the half Robin Hood, Line 16
All which elsewhere are but half animate, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 37
She spoilt her half -done broidery with the same. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 16
"O Isabella, I can half perceive Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 57
Half -ignorant, they turn'd an easy wheel, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 119
One hour, half ideot, he stands by mossy waterfall, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 41
Half -hidden, like a mermaid in sea-weed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 231
A table, and, half anguish'd, threw thereon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 255
And Bertha had not yet half done The Eve of St. Mark, Line 24
Ne cared he for wine, or half and half, Character of C.B., Line 10
Ne cared he for wine, or half and half , Character of C.B., Line 10
Ere half this region-whisper had come down, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 349
In the half -glutted hollows of reef-rocks, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 306
Thus with half -shut suffused eyes he stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 44
I have been half in love with easeful Death, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 52
Than see you humbled but a half degree! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 15
This was but half expected, my good sire, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 73
Stay, stay; here is one I have half a word with. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 114
Will blow one half of your sad doubts away. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 61
Half mad - not right here - I forget my purpose. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 176
The God on half -shut feathers sank serene, Lamia, Part I, Line 123
She dwelt but half retir'd, and there had led Lamia, Part I, Line 312
That Lycius could not love in half a fright, Lamia, Part I, Line 335
Or on a half -reap'd furrow sound asleep, To Autumn, Line 16
And grape stalks but half bare, and remnants more, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 33
Rot on the pavement where thou rotted'st half ."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 153
Half closed, and visionless entire they seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 267
With half unravel'd web. I set myself The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 308
Enough to catch me in but half a snare, What can I do to drive away, Line 8
Predestin'd for his ear, scape as half check'd King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 54
To half beg, and half demand, respectfully, The Jealousies, Line 30
To half beg, and half demand, respectfully, The Jealousies, Line 30
Half lidded, piteous, languid, innocent; The Jealousies, Line 173
These orders given, the Prince, in half a pet, The Jealousies, Line 199
While Hum continued, shamming half a sob,- The Jealousies, Line 412
From twelve to half -past - wings not fit to fly The Jealousies, Line 646
"From two to half -past, dusky way we made, The Jealousies, Line 658
"At half -past three arose the cheerful moon- The Jealousies, Line 685
Cinque-parted danced, some half asleep reposed The Jealousies, Line 690
At half -past four the morn essay'd to beam- The Jealousies, Line 708
 
HALL..............16
Round the wide hall , and show their happy faces; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 42
The lamps that from the high-roof'd hall were pendent, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 132
So wide was Neptune's hall : and as the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 868
The stranger walk'd into the hall , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 5
A mossy place, a Merlin's hall , a dream. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 34
Waking an Indian from his cloudy hall Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 270
Behind a broad hall -pillar, far beyond The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 94
The hall door shuts again, and all the noise is gone. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 261
They glide, like phantoms, into the wide hall ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 361
With stride colossal, on from hall to hall; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 195
With stride colossal, on from hall to hall ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 195
A Banquetting Hall , brilliantly illuminated, and set forth with all Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
With strides colossal, on from hall to hall; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 39
With strides colossal, on from hall to hall ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 39
A motley crowd thick gather'd in the hall , The Jealousies, Line 762
Came forth to quell the hubbub in the hall . The Jealousies, Line 794
 
HALLOO............1
While the torch-bearing slaves a halloo sent The Jealousies, Line 392
 
HALLOO'D..........1
By one, who at a distance loud halloo'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 344
 
HALLOOS...........1
Where dost thou listen to the wide halloos Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 307
 
HALLOW'D..........1
The hallow'd hour was near at hand: she sighs The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 66
 
HALLOWED..........1
Your hallowed names, in this unholy place, Sleep and Poetry, Line 210
 
HALLOWING.........1
Ambitious for the hallowing of thine eyes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 60
 
HALLS.............6
In Spenser's halls he strayed, and bowers fair, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 9
In thy western halls of gold Ode to Apollo, Line 1
Of halls and corridors. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 72
The Poet's eye can reach those golden halls , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 35
Come, let me lead you to our halls again! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 56
About the halls , and to and from the doors, Lamia, Part II, Line 119
 
HALO..............4
The halo of my memory. Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 28
With a bright halo , shining beamily; To Lord Byron, Line 8
Spangler of clouds, halo of crystal rivers, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 118
Haply a halo round the moon - a glee To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 3
 
HALT..............1
and Attendants. The Soldiers halt at the gate, with banners in sight. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
 
HAMADRYADS........1
Who lov'st to see the hamadryads dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 236
 
HAME..............2
Ah Marie, they are all gane hame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 37
Ah! Marie, they are all gone hame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 41
 
HAMLET............1
Descry a favourite hamlet faint and far. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 397
 
HAMMER............1
Crush one with Vulcan's hammer ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 98a
 
HAN...............1
Men han beforne they wake in bliss, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 100
 
HAND..............131
Thou biddest Shakspeare wave his hand , Ode to Apollo, Line 24
So smile acquiescence, and give me thy hand , O come, dearest Emma!, Line 19
A lay that once I saw her hand awake, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 38
A dewy flower, oft would that hand appear, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 41
So graceful, that it seems no mortal hand , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 5
And his tremendous hand is grasping it, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 25
What gentle squeeze he gave each lady's hand ! Calidore: A Fragment, Line 81
That nestled in his arms. A dimpled hand , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 93
A hand heaven made to succour the distress'd; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 106
A hand that from the world's bleak promontory Calidore: A Fragment, Line 107
And mailed hand held out, ready to greet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 126
He gave each damsel's hand so warm a kiss, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 147
'Twas but to kiss my hand , dear George, to you! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 142
The hand of Brutus, that so grandly fell To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 71
Yet, as my hand was warm, I thought I'd better To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 103
No, nor till cordially you shook my hand To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 121
Again I shake your hand ,- friend Charles, good night. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 132
Or hand of hymning angel, when 'tis seen On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 4
Some with upholden hand and mouth severe; Sleep and Poetry, Line 143
One, loveliest, holding her white hand toward Sleep and Poetry, Line 366
If you but scantily hold out the hand , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 78
Yet would I kneel and kiss thy gentle hand ! To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 14
You say you love; but then your hand You say you love; but with a voice, Line 16
From his right hand there swung a vase, milk-white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 153
Peona's busy hand against his lips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 444
Went, spiritual, through the damsel's hand ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 498
Endymion look'd at her, and press'd her hand , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 516
Not - thy soft hand , fair sister! let me shun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 611
And press'd me by the hand : Ah! 'twas too much; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 636
Of thy combing hand , the while it travelling cloys Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 968
Through autumn mists, and took Peona's hand : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 991
To him her dripping hand she softly kist, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 101
One moment with his hand among the sweets: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 354
The while one hand , that erst upon his thigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 498
So still obey the guiding hand that fends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 574
Is in Apollo's hand : our dazed eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 726
Shakes hand with our own Ceres; every sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 38
Mantling the east, by Aurora's peering hand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 113
The sway of human hand ; gold vase emboss'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 126
Thou seem'dst my sister: hand in hand we went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 145
Thou seem'dst my sister: hand in hand we went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 145
Or will he touch me with his searing hand , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 261
A hand was at my shoulder to compel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 604
Upon a dead thing's face my hand I laid; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 618
When at my feet emerg'd an old man's hand , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 669
I knelt with pain - reached out my hand - had grasp'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 671
Press'd its cold hand , and wept,- and Scylla sigh'd! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 780
Endymion, with quick hand , the charm applied- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 781
At his right hand stood winged Love, and on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 864
No hand to toy with mine? No lips so sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 47
How dying I shall kiss that lily hand .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 118
Or is't thy dewy hand the daisy tips? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 151
This cannot be thy hand , and yet it is; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 315
To divine powers: from his hand full fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 409
Touching with dazzled lips her starlight hand . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 419
She press'd his hand in slumber; so once more Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 454
It melted from his grasp: her hand he kiss'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 509
Come hand in hand with one so beautiful. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 812
Come hand in hand with one so beautiful. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 812
Peona, ye should hand in hand repair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 912
Peona, ye should hand in hand repair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 912
Then he embrac'd her, and his lady's hand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 974
Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 8
And snared by the ungloving of thy hand : Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 4
Each step he took should make his lady's hand Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 5
There may not be one dimple on her hand , Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 6
He seiz'd my lady's lily hand , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 3
Aye hand in hand into the bower, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 11
Aye hand in hand into the bower, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 11
He knew whose gentle hand was at the latch, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 17
Thy hand by unwelcome pressing, would not fear Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 62
And for them many a weary hand did swelt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 107
Warm the nerve of a welcoming hand , Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 5
In his hand There was a naughty boy, Line 32
The spirit's hand to wake his eyes. Not Aladdin magian, Line 23
It lifts its little hand into the flame 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 44
The hallow'd hour was near at hand : she sighs The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 66
And grasp'd his fingers in her palsied hand , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 97
Her falt'ring hand upon the balustrade, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 190
These delicates he heap'd with glowing hand The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 271
Arise - arise! the morning is at hand ;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 345
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 18
But there came one, who with a kindred hand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 23
One hand she press'd upon that aching spot Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 42
From the young day when first thy infant hand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 73
Whose hand , whose essence, what divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 104
Emprison her soft hand , and let her rave, Ode on Melancholy, Line 19
And Joy, whose hand is ever at his lips Ode on Melancholy, Line 22
His right hand , his brave Conrad! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 44a
E'en for his Highness Ludolph's sceptry hand , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
On all the many bounties of your hand ,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 113
Kiss your fair hand and lady fortune's too. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 16
Give me your hand , and let this kindly grasp Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 121
To kiss that hand , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 179b
Daughter, your hand ; Ludolph's would fit it best. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 201
Your hand - I go! Ha! here the thunder comes Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 57
Because I hold those base weeds with tight hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
He shall feel what it is to have the hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 271
Ere, by one grasp, this common hand is made Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 86
Cut off these curls, and brand this lily hand , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 95
Whose snowy timid hand has never sinn'd Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 24
Give me thy hand ; hast thou forgiven me? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 8
Where is your hand , father?- what sultry air! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 193
But the God fostering her chilled hand , Lamia, Part I, Line 140
Had Lycius liv'd to hand his story down, Lamia, Part II, Line 7
Beseeching him, the while his hand she wrung, Lamia, Part II, Line 68
Lycius then press'd her hand , with devout touch, Lamia, Part II, Line 249
As her weak hand could any meaning tell, Lamia, Part II, Line 302
habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand , carried him home to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
When this warm scribe my hand is in the grave. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 18
And no hand in the universe can turn The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 115
About a golden censer from the hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 197
About a golden censer from her hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 219
This saw that Goddess, and with sacred hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 255
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 323
But there came one who with a kindred hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 328
One hand she press'd upon that aching spot The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 344
Sweet voice, sweet lips, soft hand , and softer breast, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 2
Ah! keep that hand unravished at the least; To Fanny, Line 19
Put your soft hand upon your snowy side, To Fanny, Line 34
Or with a rude hand break To Fanny, Line 52
Wrench'd with an iron hand from firm array, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 5
Broke short in his hand ; upon which he flung King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 40
Where are my enemies? Here, close at hand , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 4
This living hand , now warm and capable This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 1
The hand of his fair daughter Bellanaine; The Jealousies, Line 31
To such a dreadful blaze, her side would scorch her hand . The Jealousies, Line 117
Sudden the music ceased, sudden the hand The Jealousies, Line 348
A fairy's hand , and in the waist, why - very small." The Jealousies, Line 477
With mad-cap pleasure, or hand -clasp'd amaze: The Jealousies, Line 724
Of lords and ladies, on each hand , make show The Jealousies, Line 752
 
HAND'S............1
With a silken thread of my own hand's weaving: I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 4
 
HANDED............2
Catch the white- handed nymphs in shady places, Sleep and Poetry, Line 105
As if disjoined by soft- handed slumber, Ode to Psyche, Line 18
 
HANDEL............1
By Arne delighted, or by Handel madden'd; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 111
 
HANDFULS..........1
Handfuls of daisies." - "Endymion, how strange! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 632
 
HANDICRAFTSMEN....1
A thousand handicraftsmen wore the mask Sleep and Poetry, Line 200
 
HANDKERCHIEF......1
She waved her handkerchief . "Ah, very grand!" The Jealousies, Line 596
 
HANDLE............3
Inverts it - dips the handle , and lo, soon Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 11
Romeo! Arise! take snuffers by the handle ; Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 14
Dear mistress, let him have no handle against you! The Jealousies, Line 54
 
HANDLED...........1
The monarch handled o'er and o'er again The Jealousies, Line 451
 
HANDLES...........1
High as the handles heap'd, to suit the thought Lamia, Part II, Line 218
 
HANDS.............42
Soft dimpled hands , white neck, and creamy breast, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 16
Kissing thy daily food from Naiad's pearly hands . To George Felton Mathew, Line 93
And rubbing of white hands , and sparkling eyes: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 96
By infant hands , left on the path to die. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 46
With hands held back, and motionless, amaz'd I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 232
And meekly let your fair hands joined be. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 4
Through his forgotten hands : then would they sigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 181
And, after lifting up his aged hands , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 195
With uplift hands our foreheads, lowly bending, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 303
My clenched hands ;- for lo! the poppies hung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 682
Doth her resign; and where her tender hands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 945
Follow'd by glad Endymion's clasped hands : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 65
And lifted hands , and trembling lips he stood; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 196
A sovereign quell is in his waving hands ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 537
These toying hands and kiss their smooth excess? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 743
In muffling hands . So temper'd, out he stray'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 873
And over Glaucus held his blessing hands .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 902
With uplift hands I blest the stars of heaven. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 735
His hands against his face, and then did rest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 917
She gave her fair hands to him, and behold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1000
In their affairs, requiring trusty hands . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 228
And put her lean hands to the horrid thing: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 381
Rose-bloom fell on her hands , together prest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 220
Who knelt, with joined hands and piteous eye, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 305
And thy sharp lightning in unpractised hands Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 62
And made his hands to struggle in the air, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 136
When, past all hindrance of my trembling hands , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 291
He utter'd, while his hands contemplative Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 377
With bowed necks, and joined hands , side-faced; Ode on Indolence, Line 2
Come, fair Auranthe, try if your soft hands Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
[Music. ETHELBERT raises his hands , as in benediction of Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
Wring hands ; embrace; and swear how lucky 'twas Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 251
Disjoin those hands - part - part - do not destroy Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 43
By minist'ring slaves, upon his hands and feet, Lamia, Part II, Line 193
And when I clasp'd my hands I felt them not. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 131
And thy sharp lightning in unpracticed hands The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 364
Of love, your kiss, those hands , those eyes divine, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 7
For I will never by mean hands be led King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 46
Whose lips were solid, whose soft hands were made The Jealousies, Line 6
Cut off my ears and hands , or head too, by my fay! The Jealousies, Line 468
She clapp'd her hands three times, and cried out ' Whoop!'- The Jealousies, Line 673
Where the Chief Justice on his knees and hands doth crawl. The Jealousies, Line 765
 
HANDY.............1
"Sire, this is Bertha Pearl's neat handy -work, The Jealousies, Line 442
 
HANG..............6
"O thou, whose mighty palace roof doth hang Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 232
Hang in thy vision like a tempting fruit, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 442
And your shawl I hang up on this willow, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 14
The blossoms hang by a melting spell, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 13
So hang upon your spirit. Twice in the fight Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 53
Imperial Elfinan, go hang thyself or drown! The Jealousies, Line 144
 
HANGINGS..........2
For old serge hangings ,- me, your humble friend, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 36
Hangings of heaven's clouds, purple and gold, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 36
 
HANGMEN...........1
Hast thou no fear of hangmen , or the faggot? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
 
HANGS.............4
What is it that hangs from thy shoulder, so brave, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 13
There hangs by unseen film, an orbed drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 806
Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 42
Whose linsey-wolsey lining hangs all slack, The Jealousies, Line 229
 
HAP...............1
At last, by hap , through some young trees it struck, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 931
 
HAPLESS...........3
Are emblems true of hapless lovers dying: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 90
O let me then my hapless fate bewail! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 10
See, with cross'd arms they sit - ah hapless crew, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 5
 
HAPLY.............14
Haply it was the workings of its pride, Imitation of Spenser, Line 34
Haply 'tis when thy ruby lips part sweetly, To G.A.W., Line 9
Round my fire-side, and haply there discover Sleep and Poetry, Line 72
The spreading blue bells: it may haply mourn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 43
So haply when I rove in some far vale, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 55
Haply a halo round the moon - a glee To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 3
And haply you will say the dewy birth To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 5
Sacred to Dian? Haply , thou hast seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 512
Its airy goal, haply some bower veils Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 192
Haply , like dolphin tumults, when sweet shells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 610
To utter secrets, haply I might say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 914
Thou haply mayst delight in, will I fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 692
Pedestal'd haply in a palace court, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 32
And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 36
 
HAPPEN............1
These things which happen . Rightly have they done: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 528
 
HAPPEN'D..........1
Just as it happen'd , true or else a bam! The Jealousies, Line 398
 
HAPPIER...........4
So with the horrors past thou'lt win thy happier fate. On Peace, Line 14
Ah, no! far happier , nobler was his fate! Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 8
Happier , and dearer to society. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 112
I pr'ythee why? What happier hour of time Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 7
 
HAPPIEST..........1
Happiest of days! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 128b
 
HAPPILY...........1
And to the sea as happily dost haste. To the Nile, Line 14
 
HAPPINESS.........17
With England's happiness proclaim Europa's liberty. On Peace, Line 9
(And blissful is he who such happiness finds,) To Some Ladies, Line 26
That mortal's a fool who such happiness misses; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 18
Therefore, 'tis with full happiness that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 34
Of happiness , to when upon the moors, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 390
Wherein lies happiness ? In that which becks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 777
Of happiness ! ye on the stubble droop, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 273
Of silent happiness , of slumberous ease: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 324
Of happiness , from fairy-press ooz'd out. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 802
Thou seest it for my happiness , no pearl Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 869
In happiness to see beyond our bourn- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 83
And so from happiness I far was gone. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 98
Great bliss was with them, and great happiness Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 71
Take you to real happiness and give Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 20
But being too happy in thine happiness ,- Ode to a Nightingale, Line 6
All happiness attend you! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 157b
Therefore, that happiness be somewhat shar'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 177
 
HAPPY.............86
Where happy spirits, crowned with circlets bright As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 6
Took happy flights. Who shall his fame impair Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 13
Whence gush the streams of song: in happy hour To George Felton Mathew, Line 78
I am no happy shepherd of the dell Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 7
Wraps round her ample robe with happy trembling. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 18
Round the wide hall, and show their happy faces; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 42
Which seem'd full loath this happy world to leave: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 4
They brought their happy burthens. What a kiss, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 80
And this he fondled with his happy cheek Calidore: A Fragment, Line 97
Sweet too the converse of these happy mortals, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 158
Who is more happy , when, with heart's content, To one who has been long in city pent, Line 5
As late I rambled in the happy fields, To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 1
Happy is England! I could be content Happy is England! I could be content, Line 1
Happy is England, sweet her artless daughters; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 9
My happy thoughts sententious; he will teem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 78
It tells me too, that on a happy day, To Kosciusko, Line 9
Light hoverer around our happy pillows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 13
Most happy listener! when the morning blesses Sleep and Poetry, Line 16
In happy silence, like the clear Meander Sleep and Poetry, Line 74
About the earth: happy are ye and glad. Sleep and Poetry, Line 229
Smiled at each other. Happy he who trusts Sleep and Poetry, Line 358
His eyes from her sweet face. Most happy they! Sleep and Poetry, Line 391
Never again saw he the happy pens Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 70
Of happy changes in emphatic dreams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 414
The happy chance: so happy, I was fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 891
The happy chance: so happy , I was fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 891
Half- happy , by comparison of bliss, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 371
Might seem unholy, be of happy cheer! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 435
Of happy times, when all he had endur'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 591
My happy love will overwing all bounds! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 814
A happy wooer, to the flowery mead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 951
Not once more did I close my happy eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 973
And make them happy in some happy plains." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1017
And make them happy in some happy plains." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1017
I sue not for my happy crown again; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 543
How happy once again in grassy nest! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1032
Long have I said, how happy he who shrives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 26
In her maternal longing! Happy gloom! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 537
O happy spirit-home! O wondrous soul! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 543
So happy was he, not the aerial blowing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 552
Behold upon this happy earth we are; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 625
Be happy both of you! for I will pull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 813
Perhaps ye are too happy to be glad: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 819
More happy than betides mortality. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 859
Too happy , happy tree, In drear nighted December, Line 2
Too happy, happy tree, In drear nighted December, Line 2
Too happy , happy brook, In drear nighted December, Line 10
Too happy, happy brook, In drear nighted December, Line 10
Happy field or mossy cavern, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 3
Happy field or mossy cavern, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 25
And let me breathe into the happy air, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 4
And should have been most happy - but I saw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 93
Me how to harbour such a happy thought. To J.R., Line 14
Portion'd us - happy days, or else to die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 332
Fra happy wedding, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 42
Happy and thoughtless of thy day of doom! This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 4
Ah, happy chance! the aged creature came, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 91
Let us away, my love, with happy speed; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 347
And they had had it, but, O happy chance, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 47
Happy , happy glowing fire! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 1
Happy, happy glowing fire! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 1
Happy , happy glowing fire, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 5
Happy, happy glowing fire, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 5
But who wast thou, O happy , happy dove? Ode to Psyche, Line 22
But who wast thou, O happy, happy dove? Ode to Psyche, Line 22
From happy pieties, thy lucent fans, Ode to Psyche, Line 41
'Tis not through envy of thy happy lot, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 5
But being too happy in thine happiness,- Ode to a Nightingale, Line 6
Ah, happy , happy boughs! that cannot shed Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 21
Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 21
And, happy melodist, unwearied, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 23
More happy love! more happy, happy love! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 25
More happy love! more happy , happy love! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 25
More happy love! more happy, happy love! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 25
To your high dignities, we are too happy . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 127
If ever king was happy , that am I! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 17
That I, by happy chance, hit the right man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 252
Behave as all were happy ; keep your eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 15
Ah, happy Lycius!- for she was a maid Lamia, Part I, Line 185
Happy in beauty, life, and love, and every thing, Lamia, Part I, Line 298
Days happy as the gold coin could invent Lamia, Part I, Line 313
But when the happy vintage touch'd their brains, Lamia, Part II, Line 203
No music but a happy -noted voice- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 164
It works a constant change, which happy death The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 259
No,- wine is only sweet to happy men; What can I do to drive away, Line 27
Bad omen - this new match can't be a happy one. The Jealousies, Line 657
 
HARBINGERS........1
Things such as these are ever harbingers Sleep and Poetry, Line 339
 
HARBOUR...........3
In which whales harbour close, to brood and sulk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 882
Me how to harbour such a happy thought. To J.R., Line 14
My gentle Ludolph, harbour not a fear; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 195
 
HARBOUR'D.........3
And so, when harbour'd in the sleepy west, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 190
For the first time, since first he harbour'd in Lamia, Part II, Line 30
Wherefore when harbour'd in the sleepy west, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 34
 
HARD..............25
Aye dropping their hard fruit upon the ground. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 41
It hard , and heavy steel: but that indeed Calidore: A Fragment, Line 118
As hard as lips can make it: till agreed, Sleep and Poetry, Line 109
A little shallop, floating there hard by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 423
With others of the sisterhood. Hard by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 418
I am too flinty- hard for thy nice touch: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 573
Can't be got without hard money! Robin Hood, Line 48
"Ha! ha!" said she, "I knew not this hard life, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 329
Work through the clayey soil and gravel hard , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 355
Full hard against the moon. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 16
Was as hard There was a naughty boy, Line 98
Unus'd to bend, by hard compulsion bent Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 300
Instead of thrones, hard flint they sat upon, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 15
While from beneath some cumbrous boughs hard by Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 45
Toil hard , ye slaves, and from the miser-earth Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 10
In yesterday's hard fight, that it has turn'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
Can manage those hard rivets to set free Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
Hard penalties against thee, if't be found Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
Remembering, as I do, hard -hearted times Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 20
Her fingers he press'd hard , as one came near Lamia, Part I, Line 363
Hard for the non-elect to understand. Lamia, Part II, Line 6
Upon the grass I struggled hard against The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 53
Or nature's rocks toil'd hard in waves and winds, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 69
Of that fierce threat, and the hard task proposed. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 120
Stung my own ears - I strove hard to escape The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 127
 
HARDEST...........1
Would pass the very hardest gazer's wish, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 208
 
HARDLY............1
My presence in wide Corinth hardly known: Lamia, Part II, Line 93
 
HARDSHIP..........1
Of godlike hardship tells me I must die On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 4
 
HARDY.............2
Sole,- in a stiff, fool- hardy , sulky pride; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 102
Death!- and slow tortures to the hardy fool Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 69
 
HARE..............4
Blue hare -bells lightly, and where prickly furze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 202
The squatted hare while in half sleeping fit; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 265
Must see behind, as doth the hunted hare . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 144
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 3
 
HARK..............8
Dark as the parentage of chaos. Hark ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 912
And if it came at last, hark , and rejoice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 356
And, in the same moment - hark ! Fancy, Line 43
Hark ! 'tis an elfin-storm from faery land, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 343
Whimpering away my reason! Hark 'e, sir,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 97
This way - hark ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 31a
Hark ! hark! the bells!" "A little further get, The Jealousies, Line 564
Hark! hark ! the bells!" "A little further get, The Jealousies, Line 564
 
HARM..............7
It cannot be that ought will work him harm ." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 130
"I will not harm her, by all saints I swear," The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 145
Harm him not! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 108b
Ward him from harm ,- and bring me better news! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 51
A little talk with her - no harm - haste! haste! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 181
It could not harm him now. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 190b
Which to the oil-trade doth great scaith and harm , The Jealousies, Line 215
 
HARMFUL...........1
To summon harmful lightning, and make yawn Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 83
 
HARMLESS..........1
In harmless tendril they each other chain'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 935
 
HARMONIES.........2
Are changed to harmonies , for ever stealing To Kosciusko, Line 7
Its strain, when other harmonies , stopt short, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 127
 
HARMONIOUS........1
Of thine harmonious sisters keep in tune Lamia, Part I, Line 266
 
HARMONIZED........1
Oh what a wild and harmonized tune Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 170
 
HARMONY...........3
Of harmony , to where it aye will poise Sleep and Poetry, Line 174
A noise of harmony , pulses and throes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 791
Hymning and harmony Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 26
 
HARMS.............1
To keep off mildews, and all weather harms : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 284
 
HARP..............10
Strikes the twanging harp of war, Ode to Apollo, Line 8
The silver strings of heavenly harp atween: On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 5
His name upon the harp -string, should achieve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 725
The poet's harp - the voice of friends - the sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 165
Have mov'd, even though Amphion's harp had woo'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 461
As in a palsied Druid's harp unstrung; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 286
Sighs, too, as mournful as that Memnon's harp Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 376
Meantime touch piously the Delphic harp , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 10
O tell me, lonely Goddess, by the harp , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 108
And dolorous accent from a tragic harp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 444
 
HARPS.............4
On many harps , which he has lately strung; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 52
And young AEolian harps personified, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 18
With death, as life. The ancient harps have said, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 396
While little harps were touch'd by many a lyric fay. The Jealousies, Line 36
 
HARSH.............8
No, he had felt too much for such harsh jars: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 865
Escap'd from dull mortality's harsh net? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 907
With its spear grass harsh - For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 20
His was harsh penance on St. Agnes' Eve: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 24
Serv'd with harsh food, with scum for Sunday-drink. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 89
Your doctrine has not been so harsh to him Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 85
Untun'd, and harsh , and barren of all love. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 132
Would fright a Dryad; whose harsh herbaged meads What can I do to drive away, Line 40
 
HARSHEST..........1
Could not thy harshest vengeance be content, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 621
 
HARSHLY...........1
My Prince, you think too harshly - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 47a
 
HARVEST...........5
Is a full harvest whence to reap high feeling; To Kosciusko, Line 2
The seed its harvest , or the lute its tones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 840
To thee the spring will be a harvest -time. O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 4
Distant harvest -carols clear; Fancy, Line 40
Slant on my sheeved harvest of ripe bliss. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 118
 
HARVEST'S.........1
And the harvest's done. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 8
 
HARVESTERS........1
And the tann'd harvesters rich armfuls took. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 441
 
HARVESTING........2
Of peaceful sway above man's harvesting , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 110
And peaceful sway above man's harvesting , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 415
 
HARVESTS..........1
To ripening harvests . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 167a


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Published @ RC

March 2005