Kn-Kz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
KNAPSACK..........2
In his knapsack There was a naughty boy, Line 6
This knapsack There was a naughty boy, Line 18
 
KNEE..............6
Ah! no - as I breathe it, I press thy fair knee , O come, dearest Emma!, Line 15
More boisterous than a lover's bended knee ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 260
Those who would watch. Perhaps, the trembling knee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 337
Of knee from knee, nor ankles pointing light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 401
Of knee from knee , nor ankles pointing light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 401
Submissive of knee -bent obeisance, The Jealousies, Line 753
 
KNEEL.............11
Of thy wide heaven - Should I rather kneel Sleep and Poetry, Line 49
Yet would I kneel and kiss thy gentle hand! To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 14
"I saw Osirian Egypt kneel adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 257
I cannot choose but kneel here and adore. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 302
Here will I kneel , for thou redeemed hast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 649
I'll kneel to Vesta, for a flame of fire; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 701
And let me kneel , and let me pray to thee, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 2
Perchance speak, kneel , touch, kiss - in sooth such things have been. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 81
Wait here, my child, with patience; kneel in prayer The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 178
Why do I anger him when I should kneel ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 75
In thy resolved looks! Yes, I could kneel Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 5
 
KNEEL'D...........1
Kneel'd down beside it, and with tenderest force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 779
 
KNEELED...........1
And so she kneeled , with her locks all hoar, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 380
 
KNEELING..........4
One, kneeling to a lyre, touch'd the strings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 420
From his green prison, and here kneeling down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 69
And that fair kneeling Goddess; and then spake, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 92
And that fair kneeling Goddess at his feet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 403
 
KNEELS............1
her robes, and a train of Women. She kneels . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
 
KNEES.............11
Ah, what a task! upon my bended knees , Sleep and Poetry, Line 310
His nervy knees there lay a boat-spear keen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 174
Then takes his lamp, and riseth from his knees , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 11
Her rich attire creeps rustling to her knees : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 230
Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth-sculptured stone. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 297
To those who woo her with too slavish knees , On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 2
The rebel-lords, on bended knees , received Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 100
Because I cannot flatter with bent knees Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 106
Thou standest safe beneath this statue's knees ." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 181
For the broad marble knees ; and who thou art, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 214
Where the Chief Justice on his knees and hands doth crawl. The Jealousies, Line 765
 
KNELL.............2
'Tis gallant Sydney's, Russell's, Vane's sad knell , Lines Written on 29 May, Line 5
Though my own knell they be! This cannot last! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 43
 
KNELLING..........1
While little sounds of life are round me knelling , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 308
 
KNELT.............11
The penitent shower fell, as down he knelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 289
I knelt with pain - reached out my hand - had grasp'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 671
Knelt to receive those accents halcyon. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 923
Or like one who, in after ages, knelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 891
Her brother kiss'd her too, and knelt adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 998
When Isabella by Lorenzo knelt . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 360
As down she knelt for heaven's grace and boon; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 219
She knelt , so pure a thing, so free from mortal taint. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 225
Who knelt , with joined hands and piteous eye, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 305
A nymph, to whom all hoofed Satyrs knelt ; Lamia, Part I, Line 14
Arose and knelt before him, wept a rain Lamia, Part II, Line 66
 
KNEW..............41
Where oaks, that erst the Druid knew , are growing, To George Felton Mathew, Line 39
To things ye knew not of,- were closely wed Sleep and Poetry, Line 194
He knew not where; and how he would say, nay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 729
Nor knew that nests were built. Now a soft kiss- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 806
They knew not whence this bounty, and elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 370
Because he knew not whither he was going. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 551
And yet he knew it not. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 797a
So after my own heart! I knew , I knew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 881
So after my own heart! I knew, I knew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 881
Nobody knew whither, till Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 15
Since men knew nor rent nor leases. Robin Hood, Line 10
He knew whose gentle hand was at the latch, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 17
"Ha! ha!" said she, "I knew not this hard life, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 329
And yet they knew it was Lorenzo's face: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 476
Boasting he never knew excess, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 32
He startled her; but soon she knew his face, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 96
Beauty before the wide world never knew - When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 60
The slang of cities in no wise he knew , Character of C.B., Line 19
With reverence, though to one who knew it not. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 25
Before our lips knew else but solemn sounds; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 340
That was before we knew the winged thing, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 341
The winged boy I knew ; Ode to Psyche, Line 21
How is it, shadows, that I knew ye not? Ode on Indolence, Line 11
And ached for wings, because I knew the three: Ode on Indolence, Line 24
I knew to be my demon Poesy. Ode on Indolence, Line 30
If Otho knew Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 11b
Cowards, who never knew their little hearts, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 79
As one I knew some passed weeks ago, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 41
I knew you through disguise. You are the Arab! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 127
By Venus, 'tis a pity I knew not Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 30
The other cursing low, whose voice I knew Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 123
Alas! poor Prince, I would you knew my heart! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 28
He would return that way, as well she knew , Lamia, Part I, Line 221
They pass'd the city gates, he knew not how, Lamia, Part I, Line 348
Were seen about the markets: none knew where Lamia, Part I, Line 391
And enter'd marveling: for they knew the street, Lamia, Part II, Line 152
Pendent; and by her voice I knew she shed The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 220
With reverence, though to one who knew it not. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 330
He sat and cursed a bride he knew he could not touch. The Jealousies, Line 126
He " knew the city," as we say, of yore, The Jealousies, Line 206
For shortest cuts and turns, was nobody knew more. The Jealousies, Line 207
 
KNIFE.............5
The sacrifice goes on; the pontif knife Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 20
Cut Mercy with a sharp knife to the bone; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 174
But there is crime - a brother's bloody knife ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 333
Shows her a knife .- "What feverous hectic flame Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 348
Then with her knife , all sudden, she began Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 367
 
KNIGHT............15
Ah! courteous Sir Knight , with large joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 17
A very Red Cross Knight - a stout Leander - Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 13
But ah! I am no knight whose foeman dies; Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 5
Sometimes, when the good knight his rest would take, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 19
Wherefore more proudly does the gentle knight Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 47
There stood a knight , patting the flowing hair Calidore: A Fragment, Line 110
O what can ail thee, knight at arms, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 1
O what can ail thee, knight at arms, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 5
ALBERT, a Knight , favoured by Otho Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 4
Yes - it is Albert; a brave German knight , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 16
Will you send yonder knight to me? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 21a
Into the lap of honour;- save me, knight ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 49
That your knight Albert be brought here before you. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 189
Enter Second Knight . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 28b
Smote on the morion of a Flemish knight , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 39
 
KNIGHTHOOD........1
Just when your knighthood is grown ripe and full King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 37
 
KNIGHTLY..........4
Thy locks in a knightly casque are rested: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 52
Over a knightly brow; while they went by Calidore: A Fragment, Line 131
To hear of knightly deeds, and gallant spurning Calidore: A Fragment, Line 143
(For knightly Spenser to Libertas told it,) To My Brother George (epistle), Line 24
 
KNIGHTS...........16
Adventurous knights take up their dinted shields: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 4
Bestridden of gay knights , in gay apparel, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 27
Knights , ladies, praying in dumb orat'ries, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 16
Nobles, Knights , Attendants, and Soldiers Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 13
Knights , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
[Enter CONRAD, from the Castle, attended by two Knights and Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
[To one of his Knights , who goes out. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 37b
CONRAD, Nobles, Knights , Ladies, etc., etc., etc. Music. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Your knights , found war-proof in the bloody field, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 34
[Exeunt Knights , Ladies, etc. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 103
back scene, guarded by two Soldiers. Lords, Ladies, Knights , Gentlemen, etc., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Alarum. Enter KING STEPHEN, Knights , and Soldiers. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
Trumpets sounding a victory. Enter GLOCESTER, Knights , and King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Intreating him, his captains, and brave knights King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 25
Enter DE KAIMS and Knights , etc. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 14
[Trumpets. Enter the EARL OF CHESTER and Knights . King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 47
 
KNIT..............2
And his dark brow for very wrath is knit ? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 26
A disguis'd demon, missioned to knit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 701
 
KNOCK.............1
I'll knock you-" "Does your Majesty mean - down? The Jealousies, Line 408
 
KNOCK'D...........2
Until he knock'd at the magician's door; The Jealousies, Line 275
And knock'd down three cut glasses, and his best ink-stand. The Jealousies, Line 351
 
KNOCKS............1
Who knocks ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 105
 
KNOT..............2
Of fruits, and flowers, and bunches of knot -grass, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 210
Tied in a burnish'd knot , their semblance took The Jealousies, Line 269
 
KNOTS.............1
Of flowers, garlands, love- knots , silly posies, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 938
 
KNOTTY............2
To the knotty side of an old pollard tree When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 84
As though some knotty problem, that had daft Lamia, Part II, Line 160
 
KNOW..............95
And then, thou wilt know that the sigh comes from me. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 16
That well you know to honour:- "Life's very toys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 128
For his great Maker's presence, but must know Sleep and Poetry, Line 43
And seems to listen: O that I might know Sleep and Poetry, Line 153
And did not know it,- no, they went about, Sleep and Poetry, Line 203
They should not know thee, who, athirst to gain Sleep and Poetry, Line 282
Of spanning wisdom; though I do not know Sleep and Poetry, Line 285
A chill as from a tomb, did I not know Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 10
That what I want I know not where to seek: To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 4
How "love doth know no fulness nor no bounds." Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 12
That thou dost know of things mysterious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 506
The which were blended in, I know not how, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 617
What I know not: but who, of men, can tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 835
Feast on, and meanwhile I will let thee know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 454
His quiver is mysterious, none can know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 539
Its powerless self: I know this cannot be. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 702
I know thine inmost bosom, and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 293
For these I know thou canst not feel a drouth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 395
And whisper one sweet word that I may know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 319
Why is this mortal here? Does thou not know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 428
That thou mayst always know whither I roam, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 687
Who know him not. Each diligently bends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 895
Her eye-lashes may be, for ought I know , Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 4
You know the Enchanted Castle - it doth stand Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 26
You know it well enough, where it doth seem Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 33
You know the clear lake, and the little isles, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 35
Moods of one's mind! You know I hate them well, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 106
You know I'd sooner be a clapping bell Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 107
Know there is richest juice in poison-flowers. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 104
"I know what was, I feel full well what is, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 313
Clearly she saw, as other eyes would know Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 363
To see if I might know the men, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 15
That gods might know my own particular taste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 4
Mankind do know of hell: I look o'erhead, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 5
Thus much I know , that, a poor witless elf, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 11
While the night breeze doth softly let us know Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 33
Child, I know thee! Child no more, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 31
Muses nine, that I may know him! Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 2
All the house is asleep, but we know very well Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 2
For if thou diest, my love, I know not where to go." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 315
Why did I laugh? I know this being's lease- Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 9
What your poor servants know but too, too well? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 23
Know you the three ' great crimes' in faery land? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 24
'Tis sooth indeed, we know it to our sorrow- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 39
Nor did he know each aged watchman's beat, Character of C.B., Line 24
I know the covert, for thence came I hither." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 152
Why do I know ye? why have I seen ye? why Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 231
And the which book ye know I ever kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 137
And know that we had parted from all hope. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 261
Thy name is on my tongue, I know not how; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 83
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 50
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know . Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 50
That I may never know how change the moons, Ode on Indolence, Line 39
I know not: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 98b
Know you not of him? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 66a
Nay, nay, without more words, dost know of him? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 67
I know how the great basement of all power Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 175
The Emperor must not know it, Sigifred. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 6
Yes, yes, I know he hath a noble nature Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 55
I know the clear truth; so would Otho see, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 86
You know his temper, hot, proud, obstinate; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 89
To chattering pigmies? I would have you know Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 61
What more than I know of could so have chang'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 142
Lady, I should rejoice to know you so. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 43
To know you spotless. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 108a
You shall know all anon. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 42a
To-day! O I forgot you could not know ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 57
Nay, my lord, I do not know . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 25b
Those grey lids wink, and thou not know it, monk! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
I know not whether to pity, curse, or laugh. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 206
I know it - it must be - I see it all! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 259
Well, well I know what ugly jeopardy Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 1
What I shall do, I know not; what I would Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 44
Imperial? I do not know the time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 87
You know full well what makes me look so pale. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 112
Some horror; all I know , this present, is Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 114
Me the great pain of telling. You must know . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 121
And listen to me; know me once for all. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 134
To know thee sad thus, will unloose my tongue Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 14
Yet, one day, you must know a grief, whose sting Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 72
I see you know it all! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 7a
I am no seer; you know we must obey Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 5
They know their own thoughts best. As for the third, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 58
That he may bless me, as I know he will, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 113
Thou art a scholar, Lycius, and must know Lamia, Part I, Line 279
So noiseless, and he never thought to know . Lamia, Part I, Line 349
We know her woof, her texture; she is given Lamia, Part II, Line 232
Sweet smelling, whose pure kinds I could not know . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 34
I know it - and to know it is despair To Fanny, Line 41
I know it - and to know it is despair To Fanny, Line 41
Fain would I know the great usurper's fate. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 8
"I know a many Berthas!" "Mine's above The Jealousies, Line 372
"You seem to know "- "I do know," answer'd Hum, The Jealousies, Line 379
"You seem to know"- "I do know ," answer'd Hum, The Jealousies, Line 379
His Majesty will know her temper time enough. The Jealousies, Line 702
 
KNOW'ST...........4
Thou know'st the deepness of his misery. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 551
My weary watching. Though thou know'st it not, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 297
On barren souls. Great Muse, thou know'st what prison, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 20
Know'st thou that man?" Poor Lamia answer'd not. Lamia, Part II, Line 255
 
KNOWING...........10
I slowly sail, scarce knowing my intent; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 18
In a green island, far from all men's knowing ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 6
Knowing within myself the manner in which this Poem has Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
At which I wondered greatly, knowing well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 556
Or I shall think you knowing ; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 2
Hath fled to her bower, well knowing I want Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 14
Knowing his mawkish honesty. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 10a
Because he mused beyond her, knowing well Lamia, Part II, Line 38
And knowing surely she could never win Lamia, Part II, Line 113
Knowing the Emperor's moody bitterness; The Jealousies, Line 338
 
KNOWLEDGE.........8
Leading to universal knowledge - see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 289
By a fore- knowledge of unslumbrous night! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 912
O fret not after knowledge - I have none, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 9
O fret not after knowledge - I have none, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 11
She had no knowledge when the day was done, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 421
And all my knowledge is that joy is gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 253
Knowledge enormous makes a God of me. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 113
If I have any knowledge of you, sir, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 112
 
KNOWN.............25
Had she but known how beat my heart Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 21
Greeted, as he had known them long before. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 33
With many else which I have never known . To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 48
Nor should I now, but that I've known you long; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 52
Or known your kindness, what might I have been? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 73
A well- known voice sigh'd, "Sweetest, here am I!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 714
"O known Unknown! from whom my being sips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 739
Sat silently. Love's madness he had known : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 860
What elysium have ye known , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 2
What elysium have ye known , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 24
There is a joy in every spot made known by times of old, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 5
What thou among the leaves hast never known , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 22
To make our golden fortune known to you. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 24
Still it must not be known , good Sigifred; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 10
Known only to his troop, hath greater plea Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 28
Had I known that of him I have since known, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 47
Had I known that of him I have since known , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 47
Yes, he was ever known to be a man Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 22
Whom I have known from her first infancy, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
To unperplex'd delight and pleasure known . Lamia, Part I, Line 327
My presence in wide Corinth hardly known : Lamia, Part II, Line 93
Be poet's or fanatic's will be known The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 17
Known to the woodland nostril, so the words The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 406
Of honour forfeit. O, that my known voice King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 7
"Good! good!" cried Hum, "I've known her from a child! The Jealousies, Line 388
 
KNOWS.............9
And 'tis right just, for well Apollo knows To My Brother George (epistle), Line 45
He who knows these delights, and, too, is prone On The Story of Rimini, Line 9
Why it is thus, one knows in heaven above: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 128
Enchanted has it been the Lord knows where. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 18
Knows thee not, thus afflicted, for a God; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 56
The Duke is out of temper; if he knows Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 145
Who comforts those she sees not, who knows not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 270
Knows thee not, so afflicted, for a God; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 358
"He's in the kitchen, or the Lord knows where,"- The Jealousies, Line 313
 
KNOX..............2
Since Knox , the revolutionist, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 14
There's Bertha Blount of York,- and Bertha Knox of Perth." The Jealousies, Line 378
 
KNUCKLES..........1
These treasures - touch'd the knuckles - they unclasp'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 672
 
KOSCIUSKO.........1
Good Kosciusko , thy great name alone To Kosciusko, Line 1
 
KOSCIUSKO'S.......1
Of the goaded world; and Kosciusko's worn Sleep and Poetry, Line 387
 
KYRTLED...........1
Green- kyrtled Spring, flush Summer, golden store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 422


Published @ RC

March 2005