In-Iz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
INCANTATION.......1
I'll gather some by spells, and incantation . Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 14
 
INCENSE...........20
Grateful the incense from the lime-tree flower; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 155
The incense went to her own starry dwelling. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 198
No wreathed incense do we see upborne To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 3
Such morning incense from the fields of May, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 470
Full of light, incense , tender minstrelsy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 390
Be incense -pillow'd every summer night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 999
Such tender incense in their laurel shade, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 14
Like pious incense from a censer old, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 7
Still sat, still snuff'd the incense , teeming up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 167
Of incense , breath'd aloft from sacred hills, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 187
No voice, no lute, no pipe, no incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 32
Thy voice, thy lute, thy pipe, thy incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 46
Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 42
Waits with high marble doors for blood and incense rare. Lamia, Part I, Line 228
Sepulchred, where no kindled incense burns, Lamia, Part II, Line 95
Melts out the frozen incense from all flowers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 99
Sending forth Maian incense , spread around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 103
Whose altar this; for whom this incense curls: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 212
Still sits, still snuffs the incense teeming up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 16
Of incense breath'd aloft from sacred hills, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 31
 
INCESSANT.........1
Their rich brimm'd goblets, that incessant run To My Brother George (epistle), Line 39
 
INCH..............4
' Aye every inch a king' - though ' Fortune's fool,' When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 80
Do it, De Kaims, I will not budge an inch . King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 18
Or a sharp needle run into her back an inch . The Jealousies, Line 72
An inch appears the utmost thou couldst budge; The Jealousies, Line 245
 
INCITEMENTS.......1
Felton! without incitements such as these, To George Felton Mathew, Line 72
 
INCLINE...........3
Come to the earth; with an incline so sweet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 86
Then with a slow incline of his broad breast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 354
If Mercury propitiously incline , The Jealousies, Line 619
 
INCLINED..........2
With head inclined , each dusky lineament The Jealousies, Line 264
Inclined to answer; wherefore instantly The Jealousies, Line 782
 
INCOGNITO.........1
Incognito upon his errand sallies, The Jealousies, Line 220
 
INCOMPLETE........1
Will die a death too lone and incomplete , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 487
 
INCONSTANT........1
Inconstant , childish, proud, and full of fancies; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 2
 
INCONVENIENCE.....1
"Thou inconvenience ! thou hungry crop The Jealousies, Line 235
 
INCREAS'D.........2
'Mong shepherds gone in eld, whose looks increas'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 358
God Neptune's palaces!" With noise increas'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 834
 
INCREASE..........1
Bring home increase of milk. And, as the year Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 45
 
INCREASED.........1
A deadly silence step by step increased , Lamia, Part II, Line 266
 
INCREASES.........2
Its loveliness increases ; it will never Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 2
Hubbub increases more they call out "Hush!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 254
 
INCREASING........3
The Cricket's song, in warmth increasing ever, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 12
Increasing still in heart, and pleasant sense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 351
Increasing gradual to a tempest rage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 523
 
INCREDIBLE........1
To the first landing, where, incredible ! The Jealousies, Line 785
 
INCREDULOUS.......1
Shut from the busy world of more incredulous . Lamia, Part I, Line 397
 
IND...............2
O to arrive each Monday morn from Ind , To J.R., Line 9
In midmost Ind , beside Hydaspes cool, The Jealousies, Line 1
 
INDE..............1
The kings of Inde their jewel-sceptres vail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 263
 
INDEED............35
For, indeed , 'tis a sweet and peculiar pleasure, To Some Ladies, Line 25
It hard, and heavy steel: but that indeed Calidore: A Fragment, Line 118
Mingled indeed with what is sweet and strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 232
attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
His fainting recollections. Now indeed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 397
Wrought suddenly in me. What indeed more strange? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 521
Indeed , locks bright enough to make me mad; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 613
The bitterness of love: too long indeed , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 105
The diamond path? And does it indeed end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 652
Call ardently! He was indeed wayworn; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 655
Away from me again, indeed , indeed- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 746
Away from me again, indeed, indeed - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 746
Because I lov'd her?- Cold, O cold indeed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 623
Indeed I am - thwarted, affrighted, chidden, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 753
'Twas love; cold,- dead indeed , but not dethroned. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 400
Of haggard seeming, but a boon indeed : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 344
Verse, fame, and beauty are intense indeed , Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 13
'Tis sooth indeed , we know it to our sorrow- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 39
Without design indeed ,- yet it is so,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
Indeed , my liege, no secret- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 66b
Indeed too much oppress'd. May I be bold Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
Indeed ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 90a
Erminia! Indeed ! I've heard of her- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
'Tis false indeed . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 100a
Indeed you are too fair: Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 100b
Gentle Prince, 'tis false indeed . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 117b
Indeed , indeed I cannot trace them further. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 17
Indeed, indeed I cannot trace them further. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 17
Indeed ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 48b
Indeed full time we slept; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 51b
Most piteous indeed ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 96b
I guess his purpose! Indeed he must not have Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 100
As a real woman, lineal indeed Lamia, Part I, Line 332
"Really you must not talk of him, indeed ." The Jealousies, Line 65
It was indeed the great magician, The Jealousies, Line 307
 
INDEMNITY.........1
And bless indemnity with all that scum,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 72
 
INDEX.............2
With silver index , bidding thee make peace? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 9
Turn to the copious index , you will find The Jealousies, Line 100
 
INDIAN............10
Of feather'd Indian darts about, as through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 881
And murmur about Indian streams?"- Then she, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 143
But starv'd and died. My sweetest Indian , here, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 648
And bless our simple lives. My Indian bliss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 663
Sweet Indian , I would see thee once again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 910
Though young Lorenzo in warm Indian clove Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 101
Waking an Indian from his cloudy hall Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 270
Cut by an Indian for its juicy balm. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 448
Trac'd upon vellum or wild Indian leaf The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 5
She was born at midnight in an Indian wild; The Jealousies, Line 390
 
INDIAN'S..........1
From a tree's summit; a poor Indian's sleep Sleep and Poetry, Line 87
 
INDIFFERENCE......1
Close to her passing, in indifference drear, Lamia, Part I, Line 238
 
INDIFFERENT.......1
To you it is indifferent . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 78a
 
INDISTINCT........1
Her charming syllables, till indistinct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 444
 
INDISTINCTLY......1
( indistinctly without) Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 39
 
INDOLENCE.........3
Bursts gradual, with a wayward indolence . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 350
The blissful cloud of summer- indolence Ode on Indolence, Line 16
And evenings steep'd in honied indolence ; Ode on Indolence, Line 37
 
INDOLENT..........2
Have become indolent ; but touching thine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 5
Stretching his indolent arms, he took, O bliss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 712
 
INDOOR............1
Of indoor pageantry; while syren whispers, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 53
 
INDULGE...........4
Might I indulge at large in all my store Sleep and Poetry, Line 346
How you indulge yourself: what can you hope for? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 76
But shall indulge itself about thine heart! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 108
Who should indulge his genius, if he has any, The Jealousies, Line 471
 
INDULGED..........1
Ye would not call this too indulged tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 298
 
INDUS.............1
The Indus with his Macedonian numbers? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 25
 
INDUSTRIOUS.......1
By ear industrious , and attention meet; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 9
 
INEXPERIENCE......1
soon perceive great inexperience , immaturity, and every error denoting a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
INFANCY...........3
Myself to things of light from infancy ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 958
Sweet Spirit, thou hast school'd my infancy : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 334
Whom I have known from her first infancy , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
 
INFANT............13
By infant hands, left on the path to die. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 46
In every place where infant Orpheus slept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 794
In pity of the shatter'd infant buds,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 923
Plump infant laughers mimicking the coil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 247
When her young infant child God of the meridian, Line 14
Infant playing with a skull; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 12
She was a Goddess of the infant world; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 26
Shall scare that infant thunderer, rebel Jove, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 249
Caught infant -like from the far-foamed sands. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 172
From the young day when first thy infant hand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 73
Is now your infant ;- I am a weak child. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 120
Who eas'd the crownet from your infant brows, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 135
And, with thine infant fingers, lift the fringe Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
 
INFANT'S..........8
His glories: with a puling infant's force Sleep and Poetry, Line 185
But though her face was clear as infant's eyes, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 199
Sweet Sappho's cheek - a sleeping infant's breath- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 12
Ready to melt between an infant's gums: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 451
In vain; remorseless as an infant's bier Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 520
By every lull to cool her infant's pain: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 36
Those dainties made to still an infant's cries: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 374
I sing an infant's lullaby, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 13
 
INFATUATE.........1
Infatuate Britons, will you still proclaim Lines Written on 29 May, Line 1
 
INFEST............2
Is most articulate; where hopes infest ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 540
To force himself upon you, and infest Lamia, Part II, Line 166
 
INFIDEL...........1
To trust, fair Madeline, to no rude infidel . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 342
 
INFINITE..........1
The passion poesy, glories infinite , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 29
 
INFIRM............1
For my firm-based footstool:- Ah, infirm ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 138
 
INFLAM'D..........1
The colours all inflam'd throughout her train, Lamia, Part I, Line 153
 
INFLICT...........1
punishment: but no feeling man will be forward to inflict it: he will leave me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
 
INFLUENCE.........8
Sweet Hope, celestial influence round me shed, To Hope, Line 47
And many a verse from so strange influence Sleep and Poetry, Line 69
So mournful strange. Surely some influence rare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 497
Of light, and that is love: its influence , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 807
The curly foam with amorous influence . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 85
Keep back thine influence , and do not blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 182
Of influence benign on planets pale, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 108
Of influence benign on planets pale, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 414
 
INFLUENCED........1
Self- influenced ; then, in his morning dreams Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 107
 
INFURIATE.........1
Wilt thou infuriate me? Proof! Thou fool! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 198
 
INGLE.............1
Sit thee by the ingle , when Fancy, Line 16
 
INGRATE...........3
Above the ingrate world and human fears. Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 12
To boot - say, wretched ingrate , have I not Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 15
That ingrate ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 39a
 
INGRATITUDE.......1
For whose vast ingratitude King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 39b
 
INHABIT...........1
They could inhabit ; the most curious Lamia, Part I, Line 392
 
INHABITANT........1
For an inhabitant of wintry earth Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 6
 
INHABITED.........1
Inhabited her frail-strung heart as his. Lamia, Part I, Line 309
 
INHERITOR.........1
Brother of Jove, and co- inheritor Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 944
 
INHUMAN...........2
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 8
A man detesting all inhuman crime; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 137
 
INJURE............1
And whom they thought to injure they befriended. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 94
 
INJURY............2
An injury may make of a staid man! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 41
In my feast; my injury is all my own, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 136
 
INK...............2
Almost before the recent ink is dry, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 266
And knock'd down three cut glasses, and his best ink -stand. The Jealousies, Line 351
 
INK'D.............1
Ink'd purple with a song concerning dying; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 43
 
INKSTAND..........1
An inkstand There was a naughty boy, Line 31
 
INLAID............1
Ribb'd and inlaid with coral, pebble, and pearl. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 629
 
INLAY.............1
Of dolts to smooth, inlay , and clip, and fit, Sleep and Poetry, Line 197
 
INLET.............1
That inlet to severe magnificence Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 211
 
INLY..............1
Of new-born woe it feels more inly smart: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 519
 
INMATE............1
But his sagacious eye an inmate owns: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 366
 
INMOST............3
A lamb strayed far a-down those inmost glens, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 69
I know thine inmost bosom, and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 293
While she the inmost of the dream would try. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 342
 
INNER.............4
[Retires to an inner apartment. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 184
An inner Court of the Castle. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Setting
about. AURANTHE in the inner -room. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
The old man through the inner doors broad-spread; Lamia, Part II, Line 170
 
INNERMOST.........1
And birds from coverts innermost and drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 470
 
INNOCENCE.........5
Such innocence to ruin, - who vilely cheats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 35
Playing in all her innocence of thought. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 100
Even when I feel as true as innocence ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 474
There - hug him - dying! O, thou innocence , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
Ah! gentlest creature, whose sweet innocence Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 169
 
INNOCENT..........17
Yet the sweet converse of an innocent mind, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 10
Lured by the innocent dimples. To sweet rest To My Brother George (epistle), Line 101
Like spiked aloe. If an innocent bird Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 698
Fresh breezes, bowery lawns, and innocent floods, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 967
Thou wouldst bathe once again. Innocent maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 978
But thou must nip this tender innocent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 622
Sweet, holy, pure, sacred, and innocent , Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 2
Those days, all innocent of scathing war, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 336
Without proof could you think me innocent ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 42
Gersa, how he believ'd you innocent . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 152
See this innocent ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 117b
To all men's sight, a lady innocent . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 139
An innocent lady, gull an emperor, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 165
And would, for your sake, she were innocent . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 76
A fair bride! A sweet bride! An innocent bride! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 53
Good gods! no innocent blood upon my head! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 54
Half lidded, piteous, languid, innocent ; The Jealousies, Line 173
 
INNUMERABLE.......4
No! loudly echoed times innumerable . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 296
Innumerable mountains rise, and rise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 59
Innumerable of stains and splendid dyes, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 212
To count with the toil the innumerable degrees. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 92
 
INQUIRED..........1
His rosy eloquence, and thus inquired : Lamia, Part I, Line 82
 
INQUIRES..........1
Whose bugle?" he inquires : they smile - "O Dis! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 427
 
INQUIRY...........2
Make soft inquiry ; pr'ythee, be not stay'd Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 6
Made close inquiry ; from whose touch she shrank, Lamia, Part II, Line 103
 
INSCRIBED.........1
INSCRIBED TO THE MEMORY OF THOMAS CHATTERTON Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Dedication
 
INSPECT...........1
Let us inspect the lyre, and weigh the stress If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 7
 
INSPHERED.........1
Twelve sphered tables, by silk seats insphered , Lamia, Part II, Line 183
 
INSPIR'D..........1
Muse of my native land, am I inspir'd ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 354
 
INSPIRATION.......2
Such an attempt required an inspiration To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 105
Came like an inspiration ; and he shouted, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 109
 
INSPIRE...........1
And then I'll stoop from heaven to inspire him. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 80
 
INSPIRED..........5
What first inspired a bard of old to sing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 163
And after, straight in that inspired place Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 837
As two close Hebrews in that land inspired , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 131
I see, and sing, by my own eyes inspired . Ode to Psyche, Line 43
"Thou smooth-lipp'd serpent, surely high inspired ! Lamia, Part I, Line 83
 
INSPIRING.........2
For I want not the stream inspiring , Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 5
While from their master's lips pour forth the inspiring words. Ode to Apollo, Line 29
 
INSTANCE..........1
a memorable instance in this kind, which I may not omit, of one Menippus Lycius, Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
INSTANT...........7
That very instant not one will remain; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 79
Behold!"- Two copious tear-drops instant fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 900
Instant dismiss'd the Council from his sight, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 20
house, and all that was in it, vanished in an instant : many thousands took Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
"At the same time, Eban, this instant go The Jealousies, Line 187
I want, this instant , an invisible ring,- The Jealousies, Line 602
Conjectured, on the instant , it might be The Jealousies, Line 678
 
INSTANTLY.........2
Send forth instantly Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 37b
Inclined to answer; wherefore instantly The Jealousies, Line 782
 
INSTEAD...........8
And come instead demurest meditation, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 975
Instead of a pitiful rummer, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 5
And then, instead of love, O misery! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 235
Instead of sweets, his ample palate took Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 188
Instead of thrones, hard flint they sat upon, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 15
With music wing'd instead of silent plumes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 287
Instead of pines shall murmur in the wind: Ode to Psyche, Line 53
Instead of sweets, his ample palate takes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 32
 
INSTILL...........1
Rouse from his heavy slumber and instill Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 4
 
INSTINCTS.........1
All its instincts ;- he hath heard Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 10
 
INSTRUCTOR........1
And good instructor ; but to-night he seems Lamia, Part I, Line 376
 
INSTRUMENTS.......2
Of dulcet instruments came charmingly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 942
Of powerful instruments :- the gorgeous dyes, Lamia, Part II, Line 205
 
INSULT............6
Therefore no insult will I give his spirit, Sleep and Poetry, Line 45
Insult , and blind, and stifle up my pomp.- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 245
Insult beyond credence! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 219b
No more insult , sir. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 167b
Of that late stounding insult ! Why has my sword Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 94
Albert, you do insult my bride - your mistress- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
 
INSULTING.........2
It was a den where no insulting light Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 5
In silence, not insulting his sad doom King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 52
 
INSURE............1
But not a moment can he there insure them, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 11
 
INTELLIGENCES.....1
Such charms with mild intelligences shine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 26
 
INTENDED..........1
To pick up the keep-sake intended for me. To Some Ladies, Line 16
 
INTENSE...........5
But, what creates the most intense surprize, Ode to Apollo, Line 11
Filling the air, as on we move, with portraiture intense , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 35
Verse, fame, and beauty are intense indeed, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 13
Let the rose glow intense and warm the air, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 15
Intense , that death would take me from the vale The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 397
 
INTENSER..........3
But death intenser - death is life's high meed. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 14
On the deep intenser roof, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 17
Yet could my eyes drink up intenser beams Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 42
 
INTENSITY.........1
To the chief intensity : the crown of these Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 800
 
INTENT............7
Or when his spirit, with more calm intent , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 27
I slowly sail, scarce knowing my intent ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 18
And now broad wings. Most awfully intent , Sleep and Poetry, Line 151
Or they might watch the quoit-pitchers, intent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 326
Forgetful utterly of self- intent ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 386
Alas, 'tis so with all, when our intent Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 6
Auranthe our intent imperial? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 2
 
INTENTLY..........1
And watch intently Nature's gentle doings: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 63
 
INTER.............1
At war, at peace, or inter -quarreling Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 141
 
INTERBREATH'D.....1
And rose, with spicy fannings interbreath'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 664
 
INTERCHANGE.......2
So keeping up an interchange of favours, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 85
Eternal oaths and vows they interchange , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 489
 
INTERCHANGED......1
From interchanged love through many years. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 101
 
INTERCHANGING.....1
Is, the clear fountains' interchanging kisses, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 48
 
INTEREST..........2
But, calling interest loyalty, swore faith Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
To listen with no common interest ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 53
 
INTERKNIT.........3
Nor with aught else can our souls interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 812
I plung'd for life or death. To interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 380
To blend and interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 963
 
INTERLACE.........2
The honied lines do freshly interlace , This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 2
The streams with changed magic interlace : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 613
 
INTERMISSION......1
Still without intermission speaking thus: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 326
 
INTERPOS'D........1
Nor muffling thicket interpos'd to dull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 966
 
INTERTWIN'D.......1
Together intertwin'd and trammel'd fresh: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 411
 
INTERTWINE........1
Till our brains intertwine Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 15
 
INTERTWINED.......1
And intertwined the cassia's arms unite, To George Felton Mathew, Line 43
 
INTERVIEW.........1
The interview he demands? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 21a
 
INTERWOVE.........1
But still he slept. At last they interwove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1016
 
INTERWOVEN........1
Sandals more interwoven and complete If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 5
 
INTERWREATH'D.....1
Interwreath'd with myrtles new, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 31
 
INTERWREATHED.....1
Dissolv'd, or brighter shone, or interwreathed Lamia, Part I, Line 52
 
INTESTINE.........1
Light, the first fruits of that intestine broil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 192
 
INTOXICATING......1
Amid the fierce intoxicating tones Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 16
 
INTOXICATION......3
When steep'd in dew rich to intoxication . Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 11
Smoothed for intoxication by the breath Sleep and Poetry, Line 57
Before the deep intoxication . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 502
 
INTREAT...........3
Four laurell'd spirits, heaven-ward to intreat him. To George Felton Mathew, Line 58
And, if thy lute is here, softly intreat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 487
Say, I intreat thee, what achievement high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 714
 
INTREATED.........1
Intreated , managed! When can you contrive Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 20
 
INTREATING........2
After my health, intreating , if I please, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 37
Intreating him, his captains, and brave knights King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 25
 
INTREATS..........1
Will never give him pinions, who intreats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 34
 
INTRICACIES.......1
And with the larger wove in small intricacies . Lamia, Part II, Line 141
 
INTRIGUE..........2
Methinks, if't now were night, I could intrigue Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 26
Intrigue with the specious chaos, and dispart Lamia, Part I, Line 195
 
INTRIGUED.........1
You have intrigued with these unsteady times Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 45
 
INTRIGUING........1
And how intriguing secresy is proof Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 177
 
INTRUDE...........1
These will in throngs before my mind intrude : How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 6
 
INTRUDED..........1
I have intruded here thus suddenly, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 134
 
INTRUSION.........1
For this intrusion . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 101a
 
INURN.............1
And in thy heart inurn me- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 24
 
INVADE............1
Lorenzo, and we are most loth to invade Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 182
 
INVADED...........1
His heart invaded . O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 60
 
INVENT............2
I will invent what soothing means I can. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 56
Days happy as the gold coin could invent Lamia, Part I, Line 313
 
INVENTOR..........1
Cham is said to have been the inventor of magic. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
INVERTS...........1
Inverts it - dips the handle, and lo, soon Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 11
 
INVISIBLE.........5
Shapes from the invisible world, unearthly singing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 186
The quick invisible strings, even though she saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 500
Mov'd in these vales invisible till now? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 52
Her loveliness invisible , yet free Lamia, Part I, Line 108
I want, this instant, an invisible ring,- The Jealousies, Line 602
 
INVISIBLY.........1
Free as the air, invisibly , she strays Lamia, Part I, Line 94
 
INVITE............2
The province to invite your Highness back Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 126
Even as you list invite your many guests; Lamia, Part II, Line 98
 
INVITER...........1
The courtliest inviter to a feast; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 9
 
INVITINGLY........1
Objects that look'd out so invitingly Calidore: A Fragment, Line 31
 
INWARD............7
For skies Italian, and an inward groan Happy is England! I could be content, Line 6
Convuls'd and headlong! Stay! an inward frown Sleep and Poetry, Line 304
To his inward senses these words spake aloud; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1020
A desert fills our seeing's inward span; To the Nile, Line 4
The inward fragrance of each other's heart. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 76
And keep his vision clear from speck, his inward sight unblind. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 48
Is quench'd with inward tears! I must rejoice Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 137
 
INWARDLY..........4
I lisp'd thy blooming titles inwardly ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 733
And twang'd it inwardly , and calmly said: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 848
Grow impious." So he inwardly began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 961
And to his heart he inwardly did pray Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 43
 
INWARDS...........2
To search it inwards ; whence far off appear'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 259
Death felt it to his inwards : 'twas too much: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 787
 
IONIAN............2
Of abrupt thunder, when Ionian shoals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 310
To seas Ionian and Tyrian. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 363
 
IONIC.............1
'Slant to a light Ionic portico, The Jealousies, Line 749
 
IRE...............3
Where, where slept thine ire , God of the golden bow, Line 7
My voice is not a bellows unto ire . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 176
Peace! nor contrive thy mistress' ire to rouse," The Jealousies, Line 61
 
IRIS..............1
Of Iris , when unfading it doth shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 851
 
IRON..............8
And rigid ranks of iron - whence who dares Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 732
Upon hot sand, or flinty road, or sea shore iron scurf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 10
Like phantoms, to the iron porch, they glide; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 362
Stubborn'd with iron . All were not assembled: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 17
Creus was one; his ponderous iron mace Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 41
And there it is my father's iron lips Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 115
Made iron -stern by habit! Thou shalt see Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 148
Wrench'd with an iron hand from firm array, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 5
 
IS'T..............10
Or is't thy dewy hand the daisy tips? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 151
How long is't since the mighty power bid To Ailsa Rock, Line 5
Of such new tuneful wonder. Is't not strange Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 67
He thus avoids us. Lady, is't not strange? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 75
I follow you to Friedburg, - is't not so? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 140
Say, what is't ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 50b
Is't madness or a hunger after death King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 14
My Lord of Chester, is't true what I hear King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 24
As backwards as he can,- is't something new? The Jealousies, Line 302
Or is't his custom, in the name of fun?" The Jealousies, Line 303
 
ISABEL............10
Fair Isabel , poor simple Isabel! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 1
Fair Isabel, poor simple Isabel ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 1
"Love, Isabel !" said he, "I was in pain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 201
From his north cavern. So sweet Isabel Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 255
Saying moreover, " Isabel , my sweet! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 297
And then the prize was all for Isabel : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 402
For simple Isabel is soon to be Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 446
For Isabel , sweet Isabel, will die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 486
For Isabel, sweet Isabel , will die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 486
Though you've padded his night-cap, O sweet Isabel . Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 4
 
ISABEL'S..........2
If Isabel's quick eye had not been wed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 51
But my Isabel's eyes and her lips pulped with bloom. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 16
 
ISABELLA..........6
"O Isabella , I can half perceive Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 57
Fair Isabella in her downy nest? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 138
And Isabella on its music hung: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 284
When Isabella by Lorenzo knelt. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 360
And Isabella did not stamp and rave. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 384
Pale Isabella kiss'd it, and low moan'd. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 399
 
ISABELLA'S........3
Until sweet Isabella's untouch'd cheek Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 33
And Isabella's was a great distress, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 100
It made sad Isabella's eyelids ache, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 327
 
ISLAND............5
In a green island , far from all men's knowing? Sleep and Poetry, Line 6
Towards a bowery island opposite; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 428
"Come hither, Sister of the Island !" Plain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 14
Just opposite, an island of the sea, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 275
For somewhere in that sacred island dwelt Lamia, Part I, Line 13
 
ISLAND'S..........1
Near to a little island's point they grew; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 24
 
ISLANDS...........4
Green tufted islands casting their soft shades Calidore: A Fragment, Line 46
Round many western islands have I been On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 3
Islands , and creeks, and amber-fretted strands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 743
Round flowery islands , and take thence a skim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 995
 
ISLE..............18
Ah! could I tell the wonders of an isle Imitation of Spenser, Line 19
The dwellings of this war-surrounded isle ; On Peace, Line 2
E'en in this isle ; and who could paragon Sleep and Poetry, Line 172
An ocean dim, sprinkled with many an isle , Sleep and Poetry, Line 306
Than the isle of Delos. Echo hence shall stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 966
Embower'd sports in Cytherea's isle . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 492
Round every isle , and point, and promontory, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 405
Aeaea's isle was wondering at the moon:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 415
Slowly they sail, slowly as icy isle Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 405
O Echo, Echo, from some sombre isle , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 435
Not St. John in Patmos' isle , Not Aladdin magian, Line 5
What, have you convents in that Gothic isle ? Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 7
Chief isle of the embowered Cyclades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 23
Began calm-throated. Throughout all the isle Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 38
To one who in this lonely isle hath been Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 71
Are there not other regions than this isle ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 96
Strike for the Cretan isle ; and here thou art! Lamia, Part I, Line 79
In port Cenchreas, from Egina isle Lamia, Part I, Line 225
 
ISLES.............9
Sweet as blue heavens o'er enchanted isles . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 151
Arion's magic to the Atlantic isles ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 360
And craggy isles , and sea-mew's plaintive cry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 341
The pleasant sun-rise; green isles hast thou too, To the Nile, Line 13
You know the clear lake, and the little isles , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 35
Into the verdurous bosoms of those isles . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 58
From isles Lethean, sigh to us - O sigh! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 484
Seek, as they once were sought, in Grecian isles , Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 6
By Oxus or in Ganges' sacred isles . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 60
 
ISSUE.............1
And thou wilt see the issue ."- 'Mid the sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 771
 
ISSUES............1
Is friendship, whence there ever issues forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 804
 
IT'S..............1
Though it's a pretty weight, it will not tire, The Jealousies, Line 516
 
ITALIAN...........1
For skies Italian , and an inward groan Happy is England! I could be content, Line 6
 
ITALY.............1
Go! conquer Italy ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 156a
 
ITHERS............1
An' mony ithers . Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 32
 
ITSELF............23
Might live, and show itself to human eyes. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 121
The golden lyre itself were dimly seen: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 12
That my own soul has to itself decreed. Sleep and Poetry, Line 98
Or maiden's sigh, that grief itself embalms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 402
To cheer itself to Delphi. Still his feet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 82
Itself , and strives its own delights to hide- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 344
Crumbles into itself . By the cloud girth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 122
Of all beyond itself : thou dost bedew To the Nile, Line 11
So time itself would be annihilate; To J.R., Line 6
Itself with dancing bulrush, and the bream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 212
Striving to be itself , what dungeon climes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 259
O leave the palm to wither by itself ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 449
That silly youth doth think to make itself And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 4
The heaven itself , is blinded throughout night. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 38
Was ripening in itself . The ripe hour came, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 194
And feedeth still, more comely than itself ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 219
To the most hateful seeing of itself . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 370
Will clear itself , and crystal turn again. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 179
But shall indulge itself about thine heart! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 108
Beyond a flower pluck'd, white as itself ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
May cure itself . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 34a
That faints into itself at evening hour: Lamia, Part I, Line 139
'Twas not the glance itself made nursey flinch, The Jealousies, Line 69
 
IVORY.............7
Be echoed swiftly through that ivory shell Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 2
Cov'ring half thine ivory breast; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 46
Upheld on ivory wrists, or sporting feet: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 156
Silent is the ivory shrill Robin Hood, Line 13
And warpt the ivory of a Juno's neck. Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 10
Shuffling along with ivory -headed wand, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 92
These lips to feel't on this soft ivory ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 18
 
IVY...............9
In dark green ivy , and among wild larches? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 34
Upholding wreaths of ivy ; the white dove, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 43
And ivy banks; all leading pleasantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 81
Seem'd like a poll of ivy in the teeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 160
The vine of glossy sprout; the ivy mesh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 412
And from beneath a sheltering ivy leaf Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 65
Trifling his ivy -dart, in dancing mood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 210
And, save when Bacchus kept his ivy tent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 240
Of some steep mossy hill, where ivy dun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 671
 
IXION'S...........1
Or with a finger stay'd Ixion's wheel. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 30


Published @ RC

March 2005