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Keats Concordance
 
HAST..............61
Hast thou from the caves of Golconda, a gem On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 1
Hast thou a goblet for dark sparkling wine? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 5
Hast thou a steed with a mane richly flowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 9
Hast thou a sword that thine enemy's smart is? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 10
Hast thou a trumpet rich melodies blowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 11
I marvel much that thou hast never told To George Felton Mathew, Line 84
That thou hast never told thy travels strange, To George Felton Mathew, Line 90
Weigh down thy nature. Hast thou sinn'd in aught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 508
Sacred to Dian? Haply, thou hast seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 512
Ah! thou hast been uphappy at the change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 520
Hast thou a symbol of her golden hair? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 609
What promise hast thou faithful guarded since Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 44
Too long, alas, hast thou starv'd on the ruth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 104
Oft hast thou seen bolts of the thunder hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 205
As from thy threshold; day by day hast been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 206
O love! how potent hast thou been to teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 92
And now, O winged Chieftain! thou hast sent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 100
I oft have dried my tears when thou hast smil'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 144
That thou hast been a witness - it must be- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 394
And speak a blessing: Mark me! Thou hast thews Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 588
O vulture-witch, hast never heard of mercy? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 620
For thou hast brought their promise to an end. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 688
For scenes like this: an empire stern hast thou; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 960
Who has another care when thou hast smil'd? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 979
Immortal bliss for me too hast thou won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1024
Thee to thy native hopes. O thou hast won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 17
Who stolen hast away the wings wherewith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 109
Hast thou felt so content: a grievous feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 547
Here will I kneel, for thou redeemed hast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 649
Twice hast thou ask'd whither I went: henceforth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 755
And thou shalt aid - hast thou not aided me? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 775
Sure I will not believe thou hast such store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 809
Cat! who hast past thy grand climacteric, To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 1
How many mice and rats hast in thy days To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 2
The pleasant sun-rise; green isles hast thou too, To the Nile, Line 13
Hast thou, as a mere shadow?- But how great, Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 13
Sweet Spirit, thou hast school'd my infancy: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 334
The meadow thou hast tramped o'er and o'er,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 11
Hast sifted well the atom-universe; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 183
"Thou hast dream'd of me; and awaking up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 62
Fairer than these, though temple thou hast none, Ode to Psyche, Line 28
What thou among the leaves hast never known, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 22
She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 19
Well! hast told Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 1b
Hast brought pollution to our holy rites? Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
Hast thou no fear of hangmen, or the faggot? Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
The sleepy thunder? Hast no sense of fear? Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 84
An ample store of misery thou hast , Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 173
If with thy mother's milk thou hast suck'd in Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
Where are they now? Hast yet heard? Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 9b
Give me thy hand; hast thou forgiven me? Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 8
To set the place in flames. I pray, hast heard Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 7
Too gentle Hermes, hast thou found the maid?" Lamia, Part I, Line 80
Where she doth breathe!" "Bright planet, thou hast said," Lamia, Part I, Line 87
What taste of purer air hast thou to soothe Lamia, Part I, Line 282
"Sure some sweet name thou hast , though, by my truth, Lamia, Part II, Line 85
As still I do. Hast any mortal name, Lamia, Part II, Line 88
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,- To Autumn, Line 24
Then said the veiled shadow - "Thou hast felt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 141
Is thy own safety; thou hast dated on The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 144
Hast hinted. King Stephen Line I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 5a
 
HASTE.............16
Haste , haste away!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 590
Haste, haste away!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 590
And to the sea as happily dost haste . To the Nile, Line 14
In haste to teach the little thing to walk, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 8
And went in haste , to get in readiness, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 191
First the soft bag-pipe mourn'd with zealous haste ; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 5
Blockhead, make haste ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 68a
In haste it seems. Now shall I be in the way, Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 121
To tell the Emperor you will haste to him? Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
I see you are thunderstruck. Haste , haste away! Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 71
I see you are thunderstruck. Haste, haste away! Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 71
Upon it. For the present I'm in haste . Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 46
A little talk with her - no harm - haste ! haste! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 181
A little talk with her - no harm - haste! haste ! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 181
Into his mantle, adding wings to haste , Lamia, Part I, Line 367
Repressing haste , as too unholy there; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 94
 
HASTEN............1
We will hasten , my fair, to the opening glades, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 5
 
HASTEN'D..........1
I hasten'd back, your grieving messenger, Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 117
 
HASTENED..........1
hastened on Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 85
 
HASTENING.........1
Have spoken? that from hastening disgrace Sleep and Poetry, Line 271
 
HASTENS...........1
While his boat hastens to the monstrous steep Sleep and Poetry, Line 88
 
HASTES............1
Upon his fairy journey on he hastes ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 352
 
HASTEST...........1
And hastest thou now to that fair lady's bower? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 16
 
HASTILY...........1
In trumping up this match so hastily , The Jealousies, Line 79
 
HASTY.............3
Now over them he goes with hasty trip, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 69
For all the blushing of the hasty morn. Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 18
With hasty steps, wrapp'd cloak, and solemn looks, The Jealousies, Line 219
 
HAT...............4
Nor when reluctantly I took my hat ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 120
The black tassell'd trencher and common hat ; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 9
A chip hat had she on. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 28
Came sudden 'fore my face, and brush'd against my hat . The Jealousies, Line 675
 
HATCH.............3
Arise then! for the hen-dove shall not hatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1025
The stockdove shall hatch her soft brace and shall coo, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 23
To hatch into sonnets- Two or three posies, Line 28
 
HATCH'D...........1
Fresh hatch'd in my ambition's eagle-nest; Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 41
 
HATCHING..........1
Hatching in the hawthorn-tree, Fancy, Line 60
 
HATE..............5
My waking must have been! disgust, and hate , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 562
Here do they look alive to love and hate , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 38
Moods of one's mind! You know I hate them well, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 106
'Mid looks of love, defiance, hate , and scorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 69
To breed distrust and hate , that make the soft voice hiss. Lamia, Part II, Line 10
 
HATED.............5
Into the bosom of a hated thing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 280
His magian fish through hated fire and flame? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 265
Not at dog's howl, or gloom-bird's hated screech, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 171
He lov'd girls smooth as shades, but hated a mere shade. The Jealousies, Line 9
Till from this hated match I get a free release. The Jealousies, Line 63
 
HATEFUL...........6
And hateful thoughts enwrap my soul in gloom; To Hope, Line 2
O, I am frighten'd with most hateful thoughts! Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 1
To the most hateful seeing of itself. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 370
Spurn the green turf as hateful to my feet? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 94
Of a man drowning on his hateful throat. Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 272
To banish thoughts of that most hateful land, What can I do to drive away, Line 31
 
HATERS............1
Being gloomy-minded, haters of fair revels,- Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 57
 
HATH..............51
In all this quiet luxury; and hath set Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 486
No one but thee hath heard me blithely sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 156
And it hath furrow'd that large front: yet now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 961
Hath no revenge in it: as it is whole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 471
Who hath not journeyed in this native hell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 523
Hath led thee to this Cave of Quietude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 548
Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 1
O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 1
He hath his lusty spring, when fancy clear Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 3
He hath his summer, when luxuriously Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 5
Part of himself. He hath his autumn ports Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 8
He hath his winter too of pale misfeature, Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 13
Who hath not loiter'd in a green church-yard, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 353
Pitying each form that hungry death hath marr'd, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 357
The gadfly he hath stung me sore- All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 5
As palmer's that with weariness mid-desert shrine hath found. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 22
Hath pass'd beyond the rocky portal; Not Aladdin magian, Line 46
All its instincts;- he hath heard Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 10
Beauties that the earth hath lost; Fancy, Line 30
Hedge-grown primrose that hath burst; Fancy, Line 50
Hath fled to her bower, well knowing I want Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 14
Against the window-panes; St. Agnes' moon hath set. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 324
As hath the seeded thistle, when in parle Character of C.B., Line 3
Quarrel with the proud forests it hath fed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 218
Because it cooeth, and hath snowy wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 222
By noble winged creatures he hath made? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 235
O let him feel the evil he hath done; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 332
Flush every thing that hath a vermeil hue, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 14
Or hath that antique mien and robed form Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 51
To one who in this lonely isle hath been Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 71
Who hath forsaken old and sacred thrones Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 77
Hath thee in thrall!" La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 40
O, for a draught of vintage! that hath been Ode to a Nightingale, Line 11
The same that oft-times hath Ode to a Nightingale, Line 68
Hath given consent that you should marry Ludolph! Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 87
What mood is this? Hath fortune touch'd thy brain? Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 99
Known only to his troop, hath greater plea Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 28
Hath he not gall'd my spirit to the quick? Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 48
Yes, yes, I know he hath a noble nature Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 55
He hath wrong'd me, and I have done him wrong; Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 58
He hath lov'd me, and I have shown him kindness; Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 59
But you must taunt this dove, for she hath lost Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 125
A foolish dream that from my brow hath wrung Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 221
Hath it not comfort in it? Would it not Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 13
What mortal hath a prize, that other men Lamia, Part II, Line 57
Apollonii, hath Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store? To Autumn, Line 12
Hath visions, and would speak, if he had lov'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 14
What haven? Every creature hath its home; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 171
Every sole man hath days of joy and pain, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 172
From the throng'd towers of Lincoln hath look'd down, King Stephen Line I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 21
 
HATRED............2
For others, good or bad, hatred and tears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 4
Loving and hatred , misery and weal, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 112
 
HATS..............1
That ye may love in spite of beaver hats . And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 17
 
HAUGHTY...........2
Turn to some level plain where haughty Mars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 728
That, on a court day bow'd to haughty Maud, King Stephen Line I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 29
 
HAUNCHES..........1
On the deer's tender haunches : late, and loth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 908
 
HAUNT.............10
Haunt us till they become a cheering light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 30
From those kind eyes,- the very home and haunt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 472
And death to this fair haunt of spring, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 3
Deserted, void, nor any haunt of mine. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 240
The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 50
You puzzle me,- you haunt me,- when I dream Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 203
A melancholy mood will haunt a man, Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 124
And in those meads where sometime she might haunt , Lamia, Part I, Line 18
Clouds still with shadowy moisture haunt the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 420
So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 4
 
HAUNTED...........4
Of late has haunted a most valiant crew Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 10
When holy were the haunted forest boughs, Ode to Psyche, Line 38
But I was haunted by the monstrous ghost Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 124
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine- Lamia, Part II, Line 236
 
HAUNTER...........1
Moving more near the while. "O Haunter chaste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 302
 
HAUNTERS..........1
Haunters of cavern, lake, and waterfall, Lamia, Part I, Line 331
 
HAUNTING..........4
Numerous as shadows haunting fairily The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 39
A certain Arab haunting in these parts. Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 120
The ghost of folly haunting my sweet dreams." Lamia, Part I, Line 377
A haunting music, sole perhaps and lone Lamia, Part II, Line 122
 
HAUNTS............5
When to thy haunts two kindred spirits flee. O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 14
From the sequester'd haunts of gay Titania, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 40
And I was free of haunts umbrageous; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 467
Why have ye left your forest haunts , why left Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 230
What leaf-fring'd legend haunts about thy shape Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 5
 
HAVE'T............1
Thou shalt have't ! Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 90b
 
HAVEN.............3
Am I to leave this haven of my rest, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 235
All else who find a haven in the world, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 150
What haven ? Every creature hath its home; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 171
 
HAVEN'D...........1
Blissfully haven'd both from joy and pain; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 240
 
HAVENS............1
And havens of repose, when his tired wings Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 9
 
HAVING............4
Each having a white wicker over brimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 137
And having done it, took his dark blue cloak Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 751
And a blush for having done it; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 6
These brethren having found by many signs Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 161
 
HAVOCK'D..........1
And seen her enemies havock'd at her feet. King Stephen Line I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 23
 
HAWING............1
So without any fuss, any hawing and humming, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 11
 
HAWK..............2
The shark at savage prey - the hawk at pounce, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 103
The arras, rich with horseman, hawk , and hound, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 358
 
HAWKS.............1
The hawks of ship-mast forests - the untired Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 133
 
HAWKWISE..........1
Dropt hawkwise to the earth. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 512a
 
HAWTHORN..........3
We feel the safety of a hawthorn glade: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 130
Hatching in the hawthorn -tree, Fancy, Line 60
White hawthorn , and the pastoral eglantine; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 46
 
HAY...............3
The comfortable green and juicy hay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 4
Sweet as a muskrose upon new-made hay ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 102
For the new mown hay For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 41
 
HAYDON............1
Forgive me, Haydon , that I cannot speak To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 1
 
HAYDON'S..........1
Of Haydon's in its fresh magnificence. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 69
 
HAZE..............1
So a day's journey, in oblivious haze To J.R., Line 7
 
HAZEL.............2
Peel'd the brown hazel twig to lilly white, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 42
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells To Autumn, Line 7
 
HAZELS............2
Their ruffled locks where meeting hazels darken; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 237
And hazels thick, dark-stemm'd beneath the shade: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 27
 
HAZLE.............1
Por'd on its hazle cirque of shedded leaves. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 769
 
HAZLITT...........1
And Hazlitt playing with Miss Edgeworth's cat; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 10
 
HAZY..............2
'Neath smothering parsley, and a hazy light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 230
Down-looking, vacant, through a hazy wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 560
 
HE'D..............4
To Lucifer or Baal, when he'd pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 892
Here's a true churchman! he'd affect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 37
Who, penitent ere he'd begun O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 75
Vowing he'd have them sent on board the gallies; The Jealousies, Line 223
 
HE'LL.............5
Into the blue of heaven. He'll be shent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 599
He'll hear none of it; Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 88b
He'll let me sleep, seeing I fast and pray. The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 14
He'll surmise sagely of a dwelling-house, The Jealousies, Line 58
'Tis nine to one he'll give you the rattan! The Jealousies, Line 319
 
HE'S..............11
He's gone - up bubbles all his amorous breath. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 14
And he's awake who thinks himself asleep. O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 14
Pity he's not here. Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 62b
He's very close to Otho, a tight leach! Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 56
To beard us for no cause; he's not the man Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
A whisper in this silence that he's dead! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 45
He's Elfinan's great state-spy militant, The Jealousies, Line 52
"Gad! he's obliged to stick to business! The Jealousies, Line 289
He's always in my way upon the mat!" The Jealousies, Line 312
" He's in the kitchen, or the Lord knows where,"- The Jealousies, Line 313
" He's not asleep, and you have little wit," The Jealousies, Line 329
 
HEAD..............109
Nor bow thy pretty head to fly. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 4
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head . To Hope, Line 6
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head ! To Hope, Line 24
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head ! To Hope, Line 30
Beneath thy pinions canopy my head ! To Hope, Line 36
Bowing her head , and ready to expire: To Hope, Line 40
Waving thy silver pinions o'er my head . To Hope, Line 48
I pillow my head on the sweets of the rose, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 38
Of mosses, and flowers, to pillow thy head ; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 10
Those smiling ladies, often turned his head Calidore: A Fragment, Line 129
Whose head is pregnant with poetic lore. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 54
Who chosen is their queen,- with her fine head To My Brother George (epistle), Line 87
Upon a tyrant's head . Ah! had I never seen, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 72
Will set a green robe floating round her head , Sleep and Poetry, Line 114
Lifts its sweet head into the air, and feeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 250
Sappho's meek head was there half smiling down Sleep and Poetry, Line 381
Round which is heard a spring- head of clear waters I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 41
O'er head we see the jasmine and sweet briar, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 135
Where had he been, from whose warm head out-flew I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 181
Upon my ambitious head a glorious gain- On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 6
By drawling out - "Ye are that head of gold!" Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 14
By angry wolf, or pard with prying head , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 76
Fall on my head , and presently unmew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 132
His aged head , crowned with beechen wreath, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 159
Until my head was dizzy and distraught. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 565
Of o'er- head clouds melting the mirror through. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 887
To sue her gentle ears for whose fair head , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 953
Must such conviction come upon his head , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 35
The crystal spout- head : so it did, with touch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 89
Upon a misty, jutting head of land- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 163
Into the fearful deep, to hide his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 217
To where thick myrtle branches, 'gainst his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 378
Disparts a dew-lipp'd rose. Above his head , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 407
Curses upon his head .- I was half glad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 472
And doubling over head their little fists Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 509
Ethereal for pleasure; 'bove his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 672
His empty arms together, hung his head , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 858
He saw the giant sea above his head . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1023
His head upon a tuft of straggling weeds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 109
The old man rais'd his hoary head and saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 218
"Thou art the man! Now shall I lay my head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 234
My head , and kiss death's foot. Love! love, farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 275
I rear'd my head , and look'd for Phoebus' daughter. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 414
And, as he pass'd, each lifted up its head , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 785
Grew drunken, and would have its head and bent. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 797
A gold-green zenith 'bove the Sea-God's head . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 878
And the great Sea-King bow'd his dripping head . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 890
His head through thorny-green entanglement Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 41
A cowslip on the head , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 168
'Twas Sleep slow journeying with head on pillow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 370
She bow'd into the heavens her timid head . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 502
Could lift Endymion's head , or he had view'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 557
Prone to the green head of a misty hill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 613
His head upon a mossy hillock green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 918
Bows down his summer head below the west. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 930
By old Saturnus' forelock, by his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 956
Too high above our head , God of the meridian, Line 10
And Coomb at the clear Teign head - For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 3
A white sail shews above the green- head cliff, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 23
Keeps head against the freshets. Sick and wan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 213
Red whortle-berries droop above my head , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 298
The flint was there, the berries at his head . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 352
They cut away no formless monster's head , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 394
From the fast mouldering head there shut from view: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 430
She turn'd her dazed head full oft, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 29
My head is light with pledging a great soul, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 6
The Stranger next with head on bosom bent Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 6
So pulled the clouds again about his head Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 70
On such a catering trust my dizzy head . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 177
She took it in her head to see the place. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 56
I would not give a sixpence for her head ." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 82
Thin in the waist, with bushy head of hair, Character of C.B., Line 2
Forest on forest hung above his head Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 6
While his bow'd head seem'd list'ning to the Earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 20
Making slow way, with head and neck convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 262
Found way from forth the thunders round his head ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 325
Had pour'd a mortal oil upon his head , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 97
To hover round my head , and make me sick Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 288
I made a garland for her head , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 17
My head cool-bedded in the flowery grass; Ode on Indolence, Line 52
Over head - look over head, Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 9
Over head - look over head , Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 9
No treason 'gainst his head in deed or word! Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
The benison of heaven on your head , Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
Kept danger all aloof from Otho's head , Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 22
Though now upon my head he heaps disgrace. Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 46
And almost put a price upon my head ? Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 53
To muster kites and eagles 'gainst my head ? Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 87
Had no perplexity to hide his head ! Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 2
On the right shoulders; on that wretch's head Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 144
And, though it never come, be on my head Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 162
Good gods! no innocent blood upon my head ! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 54
Oh! thou good man, against whose sacred head Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 140
And wound with many a river to its head , Lamia, Part I, Line 29
Her head was serpent, but ah, bitter-sweet! Lamia, Part I, Line 59
Ravish'd, she lifted her Circean head , Lamia, Part I, Line 115
His drooping head , and clear his soul of doubt, Lamia, Part I, Line 305
But left a thought, a buzzing in his head . Lamia, Part II, Line 29
And pledge him. The bald- head philosopher Lamia, Part II, Line 245
Steady thy laden head across a brook; To Autumn, Line 20
While his bow'd head seem'd listening to the Earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 325
Surpassing wan Moneta by the head , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 337
In Scarab Street, Panthea, at the Jubal's Head . The Jealousies, Line 90
With head inclined, each dusky lineament The Jealousies, Line 264
for the head ." The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 365
Cut off my ears and hands, or head too, by my fay! The Jealousies, Line 468
Then lords in waiting; then (what head not reels The Jealousies, Line 591
The stair- head ; that being glutted as a leach, The Jealousies, Line 626
Too ripe, he fell, being puzzled in his head The Jealousies, Line 629
 
HEADED............4
Shuffling along with ivory- headed wand, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 92
That fosters the droop- headed flowers all, Ode on Melancholy, Line 13
Is this clear- headed Albert? He brain-turn'd! Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 64
Somewhere in the column headed letter B The Jealousies, Line 101
 
HEADLONG..........3
Convuls'd and headlong ! Stay! an inward frown Sleep and Poetry, Line 304
Headlong I darted; at one eager swirl Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 630
And all the headlong torrents far and near, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 364
 
HEADS.............14
Where swarms of minnows show their little heads , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 72
Then heighten'd just above the silvery heads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 603
Above their heads , and follow them untir'd.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 353
Spirits in grief, lift up your heads , and smile; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 437
Lift up your heads , sweet Spirits, heavily, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 438
With blood upon their heads , to banishment. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 480
Star'd, where upon their heads the cornice rests, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 35
Their heads appear'd, and up their stature grew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 87
Lift up their heads , as still the whisper pass'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 58
Now, while I speak to you, their comely heads Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 60
A quick plot, swift as thought to save your heads ; Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 66
Over heads and ears, King Stephen Line I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 15b
The sable-pointed heads of firs and pines The Jealousies, Line 555
Powder'd bag-wigs and ruffy-tuffy heads The Jealousies, Line 770
 
HEADY.............1
Is in the heady , proud, ambitious vein; Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 149
 
HEAL..............4
That its mild light creates to heal again: Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 5
When there is none to heal it, In drear nighted December, Line 22
A father his son's debtor, or to heal Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 38
Console my poor boy, cheer him, heal his spirits? Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 14
 
HEAL'D............1
Heal'd up the wound, and, with a balmy power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 483
 
HEALING...........3
Of all that's high, and great, and good, and healing . To George Felton Mathew, Line 10
By your own healing presence, and that too, Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 132
For, in the healing of one wound, I fear Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 149
 
HEALTH............12
That men of health were of unusual cheer; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 216
Full of sweet dreams, and health , and quiet breathing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 5
The natural hue of health , from vermeil lips?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 148
Of health by due; where silence dreariest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 539
As say these sages, health perpetual Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 831
For to thy tongue will I all health confide. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 864
Do you get health - and Tom the same - I'll dance, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 110
After my health , intreating, if I please, Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 37
Pout her faint lips anew with rubious health ; Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
health ! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Ludolph, Line 40a
And fills the air with so much pleasant health The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 100
The gas (objected to on score of health ), The Jealousies, Line 211
 
HEALTHFUL.........5
His healthful spirit eager and awake Calidore: A Fragment, Line 2
More healthful than the leafiness of dales? Sleep and Poetry, Line 7
As when of healthful midnight sleep bereft, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 323
Aye, if a madman could have leave to pass a healthful day, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 25
Save when, for healthful exercise and air, The Jealousies, Line 43
 
HEALTHIER.........1
Opening his eyelids with a healthier brain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 465
 
HEALTHY...........6
The imagination of a boy is healthy , and the mature Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
of a man is healthy ; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Already, a more healthy countenance? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 987
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 2
Sparkle with healthy fevers,- the Emperor Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 86
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 295
 
HEAP..............5
Let it not be among the jumbled heap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 2
And reaching fingers, 'mid a luscious heap Sleep and Poetry, Line 362
While he from forth the closet brought a heap The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 264
I would not, I, be pardon'd in the heap , Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 71
All in a mingled heap confus'd there lay The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 78
 
HEAP'D............7
On heap'd up flowers, in regions clear, and far; On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 2
Thus ending, on the shrine he heap'd a spire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 223
These delicates he heap'd with glowing hand The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 271
Nor altar heap'd with flowers; Ode to Psyche, Line 29
Is heap'd upon her, maiden most unmeek,- Ode on Indolence, Line 29
At Venus' temple porch, 'mid baskets heap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 317
High as the handles heap'd , to suit the thought Lamia, Part II, Line 218
 
HEAPED............2
All the heaped autumn's wealth, Fancy, Line 35
A full- heaped helmet of the purest gold. Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 42
 
HEAPING...........1
Up heaping through the slab: refreshment drowns Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 343
 
HEAPS.............2
Though now upon my head he heaps disgrace. Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 46
Faggots of cinnamon, and many heaps The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 235
 
HEAR..............79
Ah! when I hear each traitorous lying bell, Lines Written on 29 May, Line 4
One's thoughts from such a beauty; when I hear Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 37
Him thou wilt hear ; so I will rest in hope Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 65
To hear of knightly deeds, and gallant spurning Calidore: A Fragment, Line 143
We hear around when Hesperus is coming. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 161
Beauties of deeper glance, and hear their singing, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 13
That I should never hear Apollo's song, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 9
Could hear your footsteps touch the grav'ly floor. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 124
And other pulses. Hear ye not the hum Addressed to the Same, Line 12
Now while I cannot hear the city's din; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 40
Hear us, great Pan! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 246
Hear us, O satyr king! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 278
To hear the speckled thrushes, and see feed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 485
O charitable Echo! hear , and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 958
O let me once more hear the linnet's note! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 322
If in soft slumber thou dost hear my voice, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 329
Yet mutter'd wildly. I could hear he lov'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 567
Why didst thou hear her prayer? O that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 938
'Tis almost death to hear : O let me pour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 982
For thou shalt hear this secret all display'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 308
My skiff along green shelving coasts, to hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 358
O let me hear thee speak, for Cupid's sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 430
I die - I hear her voice - I feel my wing-" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1012
And I have told thee all thou mayest hear . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 272
To hear the marriage melodies, and then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 383
Beset with plainful gusts, within ye hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 529
When he shall hear the wedding lutes a playing.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 601
To some wight, amaz'd to hear Robin Hood, Line 17
And hear a merry laugh amid the thunder; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 6
To hear her morning-step upon the stair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 24
Now they can no more hear thy ghittern's tune, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 150
If he could hear his lady's matin-song, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 195
Of thee I hear and of the Cyclades, To Homer, Line 2
Woodlark may sing from sandy fern,- the sun may hear his lay; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 14
Blockhead, d'ye hear - Blockhead, I'll make her feel. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 53
To hear what I shall say. 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 9
And hear my lullaby! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 17
And hear my lullaby! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 26
And thou shalt quaff it:- thou shalt hear Fancy, Line 39
One would hear so very oft? Fancy, Line 76
That the jealous, the jealous old baldpate may hear , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 3
For less than a nothing the jealous can hear . Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 8
There are no ears to hear , or eyes to see,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 348
"O mighty Princess, did you ne'er hear tell When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 22
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 13
O Goddess! hear these tuneless numbers, wrung Ode to Psyche, Line 1
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 24
The voice I hear this passing night was heard Ode to a Nightingale, Line 63
Or hear the voice of busy common-sense! Ode on Indolence, Line 40
'Tis chosen I hear from Hymen's jewelry, Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 137
For, as I hear , the wily enemy, Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 134
He'll hear none of it; Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 88b
Fair prisoner, you hear these joyous shouts? Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 7
To hear you condescend to ribbald-phrase. Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 90
Silence! and hear the magic of a name- Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 92
To hear my story. O be gentle to me, Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 114
Let us be calm, and hear the abbot's plea Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 100
Something of quick dispatch, for should she hear , Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 168
You would not hear my counsel, when his life Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 17
For ever! Speak no more; but hear my words, Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 140
You would not hear the end of. At nightfall Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 170
I'm sorry I can hear no more. Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 70a
Hear , he pleads not guilty! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 29b
Hear him! He calls you - sweet Auranthe, come! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
Enough! I hear , I hear. Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 27b
Enough! I hear, I hear . Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 27b
Open the door; let's hear if all is quiet. Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 35
Let, let me hear his voice; this cannot last; Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 41
O let me catch his voice - for lo! I hear Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 44
First I would hear what music is prepared Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 78
To herald and receive her; let me hear ! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 79
The only sad one; for thou didst not hear Lamia, Part I, Line 72
To hear her whisper woman's lore so well; Lamia, Part I, Line 325
he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Let me hear other groans, and trumpets blown The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 432
From this so famous field - D'ye hear ! be quick! King Stephen Line I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 47
My Lord of Chester, is't true what I hear King Stephen Line I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 24
For chalk, I hear , stands at a pretty price; The Jealousies, Line 290
The little birds I hear are all alive; The Jealousies, Line 480
 
HEAR'ST...........1
Is Saturn's; tell me, if thou hear'st the voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 99
 
HEARD.............74
Mysterious, wild, the far heard trumpet's tone; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 156
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 8
And catch soft floatings from a faint- heard hymning; Sleep and Poetry, Line 34
Fresh garlands: for sweet music has been heard Sleep and Poetry, Line 223
Round which is heard a spring-head of clear waters I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 41
Along the reedy stream; a half heard strain, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 161
Were heard of none beside the mournful robbins. This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 14
All lovely tales that we have heard or read: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 22
Among sere leaves and twigs, might all be heard . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 452
Salt tears were coming, when I heard my name Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 963
Had more been heard . Thus swell'd it forth: "Descend, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 202
He heard but the last words, nor could contend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 215
Broke through the careful silence; for they heard Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 495
The Latmian listen'd, but he heard no more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1010
No one but thee hath heard me blithely sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 156
How sweet, and sweeter! for I heard a lyre, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 421
Whereat was heard a noise of painful toil, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 522
O vulture-witch, hast never heard of mercy? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 620
I heard their cries amid loud thunder-rolls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 660
Like what was never heard in all the throes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 825
Nor be the trumpet heard ! O vain, O vain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 970
Was heard no more Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 990b
Before our forests heard the talk of men; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 6
Endymion heard not: down his steed him bore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 612
When yet a child, I heard that kisses drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 738
Of jubilee to Dian:- truth I heard ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 876
Of Cynthia he heard not, though rough briar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 965
I have heard that on a day Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 13
He heard a laugh full musical aloft; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 198
But their low voices are not heard , though come on travels drear; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 16
All its instincts;- he hath heard Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 10
That ancient Beadsman heard the prelude soft; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 28
As she had heard old dames full many times declare. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 45
She scarcely heard : her maiden eyes divine, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 57
Which when he heard , that minute did he bless, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 248
The kettle-drum, and far- heard clarionet, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 259
In all the house was heard no human sound. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 356
He stood, and heard not Thea's sobbing deep; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 139
Darken'd the place; and neighing steeds were heard , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 184
Not heard before by Gods or wondering men. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 185
They felt, but heard not, for the solid roar Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 7
Of what I heard , and how it made me weep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 260
Presumptuous, in thus venturing to be heard ." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 299
Though scarcely heard in many a green recess. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 41
Sure I have heard those vestments sweeping o'er Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 53
I have heard the cloudy thunder: Where is power? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 103
The voice I hear this passing night was heard Ode to a Nightingale, Line 63
Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 11
That I heard Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 106b
And make the politic smile; no, I have heard Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 146
Erminia! Indeed! I've heard of her- Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
Young man, you heard this virgin say 'twas false,- Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
Heard his loud laugh, and answer'd in full choir. Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 51
You heard what oath I sware, as the sun rose, Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 27
[A sennet heard faintly. Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 53
You have heard , my liege, and so, no doubt, all here, Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 129
When I had heard e'en of thy death perhaps, Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 21
And not a foot or whisper to be heard . Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 119
And, as I follow'd, heard my lady speak. Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 126
Where are they now? Hast yet heard ? Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 9b
To set the place in flames. I pray, hast heard Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 7
To give fit salutation. Methought I heard , Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 26
There as he stood, he heard a mournful voice, Lamia, Part I, Line 35
Such as once heard , in gentle heart, destroys Lamia, Part I, Line 36
These words dissolv'd: Crete's forests heard no more. Lamia, Part I, Line 170
Jove heard his vows, and better'd his desire; Lamia, Part I, Line 229
The many heard , and the loud revelry Lamia, Part II, Line 262
From whose white fragrant curtains thus I heard The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 106
I heard , I look'd: two senses both at once The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 118
Methought I heard some old man of the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 440
To what I erewhile heard : only his lips The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 450
When Eban thought he heard a soft imperial snore. The Jealousies, Line 324
Where from the earth we heard a lively tune The Jealousies, Line 687
At six we heard Panthea's churches ring- The Jealousies, Line 718
 
HEARING...........5
the Anniversary of Charles's Restoration, on Hearing the Bells Lines Written on 29 May, Extended Title
And some are hearing , eagerly, the wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 370
And thus: "I need not any hearing tire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 457
hearing the cheers of the soldiery). Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 85
Hearing that his brave son had reappeared, Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 19
 
HEARK'NING........1
More heark'ning to the sermon's horrid sound. Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 4
 
HEARKEN...........9
And through whole solemn hours dost sit, and hearken Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 238
Among the winds at large - that all may hearken ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 738
Was pass'd in dreaming. Hearken , sweet Peona! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 861
Hearken , thou craggy ocean pyramid, To Ailsa Rock, Line 1
Hearken , stars, and hearken, spheres; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 11
Hearken, stars, and hearken , spheres; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 11
Hearken , thou eternal sky- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 12
This is too much! Hearken , my lady pure,- Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
You would not hearken . Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 132a
 
HEARKEN'D.........1
And griev'd I hearken'd . "That divinity The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 332
 
HEARKENER.........1
"O Hearkener to the loud clapping shears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 279
 
HEARKENING........1
And hearkening for a love-sound, doth devour Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 11
 
HEARS.............2
Its voice mysterious, which whoso hears To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 7
He hears a whisper plainer than a rant: The Jealousies, Line 50
 
HEARS'D...........1
Would you were both hears'd up in stifling lead! Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
 
HEARSE............2
Who, to thy sacred and ennobled hearse , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 8
And went into that dismal forest- hearse . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 344
 
HEART.............125
Had she but known how beat my heart Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 21
Strive for her son to seize my careless heart ; To Hope, Line 14
Over the genius loving heart , a feeling To George Felton Mathew, Line 9
Thine ear, and find thy gentle heart ; so well Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 3
And always does my heart with pleasure dance, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 51
Until his heart is well nigh over wound, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 8
With a warm heart , and eye prepared to scan Calidore: A Fragment, Line 29
About each youthful heart ,- with stifled cries, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 95
But many days have past since last my heart To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 109
These, these will give the world another heart , Addressed to the Same, Line 11
And from the heart up-springs, rejoice! rejoice! Sleep and Poetry, Line 38
Who simply tell the most heart -easing things. Sleep and Poetry, Line 268
Bring round the heart an undescribable feud; On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 10
And in thy heart inurn me- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 24
One felt heart -certain that he could not miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 374
I, who, for very sport of heart , would race Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 533
The gentle heart , as northern blasts do roses; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 734
Smiling in the clear well. My heart did leap Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 896
Increasing still in heart , and pleasant sense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 351
A tumult to his heart , and a new life Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 528
For quenchless burnings come upon the heart , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 844
Stifle thine heart no more;- nor be afraid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 979
Towards her with the Muses in thine heart ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 49
My heart so potently? When yet a child Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 143
Frosted the springing verdure of his heart ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 188
Look'd high defiance. Lo! his heart 'gan warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 282
Had he then wrong'd a heart where sorrow kept? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 284
Grew a new heart , which at this moment plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 306
To sue thee to his heart ? Kind stranger-youth! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 401
Naked and sabre-like against my heart . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 557
That our heart -broken parting is so nigh. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 584
Put cross-wise to its heart . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 744a
Of flutes and viols, ravishing his heart , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 772
I move to the end in lowliness of heart .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 29
Of passion from the heart !"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 85a
I feel my heart is cut for them in twain." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 97
The lady's heart beat quick, and he could see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 99
To meet oblivion."- As her heart would burst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 124
His heart leapt up as to its rightful throne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 445
I have no daedale heart : why is it wrung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 459
Ah, shouldst thou die from my heart -treachery!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 469
"O that the flutter of this heart had ceas'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 728
So after my own heart ! I knew, I knew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 881
All my thirst for sweet heart -ache! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 29
Without some stir of heart , some malady; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 4
His heart beat awfully against his side; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 42
And to his heart he inwardly did pray Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 43
The inward fragrance of each other's heart . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 76
Not long - for soon into her heart a throng Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 245
Sense of the gnawing fire at heart and brain. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 272
Until her heart felt pity to the core Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 378
No heart was there in Florence but did mourn Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 499
An' every heart is full on flame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 39
O bag-pipe, thou didst steal my heart away; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 9
Alas! I could not choose. Ah! my poor heart , Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 13
There is a deeper joy than all, more solemn in the heart , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 7
Forgotten is the worldly heart - alone, it beats in vain. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 24
His heart invaded. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 60
My heart began to burn - and only pains, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 10
Whose heart had brooded, all that wintry day, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 43
But she saw not: her heart was otherwhere: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 62
Had come young Porphyro, with heart on fire The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 75
Will storm his heart , Love's fev'rous citadel: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 84
Flushing his brow, and in his pained heart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 137
But to her heart , her heart was voluble, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 204
But to her heart, her heart was voluble, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 204
Her throat in vain, and die, heart -stifled, in her dell. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 207
Anon his heart revives: her vespers done, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 226
I curse not, for my heart is lost in thine, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 331
Thy beauty's shield, heart -shap'd and vermeil dyed? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 336
Then to my human heart I turn at once- Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 4
Heart ! thou and I are here sad and alone; Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 5
To question heaven and hell and heart in vain! Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 8
Try'd to look unconcern'd with beating heart . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 44
Where beats the human heart , as if just there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 43
Doth ease its heart of love in. - I am gone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 112
O Saturn! come away, and give them heart ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 151
As with us mortal men, the laden heart Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 101
So that I felt a movement in my heart Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 267
And dotes the more upon a heart at ease; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 4
My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 1
Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 66
That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloy'd, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 29
Our by-gone quarrels, I confess my heart Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 22
Such salutation argues a glad heart Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 130
His deep heart -sickness for a rebel child. Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 39
Is not the only proud heart in his realm. Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 57
Possible!- Easy! O my heart ! Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 52b
Nothing? Her burst heart nothing? Emperor! Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 121
A young man's heart , by heaven's blessing, is Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 180
With such an aching heart , such swooning throbs Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
But make your own heart monitor, and save Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 120
Moans from my heart , and sighs not counterfeit. Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 17
But shall indulge itself about thine heart ! Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 108
Alas! poor Prince, I would you knew my heart ! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 28
I will see more. Bear you so stout a heart ? Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 17
His heart is full, it can contain no more, Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 23
Those charitable eyes will thaw my heart , Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 144
Such as once heard, in gentle heart , destroys Lamia, Part I, Line 36
"Too frail of heart ! for this lost nymph of thine, Lamia, Part I, Line 93
For pity do not this sad heart belie- Lamia, Part I, Line 259
Inhabited her frail-strung heart as his. Lamia, Part I, Line 309
So threw the goddess off, and won his heart Lamia, Part I, Line 336
'Twould humour many a heart to leave them thus, Lamia, Part I, Line 396
Not in your heart while care weighs on your brow: Lamia, Part II, Line 43
While I am striving how to fill my heart Lamia, Part II, Line 50
His foolish heart from its mad pompousness, Lamia, Part II, Line 114
Of an unnatural heat shot to his heart . Lamia, Part II, Line 253
For all thine impious proud- heart sophistries, Lamia, Part II, Line 285
From Lycius answer'd, as heart -struck and lost, Lamia, Part II, Line 293
Grew stifling, suffocating, at the heart ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 130
That made my heart too small to hold its blood. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 254
Where beats the human heart ; as if just there, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 345
Doth ease its heart of love in. Moan and wail. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 417
O ease my heart of verse and let me rest; To Fanny, Line 2
The current of your heart from me so soon: To Fanny, Line 22
Where the heart beats: confess - 'tis nothing new- To Fanny, Line 35
Whose heart goes fluttering for you every where, To Fanny, Line 43
She greets most noble Glocester from her heart , King Stephen Line I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 24
The gloomy current of a traitor's heart . King Stephen Line I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 17
That thou would wish thine own heart dry of blood, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 5
Not liking in her heart an hour-long pinch, The Jealousies, Line 71
He goes on to expose, with heart and soul, The Jealousies, Line 93
Her tender heart , and its warm ardours fann'd The Jealousies, Line 116
Alas! my wearied heart within me sinks, The Jealousies, Line 165
 
HEART'S...........8
Of him whose name to ev'ry heart's a solace, To George Felton Mathew, Line 68
Who is more happy, when, with heart's content, To one who has been long in city pent, Line 5
Of his heart's blood: 'twas very sweet; he stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 107
Heart's lightness from the merriment of May?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 166
Show thy heart's secret to an ancient Power Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 76
From a man's little heart's short fever-fit; Ode on Indolence, Line 34
All scope of thought, convulsest my heart's blood Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 78
Of love deep learned to the red heart's core: Lamia, Part I, Line 190
 
HEARTBREAK........1
We miscal grief, bale, sorrow, heartbreak , woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 942
 
HEARTED...........8
And that warm- hearted Shakspeare sent to meet him To George Felton Mathew, Line 57
I turn full hearted to the friendly aids Sleep and Poetry, Line 316
Had played upon my heels: I was light- hearted , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 25
So that he here and there full hearted stops; This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 4
I bow full hearted to your old decree! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 252
Sick hearted , weary - so I took a whim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 269
Remembering, as I do, hard- hearted times Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 20
Spleen- hearted came in full career at him. King Stephen Line I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 43
 
HEARTFELT.........1
Had been less heartfelt by him than the clang Calidore: A Fragment, Line 75
 
HEARTH............1
When by my solitary hearth I sit, To Hope, Line 1
 
HEARTS............11
Of human hearts : for lo! I see afar, Sleep and Poetry, Line 125
We lay our hearts before thee evermore- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 966
'Tis well nigh past man's search their hearts to see; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 493
With both our hearts a beating. Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 12
If queens and soldiers have play'd high for hearts , And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 12
Without a motion, save of their big hearts Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 26
Where other hearts are sick of the same bruise; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 104
And this thing woe crept in among our hearts , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 254
Cowards, who never knew their little hearts , Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 79
Of hearts and lips! Ah, miserable me!" Lamia, Part I, Line 41
In stouter hearts than nurse's fear and dread: The Jealousies, Line 68
 
HEARTY............3
The hearty grasp that sends a pleasant sonnet Sleep and Poetry, Line 319
She does not mean it really. Cheer up, hearty - there! The Jealousies, Line 459
Thank heaven, I'm hearty yet!- 'twas no such thing:- The Jealousies, Line 715
 
HEAT..............7
The large-eyed wonder, and ambitious heat Calidore: A Fragment, Line 127
When all above was faint with mid-day heat . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 878
I care not for cold or heat ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 75
No shrine, no grove, no oracle, no heat Ode to Psyche, Line 34
Thy shrine, thy grove, thy oracle, thy heat Ode to Psyche, Line 48
So Hermes thought, and a celestial heat Lamia, Part I, Line 22
Of an unnatural heat shot to his heart. Lamia, Part II, Line 253
 
HEATH.............6
And the bare heath of life presents no bloom; To Hope, Line 4
O'er many a heath , through many a woodland dun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 72
For wine we left our heath , and yellow brooms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 233
Past the heath and up the hill; Robin Hood, Line 14
Her bed it was the brown heath turf, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 3
There is a pleasure on the heath where Druids old have been, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 3
 
HEATHEN...........2
In sending heathen , Turk, and sect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 41
Tipping the wink to him was heathen Greek; Character of C.B., Line 20
 
HEATHER...........1
Go, shed one tear upon my heather -bloom, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 303
 
HEATHS............1
Were deepest dungeons; heaths and sunny glades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 693
 
HEATHY............1
Of river sides, and woods, and heathy waste, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 303
 
HEATS.............1
That heats the sense with lewd desiring; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 6
 
HEAV'D............1
Before his footsteps; as when heav'd anew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 347
 
HEAVE.............3
Heave his broad shoulder o'er the edge of the world, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 530
Her gentle bosom heave tumultuously. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 100
Thee heave to airy sleep from fathom dreams- To Ailsa Rock, Line 6
 
HEAVEN............115
In melodies that even heaven fair As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 10
Of highest heaven ; to the rolling spheres Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 10
Thy heaven -born radiance around me shed, To Hope, Line 23
But let me see thee stoop from heaven on wings To Hope, Line 41
Brightening the half veil'd face of heaven afar: To Hope, Line 45
Had brought me a gem from the fret-work of heaven ; To Some Ladies, Line 18
The wondering spirits of heaven were mute, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 31
Four laurell'd spirits, heaven -ward to intreat him. To George Felton Mathew, Line 58
These pleasant things, and heaven was bedewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 53
Thank'd heaven that his joy was never ending; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 104
A hand heaven made to succour the distress'd; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 106
And open face of heaven ,- to breathe a prayer To one who has been long in city pent, Line 3
And then I'll stoop from heaven to inspire him. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 80
Of bean blossoms, in heaven freshly shed. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 96
Of thy wide heaven - Should I rather kneel Sleep and Poetry, Line 49
Of thy wide heaven ; yet, to my ardent prayer, Sleep and Poetry, Line 55
Into the light of heaven , and in their stead Sleep and Poetry, Line 156
The winds of heaven blew, the ocean roll'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 188
On the blue fields of heaven , and then there crept I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 10
Their woes gone by, and both to heaven upflown, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 149
Of heaven , Hesperus - let him lowly speak On The Story of Rimini, Line 6
When last the winds of heaven were unbound. On the Sea, Line 8
I'll feel my heaven anew, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 17
The freshness of the space of heaven above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 85
Conception to the very bourne of heaven , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 295
And giving out a shout most heaven rending, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 304
Aught else, aught nearer heaven , than such tears? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 474
Of heaven appear'd to open for my flight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 582
In midst of all this heaven ? Why not see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 673
Of heaven and earth had faded: deepest shades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 692
Rock'd me to patience. Now, thank gentle heaven ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 706
The clear religion of heaven ! Fold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 781
Why it is thus, one knows in heaven above: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 128
Of heaven ! Oh Cynthia, ten-times bright and fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 170
'Tis in the breath of heaven : thou dost taste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 310
First heaven , then hell, and then forgotten clear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 374
An unseiz'd heaven dying at his feet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 464
Blue heaven , and a silver car, air-borne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 518
Of this in heaven : I have mark'd each cheek, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 570
Dancing before the morning gates of heaven ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 688
Exhales in mists to heaven . Aye, the count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 723
And I must blush in heaven . O that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 781
Of heaven ambrosial; and we will shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 810
Into the bloom of heaven : other light, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 909
Our piece of heaven - whose benevolence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 37
Writ in the tongue of heaven , by those souls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 130
How specious heaven was changed to real hell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 476
Of joy that ever pour'd from heaven . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 806a
Aye, I have seen these signs in one of heaven , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 912
Waits at the doors of heaven . Thou art not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 959
As newly come of heaven , dost thou sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 962
Thee into endless heaven . Awake! awake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1027
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 3
Great Brahma from his mystic heaven groans, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 265
He leans away for highest heaven and sings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 568
Crystalline brother of the belt of heaven , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 581
Into the blue of heaven . He'll be shent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 599
Heaven shield thee for thine utter loveliness! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 710
With uplift hands I blest the stars of heaven . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 735
Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 1
Of either earth of heaven ?- It is a flaw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 82
Of heaven , and few ears Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 11
For Jove uncurtain'd heaven to let thee live, To Homer, Line 6
To Dian, Queen of Earth, and Heaven , and Hell. To Homer, Line 14
Nears more to heaven in aught than when we nurse Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 8
Golden aisled, built up in heaven , Not Aladdin magian, Line 8
Mankind can tell of heaven : mist is spread Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 7
With prayers that heaven would cease to bless O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 35
Have ye souls in heaven too, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 3
Yes, and those of heaven commune Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 5
Of heaven and its mysteries. Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 22
Ye have souls in heaven too, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 39
Seem'd taking flight for heaven , without a death, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 8
Of heaven with upward eyes for all that they desire. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 54
Save wings, for heaven :- Porphyro grew faint: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 224
Thou art my heaven , and I thine eremite: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 277
The stars of heaven , and angels' wings, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 30
Candlesticks John saw in heaven , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 34
Deigns to reply from heaven or from hell. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 3
To question heaven and hell and heart in vain! Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 8
For heaven is parted from thee, and the earth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 55
A heaven he lost erewhile: it must - it must Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 124
There as he lay, the heaven with its stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 305
The heaven itself, is blinded throughout night. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 38
O Heaven wide! O unseen parent dear! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 159
As Heaven and Earth are fairer, fairer far Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 206
And as we show beyond that Heaven and Earth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 208
When all the fair Existences of heaven Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 337
And not a wind of heaven but will breathe Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 11
Save what from heaven is with the breezes blown Ode to a Nightingale, Line 39
Sudden from heaven like a weeping cloud, Ode on Melancholy, Line 12
Lady! O would to heaven your poor servant Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 132
Auranthe - heaven preserve her always fair!- Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 148
The benison of heaven on your head, Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
Could thy pleas'd star point down upon from heaven Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 8
Pray heaven it end not in apoplexy! Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 49
That, unless heaven would send me back my son, Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 28
Well, I give up, and save my prayers for heaven ! Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 255
And hopeful featur'd. Ha! by heaven you weep! Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 85
Farewell! For this heaven pardon you! Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 10b
Either of heaven or earth, can cure, unless Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 4
She is the world's chief jewel, and, by heaven , Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 73
Unveil'd the summer heaven , blue and clear, Lamia, Part II, Line 21
There was an awful rainbow once in heaven : Lamia, Part II, Line 231
Guesses at heaven : pity these have not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 4
Might spread beneath, as o'er the stars of heaven ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 64
From the green turf to heaven .- "Holy Power," The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 136
For heaven is parted from thee, and the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 357
Hung nobly, as upon the face of heaven The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 453
Then, heaven ! there will be To Fanny, Line 31
Now I thank heaven I am in the toils, King Stephen Line I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 27
And make a heaven of his purgatory, King Stephen Line I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 50
So, through a real heaven , on they swim The Jealousies, Line 39
She sha'n't be maid of honour,- by heaven that she sha'n't! The Jealousies, Line 153
Thank heaven , I'm hearty yet!- 'twas no such thing:- The Jealousies, Line 715
 
HEAVEN'S..........22
Pouring unto us from the heaven's brink. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 24
O let me 'noint them with the heaven's light! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 324
A vaulted dome like heaven's , far bespread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 631
Until the gods through heaven's blue look out!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 268
Heaven's gates, and Aethon snort his morning gold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 364
Endymion to heaven's airy dome Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 38
Now was he slumbering towards heaven's gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 381
On heaven's pavement; brotherly he talks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 408
If it were heaven's will, on our sad fate." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 976
And let me call heaven's blessing on thine eyes, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 3
To deal heaven's lightning. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 72
And hoping heaven's dread wrath to shun, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 77
With the whisper of heaven's trees Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 9
As down she knelt for heaven's grace and boon; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 219
Seen mid the sapphire heaven's deep repose; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 319
I vanish in the heaven's blue- Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 18
Devoted to heaven's pious ministries, Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 192
Though heaven's choir Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
A young man's heart, by heaven's blessing, is Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 180
Hangings of heaven's clouds, purple and gold, Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 36
From the gold peaks of heaven's high piled clouds; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 434
An immaterial wife to espouse as heaven's boon. The Jealousies, Line 27
 
HEAVENLY..........10
From thee, great God of Bards, receive their heavenly birth. Ode to Apollo, Line 47
The silver strings of heavenly harp atween: On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 5
Aye, those fair living forms swam heavenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 315
A heavenly beacon in their dreary woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 354
Offensive to the heavenly powers? Caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 509
Had not a heavenly guide benignant led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 377
With thee into the ken of heavenly powers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 796
Immortal, for thou art of heavenly race: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 589
A youth, by heavenly power lov'd and led, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 708
Not mortal, but of heavenly progeny, Lamia, Part II, Line 87
 
HEAVENS...........24
And leave once more the ravish'd heavens in peace. Ode to Apollo, Line 23
Heavens ! how desperately do I adore Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 10
From such fine pictures, heavens ! I cannot dare Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 19
Which, O heavens ! I should see, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 47
Like those fair stars that twinkle in the heavens . Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 44
Sweet as blue heavens o'er enchanted isles. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 151
From the sick heavens all unseemly stains. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 4
Although, before the crystal heavens darken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 739
Thy soul of care, by heavens , I would offer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 107
He cannot see the heavens , nor the flow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 285
My eyes against the heavens , and read again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 683
The heavens and earth in one to such a death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 81
I was to top the heavens . Dear maid, sith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 110
In the dusk heavens silverly, when they Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 486
She bow'd into the heavens her timid head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 502
Good heavens , lady, how the gemini Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 30
Each day from east to west the heavens through, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 270
The Heavens and the Earth, were manifest: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 199
Were lingering in the heavens , while the thrush Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 37
By heavens , I'd rather kiss Duke Conrad's slipper, Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 13
Prais'd be the heavens , I now dare own myself! Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 94
The heavens forbid that I should not think so. King Stephen Line I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 7
Truth! I think so - by heavens , it shall not last. King Stephen Line I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 35
And take some more wine, Hum;- O, heavens ! I burn The Jealousies, Line 530
 
HEAVENS'..........1
Are upward turn'd to catch the heavens' dew. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 23
 
HEAVENWARD........3
Ask nought so heavenward , so too - too high: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 549
He with his wand light touch'd, and heavenward Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 336
How heavenward thou soundedst, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 11
 
HEAVES............3
The voice of waters - the great bell that heaves How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 11
Heaves calmly its broad swelling smoothness o'er Sleep and Poetry, Line 377
Born of the very sigh that silence heaves : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 12
 
HEAVIER...........3
So all have set my heavier grief above Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 527
Like sorrow came upon me, heavier still, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 913
He spake, and ceas'd, the while a heavier threat Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 251
 
HEAVILY...........6
Weighs heavily on me like unwilling sleep, On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 2
Of their petty ocean. Oftener, heavily , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 884
Obstinate silence came heavily again, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 335
Nor at each other gaz'd, but heavily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 768
Lift up your heads, sweet Spirits, heavily , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 438
Two muffled up,- one sighing heavily , Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 122
 
HEAVINESS.........2
With heaviness ; in seasons when I've thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 3
Dian had chaced away that heaviness , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 138
 
HEAVING...........1
Heaving in pain, and horribly convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 27
 
HEAVY.............26
That goblet right heavy , and massy, and gold? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 6
It hard, and heavy steel: but that indeed Calidore: A Fragment, Line 118
Dead heavy - arms and shoulders gleam awhile: On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 13
Of unseen flowers in heavy peacefulness; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 235
That balances the heavy meteor-stone;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 644
A heavy ditty, and the sullen day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 684
That when through heavy hours I used to rue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 553
Their surly eyes brow-hidden, heavy paws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 645
Its heavy pressure, and will press at least Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 770
Or let me from this heavy prison fly: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 541
I am to stifle all the heavy sorrow Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 204
Rouse from his heavy slumber and instill Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 4
Gold, black, and heavy , from the lama brought. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 64
From the ploughboy's heavy shoon; Fancy, Line 21
Clear'd them of heavy vapours, burst them wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 267
Too heavy to be borne. Otho the Great, Line I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 139a
And chains too heavy for your life; Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 90b
O heavy crime! that your son's blinded eyes Otho the Great, Line II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 100
Which, being pleasant, ease the heavy pulse, Otho the Great, Line III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
Tears, tears of misery. O, the heavy day! Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 90
Ludolph! Erminia! Proofs! O heavy day! Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 92
But pale, as if you brought some heavy news. Otho the Great, Line IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 111
Too heavy a sigh would kill him, or do worse. Otho the Great, Line V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 19
On libbard's paws, upheld the heavy gold Lamia, Part II, Line 185
And, in its marriage robe, the heavy body wound. Lamia, Part II, Line 311
Slow, heavy , deadly was my pace: the cold The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 129


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Published @ RC

March 2005