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Keats Concordance
 
HEBE..............2
A Jovian thunderbolt: arch Hebe brings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 415
Stood smiling; merry Hebe laughs and nods; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 437
 
HEBE'S............1
White as Hebe's , when her zone Fancy, Line 85
 
HEBREWS...........1
As two close Hebrews in that land inspired, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 131
 
HECATE............1
Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound. On the Sea, Line 4
 
HECATOMB..........1
Was offering up a hecatomb of vows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 39
 
HECATOMBS.........1
Ten hecatombs shall bellow out their last, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 130
 
HECTIC............2
Shows her a knife.- "What feverous hectic flame Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 348
With hectic lips, and eyes up-looking mild, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 250
 
HECTORERS.........1
And careless hectorers in proud bad verse. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 208
 
HEDGE.............8
A filbert hedge with wild briar overtwined, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 35
From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead; On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 4
From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead; On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 4
And hedge for the thrush to live in, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 27
Hedge -grown primrose that hath burst; Fancy, Line 50
Of the green thorny bloomless hedge , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 9
Hedge -crickets sing; and now with treble soft To Autumn, Line 31
A hedge -stake - or a ponderous stone to hurl King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 7
 
HEED..............6
As to my sonnets, though none else should heed them, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 117
His senses had swoon'd off: he did not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 398
And there in strife no burning thoughts to heed , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 879
Thou wilt be gone away, and wilt not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 747
The bloated wassaillers will never heed :- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 346
But of its threat she took the utmost heed ; The Jealousies, Line 70
 
HEEDED............1
Pass by - she heeded not at all: in vain The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 59
 
HEEDLESS..........1
Before my heedless footsteps stirr'd, and stirr'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 699
 
HEEDLESSLY........2
Done heedlessly , those spouting columns rose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 606
But ever since I heedlessly did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 969
 
HEEL..............3
There lies beneath my east leg's northern heel Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 54
To crush her with my heel ! Wait; wait! I marvel Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 109
Toe crush'd with heel ill-natured fighting breeds, The Jealousies, Line 772
 
HEELS.............11
Had played upon my heels : I was light-hearted, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 25
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 214
So on our heels a fresh perfection treads, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 212
Go, page his dusty heels upon a march, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 81
After whose spurring heels he sent me forth, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 13
Retraction follow close upon the heels Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 93
Burnt from his winged heels to either ear, Lamia, Part I, Line 23
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 58
Ply well the rowel with faint trembling heels , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 11
To have such splendour dance attendance at her heels . The Jealousies, Line 594
Rode to the Princess swift with spurring heels , The Jealousies, Line 776
 
HEFT..............1
The heft away with such a vengeful force King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 41
 
HEIFER............2
Gleams in the sun, the milk-white heifer lows, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 21
Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 33
 
HEIFERS...........2
Are not our lowing heifers sleeker than Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 214
Where the white heifers low. And appetite The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 38
 
HEIGHT............14
For what a height my spirit is contending! On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 13
Sudden a poplar's height , and 'gan to enclose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 607
Had waned from Olympus' solemn height , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 784
Down from the ceiling's height , pouring a noise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 923
Or height , or depth, or width, or any chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 357
He reads it on the mountain's height , where chance he may sit down There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 43
Is mist and crag - not only on this height , Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 13
Had stood a pigmy's height : she would have ta'en Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 28
Till on the level height their steps found ease: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 88
And every height , and every sullen depth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 361
Yet I am griev'd at it, to the full height , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 74
Humour him to the height . I fear to go; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 52
Soon was God Bacchus at meridian height ; Lamia, Part II, Line 213
"None can usurp this height ," return'd that shade, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 147
 
HEIGHTEN'D........1
Then heighten'd just above the silvery heads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 603
 
HEIGHTS...........1
My voice upon the mountain- heights ; once more Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 478
 
HELD..............33
And mailed hand held out, ready to greet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 126
With hands held back, and motionless, amaz'd I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 232
And in his left he held a basket full Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 155
And still, a sleeping, held her finger-tips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 445
Held her in peace: so that a whispering blade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 449
Yet held my recollection, even as one Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 638
The wooing arms which held me, and did give Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 654
Sure never since king Neptune held his state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 726
And over Glaucus held his blessing hands.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 902
Held sacred for thy bower, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 171
So she held her tongue and lay plump and fair Over the hill and over the dale, Line 15
For them the Ceylon diver held his breath, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 113
But Selfishness, Love's cousin, held not long Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 241
Love meanwhile held her dearly with his wings, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 5
Held by the finest spirits fitter far Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 56
While she held the goblet sweet, Fancy, Line 88
For him, those chambers held barbarian hordes, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 85
And pale enchantment held her sleepy-eyed. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 169
Clench'd her small teeth, and held her lips apart, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 43
And sauces held he worthless as the chaff; Character of C.B., Line 12
Held struggle with his throat but came not forth; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 252
Forehead to forehead held their monstrous horns; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 12
Went trickling down the golden bow he held . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 43
My friend had held poor Ludolph's honour dear. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 63
Till flurried danger held the mirror up, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 80
My sword to my own throat, rather than held Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
The menial of Mars, and held a spear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 18
While, like held breath, the stars drew in their panting fires. Lamia, Part I, Line 300
Each by a sacred tripod held aloft, Lamia, Part II, Line 177
They held me back, with a benignant light, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 265
Whom with his sword swift-drawn and nimbly held , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 46
His mouth being held conveniently fit The Jealousies, Line 421
Then pages three and three; and next, slave- held , The Jealousies, Line 584
 
HELICON...........3
Of sparkling Helicon :- small good it were To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 27
They trembled to each other.- Helicon ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 716
O fountain'd hill! Old Homer's Helicon ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 717
 
HELICONIAN........1
Even to the steep of Heliconian springs, To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 7
 
HELL..............20
the conviction that there is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Of Proserpine, when Hell , obscure and hot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 944
First heaven, then hell , and then forgotten clear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 374
O misery of hell ! resistless, tame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 266
How specious heaven was changed to real hell . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 476
A war-song of defiance 'gainst all hell . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 603
Against that hell -born Circe. The crew had gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 665
The spite of hell is tumbling to its grave. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 760
Who hath not journeyed in this native hell . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 523
A path in hell , for ever would I bless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 617
To Dian, Queen of Earth, and Heaven, and Hell . To Homer, Line 14
Mankind do know of hell : I look o'erhead, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 5
Gave hell his treasure. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 78
Deigns to reply from heaven or from hell . Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 3
To question heaven and hell and heart in vain! Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 8
But to that second circle of sad hell , As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 9
Spaces of fire, and all the yawn of hell .- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 120
Shall be a hell to look upon, and she- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 92
Fire of hell ! Auranthe - lewd demon! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 64
To dissipate the shadows of this hell ! What can I do to drive away, Line 45
 
HELL'S............1
My soul for foot-ball at hell's holiday! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 30
 
HELLEBORE.........1
As the leaves of hellebore Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 15
 
HELLISH...........3
"Young lover, I must weep - such hellish spite Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 615
Strenuous with hellish tyranny. Attend! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 687
And through whose curtains peeps no hellish nose, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 15
 
HELM..............1
Conrad's sword, his corslet, and his helm , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 69
 
HELMET............2
Long time this sconce a helmet wore, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 49
A full-heaped helmet of the purest gold. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 42
 
HELMETED..........1
Thou superb, plum'd, and helmeted renown, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 10
 
HELMETS...........2
Old rusted anchors, helmets , breast-plates large Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 123
Blush in your casing helmets !- for see, see! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 3
 
HELP..............20
The moments, by some greedy help that seem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 658
Sweet sister, help to stem the ebbing sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 709
Dear goddess, help ! or the wide-gaping air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 194
Will gulph me - help !" - At this with madden'd stare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 195
Of help from Dian: so that when again Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 300
"Is no one near to help me? No fair dawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 44
He could not help but kiss her: then he grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 449
He could not help but kiss her and adore. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 455
His fate most goddess-like. Help me, I pray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 844
With thy good help , this very night shall see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 887
Pray pardon me, I cannot help but smile- Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 8
God's help ! my lady fair the conjuror plays The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 124
Which comes of thought and musing: give us help !" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 166
So weak a creature could turn off the help Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 257
Conrad! Albert! help ! help! What can I do? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 76
Conrad! Albert! help! help ! What can I do? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 76
To entice the devil to your help , that he Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
Aye, stare for help ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 48a
Moan, moan; for still I thaw - or give me help : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 430
Her work-box, and 'twill help your purpose dearly; The Jealousies, Line 525
 
HELP'D............1
To most believing Otho; and so help'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
 
HELPLESS..........1
Of helpless discontent,- hurling my lance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 929
 
HELVELLYN'S.......1
Who on Helvellyn's summit, wide awake, Addressed to the Same, Line 3
 
HELVETIAN.........1
Of our own Alfred, of Helvetian Tell; To George Felton Mathew, Line 67
 
HEM...............2
Whose else? In this who touch thy vesture's hem ? To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 10
Whanne thate hir friendes thinke hem bound The Eve of St. Mark, Line 101
 
HEMLOCK...........2
The pipy hemlock to strange overgrowth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 241
My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 2
 
HEMM'D............1
Though hemm'd around by thy victorious arms. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 197
 
HEMS..............1
Of delicate birch trees, or long grass which hems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 51
 
HEN...............3
Arise then! for the hen -dove shall not hatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1025
And, patient as a hen -bird, sat her there Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 471
When the hen -bird's wing doth rest Fancy, Line 61
 
HENCE.............13
Yet dry them up, in bidding hence all fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 475
Than the isle of Delos. Echo hence shall stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 966
Hence , pageant history! hence, gilded cheat! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 14
Hence, pageant history! hence , gilded cheat! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 14
And now 'tis done to thee, Endymion. Hence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 439
My soul of any rest: yet must I hence : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 776
I shudder - gentle river, get thee hence . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 964
Hence shalt thou quickly to the watery vast; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 593
Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 1
"Get hence ! get hence! there's dwarfish Hildebrand; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 100
"Get hence! get hence ! there's dwarfish Hildebrand; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 100
Not far hence Atlas; and beside him prone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 73
Of all these eyes; pr'ythee command me hence ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 112
 
HENCEFORTH........4
Henceforth was dove-like.- Loth was he to move Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 870
Twice hast thou ask'd whither I went: henceforth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 755
My top has henceforth slept in faery land. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 32
Advised, not school'd, I would be, and henceforth King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 14
 
HENRY.............1
Henry the Fowler pass'd the streets of Prague. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 16
 
HER'..............1
This ditty to her!- tell her' - so I stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 959
 
HERALD............5
My herald thought into a wilderness: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 59
Had chidden herald Hesperus away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 685
Lightly this little herald flew aloft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 64
Where is my noble herald ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 1a
To herald and receive her; let me hear! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 79
 
HERALDED..........1
Veil'd, in a chariot, heralded along Lamia, Part II, Line 108
 
HERALDRIES........1
And in the midst, 'mong thousand heraldries , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 214
 
HERALDS...........1
The heralds have prepared a royal lists; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 33
 
HERBAGE...........2
Hide in deep herbage ; and ere yet the bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 51
But the Mule grasing on the herbage green. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 74
 
HERBAGED..........1
Would fright a Dryad; whose harsh herbaged meads What can I do to drive away, Line 40
 
HERBAL............1
Of the world's herbal , this fair lily blanch'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 123
 
HERBS.............2
Of all sweet herbs that searching eye could cull: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 156
Of amorous herbs and flowers, newly reap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 318
 
HERCULES..........1
From where large Hercules wound up his story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 406
 
HERD..............5
Thy deathful bow against some deer- herd bent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 511
For the whole herd , as by a whirlwind writhen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 529
He 'sdeign'd the swine- herd at the wassel bowl, Character of C.B., Line 13
Pick'd like a red stag from the fallow herd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 86
The herd approach'd; each guest, with busy brain, Lamia, Part II, Line 150
 
HERDED............1
Like herded elephants; nor felt, nor prest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 289
 
HERDS.............1
Where fed the herds of Pan: ay great his gains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 78
 
HERDSMAN..........1
A fear in the poor herdsman who doth bring Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 63
 
HERE'S............6
Here's somebody coming, here's somebody coming! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 9
Here's somebody coming, here's somebody coming! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 9
Here's somebody here and here's somebody there! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 13
Here's somebody here and here's somebody there! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 13
Here's a true churchman! he'd affect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 37
Fill, fill my goblet,- here's a Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ludolph, Line 39
 
HEREAT............4
Hereat Peona, in their silver source, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 489
For nothing but a dream?" Hereat the youth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 760
Hereat , she vanished from Endymion's gaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 131
Hereat , with many sobs, her gentle strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 825
 
HERESY............1
A heresy and schism, What can I do to drive away, Line 25
 
HERETOFORE........2
Show'd teeth again, and smiled as heretofore , The Jealousies, Line 274
And did refit his limbs as heretofore , In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 3
 
HEREUPON..........1
Of noises far away?- list!"- Hereupon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 915
 
HERMES............11
O Hermes ! on this very night will be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 827
Mother of Hermes ! and still youthful Maia! Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 1
As Hermes once took to his feathers light, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 1
The ever-smitten Hermes empty left Lamia, Part I, Line 7
So Hermes thought, and a celestial heat Lamia, Part I, Line 22
And thus; while Hermes on his pinions lay, Lamia, Part I, Line 66
"Fair Hermes , crown'd with feathers, fluttering light, Lamia, Part I, Line 68
Too gentle Hermes , hast thou found the maid?" Lamia, Part I, Line 80
"I swear," said Hermes , "by my serpent rod, Lamia, Part I, Line 89
Thou shalt behold her, Hermes , thou alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 110
Stoop, Hermes , let me breathe upon thy brow, Lamia, Part I, Line 121
 
HERMES'...........3
Than Hermes' pipe, when anxious he did lean Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 876
"O for Hermes' wand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 66b
Lethe's weed, and Hermes' feather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 2
 
HERMIT............1
A hermit young, I'll live in mossy cave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 860
 
HERMIT'S..........1
More grievous torment than a hermit's fast:- Lamia, Part II, Line 4
 
HERMITAGE.........1
Had watch'd for years in forlorn hermitage , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 227
 
HERO'S............2
For Hero's cheek and smiles against her smile. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 11
Of Hero's tears, the swoon of Imogen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 31
 
HEROES............4
The names of heroes , burst from clouds concealing, To Kosciusko, Line 6
Of mailed heroes should tear off my crown:- To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 13
Thermopylae its heroes - not yet dead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 318
Of heroes gone! Against his proper glory Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 643
 
HEROIC............4
Heroic deeds, and sung of fate, Ode to Apollo, Line 4
Servant of heroic deed! Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 58
More warm than those heroic tints that fill a painter's sense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 36
Could bend that bow heroic to all times. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 75
 
HERS..............2
Endymion awoke, that grief of hers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 855
And poesied with hers in dewy rhyme: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 70
 
HERSELF...........12
The soft vespers to herself You say you love; but with a voice, Line 3
And the rose herself has got Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 15
First at herself and at him and then When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 53
It is as if the rose should pluck herself , On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 5
But the rose leaves herself upon the briar, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 9
Herself , and all her sisterhood. She false! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 129
Who, by close stratagems, did save herself , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 145
Should so entrench herself away from me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 94
Left to herself , the serpent now began Lamia, Part I, Line 146
To see herself escap'd from so sore ills, Lamia, Part I, Line 183
She set herself , high-thoughted, how to dress Lamia, Part II, Line 115
gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
HERTIS............1
hertis ese/ Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
 
HESPEREAN.........2
Thou hadst beheld the Hesperean shine To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 13
Was Hesperean ; to his capable ears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 674
 
HESPERIAN.........1
There!- as the fabled fair Hesperian tree, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 82
 
HESPERIDES........1
In starlight, by the three Hesperides . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 453
 
HESPERUS..........5
We hear around when Hesperus is coming. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 161
Of heaven, Hesperus - let him lowly speak On The Story of Rimini, Line 6
Had chidden herald Hesperus away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 685
Not Hesperus : lo! upon his silver wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 567
The tent of Hesperus and all his train; Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 3
 
HETHER............2
But O on the hether to lie together Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 11
Light hether -bells may tremble then, but they are far away; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 13
 
HEY...............1
But we must plague him in the flank,- hey , friends? King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 18
 
HID...............18
Hid in the fringes of your eyelids white- On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 3
'Twas with slow, languid paces, and face hid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 872
In thicket hid I curs'd the haggard scene- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 497
'Twas hid from her: "For cruel 'tis," said she, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 495
When from the sun was thy broad forehead hid ? To Ailsa Rock, Line 4
I have hid from mortal man; Not Aladdin magian, Line 43
To where he stood, hid from the torch's flame, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 93
The Titans fierce, self- hid , or prison-bound, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 161
Not therefore veiled quite, blindfold, and hid , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 272
Pale wox I, and in vapours hid my face. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 326
Low-ebb'd still hid it up in shallow gloom;- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 136
And many hid their faces from the light: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 381
My secret; which I ever hid from him, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 9
Hid in the forest, safe from my revenge, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 32
Like the hid scent in an unbudded rose? Lamia, Part II, Line 54
Old Apollonius - from him keep me hid ." Lamia, Part II, Line 101
The Titans fierce, self- hid , or prison-bound, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 10
The woof of darkness, thick, for hid delight; The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 12
 
HIDDEN............12
Than if I'd brought to light a hidden treasure. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 116
So plenteously all weed- hidden roots Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 65
And, being hidden , laugh at their out-peeping; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 273
Their surly eyes brow- hidden , heavy paws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 645
From the green sea up to my hidden source Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 989
Anxious as hind towards her hidden fawn. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 43
Search my most hidden breast! By truth's own tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 458
It comes in silence - now 'tis hidden all. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 60
To her, than noise of trees or hidden rill; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 14
This hidden whim; and long they watch'd in vain; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 466
Half- hidden , like a mermaid in sea-weed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 231
Erminia, sir, was hidden in your tent,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 99
 
HIDE..............15
'Twere better far to hide my foolish face? Sleep and Poetry, Line 272
If I do hide myself, it sure shall be Sleep and Poetry, Line 275
And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 3
Hide in deep herbage; and ere yet the bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 51
To hide the cankering venom, that had riven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 396
And earnestly said: "Brother, 'tis vain to hide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 505
Into the fearful deep, to hide his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 217
Itself, and strives its own delights to hide - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 344
Would hide us up, although spring leaves were none; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 672
I have oft honoured thee. Great shadow, hide On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 13
Vaprous doth hide them; just so much I wist Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 4
Even to Madeline's chamber, and there hide The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 164
The wakeful bloodhound rose, and shook his hide , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 365
To hide themselves in forms of beast and bird. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 72
Had no perplexity to hide his head! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 2
 
HIDEOUS...........1
And calm, and whispering, and hideous roar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 201
 
HIDES.............3
But hides and shrouds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 191
Ever hides his brilliance pale, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 53
And hides the green hill in an April shroud; Ode on Melancholy, Line 14
 
HIDING............3
Not hiding up an Apollonian curve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 399
One obscure hiding -place, one little spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 62
The thorny sharks from hiding -holes, and fright'ning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 89
 
HIE...............4
All gather'd in the dewy morning: hie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 579
O who wouldn't hie to Dawlish fair, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 17
How she might secret to the forest hie ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 338
Saying, "Mercy, Porphyro! hie thee from this place; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 98
 
HIED..............1
And to old Hum through street and alley hied ; The Jealousies, Line 205
 
HIERARCHY.........2
Of all Olympus' faded hierarchy ! Ode to Psyche, Line 25
Foughten long since by giant hierarchy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 223
 
HIEROGLYPHICS.....2
Up to the zenith,- hieroglyphics old, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 277
These day-school hieroglyphics with a sigh; The Jealousies, Line 452
 
HIES..............2
His limbs are loos'd, and eager, on he hies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 67
So, with unusual gladness, on he hies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 593
 
HIGH..............110
Of the bright waters; or as when on high , Imitation of Spenser, Line 26
Taste the high joy none but the bless'd can prove. As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 8
Whence genius wildly flash'd, and high debate! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 4
Let me not see the patriot's high bequest, To Hope, Line 37
Of all that's high , and great, and good, and healing. To George Felton Mathew, Line 10
High -minded and unbending William Wallace. To George Felton Mathew, Line 69
Lifted up her lance on high , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 42
High as the berries of a wild ash tree, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 114
The lamps that from the high -roof'd hall were pendent, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 132
Through its tall woods with high romances blent: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 4
To see high , golden corn wave in the light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 92
Or of those silver lamps that burn on high , Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 7
Is a full harvest whence to reap high feeling; To Kosciusko, Line 2
More full of visions than a high romance? Sleep and Poetry, Line 10
To see the laurel wreath, on high suspended, Sleep and Poetry, Line 35
In the present strength of manhood, that the high Sleep and Poetry, Line 163
And converse high of those with glory crown'd. Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 8
But there are left delights as high as these, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 9
High genitors, unconscious did they cull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 320
Who thus were ripe for high contemplating Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 355
Something more high perplexing in thy face!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 515
From such high soaring by a downward glance: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 584
Whence came that high perfection of all sweetness? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 607
To what high fane?- Ah! see her hovering feet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 624
Soon, as it seem'd, we left our journeying high , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 647
Of high and noble life with thoughts so sick? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 758
Why pierce high -fronted honour to the quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 759
Is made of love and friendship, and sits high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 801
As does the nightingale, upperched high , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 828
Unto the temperate air: then high it soar'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 86
As those are high , descend! He ne'er is crown'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 211
Will be its high remembrancers: who they? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 252
A chamber, myrtle wall'd, embowered high , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 389
When some ethereal and high -favouring donor Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 437
Were high about Pomona: here is cream, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 446
To Jove's high throne, and by her plainings drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 475
Up went the hum celestial. High afar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 581
Pillars, and frieze, and high fantastic roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 624
My breath of life, where art thou? High above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 687
High with excessive love. "And now," thought he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 901
To their spirit's perch, their being's high account, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 14
As if thine eye, high Poet! was not bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 48
Look'd high defiance. Lo! his heart 'gan warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 282
Ask nought so heavenward, so too - too high : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 549
Say, I intreat thee, what achievement high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 714
And onward went upon his high employ, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 783
Felt a high certainty of being blest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 795
Rich opal domes were seen, on high upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 841
Their doming curtains, high , magnificent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 870
High Muses! let him hurry to the ending. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 940
High as the eagles. Like two drops of dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 348
Would at high Jove's empyreal footstool win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 378
Could rouse from that fine relish, that high feast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 554
Your baskets high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 574
Pangs are in vain - until I grow high -rife Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 29
Before high piled books, in charactry, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 3
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 6
Too high above our head, God of the meridian, Line 10
High reason, and the lore of good and ill, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 75
Fever'd his high conceit of such a bride, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 46
To every symbol on his forehead high ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 52
To some high noble and his olive-trees. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 168
Around me beeches and high chestnuts shed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 300
Ring-doves may fly convuls'd across to some high cedar'd lair; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 20
Of high Olympus utter'd slavish sighs. Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 8
Fools! if some passions high have warm'd the world, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 11
If queens and soldiers have play'd high for hearts, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 12
Fancy, high -commission'd:- send her! Fancy, Line 27
Thus ye live on high , and then Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 23
And back retir'd, not cool'd by high disdain; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 61
A casement high and triple-arch'd there was, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 208
But death intenser - death is life's high meed. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 14
Even as he spake he trotted in high glee When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 83
And from the basements deep to the high towers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 223
Unruffled, like high Gods, ye liv'd and ruled: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 331
Palm-shaded temples, and high rival fanes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 59
Ponderest high and deep; and in thy face Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 164
To thy high requiem become a sod. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 60
That leaves a heart high -sorrowful and cloy'd, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 29
From your alert eyes and high -lifted brows. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 18
High commented with smiles. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 128a
Though I did hold you high in my esteem Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 142
Long toil'd in foreign wars, and whose high deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 26
To your high dignities, we are too happy. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 127
That such neglect of our high Majesty Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 62
Yet shall I season high my sudden fall Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 269
Conducting to the throne high canopied. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 16
Pass the high stars, before sweet embassage Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Some wider-domed high magnificence! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 34
From high Olympus had he stolen light, Lamia, Part I, Line 9
"Thou smooth-lipp'd serpent, surely high inspired! Lamia, Part I, Line 83
Waits with high marble doors for blood and incense rare. Lamia, Part I, Line 228
She set herself, high -thoughted, how to dress Lamia, Part II, Line 115
High in the midst, in honour of the bride: Lamia, Part II, Line 127
That royal porch, that high -built fair demesne; Lamia, Part II, Line 155
To the high roof, still mimick'd as they rose Lamia, Part II, Line 181
High as the level of a man's breast rear'd Lamia, Part II, Line 184
High as the handles heap'd, to suit the thought Lamia, Part II, Line 218
On the high couch he lay!- his friends came round- Lamia, Part II, Line 309
Builded so high , it seem'd that filmed clouds The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 63
Thy doom."- " High Prophetess," said I, "purge off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 145
Behind enwombed: what high tragedy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 277
Like to the image pedestal'd so high The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 299
From the gold peaks of heaven's high piled clouds; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 434
Of her high phrase: perhaps no further dare. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 468
To grace a banquet. The high city gates King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 26
Which seeing, his high court of parliament The Jealousies, Line 19
Surprises me!- they too at these high games! The Jealousies, Line 142
Bow'd low with high demeanour, and, to pay The Jealousies, Line 741
Now Hum, new fledg'd with high authority, The Jealousies, Line 793
 
HIGHER............11
On holy message sent. - What pleasures higher ? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 13
Couldst thou wish for lineage higher Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 37
And staidly paces higher up, and higher, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 61
And staidly paces higher up, and higher , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 61
But what is higher beyond thought than thee? Sleep and Poetry, Line 19
No higher bard than simple maidenhood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 726
And sullenly drifting: yet my higher hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 774
A higher summons:- still didst thou betake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 16
Her steed a little higher soar'd, and then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 511
But there are higher ones I may not see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 853
Of higher occupants, a richer zest, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 246
 
HIGHEST...........4
Of highest heaven; to the rolling spheres Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 10
Almost the highest bliss of human-kind, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 13
Far as the mariner on his highest mast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 866
He leans away for highest heaven and sings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 568
 
HIGHLAND..........2
Against this highland princess, rating her The Jealousies, Line 105
Which calls them Highland pebble-stones not worth a fly. The Jealousies, Line 747
 
HIGHMINDEDNESS....1
Highmindedness , a jealousy for good, Addressed to Haydon, Line 1
 
HIGHNESS..........13
But ape. So pray your highness stay awhile; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 38
They saw her highness had made up her mind, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 45
His Highness Ludolph - where is he? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 98a
E'en for his Highness Ludolph's sceptry hand, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
Will't please your Highness enter, and accept Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 77
The province to invite your Highness back Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 126
Pray what day has his Highness fix'd upon? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 55
To make a greater. His young Highness here Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 150
This should cheer up your Highness ; the weariness Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 57
What message from her Highness ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 20a
It would amaze your Highness now to mark King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 36
Persuade your honour's Highness to refrain The Jealousies, Line 464
Return'd his Highness ; "they are piping hot The Jealousies, Line 546
 
HIGHNESS'.........3
If wary, for your Highness' benefit- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 6
Laid a remonstrance at his Highness' feet, The Jealousies, Line 20
Her Highness' pug-dog - got a sharp rebuff- The Jealousies, Line 699
 
HILDEBRAND........1
"Get hence! get hence! there's dwarfish Hildebrand ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 100
 
HILL..............19
And her first footsteps touch'd a verdant hill ; Imitation of Spenser, Line 2
Or a green hill o'erspread with chequered dress Sleep and Poetry, Line 77
I stood tip-toe upon a little hill , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 1
Than a sunny hill : Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 14
Than when I wander'd from the poppy hill : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 914
Of rivers, nor hill -flowers running wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 286
O fountain'd hill ! Old Homer's Helicon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 717
Prone to the green head of a misty hill . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 613
Of some steep mossy hill , where ivy dun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 671
On the green of the hill , Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 12
Past the heath and up the hill ; Robin Hood, Line 14
Over the hill and over the dale, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 1
Rantipole Betty she ran down a hill , Over the hill and over the dale, Line 5
He with light steps went up a western hill , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 79
Up the hill -side; and now 'tis buried deep Ode to a Nightingale, Line 77
And hides the green hill in an April shroud; Ode on Melancholy, Line 14
When from the slope side of a suburb hill , Lamia, Part II, Line 26
Of yonder hill , what crowds of people!" "Whew! The Jealousies, Line 544
Reach the hill top, and now throughout the valley shines." The Jealousies, Line 558
 
HILL'S............4
And now I see them on a green- hill's side Sleep and Poetry, Line 134
Upon rough marble diadem, that hill's eternal crown. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 44
On the cold hill's side. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 36
On the cold hill's side. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 44
 
HILLOCK...........2
The hillock turf, and caught the latter end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 323
His head upon a mossy hillock green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 918
 
HILLOCKS..........1
From stumbling over stumps and hillocks small; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 418
 
HILLS.............18
Thy dales, and hills , are fading from my view: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 104
To feel the air that plays about the hills , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 90
It is to hover round our pleasant hills ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 207
Between two hills . All hail delightful hopes! Sleep and Poetry, Line 264
The Grasshopper's among some grassy hills . On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 14
Over the hills at every nightfall went. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 72
"And as I sat, over the light blue hills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 193
I love your hills and I love your dales, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 9
The clouds, the trees, the rounded hills all seem, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 2
Her brothers were the craggy hills , Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 9
And daisies on the aguish hills . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 12
Of incense, breath'd aloft from sacred hills , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 187
Float in voluptuous fleeces o'er the hills ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 17
And rested at the foot of those wild hills , Lamia, Part I, Line 175
Over the solitary hills he fared, Lamia, Part I, Line 233
And will you leave me on the hills alone? Lamia, Part I, Line 245
Over these hills and vales, where no joy is,- Lamia, Part I, Line 277
Of incense breath'd aloft from sacred hills , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 31
 
HILLY.............1
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; To Autumn, Line 30
 
HILT..............1
There is no part of it, to the very hilt , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 107
 
HILTS.............2
My sword met his and snapp'd off at the hilts . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 50
The Earl of Glocester. Stab to the hilts , De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 45
 
HIMSELF...........24
And oar'd himself along with majesty; Imitation of Spenser, Line 15
Himself from fireside joys, and Lydian airs, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 7
Himself along the grass. What gentle tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 96
Thus breath'd he to himself : "Whoso encamps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 142
Himself with every mystery, and awe; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 270
Himself on wither'd leaves, even as though Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 565
Without one impious word, himself he flings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 659
He threw himself , and just into the air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 711
Wherever he may sport himself and play. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 172
On one, and felt himself in spleen to tame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 346
And he's awake who thinks himself asleep. O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 14
That when a man doth set himself in toil Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 3
Part of himself . He hath his autumn ports Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 8
Even so vague is man's sight of himself . Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 9
And breath'd himself : then from the closet crept, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 249
Where even the robin feels himself exil'd, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 6
The Mule no sooner saw himself alone When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 75
He stretch'd himself in grief and radiance faint. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 304
Wroth as himself . He look'd upon them all, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 351
He doth this moment wish himself asleep Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 91
Each one himself a king in embryo, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 77
To cry himself up an ambassador Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 109
To force himself upon you, and infest Lamia, Part II, Line 166
What weapon has the lion but himself ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 21
 
HIND..............2
Would melt at thy sweet breath.- By Dian's hind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 277
Anxious as hind towards her hidden fawn. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 43
 
HINDER............1
Nor did speed hinder converse soft and strange- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 488
 
HINDERING.........1
Had been resum'd in spite of hindering force- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 650
 
HINDERS...........1
I will! Who hinders me? Who's Emperor? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 16
 
HINDRANCE.........2
When, past all hindrance of my trembling hands, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 291
By any hindrance , but with gentlest force Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
 
HINGES............2
The key turns, and the door upon its hinges groans. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 369
Breath'd from the hinges , as the ample span Lamia, Part I, Line 387
 
HINNOM'S..........1
Came on them, like a smoke from Hinnom's vale; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 262
 
HINT..............3
I utter even the shadow of a hint Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 26
Throw in a hint , that if he should neglect The Jealousies, Line 194
Yet at the slightest nod, or hint , or sign, The Jealousies, Line 246
 
HINTED............1
Hast hinted . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 5a
 
HINTS.............1
Nods, becks, and hints , should be obey'd with care, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 32
 
HIPPOCRENE........1
Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 16
 
HIPS..............1
By those loosen'd hips , you have tasted the pips, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 11
 
HIR...............1
Whanne thate hir friendes thinke hem bound The Eve of St. Mark, Line 101
 
HISS..............3
It seems an angry lightning, and doth hiss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 233
Poor cheated Ludolph! Make the forest hiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
To breed distrust and hate, that make the soft voice hiss . Lamia, Part II, Line 10
 
HISSING...........2
Its deep foundations, hissing into foam. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 948
Serpents in red roses hissing ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 15
 
HIST..............3
And soothe thy lips: hist , when the airy stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 783
Their upper lids?- Hist ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 66a
Turn, damsels! hist ! one word I have to say. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 909
 
HISTORIAN.........1
Sylvan historian , who canst thus express Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 3
 
HISTORIES.........2
Tales and golden histories Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 21
Some histories say that this was Hum's last speech; The Jealousies, Line 623
 
HISTORY...........2
Of some strange history , potent to send Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 324
Hence, pageant history ! hence, gilded cheat! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 14
 
HIT...............1
That I, by happy chance, hit the right man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 252
 
HITCH'D...........1
Your oratory; your breath is not so hitch'd . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 47
 
HITHER............30
Hither and thither all the changing thoughts Sleep and Poetry, Line 287
Come hither all sweet maidens, soberly On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 1
Hither , hither, love, Hither, hither, love, Line 1
Hither, hither , love, Hither, hither, love, Line 1
Hither , hither, love, Hither, hither, love, Line 3
Hither, hither , love, Hither, hither, love, Line 3
Hither , hither, sweet, Hither, hither, love, Line 5
Hither, hither , sweet, Hither, hither, love, Line 5
Hither , hither, sweet, Hither, hither, love, Line 7
Hither, hither , sweet, Hither, hither, love, Line 7
Hither , hither, dear, Hither, hither, love, Line 9
Hither, hither , dear, Hither, hither, love, Line 9
Hither , hither, dear, Hither, hither, love, Line 11
Hither, hither , dear, Hither, hither, love, Line 11
Hither , hither, hither, Hither, hither, love, Line 21
Hither, hither , hither, Hither, hither, love, Line 21
Hither, hither, hither , Hither, hither, love, Line 21
To her entrancements: hither , sleep awhile! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 704
Hither , most gentle sleep! and soothing foil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 705
"Come hither , Sister of the Island!" Plain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 14
Come hither , lady fair, and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 226
Come hither , lady fair, and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 237
So timidly among the stars: come hither ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 603
As was thy cradle; hither shalt thou flee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 995
Moan hither , all ye syllables of woe, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 441
He broke his sword, and hither bore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 51
Cruel! what traitor could thee hither bring? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 330
I know the covert, for thence came I hither ." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 152
And hither came, to see how dolorous fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 240
The day is not quite done. Go, bring them hither . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 116
 
HIVE..............6
Honey from out the gnarled hive I'll bring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 682
And a bank for the wasp to hive in. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 30
And Pan made sing for thee his forest- hive ; To Homer, Line 8
Sons, daughters, and a home like honied hive . Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 21
When the bee- hive casts its swarm; Fancy, Line 64
Many as bees about a straw-capp'd hive , The Jealousies, Line 260
 
HO................5
Ho ! let the music sound! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 202
Ho ! Ho, there! Guards! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 144
Ho! Ho , there! Guards! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 144
To-morrow? Ho ! some wine! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 32a
My guards, ho ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 245a
 
HOAR..............8
Went off in gentle windings to the hoar Calidore: A Fragment, Line 27
Of winter hoar . Then came another crowd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 161
Make my horn parley from their foreheads hoar : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 479
Down whose green back the short-liv'd foam, all hoar , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 349
In Autumn's sickle, Winter frosty hoar , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 423
And so she kneeled, with her locks all hoar , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 380
But splendider in Saturn's, whose hoar locks Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 353
With the bright mists about the mountains hoar Lamia, Part I, Line 169
 
HOARDED...........1
A sampler hoarded slyly, good as new, The Jealousies, Line 440
 
HOARDS............1
Save me from curious conscience, that still hoards Sonnet to Sleep, Line 11
 
HOAREST...........1
To burst with hoarest thunderings, and wipe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 348
 
HOARSE............6
More wildering than all that hoarse affright; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 528
Like hoarse night-gusts sepulchral briars among. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 288
By many a damsel hoarse and rouge of cheek; Character of C.B., Line 23
Of thunderous waterfalls and torrents hoarse , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 8
Voiceless, or hoarse with loud tormented streams: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 362
Amid the hoarse alarm of Corinth's voice. Lamia, Part II, Line 61
 
HOARSELY..........1
Louted full low, and hoarsely did him greet: The Jealousies, Line 256
 
HOARY.............4
O may no wintry season, bare and hoary , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 54
The old man rais'd his hoary head and saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 218
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 59
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 361
 
HOBBLED...........1
So saying, she hobbled off with busy fear. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 181
 
HOCK..............2
Away with old hock and madeira! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 2
Sherry in silver, hock in gold, or glass'd champagne?" The Jealousies, Line 360
 
HOCUS.............1
I say, old hocus , have you such a thing The Jealousies, Line 600
 
HOITY.............1
And see what hoity -toity airs she took:) The Jealousies, Line 707
 
HOLD..............27
Whene'er the fate of those I hold most dear To Hope, Line 19
And hold my faculties so long in thrall, To George Felton Mathew, Line 19
Untill I cry out " hold , enough!" Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 2
It has been said, dear George, and true I hold it, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 23
Yet shall my spirit lofty converse hold To My Brother George (epistle), Line 72
Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold . On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 4
O Poesy! for thee I hold my pen Sleep and Poetry, Line 47
If you but scantily hold out the hand, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 78
Hold sphery sessions for a season due. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 33
How every soldier, with firm foot, doth hold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 730
And thou, old forest, hold ye this for true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 77
Hold like rich garners the full ripen'd grain; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 4
Says I, hold your tongue, you young gipsey. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 14
Thou must hold water in a witch's sieve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 120
Of my poor secrets, and so hold a rod Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 117
Though I did hold you high in my esteem Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 142
Like to a jealous casket, hold my pearl- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 103
Would I hold more trustworthy. Now! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 26a
They hold the Emperor in admiration. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Second Lady, Line 16
Because I hold those base weeds with tight hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
Conrad, hold ! I would not bear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 59b
That made my heart too small to hold its blood. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 254
Whose winds, all zephyrless, hold scourging rods, What can I do to drive away, Line 37
A mighty soldier. Does he still hold out? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 34
Woos him to hold a duet in a smile, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 44
I hold it towards you. This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 8
If you hold Bertha as a worthy prize. The Jealousies, Line 499
 
HOLDEN............1
Stiff- holden shields, far-piercing spears, keen blades, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 9
 
HOLDING...........5
Holding a poor, decrepid standard out Sleep and Poetry, Line 204
One, loveliest, holding her white hand toward Sleep and Poetry, Line 366
Holding his forehead, to keep off the burr Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 138
[Enter, from the Castle, AURANTHE, followed by Pages holding Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
Holding it by his thumb and finger full in view. The Jealousies, Line 441
 
HOLDS.............4
How tiptoe Night holds back her dark-grey hood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 831
This corner holds at least a score, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 92
It holds the zephyr, ere it sendeth fair Character of C.B., Line 4
And holds our bladed falchions all aloof. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 37
 
HOLE..............1
And to the windings in the foxes' hole , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 409
 
HOLES.............2
The thorny sharks from hiding- holes , and fright'ning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 89
Collected silently in holes and corners, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
 
HOLIDAY...........6
Some folk of holiday : nor had they waited Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 113
Ah! this is holiday to what was felt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 359
My soul for foot-ball at hell's holiday ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 30
When the dusk holiday - or holinight- The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 10
The morn was full of holiday ; loud bells The Jealousies, Line 568
Legions of holiday ; bright standards waved, The Jealousies, Line 733
 
HOLIER............1
O Moon! old boughs lisp forth a holier din Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 54
 
HOLINIGHT.........1
When the dusk holiday - or holinight - The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 10
 
HOLLOW............25
That come a swooning over hollow grounds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 286
There hollow sounds arous'd me, and I sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 651
Lies a deep hollow , from whose ragged brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 864
I have a ditty for my hollow cell." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 130
Where airy voices lead: so through the hollow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 213
With nothing save the hollow vast, that foam'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 120
But hollow rocks,- and they were palaces Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 323
And the hollow tree For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 28
In blood from stinging whip;- with hollow eyes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 110
Hollow organs all the day; Not Aladdin magian, Line 30
Awakening up, he took her hollow lute,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 289
Of strings in hollow shells; and there shall be Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 131
Her eye-brows thin and jet, and hollow eyes. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 115
Gave from their hollow throats the name of "Saturn!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 391
Of fear and weakness, and a hollow state. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 178
What, man, do you mistake the hollow sky Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 34
Though, at my words, the hollow prison-vaults Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 257
Here is no quiet depth of hollow ground. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 47
O that that door with hollow slam would close Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 16
Howling in vain along the hollow night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 49
I ached to see what things the hollow brain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 276
She laid, and to the level of his hollow ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 348
Of strings in hollow shells; and let there be The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 436
And stretch'd her white arm through the hollow dark, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 455
Or with my gauntlet crush your hollow breast, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 36
 
HOLLOWNESS........1
The craggy hollowness of a wild-reefed shore. The Jealousies, Line 738
 
HOLLOWS...........4
Into the sparry hollows of the world! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 204
In the half-glutted hollows of reef-rocks, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 306
Pour into the wide hollows of my brain, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 117
Even to the hollows of time-eaten oaks, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 408
 
HOLLY.............1
And I forgot thee, as the berried holly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 205
 
HOLY..............34
On holy message sent. - What pleasures higher? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 13
Like a sweet nun in holy -day attire? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 62
The thought thereof is awful, sweet, and holy , Sleep and Poetry, Line 25
Some holy bark let forth an anthem sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 81
Silence was music from the holy spheres; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 675
Pan's holy priest for young Endymion calls; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 815
Into those holy groves, that silent are Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 913
His laugh at nature's holy countenance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 948
Alone: I chant alone the holy mass, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 307
And have her holy way? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 48
Sweet, holy , pure, sacred, and innocent, Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 2
Soars for ever; holy fire Not Aladdin magian, Line 42
The holy missal; thou didst craze O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 45
His prayer he saith, this patient, holy man; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 10
"O tell me, Angela, by the holy loom The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 115
Yet men will murder upon holy days: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 119
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 2
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 13
Of holy Mark from youth to age; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 90
And kissen devoute the holy croce. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 107
Then lastly to his holy shrine, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 117
When holy were the haunted forest boughs, Ode to Psyche, Line 38
Holy the air, the water, and the fire; Ode to Psyche, Line 39
Demand the holy sisterhood in our name Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 198
Good morrow, holy father! I have had Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 118
Holy father, you must not. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Voice, Line 55b
Hast brought pollution to our holy rites? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
I will confess, O holy abbot!- How! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 99
A kind forbearance, holy abbot. Come, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 6
Wilt thou forgive me? And thou, holy man, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 171
And I neglect the holy rite for thee. Lamia, Part II, Line 97
Girdles, and chains, and holy jewelries. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 80
From the green turf to heaven.- " Holy Power," The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 136
Let none profane my Holy See of Love, To Fanny, Line 51


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Published @ RC

March 2005