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Keats Concordance
 
I'................2
And what have ye there i' the basket? Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 2
I' the morning, freighted with a weight of woe, The Jealousies, Line 239
 
I'D...............11
Than if I'd brought to light a hidden treasure. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 116
And so I did. When many lines I'd written, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 101
Yet, as my hand was warm, I thought I'd better To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 103
Vistas of solemn beauty, where I'd wander Sleep and Poetry, Line 73
Then the events of this wide world I'd seize Sleep and Poetry, Line 81
I'd bubble up the water through a reed; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 880
I'd rather stand upon this misty peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 166
It is a thing I dote on: so I'd fain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 911
You know I'd sooner be a clapping bell Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 107
By heavens, I'd rather kiss Duke Conrad's slipper, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 13
And sing for my delight, I'd stop my ears! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
 
I'LL..............67
And when thou art weary, I'll find thee a bed, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 9
There, beauteous Emma, I'll sit at thy feet, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 11
So fondly I'll breathe, and so softly I'll sigh, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 13
So fondly I'll breathe, and so softly I'll sigh, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 13
But though I'll gladly trace these scenes with thee, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 9
I'll gather some by spells, and incantation. Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 14
And then I'll stoop from heaven to inspire him. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 80
Taste their pure fountains. First the realm I'll pass Sleep and Poetry, Line 101
For sweet relief I'll dwell Sleep and Poetry, Line 312b
I'll feel my heaven anew, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 17
Weep! I'll count the tears: Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 10
Grows lush in juicy stalks, I'll smoothly steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 46
Around the breathed boar: again I'll poll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 481
Again I'll linger in a sloping mead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 484
I'll smile no more, Peona; nor will wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 972
Where'er I look: but yet, I'll say 'tis naught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 985
I'll swim to the syrens, and one moment listen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 241
Anon upon that giant's arm I'll be, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 243
To northern seas I'll in a twinkling sail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 245
To some black cloud; thence down I'll madly sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 247
Young dove of the waters! truly I'll not hurt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 582
Her ready eggs, before I'll kissing snatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1026
Honey from out the gnarled hive I'll bring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 682
Its sides I'll plant with dew-sweet eglantine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 697
I'll kneel to Vesta, for a flame of fire; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 701
'Fore which I'll bend, bending, dear love, to thee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 712
A hermit young, I'll live in mossy cave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 860
Behind great Dian's temple. I'll be yon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 914
When I do speak, I'll think upon this hour, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 33
I'll put your basket all safe in a nook Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 13
Says I, I'll be Jack if you will be Gill- Over the hill and over the dale, Line 7
Do you get health - and Tom the same - I'll dance, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 110
Good bye! I'll soon be back."- "Good bye!" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
I'll visit thee for this, and kiss thine eyes, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 335
And to be so awaked I'll not endure. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 24
Blockhead, d'ye hear - Blockhead, I'll make her feel. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 53
To-night I'll have my friar,- let me think Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 24
About my room,- I'll have it in the pink; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 25
The Queen of Egypt melted, and I'll say And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 16
I'll switch you soundly and in pieces tear." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 17
"Now ye are flames, I'll tell you how to burn, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 327
I'll not be perjured. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 76a
My spirit's faculties! I'll flatter you Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 93
I'll choose a jailor, whose swart monstrous face Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 91
And old romances; but I'll break the spell. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 48
I'll chain up myself. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 110b
To tune our jarred spirits. I'll explain. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 281
I'll expiate with truth. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 143a
I'll hunt with you. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 133a
My appetite sharp - for revenge! I'll no sharer Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 135
If't must be so I'll bring him to your presence. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 22
" I'll trounce some of the members," cried the Prince, The Jealousies, Line 136
" I'll put a mark against some rebel names, The Jealousies, Line 137
I'll make the opposition-benches wince, The Jealousies, Line 138
I'll show them very soon, to all their shames, The Jealousies, Line 139
" I'll trounce 'em!- there's the square-cut chancellor, The Jealousies, Line 145
I'll show him that his speeches made me sick, The Jealousies, Line 148
" I'll shirk the Duke of A.; I'll cut his brother; The Jealousies, Line 154
"I'll shirk the Duke of A.; I'll cut his brother; The Jealousies, Line 154
I'll give no garter to his eldest son; The Jealousies, Line 155
" I'll pull the string," said he, and further said, The Jealousies, Line 226
"In preference to these, I'll merely taste The Jealousies, Line 362
" I'll have a glass of nantz, then,"- said the seer,- The Jealousies, Line 366
I'll knock you-" "Does your Majesty mean - down? The Jealousies, Line 408
Your pulse is shocking, but I'll ease your pain." The Jealousies, Line 426
Anon, I'll tell what course were best to take; The Jealousies, Line 493
Ask what you will,- I'll give you my new bride! The Jealousies, Line 529
 
I'M...............17
E'en now I'm pillow'd on a bed of flowers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 123
Leaving us fancy-sick. No, no, I'm sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 853
I'm giddy at that cheek so fair and smooth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 311
Enlarge not to my hunger, or I'm caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 760
And if not Mr. Bates, why I'm not old! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 19
Well! I'm a craniologist, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 17
My safety lies, then, Sigifred, I'm safe. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 59
Upon it. For the present I'm in haste. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 46
Albert, you jest; I'm sure you must. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 150b
I'm sorry I can hear no more. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 70a
When I have finish'd it! Now,- now, I'm pight, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 166
" I'm wearied," said fair Lamia: "tell me who Lamia, Part I, Line 371
O pardon me - I'm absent now and then. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 20
I'm faint - a biting sword! A noble sword! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 6
"Open the window, Hum; I'm ready now!" The Jealousies, Line 541
Adieu! adieu! I'm off for Angle-land! The Jealousies, Line 599
Thank heaven, I'm hearty yet!- 'twas no such thing:- The Jealousies, Line 715
 
I'VE..............21
For that to love, so long, I've dormant lain: Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 8
Or again witness what with thee I've seen, To George Felton Mathew, Line 25
With heaviness; in seasons when I've thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 3
At times, 'tis true, I've felt relief from pain To My Brother George (epistle), Line 113
Through all that day I've felt a greater pleasure To My Brother George (epistle), Line 115
Nor should I now, but that I've known you long; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 52
Therefrom my liberty; thence too I've seen Sleep and Poetry, Line 292
I've left my little queen, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 2
I've been thy guide; that thou must wander far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 123
I've been a ranger Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 274
Fair Melody! kind Syren! I've no choice; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 300
I've gathered young spring-leaves, and flowers gay Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 100
I've had a damn'd confounded ugly dream, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 26
Child, I see thee! Child, I've found thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 27
But let me laugh awhile, I've mickle time to grieve." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 126
Can smother from myself the wrong I've done him,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 156
Erminia! Indeed! I've heard of her- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
But, as I've read Love's missal through to-day, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 13
"Good! good!" cried Hum, " I've known her from a child! The Jealousies, Line 388
I've said it, sire; you only have to choose The Jealousies, Line 437
( I've got a conscience, maugre people's jokes:) The Jealousies, Line 697
 
IAPETUS...........2
Iapetus another; in his grasp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 44
Uprose Iapetus , and Creus too, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 384
 
IBERIAN...........1
The strong Iberian juice? or mellow Greek? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 121
 
ICE...............3
Pure as the ice -drop that froze on the mountain? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 2
Still fed by melting ice , he takes a draught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 535
The seal on the cold ice with piteous bark Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 116
 
ICED..............4
Impossible to melt as iced stream: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 283
'Tis dark: the iced gusts still rave and beat: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 327
One minute before death, my iced foot touch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 132
Iced in the great lakes, to afflict mankind; What can I do to drive away, Line 38
 
ICICLES...........1
Go feed on icicles , while we Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 91
 
ICY...............10
Of icy pinnacles, and dipp'dst thine arms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 208
"That curst magician's name fell icy numb Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 555
'Twas vast, and desolate, and icy -cold; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 632
Slowly they sail, slowly as icy isle Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 405
To think how they may ache in icy hoods and mails. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 18
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 201
Off, ye icy spirits, fly, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 87
'Twas icy , and the cold ran through his veins; Lamia, Part II, Line 251
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 45
And in the icy silence of the tomb, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 3
 
IDA...............2
The passion" - "O dov'd Ida the divine! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 761
Not to pure Ida with its snow-cold skies, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 7
 
IDEA..............2
With you, kindest friends, in idea I muse; To Some Ladies, Line 6
A vast idea before me, and I glean Sleep and Poetry, Line 291
 
IDENTITY..........2
Have no self-passion or identity . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 477
My strong identity , my real self, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 114
 
IDEOT.............4
When like a blank ideot I put on thy wreath- God of the golden bow, Line 8
One hour, half ideot , he stands by mossy waterfall, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 41
This ideot -skull belong'd to one, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 73
Whimpering ideot ! up! up! and quell! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 101
 
IDIOT.............1
Who, through an idiot blink, will see unpack'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 6
 
IDIOTISM..........1
With browless idiotism - o'erweening phlegm- To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
 
IDLE..............16
Calling youth from idle slumbers, Ode to Apollo, Line 38
Our idle sheep. So be thou cheered, sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 486
O, not so idle : for down-glancing thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 86
Or I am skilless quite: an idle tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 909
At thought of idleness cannot be idle , O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 13
Than idle ears should pleasure in their woe. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 88
For men, though idle , may be loth O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 23
While others pass'd their idle days O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 47
So on a Delphic reed, my idle spright As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 3
While I here idle listen on the shores Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 106
My idle days? Ripe was the drowsy hour; Ode on Indolence, Line 15
Vanish, ye phantoms, from my idle spright, Ode on Indolence, Line 59
And kept his rosy terms in idle languishment. Lamia, Part I, Line 199
Forget, in the mist of idle misery, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 12
Of feasts and music, and all idle shows King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 52
But let us leave this idle tittle tattle The Jealousies, Line 118
 
IDLENESS..........6
Of idleness in groves Elysian: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 177
For very idleness ? Where'er thou art, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 694
Pillow'd in lovely idleness , nor dream'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 467
At thought of idleness cannot be idle, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 13
On mists in idleness : to let fair things Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 11
For idleness to cosset, nurse, and dandle; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 2
 
IDLING............1
Idling in the "grene shawe"; Robin Hood, Line 36
 
IDLY..............2
Some idly trailed their sheep-hooks on the ground, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 145
For tenderness the arms so idly lain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 61
 
IF'T..............4
Or, if't please you best- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 36c
Hard penalties against thee, if't be found Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
Methinks, if't now were night, I could intrigue Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 26
If't must be so I'll bring him to your presence. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 22
 
IGNOBLE...........1
In sickness not ignoble , I rejoice, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 184
 
IGNOMINIOUS.......1
Too tender of my ignominious life; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 27
 
IGNOMINY..........2
The ignominy of that whisper'd tale Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 140
His ignominy up in purging fires! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 136
 
IGNORANCE.........4
'Tis ignorance that makes a barren waste To the Nile, Line 10
And she had died in drowsy ignorance , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 265
Standing aloof in giant ignorance , To Homer, Line 1
In fearless yet in aching ignorance ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 107
 
IGNORANT..........2
My only visitor! not ignorant though, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 850
Half- ignorant , they turn'd an easy wheel, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 119
 
IGNORANTLY........1
And what we, ignorantly , sheet-lightning call, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 29
 
ILION.............1
Like Pallas from the walls of Ilion , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 22
 
ILL...............17
Of Poesy. Ill -fated, impious race! Sleep and Poetry, Line 201
And fish were dimpling, as if good nor ill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 136
Bacchus, young Bacchus! good or ill betide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 224
Of every ill : the man is yet to come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 522
Unto my friend, while sick and ill he lies. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 32
High reason, and the lore of good and ill , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 75
"How ill she is," said he, "I may not speak, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 37
For venturing syllables that ill beseem Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 151
It aches in loneliness - is ill at peace Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 220
Ever cures the good man's ill . Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 14
To no ill . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 149b
Relented not, nor mov'd; "from every ill Lamia, Part II, Line 296
Poor Elfinan is very ill at ease- The Jealousies, Line 121
I say no more." "Or good or ill betide, The Jealousies, Line 526
Pale was his face, he still look'd very ill : The Jealousies, Line 608
It bodes ill to his Majesty - (refer The Jealousies, Line 705
Toe crush'd with heel ill -natured fighting breeds, The Jealousies, Line 772
 
ILLIMITABLE.......1
And hurl'd me down the illimitable gulph Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 5
 
ILLS..............1
To see herself escap'd from so sore ills , Lamia, Part I, Line 183
 
ILLUME............1
Misted the cheek; no passion to illume Lamia, Part II, Line 274
 
ILLUMINATED.......1
A Banquetting Hall, brilliantly illuminated , and set forth with all Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
ILLUMININGS.......1
To fan-like fountains,- thine illuminings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 584
 
ILLUSIONS.........1
gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions . When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
ILLUSTRIOUS.......5
God save illustrious Otho! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 6b
Illustrious Otho, stay! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 172b
Your generous father, most illustrious Otho, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 61
O, where is that illustrious noise of war, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 28
"But how shall I account, illustrious fay! The Jealousies, Line 533
 
IMAG'RIES.........1
All garlanded with carven imag'ries The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 209
 
IMAGE.............11
The image of the fairest form Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 10
To woo its own sad image into nearness: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 174
And one's own image from the bottom peep? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 332
His image in the dusk she seem'd to see, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 237
Of Memnon's image at the set of sun Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 374
Each shrining in the midst the image of a God. Lamia, Part II, Line 190
An image , huge of feature as a cloud, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 88
What image this, whose face I cannot see, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 213
Against rebellion: this old image here, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 224
And saw, what first I thought an image huge, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 298
Like to the image pedestal'd so high The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 299
 
IMAGERIES.........2
And dazed with saintly imageries . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 56
Ran imageries from a sombre loom. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 77
 
IMAGERY...........1
Forth creeping imagery of slighter trees, Lamia, Part II, Line 140
 
IMAGES............4
Whose words are images of thoughts refin'd, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 11
To trains of peaceful images : the stirs Sleep and Poetry, Line 340
Scarce images of life, one here, one there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 33
Of all the Gods, whose dreadful images Lamia, Part II, Line 279
 
IMAGIN'D..........1
All earthly pleasure, all imagin'd good, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 743
 
IMAGINARY.........1
Spreading imaginary pinions wide. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 586
 
IMAGINATION.......9
Imagination cannot freely fly Sleep and Poetry, Line 164
As she was wont, th' imagination Sleep and Poetry, Line 265
The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
imagination Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Imagination gave a dizzier pain. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1009
Or is it that imagination brought Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 78
Sickly imagination and sick pride On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 11
And in her wide imagination stood Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 58
Imagination from the sable charm The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 10
 
IMAGINATION'S.....1
Imagination's struggles, far and nigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 155
 
IMAGINATIONS......1
Their fond imaginations ,- saving him Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 393
 
IMAGINE...........2
One step? Imagine further, line by line, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 733
Imagine not that greatest mastery Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 6
 
IMAGINED..........2
And each imagined pinnacle and steep On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 3
We have imagined for the mighty dead; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 21
 
IMAGININGS........2
It came. Also imaginings will hover Sleep and Poetry, Line 71
More dead than Morpheus' imaginings : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 122
 
IMAIAN............3
Poison, as every staunch true-born Imaian ought. The Jealousies, Line 81
The Imaian 'scutcheon bright,- one mouse in argent field. The Jealousies, Line 585
Some strange Imaian custom. A large bat The Jealousies, Line 674
 
IMAUS.............2
To Pigmio, of Imaus sovereign, The Jealousies, Line 29
Will they fetch from Imaus for my bride? The Jealousies, Line 164
 
IMBRUED...........1
And little rills of crimson wine imbrued Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 212
 
IMMATERIAL........1
An immaterial wife to espouse as heaven's boon. The Jealousies, Line 27
 
IMMATURITY........1
soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity , and every error denoting a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
IMMEDIATE.........1
To more immediate matter. Woe, alas! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 398
 
IMMEDIATELY.......2
You gentlemen immediately turn tail- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 9
See him immediately ; why not now? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 29
 
IMMENSE...........3
For both, for both my love is so immense , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 96
And now, from forth the gloom their plumes immense Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 286
The sequel of this day, though labour 'tis immense ! The Jealousies, Line 792
 
IMMENSITY.........1
Be still a symbol of immensity ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 299
 
IMMERSE...........2
By one consuming flame: it doth immerse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 369
She did so breathe ambrosia; so immerse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 454
 
IMMODERATE........1
Was seen, to our immoderate surprise, The Jealousies, Line 761
 
IMMOLATE..........1
The priest of justice, will immolate her Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 156
 
IMMORTAL..........27
There thou or joinest the immortal quire As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 9
In his immortal spirit, been as free Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 3
And many glories of immortal stamp. Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 14
Catch an immortal thought to pay the debt On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 4
An endless fountain of immortal drink, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 23
Immortal , starry; such alone could thus Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 507
Men's being mortal, immortal ; to shake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 844
A love immortal , an immortal too. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 849
A love immortal, an immortal too. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 849
Presents immortal bowers to mortal sense; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 438
Immortal tear-drops down the thunderer's beard; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 476
Some fair immortal , and that his embrace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 568
Yet still I feel immortal ! O my love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 686
A quill immortal in their joyous tears. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 732
Immortal , for thou art of heavenly race: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 589
Immortal bliss for me too hast thou won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1024
Love never dies, but lives, immortal Lord: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 397
Those looks immortal , those complainings dear! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 313
Though an immortal , she felt cruel pain: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 44
And so become immortal ."- Thus the God, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 120
All the immortal fairness of his limbs; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 125
Of pale immortal death, and with a pang Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 128
Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 61
Their pleasures in a long immortal dream. Lamia, Part I, Line 128
Ere thou canst mount up these immortal steps." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 117
By an immortal sickness which kills not; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 258
Though an immortal , she felt cruel pain; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 346
 
IMMORTAL'S........1
As near as an immortal's sphered words The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 249
 
IMMORTALITY.......9
Wings to find out an immortality . Sleep and Poetry, Line 84
With immortality , who fears to follow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 212
An immortality of passion's thine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 808
Myself to immortality : I prest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 173
Cut short its immortality . Sea-flirt! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 581
An immortality , and how espouse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 379
His touch an immortality , not I!- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 43
Pale grew her immortality , for woe Lamia, Part I, Line 104
Empty of immortality and bliss! Lamia, Part I, Line 278
 
IMMORTALS.........2
Us young immortals , without any let, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 487
Among immortals when a God gives sign, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 118
 
IMOGEN............1
Of Hero's tears, the swoon of Imogen , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 31
 
IMP...............1
A she devil! A dragon! I her imp ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 63
 
IMPAIR............2
Wherefore does any grief our joy impair ? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 14
Took happy flights. Who shall his fame impair Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 13
 
IMPART............1
Whilst I my thoughts to thee impart . Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 8
 
IMPASSABLE........1
Then seem impassable . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 127a
 
IMPASSION'D.......3
At my lost brightness, my impassion'd wiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 783
Betwixt damnation and impassion'd clay On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 6
Beyond a mortal man impassion'd far The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 316
 
IMPATIENCE........1
Cures not his keen impatience to behold Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 12
 
IMPATIENT.........2
Until, impatient in embarrassment, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 430
The impatient doves, up rose the floating car, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 580
 
IMPEARL'D.........1
On gold sand impearl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 102b
 
IMPEDIMENT........1
Wretched impediment ! evil genius! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 12
 
IMPELL'D..........1
Down a precipitous path, as if impell'd . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 489
 
IMPERIAL..........10
Be gods of your own rest imperial . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 823
Or one of few of that imperial host Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 22
Auranthe our intent imperial ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 2
Imperial Otho! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 186a
Imperial ? I do not know the time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 87
Throughout her palaces imperial , Lamia, Part I, Line 351
Imperial Elfinan, go hang thyself or drown! The Jealousies, Line 144
When Eban thought he heard a soft imperial snore. The Jealousies, Line 324
For thine imperial absence? Pho! I can The Jealousies, Line 534
Of our Imperial Basilic; a row The Jealousies, Line 751
 
IMPERSONATE.......1
If Love impersonate was ever dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 398
 
IMPIOUS...........9
Of Poesy. Ill-fated, impious race! Sleep and Poetry, Line 201
' Ah! impious mortal, whither do I roam?' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 942
My madness impious ; for, by all the stars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 184
Without one impious word, himself he flings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 659
Thirst for another love: O impious , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 87
Grow impious ." So he inwardly began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 961
"A cruel man and impious thou art: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 140
For all thine impious proud-heart sophistries, Lamia, Part II, Line 285
If impious prince no bound or limit kept, The Jealousies, Line 13
 
IMPIOUSLY.........1
If impiously an earthly realm I take. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 854
 
IMPLORES..........1
Buttress'd from moonlight, stands he, and implores The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 77
 
IMPLORING.........1
Imploring for her basil to the last. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 498
 
IMPORT............1
Of stone, or marble swart; their import gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 282
 
IMPOSE............1
The hypocrite. What vow would you impose ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 31
 
IMPOSSIBILITY.....1
Why wilt thou tease impossibility Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 199
 
IMPOSSIBLE........13
But 'tis impossible ; far different cares To George Felton Mathew, Line 17
I could unsay those - no, impossible ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 311
Impossible ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 312a
Or art, impossible ! a nymph of Dian's, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 692
Impossible - how dearly they embrace! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 802
But Elfin-Poet, 'tis impossible Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 5
It is impossible to escape from toil Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 9
Impossible to melt as iced stream: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 283
This reconcilement is impossible , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 121
Impossible ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 192b
Impossible of slur? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 217a
'Twill be impossible , while the broad day Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 24
In such a fine extreme,- impossible ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 104
 
IMPOSTER..........1
That vile imposter Hum,-" The Jealousies, Line 787a
 
IMPREGNATES.......1
Of music's kiss impregnates the free winds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 784
 
IMPRINTED.........1
From the imprinted couch, and when he did, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 871
 
IMPRISONED........1
Restraint! imprisoned liberty! great key Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 456
 
IMPS..............1
Throw down those imps and give me victory. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 431
 
IMPUDENCE.........1
Aye, wife! Oh, impudence ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 75b
 
IMPUDENT..........1
That stubborn fool, that impudent state-dun, The Jealousies, Line 160


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Published @ RC

March 2005