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Keats Concordance
 
HOMAGE............2
That even the homage of his ranged chiefs Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 11
Of loyal homage now! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 81a
 
HOME..............37
Returning home at evening, with an ear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 9
Feel all about their undulating home . Sleep and Poetry, Line 380
Bring home increase of milk. And, as the year Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 45
From those kind eyes,- the very home and haunt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 472
Thick, as to curtain up some wood-nymph's home . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 941
Rough billows were my home by night and day,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 320
I found me; by my fresh, my native home . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 608
All mountain-rivers lost in the wide home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 949
Such home -bred glory, that they cry'd in vain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 13
Of native air - let me but die at home ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 37
One moment from his home : only the sward Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 335
At random flies; they are the proper home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 521
O happy spirit- home ! O wondrous soul! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 543
When it shall please thee in our quiet home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 688
Home through the gloomy wood in wonderment. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1003
Along the flat brown sand. I was at home , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 92
In anxious secrecy they took it home , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 401
Sons, daughters, and a home like honied hive. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 21
He would not stop at home There was a naughty boy, Line 3
And bring home There was a naughty boy, Line 74
Pleasure never is at home : Fancy, Line 2
Pleasure never is at home . Fancy, Line 94
For o'er the southern moors I have a home for thee." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 351
They rang - no one at home - all gone to sport When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 2
"No one at home !" the fretful Princess cry'd, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 9
Is making free when they are not at home . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 29
To my home , far, far in west, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 45
Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 66
O bless'd asylum! Comfortable home ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 100
Done to another,- Conrad has it home ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 6
To dull the nice remembrance of my home ? Lamia, Part I, Line 275
The bride from home at blushing shut of day, Lamia, Part II, Line 107
habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
What haven? Every creature hath its home ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 171
Useless, could find about its roofed home The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 229
Ah! dearest love, sweet home of all my fears To Fanny, Line 9
Dare keep its wretched home : To Fanny, Line 45
 
HOME'S............1
Or of the distance from home's pleasant lair: Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 8
 
HOMELY............1
Abroad and in the homely room; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 68
 
HOMER.............4
There Homer with his nervous arms Ode to Apollo, Line 7
That deep-brow'd Homer ruled as his demesne; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 6
Stepping like Homer at the trumpet's call, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 217
gold, described by Homer , no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
HOMER'S...........1
O fountain'd hill! Old Homer's Helicon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 717
 
HOMES.............2
Mid-way between our homes :- your accents bland To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 122
That keeps us from our homes ethereal; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 361
 
HOMESPUN..........1
Honouring with royal tears the poor homespun ; The Jealousies, Line 446
 
HOMEWARD..........4
The journey homeward to habitual self! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 276
A homeward fever parches up my tongue- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 319
Straight homeward to their symbol-essences; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 700
Their horses homeward , with convulsed spur, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 223
 
HONEST............4
Your honest countenance all things above, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 34
O proof! proof! proof! Albert's an honest man; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 24
To do an honest deed. Shall I confide-? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 37
Is an honest yeoman's spear King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, A Soldier, Line 38b
 
HONESTY...........3
Who, for your bright sword and clear honesty , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 47
My love of fame, my prided honesty Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 23
Knowing his mawkish honesty . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 10a
 
HONEY.............17
That the still murmur of the honey bee To My Brother George (epistle), Line 13
O for three words of honey , that I might I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 209
Will put choice honey for a favoured youth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 211
Loiter'd around us; then of honey cells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 668
Aye, such a breathless honey -feel of bliss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 903
And weave them dyingly - send honey -whispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 955
One kiss brings honey -dew from buried days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 7
That he will seize on trickling honey -combs: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 150
Large honey -combs of green, and freshly teem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 667
With tears, and smiles, and honey -words she wove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 426
Even in the passing of thine honey -moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 917
Honey from out the gnarled hive I'll bring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 682
Sang not to her - strange! that honey Robin Hood, Line 47
And honey wild, and manna dew, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 26
Came, as through bubbling honey , for Love's sake, Lamia, Part I, Line 65
Bloom'd, and gave up her honey to the lees. Lamia, Part I, Line 143
When first for April honey into faint flowers they dive." The Jealousies, Line 261
 
HONEY'D...........2
Sang, of delicious love and honey'd dart; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 78
Upon the honey'd middle of the night, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 49
 
HONEYCOMBS........1
Their golden honeycombs ; our village leas Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 254
 
HONEYLESS.........1
Honeyless days and days did he let pass; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 32
 
HONEYSUCKLES......1
And honeysuckles full of clear bee-wine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 698
 
HONIED............8
Sweeter by far than Hybla's honied roses Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 10
Of thy honied voice; the neatness Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 24
The honied lines do freshly interlace, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 2
Thine honied tongue - lute-breathings, which I gasp Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 820
Buzz from their honied wings: and thou shouldst please Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 997
He chews the honied cud of fair spring thoughts, Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 6
Sons, daughters, and a home like honied hive. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 21
And evenings steep'd in honied indolence; Ode on Indolence, Line 37
 
HONOR.............5
And live for that honor to stoop to thee now, God of the golden bow, Line 35
Such men to honor thee, who, worn with toil, To the Nile, Line 7
Will for thine honor and his pleasure try. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 14
To do an honor to your old bald pate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 3
But I honor more the flame. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 78
 
HONORER...........1
Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 1
 
HONORS............2
Leaps to the honors of a tournament, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 28
With honors ; nor had any other care Sleep and Poetry, Line 179
 
HONOUR............29
Let me not see our country's honour fade: To Hope, Line 32
That well you know to honour :- "Life's very toys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 128
That smooth the path of honour ; brotherhood, Sleep and Poetry, Line 317
to the honour of English literature. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
With wine, in honour of the shepherd-god. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 226
Why pierce high-fronted honour to the quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 759
For 'tis the nicest touch of human honour , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 436
Honour to the old bow-string! Robin Hood, Line 50
Honour to the bugle-horn! Robin Hood, Line 51
Honour to the woods unshorn! Robin Hood, Line 52
Honour to the Lincoln green! Robin Hood, Line 53
Honour to the archer keen! Robin Hood, Line 54
Honour to tight little John, Robin Hood, Line 55
Honour to bold Robin Hood, Robin Hood, Line 57
Honour to maid Marian, Robin Hood, Line 59
To honour thee, and thy gone spirit greet; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 158
Cast wan upon it! Burns! with honour due On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 12
My friend had held poor Ludolph's honour dear. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 63
Great honour to the Prince! The Emperor, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 18
Into the lap of honour ;- save me, knight! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 49
Of honour 'mid the growling wilderness. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 12
My honour be my executioner,- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 22
Is her life nothing? Her fair honour nothing? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 119
Though my name perish from the book of honour , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 265
Of honour battailous! I could not turn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 90
High in the midst, in honour of the bride: Lamia, Part II, Line 127
Of honour forfeit. O, that my known voice King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 7
She sha'n't be maid of honour ,- by heaven that she sha'n't! The Jealousies, Line 153
"Upon my honour !" said the son of Cham, The Jealousies, Line 403
 
HONOUR'D..........1
Soe'er, I shall be honour'd . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 49a
 
HONOUR'S..........1
Persuade your honour's Highness to refrain The Jealousies, Line 464
 
HONOURABLE........1
In this most honourable antiroom, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 11
 
HONOURABLENESS....1
Of any proof against the honourableness Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 213
 
HONOURED..........3
I have oft honoured thee. Great shadow, hide On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 13
An hundred horsemen from my honoured gates, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 38
How is Friedburg honoured ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 184b
 
HONOURING.........1
Honouring with royal tears the poor homespun; The Jealousies, Line 446
 
HONOURS...........1
Four lily stalks did their white honours wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 408
 
HOOD..............7
How tiptoe Night holds back her dark-grey hood . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 831
So reaching back to boy- hood : make me ships Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 881
Drest as though bold Robin Hood Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 10
Honour to bold Robin Hood , Robin Hood, Line 57
A mild hood For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 14
I saw her wrappit in her hood Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 25
Forth from his hood that hung his neck below, The Jealousies, Line 509
 
HOODED............2
That ought to frighten into hooded shame Addressed to Haydon, Line 7
Beheld afar off, in the hooded shade The Jealousies, Line 660
 
HOODS.............1
To think how they may ache in icy hoods and mails. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 18
 
HOODWINK'D........1
Hoodwink'd with faery fancy; all amort, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 70
 
HOOF..............1
March, little Pegasus, with pawing hoof sublime! The Jealousies, Line 639
 
HOOFED............1
A nymph, to whom all hoofed Satyrs knelt; Lamia, Part I, Line 14
 
HOOFS.............2
Of clattering hoofs ; into the court he sprang, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 76
And rifled,- stuff! the horses' hoofs have minced it! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 68
 
HOOK..............2
By hook or crook There was a naughty boy, Line 72
Drows'd with the fume of poppies, while thy hook To Autumn, Line 17
 
HOOKS.............1
Some idly trailed their sheep- hooks on the ground, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 145
 
HOOP..............1
Then passing by the Princess, singed her hoop : The Jealousies, Line 671
 
HOP...............1
Where robins hop , and fallen leaves are sere. On The Story of Rimini, Line 14
 
HOPE..............28
Sweet Hope , ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 5
Chace him away, sweet Hope , with visage bright, To Hope, Line 17
O bright-eyed Hope , my morbid fancy cheer; To Hope, Line 21
Sweet Hope , ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 29
Sweet Hope , celestial influence round me shed, To Hope, Line 47
Him thou wilt hear; so I will rest in hope Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 65
Life is the rose's hope while yet unblown; Sleep and Poetry, Line 90
me, if I had not some hope that while it is dwindling I may be plotting, and Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
I hope I have not in too late a day touched the beautiful Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
Many and many a verse I hope to write, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 49
And sullenly drifting: yet my higher hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 774
A hope beyond the shadow of a dream. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 857
There is a paly flame of hope that plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 984
Is there no hope from thee? This horrid spell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 276
Without one hope , without one faintest trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 640
Each Atlas-line bore off!- a shine of hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 685
And in her bearing was a sort of hope , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 148
Now I behold in you fear, hope , and wrath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 332
Even as Hope upon her anchor leans, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 61
Remorse, spleen, hope , but most of all despair. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 95
And know that we had parted from all hope . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 261
How you indulge yourself: what can you hope for? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 76
Nothing, my liege; I have to hope for nothing. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 77
I hope , resolv'd between us. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50a
With hope that gloss of words, or suppliant action, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 128
Yes, yes! A hope ! A music! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 31b
What bliss even in hope is there for thee? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 170
And darkness for no hope ."- And she spake on, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 463
 
HOPE'S............1
And 'scape at once from Hope's accursed bands; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 230
 
HOPED.............2
Auranthe! I had hoped this whim had pass'd. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 117
Wish'd, trusted, hoped 'twas no sign of decay- The Jealousies, Line 714
 
HOPEFUL...........1
And hopeful featur'd. Ha! by heaven you weep! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 85
 
HOPELESS..........3
Thou couldst rejoice to see my hopeless stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1002
The remedy grows hopeless ! Here he comes,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 20
A hopeless bustle 'mid our swarming arms; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 11
 
HOPES.............15
Its ships, its rocks, its caves, its hopes , its fears,- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 6
For she's to read a tale of hopes , and fears; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 97
With hopes that you would one day think the reading To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 81
Between two hills. All hail delightful hopes ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 264
The kernel of his hopes , how more than vile: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 146
As of some breathless racers whose hopes poize Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 924
By our eternal hopes , to soothe, to assuage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1015
Our gold and ripe-ear'd hopes . With not one tinge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 8
Thee to thy native hopes . O thou hast won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 17
Is most articulate; where hopes infest; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 540
As though my hopes of favour had been whole. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 75
A wide world, where a thousand new-born hopes Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 181
Of hopes , and stuff'd with many memories, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 184
It gives me pleasant hopes . Please you, walk forth Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 59
And hopes and joys and panting miseries,- To Fanny, Line 10
 
HOPING............1
And hoping heaven's dread wrath to shun, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 77
 
HOPS..............1
Which way the tender-legged linnet hops . This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 8
 
HORDES............2
For him, those chambers held barbarian hordes , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 85
Or routing out of Hyperborean hordes , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 21
 
HORIZON...........1
Past each horizon of fine poesy; To George Felton Mathew, Line 12
 
HORIZON'S.........4
Far round the horizon's crystal air to skim, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 17
Until, from the horizon's vaulted side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 349
And dropt my vision to the horizon's verge; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 590
I saw grow up from the horizon's brink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 647
 
HORIZONTAL........1
I, who still saw the horizontal sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 529
 
HORN..............10
By the dim echoes of old Triton's horn : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 206
A ram goes bleating: Winder of the horn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 281
Make my horn parley from their foreheads hoar: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 479
Till Triton blew his horn . The palace rang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 888
About the wilds they hunt with spear and horn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 255
Sup and bowse from horn and can. Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 12
Honour to the bugle- horn ! Robin Hood, Line 51
Of Ceres' horn , and, in huge vessels, wine Lamia, Part II, Line 187
Still was more plenty than the fabled horn The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 35
A plenty horn of jewels. And here I The Jealousies, Line 744
 
HORNED............1
Cried I, approaching near the horned shrine, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 137
 
HORNS.............4
Not longer than the May-fly's small fan- horns ; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 5
Forehead to forehead held their monstrous horns ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 12
Smote 'twixt the horns by the death-stunning mace Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 131
I look'd upon the altar and its horns The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 237
 
HORNY.............1
What his horny throat expresseth; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 12
 
HORRIBLE..........3
O horrible ! to lose the sight of well remember'd face, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 33
Bestirr'd themselves, thrice horrible and cold; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 256
In midst of this dethronement horrible . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 315
 
HORRIBLY..........1
Heaving in pain, and horribly convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 27
 
HORRID............21
By horrid suffrance - mightily forlorn. Sleep and Poetry, Line 388
More heark'ning to the sermon's horrid sound. Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 4
O horrid dream - see how his body dips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 12
A horrid nightmare, similar somewhat, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 9
Is there no hope from thee? This horrid spell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 276
Ravening a worm.- Away ye horrid moods, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 105
Than with these horrid moods be left in lurch. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 109
The while it did unthread the horrid woof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 292
And put her lean hands to the horrid thing: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 381
But we have many a horrid bore All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 7
Awake, with horrid shout, my foeman's ears, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 152
Shook horrid with such aspen-malady: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 94
And eyes at horrid working. Nearest him Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 52
More horrid still. Above a sombre cliff Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 86
With horrid warning gaped wide, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 42
That blackens northward of these horrid towers, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 148
A muffled death, ensnared in horrid silence! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26
Until it seem'd a horrid presence there, Lamia, Part II, Line 267
With special strictures on the horrid crime, The Jealousies, Line 96
My master finds a monstrous horrid bore; The Jealousies, Line 285
"The Emperor's horrid bad; yes, that's my cue!" The Jealousies, Line 622
 
HORROR............4
Yet must I be a coward!- Horror rushes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 789
And horror ! kiss'd his own - he was alone. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 510
No, no, that horror cannot be - for at the cable's length There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 39
Some horror ; all I know, this present, is Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 114
 
HORRORS...........10
So with the horrors past thou'lt win thy happier fate. On Peace, Line 14
What horrors may discomfort thee and me. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 468
Horrors which nourish an uneasiness Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 618
But horrors , portion'd to a giant nerve, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 175
To see and to behold these horrors new? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 233
Such horrors ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 19a
What horrors ? Is it not a joyous time? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 20
To talk of horrors on our wedding-night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 27
What horrors more? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 1b
But horrors portion'd to a giant nerve The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 23
 
HORSE.............5
They sway'd about upon a rocking horse , Sleep and Poetry, Line 186
They stung the feather'd horse : with fierce alarm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 555
And the horse he rode upon! Robin Hood, Line 56
Take horse , my lord. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 26a
It paunch'd the Earl of Chester's horse , who then King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 42
 
HORSE'S...........2
Of his proud horse's mane: he was withal Calidore: A Fragment, Line 111
Stooping their shoulders o'er a horse's prance, Sleep and Poetry, Line 332
 
HORSEMAN..........1
The arras, rich with horseman , hawk, and hound, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 358
 
HORSEMEN..........2
And through the light the horsemen swiftly glide, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 34
An hundred horsemen from my honoured gates, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 38
 
HORSES............8
With horses prancing o'er them, palaces Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 744
Those towering horses and their mournful freight. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 359
These raven horses , though they foster'd are Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 398
Their horses homeward, with convulsed spur, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 223
A troup o' horses - Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 12
I wait for you with horses . Choose your fate. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 149
For me, with horses by the forest-side Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 180
Our horses ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 8a
 
HORSES'...........1
And rifled,- stuff! the horses' hoofs have minced it! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 68
 
HOSE..............1
From the left pocket of his threadbare hose , The Jealousies, Line 439
 
HOSIER............1
Stands next door to Wilson the Hosier . The Gothic looks solemn, Line 6
 
HOST..............8
Moved either host . On a wide sand they met, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 822
This mighty consummation made, the host Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 828
In little time a host of joys to bind, To J.R., Line 11
Or one of few of that imperial host Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 22
Appear'd, a sudden host , in the open day. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
Most mighty Otho? Will not my great host Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
To cheer the brave remainder of your host Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 131
But, Conrad, now be gone; the host is look'd for; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 68
 
HOST'S............2
Than mine host's Canary wine? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 6
Mine host's sign-board flew away, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 14
 
HOSTESS...........2
To fair hostess Merriment, Robin Hood, Line 29
Hail, my sweet hostess ! I do thank the stars, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 12
 
HOT...............25
Over some precipice; let the hot sun Sleep and Poetry, Line 302
Nor with hot fingers, nor with temples bursting: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 226
When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 2
'Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 18
Of Proserpine, when Hell, obscure and hot , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 944
Whose tips are glowing hot . The legend cheers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 841
Tortures hot breath, and speech of agony, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 257
Walk'd dizzily away. Pained and hot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 904
Because I feel my forehead hot and flush'd- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 34
With the hot lyre and thee God of the meridian, Line 21
A straying from his toil? Hot Egypt's pest Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 140
Come down, we pray thee, ere the hot sun count Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 187
Upon hot sand, or flinty road, or sea shore iron scurf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 10
Hot to their Councils, scarce content O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 9
Hyena foemen, and hot -blooded lords, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 86
As hot as death's is chill, with fierce convulse Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 129
I strove against thee and my hot -blood son, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 21
You know his temper, hot , proud, obstinate; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 89
Had put a sudden stop to my hot breath, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 4
The Emperor on this marriage is so hot , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 48
Thine arms from forth a pulpit of hot fire Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 91
Thou mak'st me boil as hot as thou canst flame! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
Hot , glaz'd, and wide, with lid-lashes all sear, Lamia, Part I, Line 151
Then sudden it grew hot , and all the pains Lamia, Part II, Line 252
Return'd his Highness; "they are piping hot The Jealousies, Line 546
 
HOTEL.............1
To Hum's hotel ; and, as he on did pass The Jealousies, Line 263
 
HOTLY.............2
I hotly burn - to be a Calidore - Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 12
I saw the whelming vintage hotly pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 261
 
HOUND.............1
The arras, rich with horseman, hawk, and hound , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 358
 
HOUNDS............3
Again my trooping hounds their tongues shall loll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 480
As the break-covert blood- hounds of such sin: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 221
That I might give it to my hounds to tear! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 94
 
HOUR..............66
To possess but a span of the hour of leisure, To Some Ladies, Line 27
Whence gush the streams of song: in happy hour To George Felton Mathew, Line 78
Full many a dreary hour have I past, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 1
Of my rough verses not an hour misspent; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 82
A noble end, are thirsty every hour . Sleep and Poetry, Line 283
The gradual sand that through an hour glass runs- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 13
For one short hour ; no, even as the trees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 26
Beneath thy drowsy wing a triple hour , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 462
And I could witness his most kingly hour , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 549
Hour after hour, to each lush-leav'd rill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 52
Hour after hour , to each lush-leav'd rill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 52
Had fallen out that hour . The wanderer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 137
Has been an under-passion to this hour . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 179
I had been grieving at this joyous hour . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 302
So every eve, nay every spendthrift hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 465
As hour -glass sand,- and fast, as you might see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 815
Of love? Now this is cruel. Since the hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 904
Glad was the hour , when, with thee, myriads bade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 32
Yet I would have, great gods! but one short hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 36
That he might at the threshold one hour wait Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 382
One hour doth linger weeping, for the pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 518
My love is still for thee. The hour may come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 657
When I do speak, I'll think upon this hour , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 33
And when I feel, fair creature of an hour , When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 9
And pulp, and ripen, richer every hour , Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 9
"To-day we purpose, ay, this hour we mount Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 185
She fretted for the golden hour , and hung Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 243
And many a chapel bell the hour is telling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 310
Let not quick Winter chill its dying hour !- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 450
Scanty the hour and few the steps beyond the bourn of care, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 29
Scanty the hour and few the steps, because a longer stay There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 31
One hour , half ideot, he stands by mossy waterfall, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 41
In such like nonsense would I pass an hour Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 20
The tapers keep aside an hour and more, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 31
An hour glass on the turn, amid the trails Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 44
Whisper that the hour is near! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 9
The hallow'd hour was near at hand: she sighs The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 66
And canst oppose to each malignant hour Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 339
Was ripening in itself. The ripe hour came, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 194
Upon that very hour , our parentage, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 198
My idle days? Ripe was the drowsy hour ; Ode on Indolence, Line 15
And pardon you will grant, that, at this hour , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 126
I pr'ythee why? What happier hour of time Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 7
The charters of man's greatness, at this hour Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 15
Yet be that hour far off; and may he live, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 32
Swift be your steed! Within this hour Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 78b
If he survive one hour , then may I die Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 11
Wilt thou forsake him at his latest hour ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 12
Things unbeliev'd one hour , so strange they are, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 2
The next hour stamps with credit. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 3a
Bear a soft message for me; for the hour Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 129
That faints into itself at evening hour : Lamia, Part I, Line 139
Not one hour old, yet of sciential brain Lamia, Part I, Line 191
And, all subdued, consented to the hour Lamia, Part II, Line 82
The sands of thy short life are spent this hour , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 114
Thy hour glass, if these gummed leaves be burnt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 116
Thy fated hour . That thou hadst power to do so The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 143
Of change, hour after hour I curs'd myself: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 399
Of change, hour after hour I curs'd myself: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 399
Aye, an hour ago, my brilliant queen! What can I do to drive away, Line 3
The poor, the fading, brief pride of an hour : To Fanny, Line 50
Of regal pomp and a vainglorious hour , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 3
Or if it please him play an hour at chess- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 45
Not liking in her heart an hour -long pinch, The Jealousies, Line 71
One hour , the next shall see him in my grasp, The Jealousies, Line 195
As he retired, an hour ago I wis, The Jealousies, Line 286
 
HOUR'S............2
His weary limbs, bathing an hour's space, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 836
From winter's ague, for one hour's gleam; On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 6
 
HOURLY............1
Endymion: yet hourly had he striven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 395
 
HOURS.............36
And drop like hours into eternity. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 14
My little boat, for many quiet hours , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 47
And through whole solemn hours dost sit, and hearken Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 238
To my down-sunken hours , and with thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 708
When love-lorn hours had left me less a child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 885
What a calm round of hours shall make my days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 983
That when through heavy hours I used to rue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 553
For some few hours the coming solitude." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 706
Revive, or these soft hours will hurry by Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 767
So thou wouldst thus, for many sequent hours , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 797
Will in a few short hours be nothing to me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 113
Join dance with shadowy Hours ; while still the blast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 424
Into the hours that have pass'd us by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 825
Temper my lonely hours God of the meridian, Line 23
And their hours are old and gray, Robin Hood, Line 2
Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 2
Thinking on rugged hours and fruitless toil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 324
Three hours they labour'd at this travail sore; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 382
But for one moment in the tedious hours , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 79
After so many hours of toil and quest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 338
He pac'd away the pleasant hours of ease Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 194
That scar'd away the meek ethereal Hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 216
To the eastern gates, and full six dewy hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 264
The watcher of thy sleep and hours of life, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 72
Upon the midnight hours ; Ode to Psyche, Line 31
Upon the midnight hours ; Ode to Psyche, Line 45
Of two or three hours - Two or three posies, Line 12
May in few hours make pleasures of them all. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 80
Making our bright hours muddy, be a thing Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 116
Men, women, rich and poor, in the cool hours , Lamia, Part I, Line 355
The silent-blessing fate, warm cloister'd hours , Lamia, Part II, Line 148
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours. To Autumn, Line 22
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours . To Autumn, Line 22
He paces through the pleasant hours of ease, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 38
That scar'd away the meek ethereal hours The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 60
For flatteries to ease this Stephen's hours , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 49
 
HOURS'............1
Of a poor three hours' absence? but we'll gain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 205
 
HOUS'D............1
By her affrighted servants. Next day, hous'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 72
 
HOUSE.............28
It was a poet's house who keeps the keys Sleep and Poetry, Line 354
Within its pearly house .- The mighty deeps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 68
Could wander in the mazy forest- house Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 468
Death fell a weeping in his charnel- house . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 788
Jove's daughter, and be reckon'd of his house . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 380
He might not in house , field, or garden stir, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 11
And her house was out of doors. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 4
All the house is asleep, but we know very well Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 2
He cursed thee and thine, both house and land: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 102
In all the house was heard no human sound. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 356
Rumbles reluctant o'er our fallen house ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 61
"This cheers our fallen house : come to our friends, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 150
When it is nighing to the mournful house Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 103
That camp-mushroom, dishonour of our house ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 80
The unworthy welcome of your servant's house ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 78
Upon the threshold of this house of joy- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 188
What discord is at ferment in this house ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 273
Are on the watch and gape through all the house ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 31
The purple slaughter- house , where Bacchus' self Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 125
And dream, when in the serpent prison- house , Lamia, Part I, Line 203
Were foil'd, who watch'd to trace them to their house : Lamia, Part I, Line 393
her house , in the Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
house , and all that was in it, vanished in an instant: many thousands took Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
"By all the gloom hung round thy fallen house , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 284
Rumbles reluctant o'er our fallen house ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 363
He'll surmise sagely of a dwelling- house , The Jealousies, Line 58
And damn'd his House of Commons, in complete chagrin. The Jealousies, Line 135
Unto some lazar- house thou journeyest, The Jealousies, Line 240
 
HOUSE'S...........1
We will make trial of your house's welcome, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 183
 
HOUSEHOLD.........2
Like whispers of the household gods that keep To My Brothers, Line 3
Her household to our lack of entertainment. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 5
 
HOUSEHOLD'S.......1
He sets his bustling household's wits at work King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 48
 
HOUSELESS.........1
From your breast houseless : ay, it must be so." Lamia, Part II, Line 45
 
HOUSES............1
It was the time when wholesale houses close The Jealousies, Line 208
 
HOUSEWIFE'S.......1
Worse than a housewife's , when she thinks her cream Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 3
 
HOUSEWIVES........1
That housewives talk of. But the spirit-blow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 899
 
HOUSING...........1
No housing from the storm and tempests mad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 322
 
HOUSINGS..........1
Or hug the golden housings of his steed, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 66
 
HOVER.............6
Call on thy gentle spirit to hover nigh Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 56
It came. Also imaginings will hover Sleep and Poetry, Line 71
It is to hover round our pleasant hills! Sleep and Poetry, Line 207
O'er which the mind may hover till it dozes; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 108
To hover round my head, and make me sick Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 288
Hover around that life, whose bitter days Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 33
 
HOVER'D...........4
And then she hover'd over me, and stole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 446
Hover'd about, a giant size, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 74
Hover'd and buzz'd his wings, with fearful roar, Lamia, Part II, Line 13
There stood, or hover'd , tremulous in the air, The Jealousies, Line 2
 
HOVERER...........1
Light hoverer around our happy pillows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 13
 
HOVERING..........3
To what high fane?- Ah! see her hovering feet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 624
One warm, flush'd moment, hovering , it might seem Lamia, Part I, Line 129
Above a pearl-built minster, hovering near; The Jealousies, Line 579
 
HOVERINGLY........1
Let us entwine hoveringly - O dearth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 817
 
HOVERINGS.........1
And was now rapt in tender hoverings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 931
 
HOW'S.............2
How's this? I marvel! Yet you look not mad. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 142
You chill me with astonishment! How's this? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 215
 
HOWE'ER...........2
Without surprise, his questions, howe'er strange. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 18
When, howe'er poor or particolour'd things, What can I do to drive away, Line 10
 
HOWEVER...........3
In short, convince you that however wise Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 1
Where's the eye, however blue, Fancy, Line 72
Where's the voice, however soft, Fancy, Line 75
 
HOWL..............4
Whose very dogs would execrations howl The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 87
Not at dog's howl , or gloom-bird's hated screech, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 171
Nor at dog's howl , or gloom-bird's even screech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 20
Where, after a long hypercritic howl The Jealousies, Line 91
 
HOWLING...........2
Green'd over April's lap? No howling sad Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 217
Howling in vain along the hollow night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 49
 
HOWSOEVER.........2
These lines; and howsoever they be done, Sleep and Poetry, Line 403
Melodious howsoever , can confound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 80
 
HUBBUB............2
Hubbub increases more they call out "Hush!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 254
Came forth to quell the hubbub in the hall. The Jealousies, Line 794
 
HUBERT............1
Talk'd of one Master Hubert , deep in her esteem. The Jealousies, Line 711
 
HUDDLED...........1
Benighted, close they huddled from the cold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 391
 
HUDDLING..........1
Are huddling undistinguish'd, my dear friends Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 128
 
HUE...............14
Can make their lying lips turn pale of hue , Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 13
And run in mazes of the youngest hue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 42
All tendrils green, of every bloom and hue , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 410
Fish-semblances, of green and azure hue , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 884
The more, the more I saw her dainty hue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 408
Ripe from hue -golden swoons took all the blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 861
The natural hue of health, from vermeil lips?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 148
Into the wide stream came of purple hue - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 195
The real of beauty, free from that dead hue On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 10
Flush every thing that hath a vermeil hue , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 14
She was a gordian shape of dazzling hue , Lamia, Part I, Line 47
And so unsullied was the marble hue , Lamia, Part I, Line 383
His passion, cruel grown, took on a hue Lamia, Part II, Line 75
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue ; To Autumn, Line 26
 
HUES..............3
Away I wander'd - all the pleasant hues Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 691
There darts strange light of varied hues and dyes: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 541
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 2
 
HUFF..............1
Turn'd from myself, her partner, in a huff ; The Jealousies, Line 701
 
HUG...............2
Or hug the golden housings of his steed, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 66
There - hug him - dying! O, thou innocence, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
 
HUGE..............20
Along a huge cloud's ridge; and now with sprightly Sleep and Poetry, Line 130
Huge as a planet, and like that roll round, Sleep and Poetry, Line 176
Huge dens and caverns in a mountain's side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 650
With starlight gems: aye, all so huge and strange, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 632
And elephant, and eagle, and huge jaw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 135
To its huge self; and the minutest fish Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 207
Went through the dismal air like one huge Python Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 530
Huge sea-marks; vanward swelling in array, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 830
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 6
When were thy shoulders mantled in huge streams? To Ailsa Rock, Line 3
With a huge empty flaggon by his side: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 364
Too huge for mortal tongue or pen of scribe: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 160
Now lost, save what we find on remnants huge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 281
Of huge Enceladus swallow'd it in wrath: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 304
Mantled before in darkness and huge shade, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 365
Of Ceres' horn, and, in huge vessels, wine Lamia, Part II, Line 187
An image, huge of feature as a cloud, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 88
And saw, what first I thought an image huge , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 298
Too huge for mortal tongue, or pen of scribe. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 9
The Emperor is now in a huge rage,- The Jealousies, Line 318
 
HUGELY............1
Curves hugely : now, far in the deep abyss, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 232
 
HUGENESS..........1
Its hungry hugeness , seeming ready ripe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 347
 
HUGEST............1
And thus in thousand hugest phantasies Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 13
 
HULL..............1
Morning fair and storm-wreck'd hull ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 13
 
HUM...............35
And other pulses. Hear ye not the hum Addressed to the Same, Line 12
Hum about globes of clover and sweet peas, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 52
Up to his forehead. Then there was a hum Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 500
Up went the hum celestial. High afar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 581
Just when the light of morn, with hum of bees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 419
To Hum the soothsayer, whose name I see The Jealousies, Line 188
"Bring Hum to me! But stay - here take my ring, The Jealousies, Line 190
And to old Hum through street and alley hied; The Jealousies, Line 205
"Salpietro!" exclaim'd Hum , "is the dog there? The Jealousies, Line 311
"Don't beat him!" return'd Hum , and on the floor came pat. The Jealousies, Line 315
"He dreams," said Hum , "or I have ever lied, The Jealousies, Line 327
"Commander of the faithful!" answer'd Hum , The Jealousies, Line 361
"I pledge you, Hum ! and pledge my dearest love, The Jealousies, Line 370
Said Hum , "in duty, and in vassalage, The Jealousies, Line 374
"You seem to know"- "I do know," answer'd Hum , The Jealousies, Line 379
"Where does she live?" ask'd Hum . "Her fair locks curl The Jealousies, Line 385
"Good! good!" cried Hum , "I've known her from a child! The Jealousies, Line 388
"Convey her to me, Hum , or by my crown, The Jealousies, Line 406
While Hum continued, shamming half a sob,- The Jealousies, Line 412
And prithee, Hum , behind the screen do peep The Jealousies, Line 430
"Pho! nonsense!" exclaim'd Hum , "now don't despair: The Jealousies, Line 458
"Ring the repeater, gentle Hum !" "'Tis five," The Jealousies, Line 478
Said gentle Hum ; "the nights draw in apace; The Jealousies, Line 479
You must away this morning." " Hum ! so soon?" The Jealousies, Line 494
And take some more wine, Hum ;- O, heavens! I burn The Jealousies, Line 530
"Open the window, Hum ; I'm ready now!" The Jealousies, Line 541
"Zooks!" exclaim'd Hum , as up the sash he drew, The Jealousies, Line 542
To see my pigsney Bellanaine. Hum ! do The Jealousies, Line 547
"Wounds! how they shout!" said Hum , "and there,- see, see, The Jealousies, Line 550
"Why, Hum , you're getting quite poetical! The Jealousies, Line 559
Good Hum , and let me view this mighty coil." The Jealousies, Line 565
"And, Hum , we must not shilly-shally stand,- The Jealousies, Line 598
"By'r Lady! he is gone!" cries Hum , "and I,- The Jealousies, Line 613
That vile imposter Hum ,-" The Jealousies, Line 787a
Now Hum , new fledg'd with high authority, The Jealousies, Line 793
 
HUM'S.............2
To Hum's hotel; and, as he on did pass The Jealousies, Line 263
Some histories say that this was Hum's last speech; The Jealousies, Line 623
 
HUMAN.............41
Above the ingrate world and human fears. Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 12
Almost the highest bliss of human -kind, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 13
And mourn the fearful dearth of human kindness To George Felton Mathew, Line 62
The placid features of a human face: To George Felton Mathew, Line 89
Might live, and show itself to human eyes. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 121
The scarlet coats that pester human -kind. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 130
All that was for our human senses fitted. Sleep and Poetry, Line 80
A lovely tale of human life we'll read. Sleep and Poetry, Line 110
Of human hearts: for lo! I see afar, Sleep and Poetry, Line 125
Out the dark mysteries of human souls Sleep and Poetry, Line 289
Of human neighbourhood envenom all. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 622
Left by men-slugs and human serpentry, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 821
If human souls did never kiss and greet? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 842
But this is human life: the war, the deeds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 153
All human ; bearing in themselves this good, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 156
For 'tis the nicest touch of human honour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 436
Of human words! roughness of mortal speech! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 818
From human pastures; or, O torturing fact! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 5
The sway of human hand; gold vase emboss'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 126
In human accent: ' Potent goddess! chief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 539
Of wind and waters: 'tis past human wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 826
Death to a human eye: for there did spring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 875
To touch this flower into human shape! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 67
My river-lily bud! one human kiss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 664
Upon the skirts of human -nature dwelling Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 306
And filling it once more with human soul? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 358
Nurture besides, and life, from human fears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 429
In all the house was heard no human sound. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 356
Then to my human heart I turn at once- Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 4
Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 6
Where beats the human heart, as if just there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 43
All breathing human passion far above, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 28
Tears, human tears! Do you repent you then Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 86
Her lips - I swear no human bones e'er wore Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 71
In human climes, and live: Alas! poor youth, Lamia, Part I, Line 281
And every soul from human trammels freed, Lamia, Part II, Line 210
More, more he gaz'd: his human senses reel: Lamia, Part II, Line 258
They seek no wonder but the human face; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 163
Not pin'd by human sorrows, but bright blanch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 257
Where beats the human heart; as if just there, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 345
Ah, fairest of all human loveliness! The Jealousies, Line 168
 
HUMANE............2
Rheum to kind eyes, a sting to humane thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 286
Circled by a humane society? Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 9
 
HUMANIST..........1
A humanist , physician to all men. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 190
 
HUMANITY..........4
Where we may soft humanity put on, To George Felton Mathew, Line 55
Upon the forehead of humanity . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 802
And thou art distant in Humanity . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 312
And more, like slaves to poor humanity , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 158
 
HUMANIZE..........1
I humanize my sayings to thine ear, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 2
 
HUMANS............1
For faeries be as humans , lovers true. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 4
 
HUMBLE............5
Conjure thee to receive our humble paean, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 305
And now your favour makes me but more humble ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 25
To royal Gersa with my humble thanks, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 20
For old serge hangings,- me, your humble friend, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 36
The slave retreated backwards, humble -eyed, The Jealousies, Line 203
 
HUMBLED...........1
Than see you humbled but a half degree! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 15
 
HUMBLER...........1
On humbler thoughts, and let this strange assay Sleep and Poetry, Line 313
 
HUMBLY............2
An unknown - but no more: we humbly screen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 302
Must I burn through; once more humbly assay On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 7
 
HUMID.............2
And thy humid eyes that dance Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 4
A humid eye, and steps luxurious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 910
 
HUMMER............1
What is more soothing than the pretty hummer Sleep and Poetry, Line 2
 
HUMMING...........6
Bright as the humming -bird's green diadem, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 3
Are closing in the west; or that soft humming Calidore: A Fragment, Line 160
To the swift treble pipe, and humming string. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 314
He kept an anxious ear. The humming tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 916
So without any fuss, any hawing and humming , Over the hill and over the dale, Line 11
Charmed to death by the drone of the humming may fly. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 12
 
HUMOUR............3
A fine humour - Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 32b
Humour him to the height. I fear to go; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 52
'Twould humour many a heart to leave them thus, Lamia, Part I, Line 396
 
HUMS..............1
And sudden cannon. Ah! how all this hums , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 18
 
HUN...............1
Hail, royal Hun ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 81b
 
HUNDRED...........8
A hundred waterfalls, whose voices come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 242
Rudders that for a hundred years had lost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 125
Ten hundred years: which gone, I then bequeath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 598
New to the feet, although the tale a hundred times be told: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 6
All eyes be muffled, or a hundred swords The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 83
The dragon-world of all its hundred eyes; As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 5
An hundred horsemen from my honoured gates, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 38
And by mysterious sleights a hundred thirsts appease? Lamia, Part I, Line 285
 
HUNG..............31
Where on one side are covert branches hung , To George Felton Mathew, Line 45
Hung from his shoulder like the drooping flowers Calidore: A Fragment, Line 95
A glowing splendour round about me hung , Sleep and Poetry, Line 51
Of pleasure's temple. Round about were hung Sleep and Poetry, Line 355
From low hung branches; little space they stop; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 88
To light- hung leaves, in smoothest echoes breaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 119
Was hung a silver bugle, and between Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 173
My clenched hands;- for lo! the poppies hung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 682
Hung a lush screen of drooping weeds, and spread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 940
His empty arms together, hung his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 858
Her voice I hung like fruit among green leaves: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 271
Hung swollen at their backs, and jewel'd sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 313
Whose eye has seen the snow clouds hung in mist, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 2
And as he thus over his passion hung , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 197
She fretted for the golden hour, and hung Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 243
And Isabella on its music hung : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 284
Hung over her sweet basil evermore, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 423
They hung his bridle on a topmost bough, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 95
Not in lone splendor hung aloft the night, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 2
Forest on forest hung above his head Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 6
And be among her cloudy trophies hung . Ode on Melancholy, Line 30
Though in her lids hung the sweet tears of May; Ode on Indolence, Line 46
Where hung a silver lamp, whose phosphor glow Lamia, Part I, Line 380
Upon her aching forehead be there hung Lamia, Part II, Line 223
Mov'd the thin linen folds that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 196
Stirr'd the thin folds of gauze that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 218
Hung pale, and curtain'd her in mysteries The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 253
"By all the gloom hung round thy fallen house, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 284
At those few words hung vast before my mind, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 307
Hung nobly, as upon the face of heaven The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 453
Forth from his hood that hung his neck below, The Jealousies, Line 509
 
HUNGARIAN.........8
An Hungarian Captain Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 10
The Castle of Friedburg, its vicinity, and the Hungarian Camp Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, SCENE
Is bruised by the Hungarian petards. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 9
It is young Gersa, the Hungarian prince, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 85
Still weep amid the wild Hungarian camp, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 196
The entrance of GERSA'S Tent in the Hungarian Camp. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Setting
Enter an Hungarian Captain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.b to Line 7
Hungarian ! Thou amazest me beyond Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 77
 
HUNGARIANS........2
I saw my moment. The Hungarians , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 47
Ludolph, that blast of the Hungarians , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 19
 
HUNGARY...........2
GERSA, Prince of Hungary Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 9
Still understand me, King of Hungary , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 140
 
HUNGER............5
Enlarge not to my hunger , or I'm caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 760
And seldom felt she any hunger -pain; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 468
Nor let these arms paternal hunger more Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 123
Is't madness or a hunger after death King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 14
Or swallow'd by my hunger -starved asp,- The Jealousies, Line 197
 
HUNGER'D..........1
Is all a- hunger'd . Thou, Oceanus, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 163
 
HUNGRY............12
Or blind Orion hungry for the morn. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 198
And pour to death along some hungry sands."- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1004
Its hungry hugeness, seeming ready ripe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 347
And roar'd for more; with many a hungry lick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 512
And went all naked to the hungry shark; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 114
In hungry pride and gainful cowardice, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 130
Pitying each form that hungry death hath marr'd, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 357
No hungry generations tread thee down; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 62
Hungry for evidence to ruin me; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 33
Some hungry spell that loveliness absorbs; Lamia, Part II, Line 259
"Thou inconvenience! thou hungry crop The Jealousies, Line 235
So on our flight with hungry eyes they gaze, The Jealousies, Line 722
 
HUNS..............1
For slaves among these Huns . Away! Away! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 77
 
HUNT..............4
Kind Hunt was shut in prison, yet has he, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 2
About the wilds they hunt with spear and horn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 255
I'll hunt with you. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 133a
He flies, for the Welch beagles to hunt down. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 18
 
HUNTED............2
Must see behind, as doth the hunted hare. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 144
Hunted me as a Tartar does the boar, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 51
 
HUNTING...........4
Or moon, if that her hunting be begun. On The Story of Rimini, Line 8
My hunting cap, because I laugh'd and smil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 925
To Empress Dian, for a hunting spear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 703
Some old hunting ditty, while Robin Hood, Line 27
 
HUNTRESS..........1
A huntress free in" - At this, sudden fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1008
 
HUNTSMAN'S........1
With belt, and spur, and bracing huntsman's dress. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 192
 
HUNTSMEN..........2
Anger our huntsmen : Breather round our farms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 283
Their fellow huntsmen o'er the wide champaign Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 386
 
HUNTSMEN'S........1
And pluck the sorrow from our huntsmen's brows. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 840
 
HURDY.............1
He pass'd the hurdy -gurdies with disdain, The Jealousies, Line 222
 
HURL..............1
A hedge-stake - or a ponderous stone to hurl King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 7
 
HURL'D............4
Out-facing Lucifer, and then had hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 531
Oft hast thou seen bolts of the thunder hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 205
Where through some sucking pool I will be hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 249
And hurl'd me down the illimitable gulph Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 5
 
HURLING...........2
Of helpless discontent,- hurling my lance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 929
Was hurling mountains in that second war, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 70
 
HURLY.............1
Hurly burly There was a naughty boy, Line 69
 
HURRICANES........1
Woe- hurricanes beat ever at the gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 527
 
HURRIED...........12
At that oppress'd I hurried in.- Ah! where Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 970
At this, from every side they hurried in, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 507
The solitary felt a hurried change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 633
Though their days have hurried by Robin Hood, Line 61
And when she left, she hurried back, as swift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 469
His poor guide hurried back with agues in her brain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 189
Out went the taper as she hurried in; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 199
She hurried at his words, beset with fears, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 352
Each family of rapturous hurried notes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 282
Who was it hurried by me so distract? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 83
While hurried Lamia trembled: "Ah," said he, Lamia, Part I, Line 368
So in they hurried all, maz'd, curious and keen: Lamia, Part II, Line 156
 
HURRIES...........1
[ Hurries out. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.a to Line 80b
 
HURRY.............6
Revive, or these soft hours will hurry by Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 767
Hurry distracted from Sol's temperate beam, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1003
High Muses! let him hurry to the ending. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 940
Then the hurry and alarm Fancy, Line 63
From hurry to and fro. Soon, up aloft, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 30
Hurry along to some less magic shade. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 8
 
HURRYING..........2
All that he writes with such a hurrying glow. Sleep and Poetry, Line 154
To where the hurrying freshnesses aye preach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 70
 
HURRYINGLY........1
Which hurryingly they gain'd, and enter'd straight. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 725
 
HURT..............1
Young dove of the waters! truly I'll not hurt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 582
 
HUSBAND'S.........1
In husband's company, but still employ'd The Jealousies, Line 113
 
HUSBANDMEN........1
Watch'd her, as anxious husbandmen the grain, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 133
 
HUSBANDS..........1
Either in lovers, husbands , or expence. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 58
 
HUSH..............20
Hush ! no exclaim - yet, justly mightst thou call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 471
Hush , hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 1
Hush, hush , tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 1
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush , hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 1
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush , my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 1
Hush , hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 7
Hush, hush , tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 7
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush , hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 7
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush , my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 7
With whispers hush and shuffling feet, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 21
Hubbub increases more they call out " Hush !" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 254
How came ye muffled in so hush a masque? Ode on Indolence, Line 12
Open it straight;- hush !- quiet!- my lost boy! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 37
I am lost! Hush , hush! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 102b
I am lost! Hush, hush ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 102b
Grew hush ; the stately music no more breathes; Lamia, Part II, Line 263
"Ah, beauteous mortal!" " Hush !" quoth Coralline, The Jealousies, Line 64
"You hush !" replied the mistress, with a shine The Jealousies, Line 66
To- " Hush - hush!" cried Eban, "sure that is he The Jealousies, Line 300
To- "Hush - hush !" cried Eban, "sure that is he The Jealousies, Line 300
 
HUSH'D............10
Till it is hush'd and smooth! O unconfin'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 455
For many years my offerings must be hush'd . Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 32
The maiden's chamber, silken, hush'd , and chaste; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 187
And over the hush'd carpet, silent, stept, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 251
'Mid hush'd , cool-rooted flowers, fragrant-eyed, Ode to Psyche, Line 13
Might have been trodden out, all sure and hush'd ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 18
Moved 'twas with careful steps, and hush'd as death: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 4
One while these proud towers are hush'd as death. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 14
And shut the chamber up, close, hush'd and still, Lamia, Part II, Line 143
With leaves all hush'd : his awful presence there The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 448
 
HUSHED............1
And seal the hushed casket of my soul. Sonnet to Sleep, Line 14
 
HUSHING...........2
His friends, the dearest. Hushing signs she made, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 409
With hushing finger, how he means to load Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 119
 
HUSKS.............1
Among the fragrant husks and berries crush'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 52
 
HUSTLED...........1
I am near hustled to a dangerous gulph, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 115
 
HUT...............1
Love in a hut , with water and a crust, Lamia, Part II, Line 1
 
HUZZA.............12
Huzza for folly O! Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 2
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 4
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 6
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 8
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 10
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 12
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 14
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 16
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 18
Huzza , etc. Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 20
Huzza ! Huzza! Long live the Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Voices without, Line 83
Huzza! Huzza ! Long live the Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Voices without, Line 83
 
HYACINTH..........3
Close in a bower of hyacinth and musk, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 85
Shaded hyacinth , alway Fancy, Line 51
They scatter'd,- daisy, primrose, hyacinth ,- The Jealousies, Line 728
 
HYACINTHUS........2
Of Hyacinthus , when the cruel breath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 328
That woodland Hyacinthus could escape Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 68
 
HYBLA'S...........1
Sweeter by far than Hybla's honied roses Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 10
 
HYDASPES..........1
In midmost Ind, beside Hydaspes cool, The Jealousies, Line 1
 
HYENA.............1
Hyena foemen, and hot-blooded lords, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 86
 
HYMEN'S...........1
'Tis chosen I hear from Hymen's jewelry, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 137
 
HYMN..............7
A hymn in praise of spotless chastity. Ode to Apollo, Line 33
To a loud hymn , that sounds far, far away To Kosciusko, Line 13
A hymn from Dian's temple; while upswelling, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 197
And then a hymn . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 943a
The vesper hymn , far swollen, soft and full, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 967
The mariners join hymn with those on land. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 25
In midst of this thine hymn , my willing eyes, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 6
 
HYMNED............1
As thou wast hymned on the shores of Baiae? Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 3
 
HYMNING...........5
Thou sweetly singest - nought thy hymning mars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 11
Or hand of hymning angel, when 'tis seen On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 4
And catch soft floatings from a faint-heard hymning ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 34
A hymning up to Cynthia, queen of light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 828
Hymning and harmony Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 26
 
HYMNS.............4
Where the fairies are chaunting their evening hymns , O come, dearest Emma!, Line 7
Half lost, and all old hymns made nullity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 794
Of triumph calm, and hymns of festival Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 128
Of triumph calm, and hymns of festival The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 433
 
HYPERBOREAN.......1
Or routing out of Hyperborean hordes, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 21
 
HYPERCRITIC.......1
Where, after a long hypercritic howl The Jealousies, Line 91
 
HYPERION..........14
"O tender spouse of gold Hyperion , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 95
Blazing Hyperion on his orbed fire Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 166
Oft made Hyperion ache. His palace bright, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 176
Hyperion , leaving twilight in the rear, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 203
Hyperion arose, and on the stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 350
Hyperion slid into the rustled air, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 2
And be ye mindful that Hyperion , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 343
Hyperion , lo! his radiance is here!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 345
It was Hyperion :- a granite peak Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 367
Hyperion from the peak loud answered, "Saturn!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 388
Blazing Hyperion on his orbed fire The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 15
Make great Hyperion ache. His palace bright, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 24
Hyperion , leaving twilight in the rear, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 47
Anon rush'd by the bright Hyperion ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 57
 
HYPERION'S........3
So at Hyperion's words the Phantoms pale Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 255
Awaiting for Hyperion's command. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 289
And they beheld, while still Hyperion's name Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 347
 
HYPOCRITE.........2
The hypocrite . What vow would you impose? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 31
Do not affect amazement, hypocrite , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 160


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Published @ RC

March 2005