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Keats Concordance
 
L'AILE............1
She chose to "promener a l'aile ," or take The Jealousies, Line 44
 
LA................2
In Provence call'd, " La belle dame sans mercy": The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 292
They cried - " La belle dame sans merci La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 39
 
LABOR.............1
Was at his old labor , God of the golden bow, Line 30
 
LABORIOUS.........1
Were pent in regions of laborious breath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 22
 
LABOUR............2
Labour for mortal good? I sure should see The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 159
The sequel of this day, though labour 'tis immense! The Jealousies, Line 792
 
LABOUR'D..........3
Three hours they labour'd at this travail sore; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 382
Have I not labour'd , plotted-? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 111a
'Twas for yourself you labour'd - not for me! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 114
 
LABOURER..........1
With brawny vengeance, like the labourer Cain. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 8
 
LABOURING.........5
At sight of such a dismal labouring , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 379
Was with its stored thunder labouring up. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 41
Then living on the earth, with labouring thought Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 279
To smother up this sound of labouring breath, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 29
Was with its stored thunder labouring up. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 343
 
LABOURS...........2
Which done, and all these labours ripened, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 707
Whether his labours be sublime or low- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 173
 
LABURNUM..........1
And let a lush laburnum oversweep them, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 31
 
LABURNUM'S........1
Where the dark-leav'd laburnum's drooping clusters To George Felton Mathew, Line 41
 
LABYRINTH.........6
Why linger you so, the wild labyrinth strolling? To Some Ladies, Line 9
Into a delphic labyrinth . I would fain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 3
About the labyrinth in his soul of love. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 141
Into a labyrinth now my soul would fly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 630
Your soul in mine, and labyrinth you there Lamia, Part II, Line 53
And progresses through its own labyrinth ; The Jealousies, Line 726
 
LABYRINTHINE......1
And trembles through my labyrinthine hair.' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 969
 
LABYRINTHS........3
Into the labyrinths of sweet utterance? To G.A.W., Line 4
Into most lovely labyrinths will be gone, Sleep and Poetry, Line 266
Through all their labyrinths ; and let the maid Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 21
 
LACED.............2
Have nantz, with which my morning-coffee's laced ." The Jealousies, Line 365
"Mr. Nisby is of opinion that laced coffee is bad The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 365
 
LACK..............2
Her household to our lack of entertainment. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 5
Will parch for lack of nutrient - thy bones The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 110
 
LACKEY............1
Will you make Titan play the lackey -page Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 60
 
LACKEYING.........2
When, lackeying my counsel at a beck, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 99
And with a sort of lackeying friendliness King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 42
 
LADDER............3
Can make a ladder of the eternal wind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 26
A rope- ladder for false witness. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 147a
As once fair angels on a ladder flew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 135
 
LADEN.............5
As with us mortal men, the laden heart Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 101
magnificence, with supper-tables, laden with services of gold and silver. A Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Steady thy laden head across a brook; To Autumn, Line 20
Though it blows legend- laden through the trees. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 6
Upon the laden wings that scantly could respire. The Jealousies, Line 666
 
LADIES............12
Those smiling ladies , often turned his head Calidore: A Fragment, Line 129
The sweet-lipp'd ladies have already greeted Calidore: A Fragment, Line 135
Their ladies fair, that in the distance seem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 37
And tearful ladies made for love, and pity: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 47
A promenade for cooks and ancient ladies ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 13
Knights, ladies , praying in dumb orat'ries, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 16
Ladies and Attendants Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 16
CONRAD, Nobles, Knights, Ladies , etc., etc., etc. Music. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
[Exeunt Knights, Ladies , etc. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 103
back scene, guarded by two Soldiers. Lords, Ladies , Knights, Gentlemen, etc., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
By ladies , habited in robes of lawn Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 87
Of lords and ladies , on each hand, make show The Jealousies, Line 752
 
LADIES'...........1
Or my good soldiers, or their ladies' eyes, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 13
 
LADY..............61
Is it a scarf that thy fair lady gave? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 15
Athwart the morning air: some lady sweet, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 13
"Dear lady ," said Endymion, "'tis past: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 137
Come hither, lady fair, and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 226
Come hither, lady fair, and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 237
At last he said: "Poor lady , how thus long Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 298
Endymion sleepeth and the lady fair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 404
Of his delicious lady . He who died Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 441
While to his lady meek the Carian turn'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 504
Thee, gentle lady , did he disenthral: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 608
Why does his lady smile, pleasing her eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 798
His lady smiles; delight is in her face; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 803
Tell me, my lady -queen, how to espouse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 841
Of Dian's sisterhood; and, kind lady , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 886
But my lady first did go,- Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 10
Lady ! thou leadest me to summer clime, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 66
With her two brothers this fair lady dwelt, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 105
(Here the lady took some more whiskey and was putting even more to Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
Good heavens, lady , how the gemini Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 30
The lady fainted and he thought her dead, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 69
And turn, sole-thoughted, to one Lady there, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 42
God's help! my lady fair the conjuror plays The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 124
Sweet lady , let her pray, and sleep, and dream The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 141
The while: Ah! thou must needs the lady wed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 179
I met a lady in the meads, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 13
Lady ! O would to heaven your poor servant Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 132
And you will prize it, lady , I doubt not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 138
Kiss your fair hand and lady fortune's too. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 16
But now my sight is clear; forgive me, lady . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 23
Lady Auranthe, I would not make you blush, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 64
He thus avoids us. Lady , is't not strange? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 75
Thank you, fair lady - Otho!- Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 118
Such beauty once again.- What ails you, lady ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 13
Lady Erminia! are you a prisoner Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 27
Lady , I should rejoice to know you so. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 43
This is too much! Hearken, my lady pure,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
Prythee, fair lady , what chance brought you here? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
Poor lady ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 117a
Pray let me lead. Fair lady , forget not Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
Best ask your lady sister, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 70b
Old abbot, stand here forth. Lady Erminia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 111
Still with the dews of piety, this meek lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
To all men's sight, a lady innocent. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 139
This guileless lady ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 155a
What swift death wilt thou die? As to the lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 171
Of Lady Auranthe, our new-spoused daughter? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 214
Let them depart. Lady Erminia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 224
Yes, lady , well. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 110a
An innocent lady , gull an emperor, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 165
Your lady sister, if I guess aright, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 171
And, as I follow'd, heard my lady speak. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 126
And the sweet lady , fair Erminia, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 8
The lady weeping, the old abbot cowl'd. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 12
She seem'd, at once, some penanced lady elf, Lamia, Part I, Line 55
Whither fled Lamia, now a lady bright, Lamia, Part I, Line 171
The cruel lady , without any show Lamia, Part I, Line 290
The lady , ever watchful, penetrant, Lamia, Part II, Line 34
Steps forth my lady bright! What can I do to drive away, Line 47
Tell me some means to get the lady here." The Jealousies, Line 402
"In Canterbury doth your lady shine? The Jealousies, Line 413
"By'r Lady ! he is gone!" cries Hum, "and I,- The Jealousies, Line 613
 
LADY'S............20
And hastest thou now to that fair lady's bower? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 16
What gentle squeeze he gave each lady's hand! Calidore: A Fragment, Line 81
And tyrannizing was the lady's look, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 507
The lady's heart beat quick, and he could see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 99
It gave bright gladness to his lady's eye, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 724
Then he embrac'd her, and his lady's hand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 974
Each step he took should make his lady's hand Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 5
He seiz'd my lady's lily hand, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 3
He kiss'd my lady's cherry lips, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 7
My lady's maid had a silken scarf, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 13
To-morrow will I ask my lady's boon."- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 28
If he could hear his lady's matin-song, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 195
A guitar-ribband - and a lady's glove Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 36
That I must chaunt thy lady's dirge, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 2
These blossoms snow upon thy lady's pall! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 7
His lady's purpose; and he scarce could brook The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 133
From such a stedfast spell his lady's eyes; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 287
Chiefly by shifting to this lady's room Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 146
Wheels round its dazzling spokes."- The lady's cheek Lamia, Part II, Line 64
Some lady's fingers nice in Candy wine; The Jealousies, Line 429
 
LAID..............10
Small, busy flames play through the fresh laid coals, To My Brothers, Line 1
If I do fall, at least I will be laid Sleep and Poetry, Line 277
So she was gently glad to see him laid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 436
His wandering steps, and half-entranced laid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 108
Upon a dead thing's face my hand I laid ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 618
What wouldst thou ere we all are laid on bier?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 973
A garden-pot, wherein she laid it by, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 414
She laid , and to the level of his ear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 46
She laid , and to the level of his hollow ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 348
Laid a remonstrance at his Highness' feet, The Jealousies, Line 20
 
LAIN..............4
For that to love, so long, I've dormant lain : Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 8
For tenderness the arms so idly lain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 61
The moss- lain Dryads shall be lull'd to sleep; Ode to Psyche, Line 57
Whom, with but one attendant, safely lain The Jealousies, Line 34
 
LAIR..............8
Rousing them from pleasure's lair :- Ode to Apollo, Line 39
Fatigued he sinks into some pleasant lair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 6
Or of the distance from home's pleasant lair : Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 8
Fainted away in that dark lair of night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 560
Leaving old Sleep within his vapoury lair . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 483
Ring-doves may fly convuls'd across to some high cedar'd lair ; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 20
Still as the silence round about his lair ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 5
With the sweet Princess on her plumaged lair , The Jealousies, Line 40
 
LAKE..............19
By many streams a little lake did fill, Imitation of Spenser, Line 7
That in fairest lake had placed been, Imitation of Spenser, Line 20
It is reflected, clearly, in a lake , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 20
Young Calidore is paddling o'er the lake ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 1
Across the lake ; sequester'd leafy glades, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 47
And soon upon the lake he skims along, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 60
Of ruffles all the surface of the lake To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 7
He of the cloud, the cataract, the lake , Addressed to the Same, Line 2
From out its crystal dwelling in a lake , Sleep and Poetry, Line 225
To a sleeping lake , whose cool and level gleam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 833
As breezeless lake , on which the slim canoe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 880
The youth at once arose: a placid lake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1028
Upon a rock on the border of a lake Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 27
You know the clear lake , and the little isles, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 35
Its cradle still are in the lake ; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 19
The sedge has wither'd from the lake , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 3
Though the sedge is wither'd from the lake , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 47
The undisturbed lake has crystal space; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 12
Haunters of cavern, lake , and waterfall, Lamia, Part I, Line 331
 
LAKES.............3
Clear streams, smooth lakes , and overlooking towers. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 68
I watch and dote upon the silver lakes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 740
Iced in the great lakes , to afflict mankind; What can I do to drive away, Line 38
 
LAMA..............1
Gold, black, and heavy, from the lama brought. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 64
 
LAMB..............6
God! she is like a milk-white lamb that bleats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 31
A lamb strayed far a-down those inmost glens, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 69
That not one fleecy lamb which thus did sever Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 74
Who thus one lamb did lose. Paths there were many, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 79
A pet- lamb in a sentimental farce! Ode on Indolence, Line 54
The strength of twenty lions 'gainst a lamb ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 59
 
LAMBETH...........1
A Faery Tale, by Lucy Vaughan Lloyd of China Walk, Lambeth The Jealousies, Subtitle
 
LAMBKINS..........1
To save poor lambkins from the eagle's maw; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 267
 
LAMBS.............4
Udderless lambs , and in a little cup Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 210
Lambs bleat my lullaby. Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 12
Save to St. Agnes and her lambs unshorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 71
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; To Autumn, Line 30
 
LAME..............1
Gaunt, wither'd, sapless, feeble, cramp'd, and lame . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 638
 
LAMENT............2
Walk'd towards the temple grove with this lament : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 926
Continued to lament and to complain, The Jealousies, Line 75
 
LAMENTING.........1
Affright you? Did our old lamenting Thames Sleep and Poetry, Line 212
 
LAMIA.............17
Whither fled Lamia , now a lady bright, Lamia, Part I, Line 171
Lamia beheld him coming, near, more near- Lamia, Part I, Line 237
Said Lamia , "here, upon this floor of clay, Lamia, Part I, Line 272
Thus gentle Lamia judg'd, and judg'd aright, Lamia, Part I, Line 334
While hurried Lamia trembled: "Ah," said he, Lamia, Part I, Line 368
"I'm wearied," said fair Lamia : "tell me who Lamia, Part I, Line 371
"I have no friends," said Lamia , "no, not one; Lamia, Part II, Line 92
Teeming with odours. Lamia , regal drest, Lamia, Part II, Line 133
What wreath for Lamia ? What for Lycius? Lamia, Part II, Line 221
The tender-person'd Lamia melt into a shade. Lamia, Part II, Line 238
" Lamia , what means this? Wherefore dost thou start? Lamia, Part II, Line 254
Know'st thou that man?" Poor Lamia answer'd not. Lamia, Part II, Line 255
" Lamia !" he cried - and no soft-toned reply. Lamia, Part II, Line 261
" Lamia !" he shriek'd; and nothing but the shriek Lamia, Part II, Line 269
Lamia , no longer fair, there sat a deadly white. Lamia, Part II, Line 276
Then Lamia breath'd death breath; the sophist's eye, Lamia, Part II, Line 299
conjectures, found her out to be a serpent, a lamia ; and that all her furniture Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
LAMIA'S...........2
The way was short, for Lamia's eagerness Lamia, Part I, Line 344
Beautiful slaves, and Lamia's self, appear, Lamia, Part II, Line 208
 
LAMP..............7
The silver lamp ,- the ravishment,- the wonder- I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 147
That they are dying like an outburnt lamp ; Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 11
Then takes his lamp , and riseth from his knees, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 11
A chain-droop'd lamp was flickering by each door; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 357
And struck a lamp from the dismal coal, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 70
Or prophesyings of the midnight lamp ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 174
Where hung a silver lamp , whose phosphor glow Lamia, Part I, Line 380
 
LAMPIT............1
Upon a lampit rock of green sea weed Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 88
 
LAMPOON...........1
Caricature was vain, and vain the tart lampoon . The Jealousies, Line 18
 
LAMPS.............6
The lamps that from the high-roof'd hall were pendent, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 132
Or of those silver lamps that burn on high, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 7
Glow-worms began to trim their starry lamps , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 141
I found the stairs all dark, the lamps extinct, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 118
These pendent lamps and chandeliers are bright Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 40
There ran a stream of lamps straight on from wall to wall. Lamia, Part II, Line 131
 
LANCE.............5
Lifted up her lance on high, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 42
For while I muse, the lance points slantingly Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 12
And that bright lance , against the fretted wall, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 37
Of helpless discontent,- hurling my lance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 929
For some few gasping moments; like a lance , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 269
 
LAND..............25
O let me see our land retain her soul, To Hope, Line 33
And now he turns a jutting point of land , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 64
Fair as some wonder out of fairy land , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 94
Made great Apollo blush for this his land . Sleep and Poetry, Line 183
They stept into the boat, and launch'd from land . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 992
Upon a misty, jutting head of land - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 163
Muse of my native land ! loftiest Muse! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1
From my dear native land ! Ah, foolish maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 31
Muse of my native land , am I inspir'd? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 354
The mariners join hymn with those on land . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 25
To land each Tuesday from the rich Levant, To J.R., Line 10
As two close Hebrews in that land inspired, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 131
When we meet over sea and o'er land Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 7
He cursed thee and thine, both house and land : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 102
Hark! 'tis an elfin-storm from faery land , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 343
On land , on seas, in pagan-chains, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 91
Know you the three ' great crimes' in faery land ? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 24
My top has henceforth slept in faery land . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 32
Where a sweet clime was breathed from a land Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 263
Pearls, while on land they wither'd and adored. Lamia, Part I, Line 16
That is a doubtful tale from faery land , Lamia, Part II, Line 5
To banish thoughts of that most hateful land , What can I do to drive away, Line 31
Themselves with what in faery land was sweet, The Jealousies, Line 22
Her wits to 'scape away to Angle- land ; The Jealousies, Line 114
Adieu! adieu! I'm off for Angle- land ! The Jealousies, Line 599
 
LANDED............1
The eagle landed him, and farewel took. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 669
 
LANDING...........1
To the first landing , where, incredible! The Jealousies, Line 785
 
LANDS.............3
Tawny and gold, ooz'd slowly from far lands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 114
Lorenzo had ta'en ship for foreign lands , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 226
Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 70
 
LANES.............1
Since I have walk'd with you through shady lanes To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 115
 
LANG'ROUS.........2
Whiten'd with ashes, and its lang'rous flame, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 238
Bright eyes, accomplish'd shape, and lang'rous waist! The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 4
 
LANGUAGE..........3
And sure in language strange she said- La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 27
Language pronounc'd. "If thou canst not ascend The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 107
Whose language is to thee a barren noise, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 5
 
LANGUID...........12
The languid sick; it cool'd their fever'd sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 223
Her languid arms in silver slumber dying: Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 3
'Twas with slow, languid paces, and face hid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 872
Follow'd their languid mazes, till well nigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 929
With those bright languid segments green and prick To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 4
And Jove grew languid .- Break the mesh Fancy, Line 89
Feebly she laugheth in the languid moon, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 127
At whose white feet the languid Tritons poured Lamia, Part I, Line 15
To the swoon'd serpent, and with languid arm, Lamia, Part I, Line 132
Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 1
Half lidded, piteous, languid , innocent; The Jealousies, Line 173
This famed for languid eyes, and that for mirth,- The Jealousies, Line 377
 
LANGUISH..........1
Beneath its rich shade did King Oberon languish , On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 26
 
LANGUISH'D........1
And languish'd there three days. Ye milder powers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 747
 
LANGUISHMENT......4
And whether there were tears of languishment , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 88
And gentle tale of love and languishment ? To one who has been long in city pent, Line 8
Yet do I sometimes feel a languishment Happy is England! I could be content, Line 5
And kept his rosy terms in idle languishment . Lamia, Part I, Line 199
 
LANGUOR...........2
Melted into a languor . He return'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 826
Languor there was in it, and tremulous shake, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 285
 
LANGUOR'S.........1
Onward it flies. From languor's sullen bands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 66
 
LANK..............2
O lank -eared Phantoms of black-weeded pools! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 230
Make lean and lank the starv'd ox while he feeds; What can I do to drive away, Line 41
 
LANTERN...........1
Whose flitting lantern , through rude nettle-briar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 278
 
LAP...............6
Green'd over April's lap ? No howling sad Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 217
And in his lap a book, the which he conn'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 214
Sleep in the lap of thunder or sunbeams, To Ailsa Rock, Line 7
And Madeline asleep in lap of legends old. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 135
Oceanus, and Tethys, in whose lap Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 75
Into the lap of honour;- save me, knight! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 49
 
LAPLAND...........2
Of Lapland thinks on sweet Arno; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 26
Built by a Lapland witch turn'd maudlin nun- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 46
 
LAPP'D............1
But lapp'd and lull'd along the dangerous sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 646
 
LAPSES............1
How many bards gild the lapses of time! How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 1
 
LARBOARD..........1
Shed a quill-feather from my larboard wing- The Jealousies, Line 713
 
LARCH.............2
Shaded o'er by a larch , The Gothic looks solemn, Line 5
And there's Larch Brook, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 8
 
LARCHEN...........1
Her sisters larchen trees- Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 10
 
LARCHES...........1
In dark green ivy, and among wild larches ? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 34
 
LARGE.............43
Ah! courteous Sir Knight, with large joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 17
For large white plumes are dancing in mine eye. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 2
Large dock leaves, spiral foxgloves, or the glow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 49
The large -eyed wonder, and ambitious heat Calidore: A Fragment, Line 127
Of Jove's large eye-brow, to the tender greening Sleep and Poetry, Line 170
Mark'd with most flimsy mottos, and in large Sleep and Poetry, Line 205
As a large cross, some old cathedral's crest, Sleep and Poetry, Line 296
Might I indulge at large in all my store Sleep and Poetry, Line 346
Among the winds at large - that all may hearken! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 738
Is of too wide, too rainbow- large a scope, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 775
Large wings upon my shoulders, and point out Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 178
Towards him a large eagle, 'twixt whose wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 658
Large honey-combs of green, and freshly teem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 667
Old rusted anchors, helmets, breast-plates large Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 123
Furrow'd deep wrinkles in his forehead large , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 223
About his large dark locks, and faultering spake: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 291
From where large Hercules wound up his story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 406
Large froth before me, while there yet remain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 613
As large , as bright, as colour'd as the bow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 850
And then, behold! large Neptune on his throne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 862
From the God's large eyes; he smil'd delectable, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 901
And it hath furrow'd that large front: yet now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 961
Each with large dark blue wings upon his back. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 344
Or like a beauteous woman's large blue eyes Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 53
And a large flint-stone weighs upon my feet; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 299
Should look through four large windows, and display Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 28
Underneath large blue-bells tented, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 13
Of witch, and demon, and large coffin-worm, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 374
Along the margin-sand large foot-marks went, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 15
Her face was large as that of Memphian sphinx, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 31
To that large utterance of the early Gods! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 51
She touch'd her fair large forehead to the ground, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 80
Who dares take such large charter from our smiles! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 70
Large as a god speak out, where all is thine. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 135
Of your large bounties. A tourney, is it not? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52
There's a large cauliflower in each candle, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 15
Store of strange vessels, and large draperies, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 73
Of all mock lyrists, large self worshipers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 207
Along the margin sand large footmarks went The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 319
To that large utterance of the early Gods!- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 353
She press'd her fair large forehead to the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 379
With large limb'd visions. More I scrutinized: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 445
Some strange Imaian custom. A large bat The Jealousies, Line 674
 
LARGER............2
And with the larger wove in small intricacies. Lamia, Part II, Line 141
Of trellis vines, and bells, and larger blooms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 26
 
LARGEST...........2
And, ample as the largest winding-sheet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 196
Take you a bundle of the largest pines, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 57
 
LARK..............8
As the sky-searching lark , and as elate. Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 4
Yet these I leave as thoughtless as a lark ; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 23
What time the sky- lark shakes the tremulous dew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 2
I see the lark down-dropping to his nest, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 135
The lark was lost in him; cold springs had run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 102
The earth is glad: the merry lark has pour'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 220
And sing above this gentle pair, like lark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 720
'Tis the early April lark , Fancy, Line 44
 
LASH..............1
Pointed each fringed lash ; the smeared loam Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 405
 
LASH'D............1
Swift, mad, fantastic round the rocks, and lash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 920
 
LASHED............1
Lashed from the crystal roof by fishes' tails. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 111
 
LASHES............3
Her eye- lashes may be, for ought I know, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 4
Finish'd with lashes fine for more soft shade, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 62
Hot, glaz'd, and wide, with lid- lashes all sear, Lamia, Part I, Line 151
 
LASHLESS..........1
Mark how, possess'd, his lashless eyelids stretch Lamia, Part II, Line 288
 
LASS..............3
And plac'd in midst of all that lovely lass To My Brother George (epistle), Line 86
I spy each pretty lass . Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 8
And lov'd to see a tempting lass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 27
 
LAST..............68
And in the last sun-beam the sylph lightly swims. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 8
Some weeks have pass'd since last I saw the spires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 84
But many days have past since last my heart To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 109
When last the winds of heaven were unbound. On the Sea, Line 8
And while it doth last , Hither, hither, love, Line 19
two last , I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Daisies upon the sacred sward last eve, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 93
Plainer and plainer shewing, till at last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 125
When last the sun his autumn tresses shook, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 440
His snorting four. Now when his chariot last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 552
At last into a dark and vapoury tent- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 597
When last the wintry gusts gave over strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 920
At last , by hap, through some young trees it struck, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 931
He heard but the last words, nor could contend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 215
At last , with sudden step, he came upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 388
And, at the last , a diamond balustrade, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 597
That the fair visitant at last unwound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 851
Over eclipsing eyes: and at the last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 877
Leaving a trickling dew. At last they shot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 922
Upon the last few steps, and with spent force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 925
And if it came at last , hark, and rejoice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 356
Let me sob over thee my last adieus, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 587
Enforced, at the last by ocean's foam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 607
Unfortunates on earth, we see at last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 980
But still he slept. At last they interwove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1016
I love thee! and my days can never last . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 138
At last he said: "Poor lady, how thus long Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 298
And tantalizes long; at last he drinks, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 417
In swells unmitigated, still doth last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 425
Me to behold thee thus in last extreme: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 771
Of grief, to last thee to my kiss again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 810
Was struck, and all were dreamers. At the last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 900
To her for the last time. Night will strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 933
For it only will last our youth out; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 14
Did last eve ask my promise to refine Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 3
Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 1
And at the last , these men of cruel clay Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 173
At last they felt the kernel of the grave, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 383
Imploring for her basil to the last . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 498
The last in air, the former in the deep- To Ailsa Rock, Line 11
First with the whales, last with the eagle skies; To Ailsa Rock, Line 12
That now in vain are weeping their last tears, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 16
When my weak voice shall whisper its last prayer, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 147
From fright of dim espial. Safe at last , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 185
The next, the last , the direst of the three, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 28
At last it struck him to pretend to sleep, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 89
So art thou not the last ; it cannot be: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 189
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 25
The last , whom I love more, the more of blame Ode on Indolence, Line 28
Ten hecatombs shall bellow out their last , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 130
As I will be of mercy! So, at last , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 128
Shrive him and comfort him at his last gasp, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
Keep fearful and aloof from his last gaze, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13
Your last news? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 3b
Let, let me hear his voice; this cannot last ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 41
Though my own knell they be! This cannot last ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 43
I had a splendid dream of thee last night: Lamia, Part I, Line 69
And last , pointing to Corinth, ask'd her sweet, Lamia, Part I, Line 342
Love in a palace is perhaps at last Lamia, Part II, Line 3
Of sorrows at his words; at last with pain Lamia, Part II, Line 67
content, and at last married Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours. To Autumn, Line 22
Could to a mother's soften, were these last : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 250
By this last temple, by the golden age, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 285
Love, on their last repose! To Fanny, Line 56
Scampering to death at last ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 12a
Truth! I think so - by heavens, it shall not last . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 35
Some histories say that this was Hum's last speech; The Jealousies, Line 623
 
LASTLY............1
Then lastly to his holy shrine, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 117
 
LATCH.............2
He knew whose gentle hand was at the latch , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 17
Lift the latch , ah gently! ah tenderly, sweet, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 17
 
LATCH'D...........1
The windows as if latch'd by fays and elves- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 50
 
LATCHET...........1
We are dead if that latchet gives one little chink. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 18
 
LATE..............21
Soothing with placid brow our late distress, On Peace, Line 3
As late I rambled in the happy fields, To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 1
Of late , too, I have had much calm enjoyment, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 119
One who, of late , had ta'en sweet forest walks To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 42
Of late has haunted a most valiant crew Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 10
I hope I have not in too late a day touched the beautiful Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
On the deer's tender haunches: late , and loth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 908
Unhappy Arethusa! thou wast late Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1007
Of the late darken'd time,- the murderous spite Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 293
Of late two dainties were before me plac'd Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 1
That fainting fit was not delayed too late . Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 74
He had a fever late , and in the fit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 101
Of one returning townwards late , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 59
O brightest! though too late for antique vows, Ode to Psyche, Line 36
Too, too late for the fond believing lyre, Ode to Psyche, Line 37
When late this province was a lawless spoil, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 195
Have you seen her of late ? No? Auranthe, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 112
Of that late stounding insult! Why has my sword Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 94
'Tis late ; the lights of festival are ever Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 49
Late on that eve, as 'twas the night before Lamia, Part I, Line 319
To our late sovereign lord, your noble sire, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 40
 
LATELY............1
On many harps, which he has lately strung; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 52
 
LATENT............1
Thy latent talons in me - and upraise To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 6
 
LATER.............1
And still more, later flowers for the bees, To Autumn, Line 9
 
LATEST............9
What does he murmur with his latest breath, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 69
Until exhausted of the latest drop, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 435
To take a latest glimpse at his sheep-fold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 995
Like one repenting in his latest moan; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 324
And sing to it one latest lullaby; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 340
The latest dream I ever dream'd La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 35
O latest born and loveliest vision far Ode to Psyche, Line 24
On some fool's errand: let his latest groan Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 56
Wilt thou forsake him at his latest hour? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 12
 
LATIN.............2
from Bayle's Dictionary, and had copied a long Latin note from that work. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
You do not like cold pig with Latin phrases, The Jealousies, Line 539
 
LATITUDE..........1
Latitude thirty-six; our scouts descry The Jealousies, Line 643
 
LATMIAN...........7
The breathless Latmian wonder'd o'er and o'er; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 429
The Latmian saw them minish into nought; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 582
The Latmian listen'd, but he heard no more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1010
At things which, but for thee, O Latmian ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 373
And curb'd, think on't, O Latmian ! did I sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 663
The Latmian persever'd along, and thus Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 789
The Latmian started up: "Bright goddess, stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 457
 
LATMOS............4
Upon the sides of Latmos was outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 63
Thus spake he: "Men of Latmos ! shepherd bands! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 196
"Young man of Latmos ! thus particular Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 449
When all great Latmos so exalt will be? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 806
 
LATMUS'...........1
Who stood on Latmus' top, what time there blew I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 194
 
LATONA............1
Beyond the matron-temple of Latona , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 862
 
LATTER............4
Not like the formal crest of latter days: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 3
The hillock turf, and caught the latter end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 323
Which undone, these our latter days had risen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 19
Savory, latter -mint, and columbines, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 576
 
LATTIC'D..........1
Pale, lattic'd , chill, and silent as a tomb. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 113
 
LATTICE...........1
Smile through an in-door lattice , all delight. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 200
 
LATTICES..........2
And crept through half closed lattices to cure I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 222
Sometimes like delicatest lattices , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 614
 
LAUGH.............18
Lo! how they murmur, laugh , and smile, and weep: Sleep and Poetry, Line 142
And, being hidden, laugh at their out-peeping; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 273
To laugh , and play, and sing, and loudly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 515
At mere remembering her pale laugh , and curse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 569
His laugh at nature's holy countenance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 948
There is no mid-forest laugh , Robin Hood, Line 15
And hear a merry laugh amid the thunder; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 6
Laugh and sigh, and laugh again, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 22
Laugh and sigh, and laugh again, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 22
He heard a laugh full musical aloft; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 198
But let me laugh awhile, I've mickle time to grieve." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 126
Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell: Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 1
Say, wherefore did I laugh ? O mortal pain! Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 6
Why did I laugh ? I know this being's lease- Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 9
You well may laugh and banter. What a fool Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 40
Heard his loud laugh , and answer'd in full choir. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 51
I know not whether to pity, curse, or laugh . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 206
I cannot catch you! You should laugh at me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 33
 
LAUGH'D...........5
My hunting cap, because I laugh'd and smil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 925
Oft-times upon the sudden she laugh'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 509
Flutter'd and laugh'd , and oft-times through the throng Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 932
Whether they wept, or laugh'd , or griev'd, or toy'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 494
'Twas Apollonius: something too he laugh'd , Lamia, Part II, Line 159
 
LAUGHERS..........1
Plump infant laughers mimicking the coil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 247
 
LAUGHEST..........1
Spirit here that laughest ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 11
 
LAUGHETH..........1
Feebly she laugheth in the languid moon, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 127
 
LAUGHING..........6
A laughing school-boy, without grief or care, Sleep and Poetry, Line 94
And bloomy grapes laughing from green attire; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 136
Laughing , and wailing, groveling, serpenting, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 501
With sidelong laughing ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 211
Laughing at the clear stream and setting sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 946
A laughing !- snapp'd his fingers!- shame it is to tell! The Jealousies, Line 612
 
LAUGHS............2
Through clouds of fleecy white, laughs the coerulean sky. Imitation of Spenser, Line 27
Stood smiling; merry Hebe laughs and nods; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 437
 
LAUGHTER..........1
She falls, she faints! while laughter peals The Jealousies, Line 779
 
LAUNCH'D..........1
They stept into the boat, and launch'd from land. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 992
 
LAUNCHES..........1
When to the stream she launches , looks not back Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
 
LAURA.............2
Of lovely Laura in her light green dress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 13
Starts at the sight of Laura ; nor can wean Sleep and Poetry, Line 390
 
LAUREL............10
Of laurel chaplets, and Apollo's glories; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 45
To see the laurel wreath, on high suspended, Sleep and Poetry, Line 35
To regions where no more the laurel grew? Sleep and Poetry, Line 216
Than the proud laurel shall content my bier. To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 4
Two bending laurel sprigs - 'tis nearly pain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 7
Thy laurel , thy glory, God of the golden bow, Line 9
Next, on a dolphin, clad in laurel boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1001
Such tender incense in their laurel shade, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 14
For every crime I have a laurel -wreath, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 3
But bare of laurel they live, dream, and die; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 7
 
LAUREL'D..........2
Breathless the laurel'd peers; Ode to Apollo, Line 20
That fill'd the eyes of morn;- the laurel'd peers To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 3
 
LAURELL'D.........1
Four laurell'd spirits, heaven-ward to intreat him. To George Felton Mathew, Line 58
 
LAURELS...........2
Than the pure freshness of thy laurels green. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 54
And flowering laurels spring from diamond vases; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 134
 
LAVA..............1
And, as the lava ravishes the mead, Lamia, Part I, Line 157
 
LAVE..............5
Saving when, with freshening lave , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 31
Whence it ran brightly forth, and white did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 936
Dost thou now lave thy feet and ankles white? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 325
But ever since I heedlessly did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 969
Where thou alone shalt come to me, and lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 861
 
LAVENDER'D........1
In blanched linen, smooth, and lavender'd , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 263
 
LAVISH............2
Buds lavish gold; or ye, whose precious charge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 203
As marble was there lavish , to the vast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 846
 
LAVISHLY..........1
And the riches of Flora are lavishly strown; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 2
 
LAW...............10
Give thy kings law - leave not uncurbed the great; On Peace, Line 13
Their godships should pass this into a law ; Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 2
Cannot refer to any standard law Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 81
We fall by course of Nature's law , not force Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 181
In right thereof; for 'tis the eternal law Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 228
Yea, by that law , another race may drive Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 230
Sister-in- law to jealous Potiphar; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 10
Be your word law ; forget to-day- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 165a
Foisted into the canon law of love;- What can I do to drive away, Line 26
This was a crime forbidden by the law ; The Jealousies, Line 10
 
LAWFUL............1
And so is my revenge, my lawful chattels! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 137
 
LAWLESS...........1
When late this province was a lawless spoil, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 195
 
LAWN..............7
To a wide lawn , whence one could only see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 82
Were busiest, into that self-same lawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 108
From pleated lawn -frill fine and thin The Eve of St. Mark, Line 53
And poplars, and lawn -shading palms, and beech, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 25
My soul had been a lawn besprinkled o'er Ode on Indolence, Line 43
By ladies, habited in robes of lawn Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 87
While on a flowery lawn a brilliant crowd The Jealousies, Line 689
 
LAWNS.............3
Fresh breezes, bowery lawns , and innocent floods, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 967
Seated on Elysian lawns Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 11
From rushes green, and brakes, and cowslip'd lawns , Lamia, Part I, Line 6
 
LAWNY.............4
Crowning its lawny crest with amber flame, Imitation of Spenser, Line 3
To see wide plains, fair trees and lawny slope: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 66
Across the lawny fields, and pebbly water; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 88
A fold of lawny mantle dabbling swims Sleep and Poetry, Line 374
 
LAWS..............4
To musty laws lined out with wretched rule Sleep and Poetry, Line 195
I bend unto your laws : Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 14
Laws to my footsteps, colour to my cheek, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 714
If looks speak love- laws , I will drink her tears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 39
 
LAWYER............2
When Sir Snap is with his lawyer , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 17
Has any here a lawyer suit All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 13
 
LAWYER'S..........1
Take lawyer's nose and put it to't All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 15
 
LAY...............45
Each opes delighted at thy lay . Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 12
A lay that once I saw her hand awake, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 38
Would never make a lay of mine enchanting, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 16
"As I lay in my bed slepe full unmete/ Was unto me, but why that I Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
His nervy knees there lay a boat-spear keen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 174
Lay a lost thing upon her paly lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 341
In which her voice should wander. 'Twas a lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 493
All I beheld and felt. Methought I lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 578
Lay , half asleep, in grass and rushes cool, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 134
In midst of all, there lay a sleeping youth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 393
Lay sorrowing; when every tear was born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 467
Lay dormant, mov'd convuls'd and gradually Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 499
Question that thus it was; long time they lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 734
Came louder, and behold, there as he lay , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 917
Beside this old man lay a pearly wand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 213
"Thou art the man! Now shall I lay my head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 234
Poor lovers lay at rest from joys and woes.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 736
We lay our hearts before thee evermore- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 966
He sprang from his green covert: there she lay , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 101
She lay on the grass debonnairly. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 12
So she held her tongue and lay plump and fair Over the hill and over the dale, Line 15
Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 1
Lay full of darts; for them alone did seethe Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 117
Woodlark may sing from sandy fern,- the sun may hear his lay ; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 14
"And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by." Shakspeare O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 2
In sort of wakeful swoon, perplex'd she lay , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 236
Where lay the Porter, in uneasy sprawl, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 363
No sooner thought of than adown he lay , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 92
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 18
There as he lay , the heaven with its stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 305
Lay vast and edgeways; like a dismal cirque Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 34
Lay by him, and a shatter'd rib of rock Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 42
Next Cottus: prone he lay , chin uppermost, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 49
In midst of all lay Themis, at the feet Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 77
They lay calm-breathing on the bedded grass; Ode to Psyche, Line 15
Let in the budding warmth and throstle's lay ; Ode on Indolence, Line 48
And thus; while Hermes on his pinions lay , Lamia, Part I, Line 66
So canopied, lay an untasted feast Lamia, Part II, Line 132
As pale it lay upon the rosy couch: Lamia, Part II, Line 250
On the high couch he lay !- his friends came round- Lamia, Part II, Line 309
Upon the marble at my feet there lay The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 72
All in a mingled heap confus'd there lay The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 78
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 323
Charm'd into ever freezing, lay an old The Jealousies, Line 512
Lay it on Bertha's table, close beside The Jealousies, Line 524
 
LAYS..............2
Lays have I left of such a dear delight To My Brother George (epistle), Line 81
To see her still, and singing so sweet lays ; Lamia, Part I, Line 323
 
LAZAR.............2
Were of more soft ascent than lazar stairs?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 124
Unto some lazar -house thou journeyest, The Jealousies, Line 240
 
LAZY..............1
Rubbing their sleepy eyes with lazy wrists, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 508


About this Page

Published @ RC

March 2005