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Keats Concordance
 
LEA...............3
At brim of day-tide, on some grassy lea , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 366
To the sheep on the lea o' the down, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 15
Or sigh'd, or blush'd, or on spring-flowered lea Lamia, Part I, Line 187
 
LEACH.............2
He's very close to Otho, a tight leach ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 56
The stair-head; that being glutted as a leach , The Jealousies, Line 626
 
LEAD..............17
O let me lead her gently o'er the brook, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 101
That is the Grasshopper's - he takes the lead On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 5
Some moulder'd steps lead into this cool cell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 869
Where airy voices lead : so through the hollow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 213
Stay, stay thy weary course, and let me lead , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 950
I lead the life of a king! Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 6
That lead There was a naughty boy, Line 105
Which was, to lead him, in close secrecy, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 163
He follow'd, and she turn'd to lead the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 155
Lead me to those fevrous glooms, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 93
Pray let me lead . Fair lady, forget not Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
Would you were both hears'd up in stifling lead ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
Come, let me lead you to our halls again! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 56
To lead you to them. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 115a
Then, father, I will lead your legions forth, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 161
When to the bridal he should lead his paramour. Lamia, Part II, Line 83
Come, lead me to this Mars - and let us move King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 51
 
LEAD'ST...........1
Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 33
 
LEADEN............3
With leaden looks: the solitary breeze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 686
Of nameless monster. A cold leaden awe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 136
And leaden -eyed despairs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 28
 
LEADER............2
Joyous all follow'd, as the leader call'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 813
Not as their leader merely, but their king; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 133
 
LEADERS...........1
To which the leaders sped; but not half raught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 856
 
LEADEST...........2
Lady! thou leadest me to summer clime, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 66
Thou leadest me,- whether thy white feet press, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
 
LEADING...........7
And ivy banks; all leading pleasantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 81
Leading the way, young damsels danced along, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 135
Leading to universal knowledge - see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 289
More self-destroying, leading , by degrees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 799
Leading afar past wild magnificence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 598
"Love! thou art leading me from wintry cold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 65
[Enter ETHELBERT, leading in ERMINIA. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 57b
 
LEADS.............1
Fancy into belief: anon it leads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 234
 
LEAF..............11
A rose leaf round thy finger's taperness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 782
Round every leaf , that all those gentle lispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 956
And from beneath a sheltering ivy leaf Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 65
Yea, every flower and leaf of every clime, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 578
Careful and soft, that not a leaf may fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 928
And every leaf , and every flower Fancy, Line 53
No leaf doth tremble, no ripple is there Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 9
But where the dead leaf fell, there did it rest. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 10
What leaf -fring'd legend haunts about thy shape Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 5
Trac'd upon vellum or wild Indian leaf The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 5
But where the dead leaf fell there did it rest: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 314
 
LEAFINESS.........2
The sidelong view of swelling leafiness , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 34
More healthful than the leafiness of dales? Sleep and Poetry, Line 7
 
LEAFITS...........1
Came forth, and in perfumed leafits spread. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 432
 
LEAFLESS..........2
Nought comforts then the leafless grove Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 19
Among the bushes half leafless , and dry; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 2
 
LEAFY.............7
Peep with the moon-beams through the leafy roof, To Hope, Line 11
In leafy quiet: where to pry, aloof, To George Felton Mathew, Line 47
Across the lake; sequester'd leafy glades, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 47
And lovely Una in a leafy nook, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 36
Till in the bosom of a leafy world Sleep and Poetry, Line 119
That they may bind the moss in leafy nets. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 34
A leafy luxury, seeing I could please To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 13
 
LEAGUE............6
Mov'd on for many a league ; and gain'd, and lost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 829
That he may stray league after league some great birthplace to find, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 47
That he may stray league after league some great birthplace to find, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 47
A brace of toads, than league with them t' oppress Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 164
Tell me,- the league of devils? Confess - confess- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
Made, by a spell, the triple league decrease Lamia, Part I, Line 345
 
LEAGUES...........1
To spur three leagues towards the Apennine; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 186
 
LEAN..............10
Of easy slopes, and shadowy trees that lean Calidore: A Fragment, Line 10
Who from the feathery gold of evening lean ;- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 4
Give me a golden pen, and let me lean On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 1
That lean against a streamlet's rushy banks, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 62
Bushes and trees do lean all round athwart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 865
Than Hermes' pipe, when anxious he did lean Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 876
On some bright essence could I lean , and lull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 172
Ere a lean bat could plump its wintery skin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 377
And put her lean hands to the horrid thing: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 381
Make lean and lank the starv'd ox while he feeds; What can I do to drive away, Line 41
 
LEAN'D............1
He lean'd ; not rising, from supreme contempt. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 308
 
LEANDER...........3
A very Red Cross Knight - a stout Leander - Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 13
'Tis young Leander toiling to his death. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 9
Amid his toil thou gav'st Leander breath; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 97
 
LEANED............1
Leaned forward, with bright drooping hair, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 71
 
LEANING...........8
Over which thine eyebrows, leaning , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 7
And Archimago leaning o'er his book: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 37
The glutted Cyclops, what care? - Juliet leaning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 27
Queen Venus leaning downward open arm'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 526
Theban Amphion leaning on his lute: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1002
Leaning with parted lips, some words she spake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 47
The swan, soft leaning on her fledgy breast, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 101
Leaning , with parted lips, some words she spake The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 349
 
LEANS.............3
Of one who leans upon a closed book; Sleep and Poetry, Line 262
He leans away for highest heaven and sings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 568
Even as Hope upon her anchor leans , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 61
 
LEANT.............6
He leant , wretched. He surely cannot now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 86
Leant to each other trembling, and sat so Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 329
And on the very bark 'gainst which he leant Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 787
So on a pleasant morning, as he leant Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 177
So leant she, not so fair, upon a tusk Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 62
Where 'gainst a column he leant thoughtfully Lamia, Part I, Line 316
 
LEAP..............5
'Mongst boughs pavillion'd, where the deer's swift leap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 7
At swelling apples with a frisky leap Sleep and Poetry, Line 361
But that 'tis ever startled by the leap I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 110
Smiling in the clear well. My heart did leap Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 896
Three then with tiger leap upon him flew, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 45
 
LEAPING...........1
Or to delight thee with fantastic leaping , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 274
 
LEAPS.............4
E'en then, elate, my spirit leaps , and prances, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 6
Leaps to the honors of a tournament, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 28
Anon he leaps along the oaken floors Calidore: A Fragment, Line 71
Against the enchased crocodile, or leaps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 714
 
LEAPT.............2
His heart leapt up as to its rightful throne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 445
His voice leapt out, despite of godlike curb, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 226
 
LEAR..............1
Or rob from aged Lear his bitter teen: Imitation of Spenser, Line 22
 
LEARN.............3
And what you soon will learn , I would have turn'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
No! Do I? Surely I am still to learn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 113
Where shall I learn to get my peace again? What can I do to drive away, Line 30
 
LEARNED...........6
Sometimes the learned eremite, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 93
This learned doctor will agree with me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 29
Of love deep learned to the red heart's core: Lamia, Part I, Line 190
School'd in a beckon, learned in a nudge, The Jealousies, Line 248
Eban then usher'd in the learned seer: The Jealousies, Line 334
And made him read in many a learned book, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 4
 
LEARNING..........1
(Section'd and subsection'd with learning sage,) The Jealousies, Line 97
 
LEARNT............3
Who have not learnt to be content without her; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 6
Forestall the fates; have you not learnt that yet? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 38
Lucy learnt this The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
LEAS..............1
Their golden honeycombs; our village leas Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 254
 
LEASE.............1
Why did I laugh? I know this being's lease - Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 9
 
LEASES............1
Since men knew nor rent nor leases . Robin Hood, Line 10
 
LEASH.............2
Of the Fancy's silken leash ; Fancy, Line 90
Is no more valid than a silken leash Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 99
 
LEAST.............16
At least for ever, evermore, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 39
And where we think the truth least understood, Addressed to Haydon, Line 5
If I do fall, at least I will be laid Sleep and Poetry, Line 277
written with the least atom of purpose to forestall criticisms of course, but Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Eyed them with joy from greatest to the least , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 194
Its heavy pressure, and will press at least Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 770
And at the least 'twill startle off her cares." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 40
This corner holds at least a score, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 92
I have, by many yards at least , been carding Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 3
At least , unhappy Prince, I may be free- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 77
At least for me,- so sweet as drowsy noons, Ode on Indolence, Line 36
While I, least guilty, am an outcast still, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 84
From the least watch upon him; if he speaks Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 16
Ah! keep that hand unravished at the least ; To Fanny, Line 19
Of the least drop of creme de citron crystal clear." The Jealousies, Line 369
When the time comes, don't feel the least alarm; The Jealousies, Line 520
 
LEAV'D............4
Where the dark- leav'd laburnum's drooping clusters To George Felton Mathew, Line 41
Broad leav'd are they and their white canopies Calidore: A Fragment, Line 22
Hour after hour, to each lush- leav'd rill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 52
Full leav'd , the forest had outstript, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 45
 
LEAVE.............50
Give thy kings law - leave not uncurbed the great; On Peace, Line 13
And leave once more the ravish'd heavens in peace. Ode to Apollo, Line 23
Yet these I leave as thoughtless as a lark; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 23
Which seem'd full loath this happy world to leave : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 4
The silver clouds, far - far away to leave Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 4
"What though I leave this dull, and earthly mould, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 71
I leave them as a father does his son. Sleep and Poetry, Line 404
punishment: but no feeling man will be forward to inflict it: he will leave me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Then leave the naked brain: be still the leaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 296
Most like a sojourning demi-god, and leave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 724
Here must we leave thee." - At these words up flew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 579
Full well I feel thou wouldst not leave me. Still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 751
And leave a black memorial on the sand? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 262
And thought to leave her far away behind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 175
And so leave her, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 180
I thought to leave thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 282
Leave to an after time Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 25
Leave melodizing on this wintry day, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 3
O leave the palm to wither by itself; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 449
I leave withouten wordes mo All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 55
Aye, if a madman could have leave to pass a healthful day, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 25
So for ever will I leave Not Aladdin magian, Line 47
Why would you leave me, sweet bird, why? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 6
Or may I never leave my grave among the dead." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 180
Oh leave me not in this eternal woe, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 314
Porphyro will leave me here to fade and pine.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 329
Am I to leave this haven of my rest, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 235
Leave the dinn'd air vibrating silverly. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 128
O leave them, Muse! O leave them to their woes; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 3
O leave them, Muse! O leave them to their woes; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 3
Leave them, O Muse! for thou anon wilt find Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 7
Or liker still to one who should take leave Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 127
Shall we leave these and go seek Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 68
That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 19
Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 15
To steal away, and leave without a task Ode on Indolence, Line 14
O, why did ye not melt, and leave my sense Ode on Indolence, Line 19
Still give me leave to wonder that the Prince Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 2
I leave it all to fate - to any thing! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 2
By the dark roots, and leave her palpable, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 138
I leave you to the desert of the world Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 230
I leave you to your thoughts. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 73b
Delicate, godlike, magic! must I leave Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 84
Will leave this busy castle. You had best Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 172
Leave traces in the grass and flowers sweet; Lamia, Part I, Line 97
And will you leave me on the hills alone? Lamia, Part I, Line 245
" Leave thee alone! Look back! Ah, Goddess, see Lamia, Part I, Line 257
'Twould humour many a heart to leave them thus, Lamia, Part I, Line 396
But let us leave this idle tittle tattle The Jealousies, Line 118
" Leave her to me," rejoin'd the magian: The Jealousies, Line 532
 
LEAVED............6
Their scantly leaved , and finely tapering stems, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 5
Broad leaved fig trees even now foredoom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 252
Beside a crumple- leaved tale of love; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 37
Studied from that old spirit- leaved book Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 133
The open casement press'd a new- leaved vine, Ode on Indolence, Line 47
And legend- leaved book, mysterious to behold. The Jealousies, Line 513
 
LEAVEN............1
Then leave the naked brain: be still the leaven , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 296
 
LEAVES............65
As the leaves of hellebore Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 15
Large dock leaves , spiral foxgloves, or the glow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 49
All the green leaves that round the window clamber, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 136
The songs of birds - the whisp'ring of the leaves - How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 10
Or of the dead leaves rustling drearily, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 6
About the leaves , and flowers - about the playing Sleep and Poetry, Line 66
Of vine leaves . Then there rose to view a fane Sleep and Poetry, Line 363
A little noiseless noise among the leaves , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 11
And as she leaves me may she often turn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 105
Mingler with leaves , and dew and tumbling streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 119
Like rose- leaves with the drip of summer rains. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 8
And calmest thoughts come round us - as, of leaves After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 9
Apollo's very leaves - woven to bless To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 7
Where robins hop, and fallen leaves are sere. On The Story of Rimini, Line 14
Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound. On the Sea, Line 4
To light-hung leaves , in smoothest echoes breaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 119
And think of yellow leaves , of owlet's cry, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 182
Bay leaves were crackling in the fragrant pile, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 228
With leaves about their brows! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 292
And with the balmiest leaves his temples bind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 382
On her own couch, new made of flower leaves , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 438
Among sere leaves and twigs, might all be heard. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 452
The rather for the sun unwilling leaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 547
And cloister'd among cool and bunched leaves - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 829
With leaves stuck in them; and the Neptune be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 883
Dew-drops, and dewy buds, and leaves , and flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 900
To margin sallows, were the leaves he spied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 341
Of velvet leaves and bugle-blooms divine; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 414
A rustling noise of leaves , and out there flutter'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 496
Himself on wither'd leaves , even as though Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 565
So thick with leaves and mosses, that they seem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 666
Thy shepherd vest, and woo thee mid fresh leaves . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 700
With fingers cool as aspen leaves . Sweet love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 804
Her voice I hung like fruit among green leaves : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 271
Made of rose leaves and thistledown, express, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 571
Parted its dripping leaves with eager care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 678
These minced leaves on me, and passing through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 769
Of light, soft, unseen leaves of sounds divine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 800
Joyous, and many as the leaves in spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 839
Fresh crush of leaves . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 937a
Crown'd with green leaves , and faces all on flame; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 201
Would hide us up, although spring leaves were none; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 672
Por'd on its hazle cirque of shedded leaves . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 769
His eyes from the dead leaves , or one small pulse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 781
On the damp grass myriads of lingering leaves , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 934
And leaves a gulf austere God of the meridian, Line 7
Of the leaves of many years: Robin Hood, Line 5
I've gathered young spring- leaves , and flowers gay Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 100
Of death among the bushes and the leaves , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 253
Their leaves and prickly nuts; a sheep-fold bleat Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 301
The fallen leaves , when I have sat alone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 54
Of leaves and trembled blossoms, where there ran Ode to Psyche, Line 11
Who vexes all the leaves of his life's book, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 3
But the rose leaves herself upon the briar, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 9
Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 12
What thou among the leaves hast never known, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 22
Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 47
Your leaves , nor ever bid the spring adieu; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 22
That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloy'd, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 29
The leaves of willow and of adder's tongue; Lamia, Part II, Line 224
Thy hour glass, if these gummed leaves be burnt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 116
Prodigious seem'd the toil; the leaves were yet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 121
As the moist scent of flowers, and grass, and leaves The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 404
With leaves all hush'd: his awful presence there The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 448
White Provence rose- leaves with her faery tears, The Jealousies, Line 83
 
LEAVEST...........1
Yet ere thou leavest me in utter woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 586
 
LEAVING...........13
Leaving , in naked comeliness, unshaded, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 615
Though now 'tis tatter'd; leaving my bark bar'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 773
Leaving us fancy-sick. No, no, I'm sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 853
Leaving a trickling dew. At last they shot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 922
Leaving old Sleep within his vapoury lair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 483
Leaving great verse unto a little clan? Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 8
At sweet life leaving , and these arbours green,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 17
Hyperion, leaving twilight in the rear, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 203
Each like a dove leaving its olive perch, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 286
Leaving your cares to one whose diligence Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 79
Leaving no drop in the bewildering cup, Lamia, Part I, Line 252
Of painful blindness; leaving thee forlorn, Lamia, Part II, Line 282
Hyperion, leaving twilight in the rear, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 47
 
LEAVY.............1
Or by the bowery clefts, and leavy shelves, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 21
 
LEBANON...........1
From silken Samarcand to cedar'd Lebanon . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 270
 
LED...............11
Of the aspiring boy; who as he led Calidore: A Fragment, Line 128
She led him, like some midnight spirit nurse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 413
Had not a heavenly guide benignant led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 377
A youth, by heavenly power lov'd and led , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 708
They led on first, bent to her meek surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 810
Since to a woe like this I have been led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 90
Hath led thee to this Cave of Quietude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 548
She turn'd, and down the aged gossip led The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 195
She dwelt but half retir'd, and there had led Lamia, Part I, Line 312
And you forgive me." Lycius blush'd, and led Lamia, Part II, Line 169
For I will never by mean hands be led King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 46
 
LEDA'S............2
Than Leda's love, and cresses from the rill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 158
With down from Leda's cygnet progeny: Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 66
 
LEDDEST...........1
Thou leddest Orpheus through the gleams of death; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 98
 
LEDGER............1
How was it these same ledger -men could spy Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 137
 
LEES..............4
When butts of wine are drunk off to the lees ? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 36
Once spiritual, are like muddy lees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 906
Ebb spouting to the lees ;- if I pledge not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 50
Bloom'd, and gave up her honey to the lees . Lamia, Part I, Line 143
 
LEFT..............61
And cruelly left him to sorrow, and anguish. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 28
Who have left streaks of light athwart their ages: To George Felton Mathew, Line 60
Lays have I left of such a dear delight To My Brother George (epistle), Line 81
From off her brow, and left her all alone. Sleep and Poetry, Line 384
By infant hands, left on the path to die. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 46
But there are left delights as high as these, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 9
I've left my little queen, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 2
Brighter has it left thine eyes Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 13
And in his left he held a basket full Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 155
Soon, as it seem'd, we left our journeying high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 647
Left his young cheek; and how he used to stray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 728
Left by men-slugs and human serpentry, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 821
When love-lorn hours had left me less a child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 885
With the conquering sun of spring, and left the skies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 921
And golden keel'd, is left unlaunch'd and dry. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 21
And left him once again in twilight lone. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 587
Without an echo? Then shall I be left Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 684
That there is no old power left to steep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 731
Her gentle limbs, and left the youth asleep.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 852
He had left thinking of the mystery,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 930
Left sudden by a dallying breath of air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 117
And left me tossing safely. But the crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 352
Left me dead-drifting to that fatal power. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 417
"One morn she left me sleeping: half awake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 477
I left poor Scylla in a niche and fled. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 635
The nymph arose: he left them to their joy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 782
His left sat smiling Beauty's paragon. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 865
Why have ye left your bowers desolate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 220
Why have ye left your forest haunts, why left Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 230
Why have ye left your forest haunts, why left Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 230
' For wine, for wine we left our kernel tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 232
For wine we left our heath, and yellow brooms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 233
Had he left more forlorn; for the first time, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 373
Are empty left ? Who, who away would be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 565
Left thee so quiet on this bed of dew? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 624
For he left the merry tale Robin Hood, Line 31
And the clothes left in the wet, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 7
Than with these horrid moods be left in lurch. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 109
The Spirit mourn'd "Adieu!"- dissolv'd, and left Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 321
And when she left , she hurried back, as swift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 469
And so left Florence in a moment's space, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 478
Left my soft cushion chair and caudle pot? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 16
Ye have left your souls on earth! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 2
And the souls ye left behind you Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 25
Ye have left your souls on earth! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 38
Until the dusk eve left her dark The Eve of St. Mark, Line 51
Till his girths burst and left him naked stark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 86
Away from my own bosom: I have left Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 113
Of all my lucent empire? It is left Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 239
Left murmuring, what deepest thought can tell? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 246
Together had he left his mother fair Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 31
And left him space for wonder. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 23a
The ever-smitten Hermes empty left Lamia, Part I, Line 7
Left to herself, the serpent now began Lamia, Part I, Line 146
Nothing but pain and ugliness were left . Lamia, Part I, Line 164
But left a thought, a buzzing in his head. Lamia, Part II, Line 29
Had not a friend. So being left alone, Lamia, Part II, Line 111
Is Saturn's; I, Moneta, left supreme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 226
Moan, brethren, moan; for I have no strength left , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 427
From the left pocket of his threadbare hose, The Jealousies, Line 439
Left it to pay the piper - a good sum- The Jealousies, Line 696
 
LEG...............1
Then each on a leg or thigh fastens. The Gothic looks solemn, Line 18
 
LEG'S.............1
There lies beneath my east leg's northern heel Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 54
 
LEGACY............1
Pray what demesne? Whose lordship's legacy ? Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 6
 
LEGEND............7
Whose tips are glowing hot. The legend cheers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 841
Upon the legend of St. Mark. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 52
Untir'd she read the legend page The Eve of St. Mark, Line 89
What leaf-fring'd legend haunts about thy shape Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 5
Though it blows legend -laden through the trees. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 6
And legend -leaved book, mysterious to behold. The Jealousies, Line 513
And into many a lively legend look; In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 5
 
LEGENDS...........3
And Madeline asleep in lap of legends old. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 135
Not in the legends of the first of days, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 132
Names, deeds, gray legends , dire events, rebellions, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 114
 
LEGGED............1
Which way the tender- legged linnet hops. This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 8
 
LEGION'D..........3
Like legion'd soldiers. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 43a
Has legion'd all his battle; and behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 729
While legion'd fairies pac'd the coverlet, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 168
 
LEGIONS...........2
Then, father, I will lead your legions forth, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 161
Legions of holiday; bright standards waved, The Jealousies, Line 733
 
LEGLESS...........1
And legless birds of paradise, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 80
 
LEGS..............3
May have crumpt up a pair of Dian's legs , Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 9
With three legs all her store? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 10
Caught up his little legs , and, in a fret, The Jealousies, Line 201
 
LEISURE...........4
To possess but a span of the hour of leisure , To Some Ladies, Line 27
In milky nest, and sip them off at leisure . To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 10
How sickening, how dark the dreadful leisure Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 910
"If ever you have leisure , sire, you shall The Jealousies, Line 561
 
LEISURELY.........1
And paces leisurely down amber plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 551
 
LEMANS............1
Ne with sly lemans in the scorner's chair; Character of C.B., Line 15
 
LEND..............3
'Mid contradictions her delights to lend . To George Felton Mathew, Line 34
Yet this is vain - O Mathew, lend thy aid To George Felton Mathew, Line 53
Lend thine ear, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 17
 
LENGTH............7
From a sick dove. At length , to break the pause, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 720
No, no, that horror cannot be - for at the cable's length There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 39
At length burst in the argent revelry, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 37
At length her constant eyelids come The Eve of St. Mark, Line 115
Until at length old Saturn lifted up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 89
Squeez'd from the gorge, and all its uncurl'd length Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 46
Her arms as one who prophesied.- At length Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 134
 
LENGTHEN..........1
To serve our joys, would lengthen and dilate. To J.R., Line 8
 
LENGTHENED........2
Old ocean rolls a lengthened wave to the shore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 348
Medicined death to a lengthened drowsiness: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 484
 
LENIENT...........1
A lenient banishment; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 82b
 
LEOPARD...........1
Onward the tiger and the leopard pants, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 241
 
LEOPARDS..........1
He had not with his tamed leopards play'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 794
 
LESS..............23
O'ershading sorrow doth not make thee less To Lord Byron, Line 6
Had been less heartfelt by him than the clang Calidore: A Fragment, Line 75
That nought less sweet might call my thoughts away, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 94
I mount for ever - not an atom less To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 3
My sayings will the less obscured seem, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 858
When love-lorn hours had left me less a child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 885
Goddess! I love thee not the less : from thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 92
Beyond the tall tree tops; and in less time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 332
The greater on the less feeds evermore:- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 95
Was not embalm'd, this truth is not the less - Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 102
For less than a nothing the jealous can hear. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 8
Hurry along to some less magic shade. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 8
Misers of sound and syllable, no less If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 10
Benumb'd my eyes; my pulse grew less and less; Ode on Indolence, Line 17
Benumb'd my eyes; my pulse grew less and less ; Ode on Indolence, Line 17
From no less man than Otho, who has sent Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 135
You not less a perplexing noble father. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 113
I not less . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 49b
More calm; his features are less wild and flush'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 47
And thou art here, for thou art less than they. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 166
"The sacrifice is done, but not the less The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 241
Show him a garden, and with speed no less , The Jealousies, Line 57
Tremble and quake to death,- he feared less The Jealousies, Line 340
 
LESSON............2
Read me a lesson , Muse, and speak it loud Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 1
A wondrous lesson in thy silent face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 112
 
LEST..............4
Made fiercer by a fear lest any part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 845
Lest I should miss to bid thee a good morrow: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 202
Lest our rent banners, too o' the sudden shown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
Lest she should vanish ere his lip had paid Lamia, Part I, Line 254
 
LET'S.............1
Open the door; let's hear if all is quiet. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 35
 
LETHARGY..........1
Affright this lethargy ! I cannot quell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 769
 
LETHE.............3
One minute past, and Lethe -wards had sunk: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 4
No, no, go not to Lethe , neither twist Ode on Melancholy, Line 1
Whereat the star of Lethe not delay'd Lamia, Part I, Line 81
 
LETHE'S...........2
As e'er from Lethe's waves was quaft, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 8
Lethe's weed, and Hermes' feather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 2
 
LETHEAN...........3
Unknown, Lethean , sigh to us - O sigh! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 436
From isles Lethean , sigh to us - O sigh! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 484
Closes up, and forgets all its Lethean care, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 11
 
LETS..............3
Who lets him forth again? or dares to give Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 171
[She lets him out. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 178
But lets it sometimes pace abroad majestical, Lamia, Part II, Line 59
 
LETTER............9
Trust to my feelings, and write you a letter . To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 104
That scrawl'd black letter ; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 16
You had a letter from me touching him? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 62
Give me the letter - it should not exist! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 65
Possible! There - that letter ! Read - read it! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 54
[Gives him a letter . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.a to Line 55
And his letter . Caitiff, he shall feel- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 70
A letter by unread? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 158a
Somewhere in the column headed letter B The Jealousies, Line 101
 
LETTER'S..........1
This letter's not so soil'd but you may read it;- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 53
 
LETTERS...........2
In letters raven-sombre, you may trace Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 53
made at parting, and I will forget to send the Emperor letters Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
 
LETTING...........2
By jasper pillars, letting through their shafts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 842
Letting her absolution pass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 29
 
LEVANT............1
To land each Tuesday from the rich Levant , To J.R., Line 10
 
LEVEL.............18
Whose patient level peeps its crystal eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 871
By my diligent springs; my level lilies, shells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 115
To a sleeping lake, whose cool and level gleam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 833
Turn to some level plain where haughty Mars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 728
And on those pinions, level in mid air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 403
A pleasant summer level For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 21
The level chambers, ready with their pride, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 32
To a safe level matting. Now prepare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 196
She laid, and to the level of his ear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 46
And from the mirror'd level where he stood Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 257
Till on the level height their steps found ease: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 88
While his enkindled eyes, with level glance Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 121
High as the level of a man's breast rear'd Lamia, Part II, Line 184
He look'd and look'd again a level - No! Lamia, Part II, Line 304
At level of whose feet an altar slept, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 89
Struck from the paved level up my limbs, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 123
She laid, and to the level of his hollow ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 348
Points level to the goal of victory. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 23
 
LEVELING..........1
No leveling bluster of my licensed thoughts, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 154
 
LEVELLING.........1
Of amber 'gainst their faces levelling . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 838
 
LEVELS............1
Meantime, on shady levels , mossy fine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 312
 
LEVIATHON.........1
Of beast, behemoth, and leviathon , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 134
 
LEWD..............4
That heats the sense with lewd desiring; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 6
Ne with lewd ribbalds sat he cheek by jowl, Character of C.B., Line 14
Fire of hell! Auranthe - lewd demon! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 64
And all her populous streets and temples lewd , Lamia, Part I, Line 352
 
LIBATION..........1
The pipes go shrilly, the libation flows: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 22
 
LIBBARD'S.........1
On libbard's paws, upheld the heavy gold Lamia, Part II, Line 185
 
LIBERTAS..........3
Trac'd by thy lov'd Libertas ; he will speak, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 61
(For knightly Spenser to Libertas told it,) To My Brother George (epistle), Line 24
The wrong'd Libertas ,- who has told you stories To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 44
 
LIBERTY...........6
With England's happiness proclaim Europa's liberty . On Peace, Line 9
Great Liberty ! how great in plain attire! To Hope, Line 38
Therefrom my liberty ; thence too I've seen Sleep and Poetry, Line 292
Restraint! imprisoned liberty ! great key Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 456
To wander as she loves, in liberty . Lamia, Part I, Line 109
In my old liberty ? What can I do to drive away, Line 6
 
LIBRARIES.........1
You may have grown from convent libraries , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 2
 
LICENSED..........1
No leveling bluster of my licensed thoughts, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 154
 
LICK..............4
And roar'd for more; with many a hungry lick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 512
Nay, look not down, nor lick thy dainty wrists- To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 9
And lick the soiled grass? No, no, my friend, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 70
So, we must lick the dust? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 178a
 
LICK'D............1
Eclips'd her crescents, and lick'd up her stars: Lamia, Part I, Line 160
 
LID...............1
Hot, glaz'd, and wide, with lid -lashes all sear, Lamia, Part I, Line 151
 
LIDDED............2
And still she slept an azure- lidded sleep, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 262
Half lidded , piteous, languid, innocent; The Jealousies, Line 173
 
LIDLESS...........1
Whereat, methought, the lidless -eyed train Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 598
 
LIDS..............15
The very archings of her eye- lids charm Sleep and Poetry, Line 238
A coward, did my very eye- lids wink Sleep and Poetry, Line 299
Dry up the moisture from your golden lids , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 49
Those faery lids how sleek, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 7
Those same full fringed lids a constant blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 563
Their upper lids ?- Hist! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 66a
Their lids shut longest in a dreamless sleep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 542
And watching, with eternal lids apart, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 3
Lifted his curved lids , and kept them wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 351
Though in her lids hung the sweet tears of May; Ode on Indolence, Line 46
Those grey lids wink, and thou not know it, monk! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
Of her sick eye- lids ; that those eyes may glow Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 39
These lids , I see far fiercer brilliances,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 44
Deep blue eyes, semi-shaded in white lids , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 61
Soft mitigated by divinest lids The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 266
 
LIE...............14
In a dainty bend they lie , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 9
Could at this moment be content to lie This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 12
More did I love to lie in cavern rude, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 354
But O on the hether to lie together Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 11
The chains lie silent on the footworn stones;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 368
For every lie a lordship. Nor yet has Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 4
No. None at all. When have I said a lie ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 96
If men, in court and camp, lie not outright, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 35
Deluded monarch, 'tis a cruel lie . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 218
By blazoning a lie , which in the dawn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 142
The lie ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 89a
Lie !- but begone all ceremonious points Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 89b
And in thy teeth I give thee back the lie ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
(Now all was silent) gave a deadly lie The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 449
 
LIED..............1
"He dreams," said Hum, "or I have ever lied , The Jealousies, Line 327
 
LIEGE.............8
And be liege -lord of all the Elves and Fays, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 121
He has not yet return'd, my gracious liege . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 35
Indeed, my liege , no secret- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 66b
Nothing, my liege ; I have to hope for nothing. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 77
Good gods! not else, in any way, my liege ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 111
And I, my liege , by far. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 4b
You have heard, my liege , and so, no doubt, all here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 129
My liege , what proof should I have 'gainst a fame Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 216
 
LIEGELESS.........1
Feel curs'd and thwarted, when the liegeless air Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 92
 
LIES..............13
Wherein lies happiness? In that which becks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 777
Lies a deep hollow, from whose ragged brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 864
I told thee of, where lovely Scylla lies ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 720
There lies a den, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 512b
Unto my friend, while sick and ill he lies . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 32
And pannier'd mules for ducats and old lies - Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 134
Red-Crag, there lies beneath my farthest toe Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 48
There lies beneath my east leg's northern heel Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 54
Broad golden fringe upon the carpet lies : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 285
Their weak rebellion, winning me with lies , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 74
My safety lies , then, Sigifred, I'm safe. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 59
Unlawful magic, and enticing lies . Lamia, Part II, Line 286
Look in the Almanack - Moore never lies - The Jealousies, Line 500
 
LIEST.............1
Thou liest ! Thou, Auranthe's fool! A wittol! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
 
LIFE..............103
And the bare heath of life presents no bloom; To Hope, Line 4
Bereft of all that now my life endears? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 75
That is to crown our name when life is ended. Sleep and Poetry, Line 36
Stop and consider! life is but a day; Sleep and Poetry, Line 85
Life is the rose's hope while yet unblown; Sleep and Poetry, Line 90
A lovely tale of human life we'll read. Sleep and Poetry, Line 110
Yes, I must pass them for a nobler life , Sleep and Poetry, Line 123
And thorns of life ; forgetting the great end Sleep and Poetry, Line 245
Or June that breathes out life for butterflies? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 11
By the breath of life , Hither, hither, love, Line 10
of a man is healthy; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Eternal whispers, glooms, the birth, life , death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 234
Endymion was calm'd to life again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 464
To take in draughts of life from the gold fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 656
Of weary life ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 710a
She could as soon have crush'd away the life Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 719
And then the ballad of his sad life closes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 735
Of high and noble life with thoughts so sick? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 758
Once more been tortured with renewed life . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 919
Dearest of sisters, what my life shall be; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 982
But this is human life : the war, the deeds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 153
Each summer time to life . Lo! this is he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 478
To your dimpled arms. Once more sweet life begin!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 506
A tumult to his heart, and a new life Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 528
My breath of life , where art thou? High above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 687
Until we taste the life of love again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 772
In the very deeps of pleasure, my sole life ?"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 824
On all his life : his youth, up to the day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 887
Kissing dead things to life . The sleeping kine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 57
Who had not from mid- life to utmost age Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 228
With new-born life ! What shall I do? Where go, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 239
My life away like a vast sponge of fate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 349
Of all my life was utmost quietude: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 353
I plung'd for life or death. To interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 380
The current of my former life was stemm'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 458
I sue not for my ruddy drops of life , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 546
Its tempering coolness, to my life akin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 609
To usher back his spirit into life : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1015
Of life from charitable voice? No sweet saying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 45
That but for tears my life had fled away!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 75
The buoyant life of song can floating be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 352
My life from too thin breathing: gone and past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 650
With my own fancies garlands of sweet life , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 750
Of thee, and of thy works, and of thy life ; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 27
Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 1
Blue!- 'Tis the life of waters - Ocean, Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 5
I lead the life of a king! Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 6
Some, Titian colours touch'd into real life . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 19
So could we live long life in little space; To J.R., Line 5
While little sounds of life are round me knelling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 308
"Ha! ha!" said she, "I knew not this hard life , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 329
With death, as life . The ancient harps have said, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 396
Nurture besides, and life , from human fears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 429
Thy life is but two dead eternities, To Ailsa Rock, Line 10
Upon my life , Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 1
This crawl'd through life in feebleness, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 31
Just in its mid- life in the midst of June, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 27
At sweet life leaving, and these arbours green,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 17
The joys of all his life were said and sung: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 23
Of Sainte Markis life and dethe." The Eve of St. Mark, Line 114
Not so much life as on a summer's day Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 8
Space region'd with life -air; and barren void; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 119
Manifestations of that beauteous life Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 317
My life is but the life of winds and tides, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 341
My life is but the life of winds and tides, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 341
Scarce images of life , one here, one there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 33
The whole enormous matter into life . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 197
And thousand other signs of purer life ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 211
The watcher of thy sleep and hours of life , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 72
Die into life : so young Apollo anguish'd: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 130
Over my life ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 118a
My ring! now, on my life , it doth rejoice Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 17
Hover around that life , whose bitter days Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 33
And chains too heavy for your life ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 90b
and papers of yours I have become possessed of. His life is no Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 57
'Tis me - my life that's pleaded for! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 59a
Of an aspiring life ! My boyhood past Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 9
Too tender of my ignominious life ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 27
Were some most sensitive portion of thy life , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 93
Each one a life , that I might, every day, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 97
Is her life nothing? Her fair honour nothing? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 119
You would not hear my counsel, when his life Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 17
How shall I bear my life till Albert comes? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 91
Auranthe! My life ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 18b
Thy life answer the truth! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 127a
A long life in the foulest sink o' the world! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
Oh! for enough life to support me on Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 1
When move in a sweet body fit for life , Lamia, Part I, Line 39
The life she had so tangled in her mesh: Lamia, Part I, Line 295
Happy in beauty, life , and love, and every thing, Lamia, Part I, Line 298
Of life have I preserv'd thee to this day, Lamia, Part II, Line 297
As were his limbs of life , from that same night. Lamia, Part II, Line 308
Could so have rapt unwilling life away. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 51
When sense of life return'd, I started up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 58
The sands of thy short life are spent this hour, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 114
The lowest stair; and as it touch'd, life seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 133
Though I breathe death with them it will be life The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 209
And seeing ne'er forget. No stir of life The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 310
Where they were wreck'd and live a wretched life ; What can I do to drive away, Line 33
And which way spur for life ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 26b
So in my veins red life might stream again, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 6
Whose springs of life are all dried up and dead, The Jealousies, Line 228
 
LIFE'S............8
That well you know to honour:- " Life's very toys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 128
Life's self is nourish'd by its proper pith, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 814
Call me his queen, his second life's fair crown! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 70
They were my pleasures, they my sad life's end; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 11
But death intenser - death is life's high meed. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 14
Who vexes all the leaves of his life's book, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 3
Set my life's star! I have liv'd long enough, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
Life's purposes,- the palate of my mind I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 13
 
LIFEFUL...........2
Upon his cheek, while thus he lifeful spake. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 768
A metropolitan murmur, lifeful , warm, The Jealousies, Line 573
 
LIFELESS..........1
His features were so lifeless . Suddenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 220
 
LIFT..............12
To sooth the cares, and lift the thoughts of man. Sleep and Poetry, Line 247
Or lift me with thee to some starry sphere? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 755
And make my branches lift a golden fruit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 908
Could lift Endymion's head, or he had view'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 557
Spirits in grief, lift up your heads, and smile; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 437
Lift up your heads, sweet Spirits, heavily, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 438
Lift the latch, ah gently! ah tenderly, sweet, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 17
Lift up their heads, as still the whisper pass'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 58
Lift their eyes above the bubbles, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 36
How dar'st thou lift those beetle brows at me? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 77
And, with thine infant fingers, lift the fringe Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
Now may we lift our bruised visors up, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 1
 
LIFTED............25
Lifted up her lance on high, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 42
Had lifted Calidore for deeds of glory. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 108
The fervid choir that lifted up a noise Sleep and Poetry, Line 173
Lifted to the white clouds. Therefore should I Sleep and Poetry, Line 297
And lifted hands, and trembling lips he stood; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 196
Were lifted from the water's breast, and fann'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 114
For as he lifted up his eyes to swear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 189
She lifted up the charm: appealing groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 518
And, as he pass'd, each lifted up its head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 785
All the long day; save when he scantly lifted Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 920
To smiles and frowns; they seem a lifted mound Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 39
Lifted dry above the main, Not Aladdin magian, Line 17
She lifted up her soft warm chin, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 54
Until at length old Saturn lifted up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 89
This passion lifted him upon his feet, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 135
Lifted his curved lids, and kept them wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 351
He lifted up his stature vast, and stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 325
From your alert eyes and high- lifted brows. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 18
Lifted you from the crowd of common men Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 48
Is it for this, I now am lifted up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 20
Ravish'd, she lifted her Circean head, Lamia, Part I, Line 115
Thy hair soft- lifted by the winnowing wind; To Autumn, Line 15
Lifted his eye-brows, spurn'd the path beneath, The Jealousies, Line 273
Lifted his wings, and stood attentive-wise. The Jealousies, Line 497
He lifted a bright casket of pure gold, The Jealousies, Line 510
 
LIFTEDST..........1
Until thou liftedst up thine eyelids fine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 152
 
LIFTING...........5
Or by the moon lifting her silver rim I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 113
Of shepherds, lifting in due time aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 162
And, after lifting up his aged hands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 195
Which, lifting sweet abroad its timid green, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
Down through tress- lifting waves the Nereids fair Lamia, Part I, Line 207
 
LIFTS.............3
Lifts its sweet head into the air, and feeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 250
It lifts its little hand into the flame 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 44
When Winter lifts his voice; there is a noise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 117
 
LIGHT.............148
Whose silken fins and golden scales light Imitation of Spenser, Line 12
Upsoars, and darts into the eastern light , As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 2
I cannot your light , mazy footsteps attend; To Some Ladies, Line 2
That its mild light creates to heal again: Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 5
Light feet, dark violet eyes, and parted hair; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 15
'Mong the light skimming gondolas far parted, To George Felton Mathew, Line 15
Who have left streaks of light athwart their ages: To George Felton Mathew, Line 60
Light -footed damsels move with gentle paces Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 41
Should madly follow that bright path of light Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 60
The morn, the eve, the light , the shade, the flowers; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 67
The light dwelt o'er the scene so lingeringly. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 5
And light blue mountains: but no breathing man Calidore: A Fragment, Line 28
That on the window spreads its feathers light , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 44
Before the point of his light shallop reaches Calidore: A Fragment, Line 67
Of a light mantle; and while Clerimond Calidore: A Fragment, Line 140
When streams of light pour down the golden west, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 2
And through the light the horsemen swiftly glide, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 34
As gracefully descending, light and thin, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 49
Than if I'd brought to light a hidden treasure. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 116
So silently, it seems a beam of light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 4
To see high, golden corn wave in the light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 92
Of lovely Laura in her light green dress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 13
Light hoverer around our happy pillows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 13
Perhaps to see shapes of light , aerial lymning, Sleep and Poetry, Line 33
The light uplifting of a maiden's veil; Sleep and Poetry, Line 92
Into the light of heaven, and in their stead Sleep and Poetry, Line 156
Paw up against the light , and do strange deeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 166
Of light is poesy; 'tis the supreme of power; Sleep and Poetry, Line 236
In the very fane, the light of Poesy: Sleep and Poetry, Line 276
Within my breast; so that the morning light Sleep and Poetry, Line 399
I gazed awhile, and felt as light , and free I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 23
Had played upon my heels: I was light -hearted, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 25
That with a score of light green brethren shoots I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 39
Than the light music of her nimble toes I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 97
Coming into the blue with all her light . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 115
But the fair paradise of Nature's light ? I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 126
Deaf to light Zephyrus it would not move; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 175
The light of thy story? God of the golden bow, Line 10
Down-looking - aye, and with a chastened light On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 2
Haunt us till they become a cheering light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 30
And so the dawned light in pomp receive. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 94
To light -hung leaves, in smoothest echoes breaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 119
Might mark a lynx's eye, there glimmered light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 123
Of mingled wine, out-sparkling generous light ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 154
'Neath smothering parsley, and a hazy light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 230
Which gaining presently, she steered light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 429
Down in the blue-bells, or a wren light rustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 451
Of colours, wings, and bursts of spangly light ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 569
Were full of pestilent light ; our taintless rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 694
A tinting of its quality: how light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 754
Of light , and that is love: its influence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 807
No sighs but sigh-warm kisses or light noise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 967
Saving, perhaps, some snow- light cadences Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 79
A virgin light to the deep; my grotto-sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 113
Glance but one little beam of temper'd light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 172
To dive into the deepest. Dark, nor light , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 221
And, just beyond, on light tiptoe divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 261
O let me 'noint them with the heaven's light ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 324
So saw he panting light , and towards it went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 383
Full of light , incense, tender minstrelsy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 390
Of knee from knee, nor ankles pointing light ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 401
There darts strange light of varied hues and dyes: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 541
Into the bloom of heaven: other light , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 909
There was a cooler light ; and so he kept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1019
Ah! surely that light peeps from Vesper's eye, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 78
In light , in gloom, in star or blazing sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 95
Poor Cynthia greeted him, and sooth'd her light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 104
Just when the light of morn, with hum of bees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 419
It ceased - I caught light footsteps; and anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 423
And scatter'd in his face some fragments light . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 774
Of light , soft, unseen leaves of sounds divine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 800
A light as of four sunsets, blazing forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 877
Gulphs in the morning light , and scuds along Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 956
Our spirits, fann'd away by thy light pinions. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 982
Dear unseen light in darkness! eclipser Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 986
Of light in light! delicious poisoner! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 987
Of light in light ! delicious poisoner! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 987
Written in star- light on the dark above: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1021
Seems to give forth its light in very scorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 24
The light - the dusk - the dark - till break of day!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 136
To give the glow-worm light ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 155
"And as I sat, over the light blue hills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 193
He with his wand light touch'd, and heavenward Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 336
Dusk for our loves, yet light enough to grace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 676
To Flora, and a nightingale shall light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 706
And that affectionate light , those diamond things, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 717
Nor could an arrow light , or javelin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 795
A hymning up to Cynthia, queen of light ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 828
Myself to things of light from infancy; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 958
Light , as reflected from a silver flame: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 983
Or the seven stars to light you, Robin Hood, Line 21
But I behold thine eyes' well-memoried light ; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 6
O thou whose only book has been the light O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 5
And from them comes a silver flash of light Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 51
He with light steps went up a western hill, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 79
Or the light whisper of her footstep soft; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 196
From the poor girl by magic of their light , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 291
And make a pale light in your cypress glooms, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 439
Aye on the shores of darkness there is light , To Homer, Line 9
An' light as feather. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 40
My head is light with pledging a great soul, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 6
Light hether-bells may tremble then, but they are far away; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 13
Listen, stars' light , listen, listen, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 24
Though your feet are more light than a fairy's feet, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 5
No light in the darkness, no torch in the gloom, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 15
With silver taper's light , and pious care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 194
Filling the chilly room with perfume light .- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 275
As Hermes once took to his feathers light , As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 1
Its light balloons into the summer air; Character of C.B., Line 5
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 9
Upon all space: space starr'd, and lorn of light ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 118
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 219
This calm luxuriance of blissful light , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 237
It was a den where no insulting light Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 5
Light , the first fruits of that intestine broil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 192
And with it Light , and Light, engendering Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 195
And with it Light, and Light , engendering Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 195
And in each face he saw a gleam of light , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 352
Now saw the light and made it terrible. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 366
And many hid their faces from the light : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 381
Trembling with light upon Mnemosyne. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 123
Her hair was long, her foot was light , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 15
Fragrant air! Delicious light ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 2
Our gloom-pleas'd eyes, embower'd from the light , Sonnet to Sleep, Line 3
That thou, light -winged Dryad of the trees, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 7
But here there is no light , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 38
This coming night of banquets must not light Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 46
With wooing light upon me, ere the morn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
Loop'd up with cords of twisted wreathed light , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 38
From high Olympus had he stolen light , Lamia, Part I, Line 9
"Fair Hermes, crown'd with feathers, fluttering light , Lamia, Part I, Line 68
Light flew his earnest words, among the blossoms blown. Lamia, Part I, Line 91
Companion'd or alone; while many a light Lamia, Part I, Line 357
From fifty censers their light voyage took Lamia, Part II, Line 180
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies; To Autumn, Line 29
Like floral-censers swinging light in air; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 27
They held me back, with a benignant light , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 265
To her cold lips, and fill with such a light The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 280
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 313
Still suck their fill of light from sun and moon, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 421
Thither we tend."- Now in clear light I stood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 49
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 55
Warm breath, light whisper, tender semi-tone, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 3
Say they are gone,- with the new dawning light What can I do to drive away, Line 46
Light flags stream out like gauzy tongues of fire; The Jealousies, Line 572
In silken tents, and 'mid light fragrance dozed, The Jealousies, Line 692
At five the golden light began to spring, The Jealousies, Line 716
'Slant to a light Ionic portico, The Jealousies, Line 749
 
LIGHTED...........3
The stranger lighted from his steed, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 1
And lighted graceful on the window-sill; The Jealousies, Line 605
Lighted our torches, and kept up a shout, The Jealousies, Line 682
 
LIGHTENING........1
Three rows of oars are lightening moment-whiles Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 57
 
LIGHTER...........1
Tinder's a lighter article,- nitre pure The Jealousies, Line 294
 
LIGHTING..........1
Then, lighting on the printless verdure, turn'd Lamia, Part I, Line 131
 
LIGHTLY...........10
And in the last sun-beam the sylph lightly swims. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 8
Of thine ankle lightly turn'd: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 25
Nature's clear beauty, could pass lightly by Calidore: A Fragment, Line 30
And now the numerous tramplings quiver lightly Sleep and Poetry, Line 129
Blue hare-bells lightly , and where prickly furze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 202
And soon it lightly dipt, and rose, and sank, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 425
Lightly this little herald flew aloft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 64
He forthright pass'd, and lightly treading went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 431
A full-brimm'd goblet, dances lightly , sings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 416
Tripp'd lightly on, in sort of deathful glee; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 945
 
LIGHTNESS.........2
In the very fane of lightness . Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 6
Heart's lightness from the merriment of May?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 166
 
LIGHTNING.........15
On the far depth where sheeted lightning plays; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 6
And what we, ignorantly, sheet- lightning call, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 29
It seems an angry lightning , and doth hiss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 233
No sight can bear the lightning of his bow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 538
A vivid lightning from that dreadful bow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 584
Swifter than lightning went these wonders rare; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 621
Their savage eyes with unaccustomed lightning . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 90
On forked lightning , to the deepest deep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 248
How lightning -swift the change! a youthful wight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 775
There is no lightning , no authentic dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 78
To deal heaven's lightning . O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 72
And thy sharp lightning in unpractised hands Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 62
To summon harmful lightning , and make yawn Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 83
And thy sharp lightning in unpracticed hands The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 364
Goes off like lightning ,- grains of paradise The Jealousies, Line 295
 
LIGHTNINGS........1
Sweet-shaped lightnings from the nadir deep Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 276
 
LIGHTS............3
Like the northern lights on snow. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 60
A cloud across the moon,- the lights bring in! Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 46
'Tis late; the lights of festival are ever Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 49
 
LIKER.............1
Or liker still to one who should take leave Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 127
 
LIKES.............1
Then, if she likes it, she will follow you. On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 14
 
LIKING............1
Not liking in her heart an hour-long pinch, The Jealousies, Line 71


Published @ RC

March 2005