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Keats Concordance
 
LILIES............6
Wild thyme, and valley- lilies whiter still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 157
'Mong lilies , like the youngest of the brood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 100
By my diligent springs; my level lilies , shells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 115
And of thy lilies , that do paler grow Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 149
White-plum'd lilies , and the first Fancy, Line 49
Full ankle-deep in lilies of the vale. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 35
 
LILLIES...........2
Like twin water lillies , born Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 33
And glides into a bed of water lillies : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 21
 
LILLY.............1
Peel'd the brown hazel twig to lilly white, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 42
 
LILLY'S...........1
Like the gentle lilly's blooms Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 54
 
LILY..............19
For there the lily , and the musk-rose, sighing, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 89
Four lily stalks did their white honours wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 408
To linger on her lily shoulders, warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 946
With lily shells, and pebbles milky white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 103
Upon some breast more lily -feminine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 577
How dying I shall kiss that lily hand.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 118
Brimming the water- lily cups with tears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 186
My river- lily bud! one human kiss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 664
And so thou shalt! and by the lily truth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 980
He seiz'd my lady's lily hand, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 3
Like to a native lily of the dell: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 366
This lily colour'd skull, with all O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 55
And couch supine their beauties, lily white; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 52
I see a lily on thy brow La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 9
Of the world's herbal, this fair lily blanch'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 123
Cut off these curls, and brand this lily hand, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 95
That from a whiteness, as the lily clear, Lamia, Part I, Line 24
The lily and the snow; and beyond these The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 262
A temperate lily , temperate as fair; To Fanny, Line 30
 
LIM'D.............1
The bird- lim'd raven? She shall croak to death! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 107
 
LIMA..............1
Call'd doves of Siam, Lima mice, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 79
 
LIMB..............1
Go,- I fear thee! I tremble every limb , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 3
 
LIMB'D............1
With large limb'd visions. More I scrutinized: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 445
 
LIMBO.............1
The limbo of a wanton. This the end Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 8
 
LIMBS.............22
When they have tired their gentle limbs with play, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 84
Cherishingly Diana's timorous limbs ;- Sleep and Poetry, Line 373
Her naked limbs among the alders green; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 513
His limbs are loos'd, and eager, on he hies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 67
His weary limbs , bathing an hour's space, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 836
Her gentle limbs , and left the youth asleep.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 852
And float my brittle limbs o'er polar seas? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 260
And buoyant round my limbs . At first I dwelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 384
Were her fair limbs , and like a common weed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 624
Met palsy half way: soon these limbs became Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 637
With all her limbs on tremble, and her eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 103
Those gentle limbs on mossy bed reclin'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 677
Pale limbs at bottom of a crystal well; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 364
Her soothed limbs , and soul fatigued away; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 238
Their clenched teeth still clench'd, and all their limbs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 24
Until a melancholy numbs my limbs ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 89
All the immortal fairness of his limbs ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 125
Apollo shriek'd; and lo! from all his limbs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 135
As were his limbs of life, from that same night. Lamia, Part II, Line 308
Struck from the paved level up my limbs , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 123
His limbs upon a sofa, full of spleen, The Jealousies, Line 134
And did refit his limbs as heretofore, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 3
 
LIME..............2
Grateful the incense from the lime -tree flower; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 155
Pines, and lime -trees full in bloom, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 32
 
LIMED.............1
Than thus fast limed in a cursed snare, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 7
 
LIMES.............1
A scent of violets, and blossoming limes , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 667
 
LIMIT.............1
If impious prince no bound or limit kept, The Jealousies, Line 13
 
LIMITS............1
Define their pettish limits , and estrange Lamia, Part I, Line 193
 
LIMP'D............1
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 3
 
LIN'D.............1
Why were they proud? Because red- lin'd accounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 125
 
LINCOLN...........2
Honour to the Lincoln green! Robin Hood, Line 53
From the throng'd towers of Lincoln hath look'd down, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 21
 
LINE..............9
Why I have never penn'd a line to thee: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 22
Let me write down a line of glorious tone, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 11
In the calm grandeur of a sober line , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 127
Each Atlas- line bore off!- a shine of hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 685
One step? Imagine further, line by line, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 733
One step? Imagine further, line by line , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 733
The little prologue to a line of kings. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
Mulciber's columns gleam in far piazzian line . Lamia, Part I, Line 212
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line , Lamia, Part II, Line 235
 
LINEAGE...........2
Couldst thou wish for lineage higher Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 37
Against his lineage : not one breast affords The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 88
 
LINEAL............1
As a real woman, lineal indeed Lamia, Part I, Line 332
 
LINEAMENT.........2
Blush joyous blood through every lineament , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 28
With head inclined, each dusky lineament The Jealousies, Line 264
 
LINED.............2
To musty laws lined out with wretched rule Sleep and Poetry, Line 195
That purple- lined palace of sweet sin, Lamia, Part II, Line 31
 
LINEN.............3
In blanched linen , smooth, and lavender'd, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 263
So white the linen ; so, in some, distinct The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 76
Mov'd the thin linen folds that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 196
 
LINENS............1
Then the tall shade in drooping linens veil'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 216
 
LINES.............9
Of scribbling lines for you. These things I thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 121
And so I did. When many lines I'd written, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 101
These lines ; and howsoever they be done, Sleep and Poetry, Line 403
The honied lines do freshly interlace, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 2
With all its lines abrupt and angular: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 228
Of gold, and lines of Naiads' long bright tress. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 709
Take refuge.- Of bad lines a centaine dose Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 112
Command an escort to the Friedburg lines . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 150
Along the forest side! Now amber lines The Jealousies, Line 557
 
LINGER............12
Why linger you so, the wild labyrinth strolling? To Some Ladies, Line 9
Which linger yet about lone gothic arches, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 33
Linger awhile upon some bending planks I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 61
Who loves to linger with that brightest one On The Story of Rimini, Line 5
Again I'll linger in a sloping mead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 484
To linger on her lily shoulders, warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 946
One hour doth linger weeping, for the pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 518
Why linger at the yawning tomb so long? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 386
O Melancholy, linger here awhile! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 433
Wife! Why dost linger on that syllable, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
Nay, linger not; make no resistance, sweet;- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 57
By the wayside to linger , we shall see; Lamia, Part I, Line 201
 
LINGER'D..........1
She linger'd still. Meantime, across the moors, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 74
 
LINGERED..........1
That lingered in the air like dying rolls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 309
 
LINGERING.........4
And a whole age of lingering moments crept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 915
On the damp grass myriads of lingering leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 934
That, lingering along a pebbled coast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 301
Were lingering in the heavens, while the thrush Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 37
 
LINGERINGLY.......2
The light dwelt o'er the scene so lingeringly . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 5
Yet lingeringly did the sad Ape forth draw When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 67
 
LINGERS...........1
In which a trembling diamond never lingers . To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 20
 
LINING............1
Whose linsey-wolsey lining hangs all slack, The Jealousies, Line 229
 
LINK..............2
No more will I count over, link by link, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 978
No more will I count over, link by link , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 978
 
LINK'D............2
O let me pluck it for thee.' Thus she link'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 443
And link'd to a dreaming fancy. What do we here? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 4
 
LINNEN............1
Though the linnen then that will be 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 20
 
LINNET............3
A linnet starting all about the bushes: Sleep and Poetry, Line 342
Which way the tender-legged linnet hops. This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 8
The chuckling linnet its five young unborn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 256
 
LINNET'S..........1
O let me once more hear the linnet's note! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 322
 
LINNETS'..........1
And th' half seen mossiness of linnets' nests. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 22
 
LINSEY............1
Whose linsey -wolsey lining hangs all slack, The Jealousies, Line 229
 
LINTEL............1
Above the lintel of their chamber door, Lamia, Part II, Line 14
 
LINY..............1
Of liny marble, and thereto a train Sleep and Poetry, Line 364
 
LION..............10
A lion into growling, loth retire- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 536
Its beams against the zodiac- lion cast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 553
Castor has tamed the planet Lion , see! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 591
The winged Lion of St. Mark, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 35
Now tiger-passion'd, lion -thoughted, wroth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 68
For when the conquer'd lion is once dungeoned, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 170
An old lion sugar-cates of mild reprieve? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 172
So act the lion with this silly gnat? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 223
Otho calls me his lion ,- should I blush Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 42
What weapon has the lion but himself? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 21
 
LION'S............3
Often with more than tortured lion's groan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 861
The Lion's mane's on end: the Bear how fierce! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 596
The lion's roaring, and can tell Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 11
 
LIONS.............3
With turrets crown'd. Four maned lions hale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 643
Where lions tug adverse, if love grow not Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 100
The strength of twenty lions 'gainst a lamb! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 59
 
LIONS'............1
"Mounted on panthers' furs and lions' manes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 251
 
LIP...............7
A lurking trouble in his nether lip , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 179
Lay a lost thing upon her paly lip , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 341
Her very cheek against my crowned lip , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 662
Thou dost bless every where, with silver lip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 56
She kiss'd it with a lip more chill than stone, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 371
Whose lip mature is ever new? Fancy, Line 71
Lest she should vanish ere his lip had paid Lamia, Part I, Line 254
 
LIPP'D............8
The sweet- lipp'd ladies have already greeted Calidore: A Fragment, Line 135
Most fondly lipp'd , and then these accents came: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 964
Disparts a dew- lipp'd rose. Above his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 407
Aye, 'bove the withering of old- lipp'd Fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 29
Autumn's red- lipp'd fruitage too, Fancy, Line 13
Cold as a bubbling well; let faint- lipp'd shells, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 19
"Thou smooth- lipp'd serpent, surely high inspired! Lamia, Part I, Line 83
A virgin purest lipp'd , yet in the lore Lamia, Part I, Line 189
 
LIPS..............83
While from their master's lips pour forth the inspiring words. Ode to Apollo, Line 29
Whose lips have trembled with a maiden's eyes. Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 8
With lips that tremble, and with glistening eye, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 91
Haply 'tis when thy ruby lips part sweetly, To G.A.W., Line 9
As hard as lips can make it: till agreed, Sleep and Poetry, Line 109
Watch her half-smiling lips , and downward look; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 102
What Psyche felt, and Love, when their full lips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 143
Circling from three sweet pair of lips in mirth; To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 4
Nigh swooning, he doth purse his weary lips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 10
Those lips how moist - they speak, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 8
You say you love; but then your lips You say you love; but with a voice, Line 11
Can make their lying lips turn pale of hue, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 13
Her lips with music for the welcoming. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 377
Peona's busy hand against his lips , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 444
With such a paradise of lips and eyes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 618
And soothe thy lips : hist, when the airy stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 783
And lifted hands, and trembling lips he stood; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 196
Of diverse passion; when her lips and eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 468
Two bubbling springs of talk from their sweet lips . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 738
Those lips , O slippery blisses, twinkling eyes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 758
My lips to thine, that they may richly feast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 771
Between her luscious lips and eyelids thin. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 942
Till round his wither'd lips had gone a smile. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 225
Her lips were all my own, and - ah, ripe sheaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 272
These uttering lips , while I in calm speech tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 475
I sought for her smooth arms and lips , to slake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 478
Such ranges of white feet, and patient lips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 739
And by thy Mother's lips -" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 990a
No hand to toy with mine? No lips so sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 47
The natural hue of health, from vermeil lips ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 148
Exhal'd to Phoebus' lips , away they are gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 349
Touching with dazzled lips her starlight hand. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 419
Its mistress' lips ? Not thou?- 'Tis Dian's: lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 429
Those lips shall be my Delphos, and shall speak Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 713
With sanest lips I vow me to the number Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 885
By all that from thy mortal lips did roll; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 19
But my fond ear, in fancy at thy lips , Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 10
To melt away upon the traveller's lips . Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 10
He kiss'd my lady's cherry lips , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 7
Lorenzo, if thy lips breathe not love's tune."- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 30
So said, his erewhile timid lips grew bold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 69
And many times they bit their lips alone, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 170
Upon his lips , and taken the soft lute Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 278
lips when she dashed it to the ground, for the mountain began to grumble; which Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
But my Isabel's eyes and her lips pulped with bloom. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 16
Well done - now those lips and a flowery seat: Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 19
Anxious her lips , her breathing quick and short: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 65
Clench'd her small teeth, and held her lips apart, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 43
Their sorrows. Pale were the sweet lips I saw, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 12
Pale were the lips I kiss'd, and fair the form As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 13
Press'd her cold finger closer to her lips . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 14
Leaning with parted lips , some words she spake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 47
With hectic lips , and eyes up-looking mild, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 250
Before our lips knew else but solemn sounds; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 340
Flew from his lips up to the vaulted rocks, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 348
Thy lips , and antheming a lonely grief. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 6
Why should I strive to show what from thy lips Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 85
I saw their starv'd lips in the gloam La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 41
Their lips touch'd not, but had not bade adieu, Ode to Psyche, Line 17
And Joy, whose hand is ever at his lips Ode on Melancholy, Line 22
With a queen's awful lips I doubly thank you! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 89
Have fallen full frequent from our Emperor's lips , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 127
These lips to feel't on this soft ivory! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 18
And there it is my father's iron lips Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 115
Her fame has pass'd into the grosser lips Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 150
With sad lips I shall; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 148b
Pout her faint lips anew with rubious health; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
I should have Orphean lips , and Plato's fancy, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 23
Her lips - I swear no human bones e'er wore Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 71
Of hearts and lips ! Ah, miserable me!" Lamia, Part I, Line 41
Put her new lips to his, and gave afresh Lamia, Part I, Line 294
And all the dead whose names are in our lips , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 45
To her cold lips , and fill with such a light The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 280
My devout lips , than side by side we stood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 292
Press'd her cold finger closer to her lips . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 318
Leaning, with parted lips , some words she spake The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 349
To what I erewhile heard: only his lips The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 450
Sweet voice, sweet lips , soft hand, and softer breast, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 2
Give me those lips again! What can I do to drive away, Line 55
From lips the courtliest and the rubiest King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 55
Whose lips were solid, whose soft hands were made The Jealousies, Line 6
To kiss a mortal's lips , when such were in their prime. The Jealousies, Line 99
He said, smack'd his moist lips , and gave a pleasant frown. The Jealousies, Line 423
 
LIQUID............4
Of his fair eyes run liquid through their souls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 544
Spangled, and rich with liquid broideries Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 619
Two liquid pulse streams 'stead of feather'd wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 583
So through the crystal polish, liquid fine, Lamia, Part I, Line 384
 
LIQUIDITY.........1
Thrilling liquidity of dewy piping. Sleep and Poetry, Line 371
 
LIQUIDS...........1
And divine liquids come with odorous ooze Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 411
 
LIQUOR............2
With liquor and the staircase: verdict - found stone dead. The Jealousies, Line 630
I met, far gone in liquor , that old man, The Jealousies, Line 786
 
LISP..............1
O Moon! old boughs lisp forth a holier din Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 54
 
LISP'D............1
I lisp'd thy blooming titles inwardly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 733
 
LISPED............1
And straight all flush'd; so, lisped tenderly, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 54
 
LISPERS...........1
Round every leaf, that all those gentle lispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 956
 
LISPING...........1
Blush'd a live damask, and swift- lisping said, Lamia, Part I, Line 116
 
LISPINGS..........1
Lispings empyrean will I sometime teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 819
 
LIST..............6
Ah! you list to the nightingale's tender condoling, To Some Ladies, Line 11
And list to the tale of the wreath, and the chain, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 39
Let me one moment to her breathing list ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 104
Of noises far away?- list !"- Hereupon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 915
Of all she list , strange or magnificent: Lamia, Part I, Line 204
Even as you list invite your many guests; Lamia, Part II, Line 98
 
LIST'NING.........1
While his bow'd head seem'd list'ning to the Earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 20
 
LISTEN............28
We listen here on earth: Ode to Apollo, Line 44
Nor listen to accents that, almost adoring, To Some Ladies, Line 3
Listen awhile ye nations, and be dumb. Addressed to the Same, Line 14
And seems to listen : O that I might know Sleep and Poetry, Line 153
Where dost thou listen to the wide halloos Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 307
I'll swim to the syrens, and one moment listen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 241
That thou mayst listen the cold dews among? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 163
To listen and think of love. Still let me speak; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 689
Seeming with bright eyes to listen . 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 4
For what listen they? 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 5
Listen , listen, listen, listen, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 15
Listen, listen , listen, listen, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 15
Listen, listen, listen , listen, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 15
Listen, listen, listen, listen , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 15
Listen , stars' light, listen, listen, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 24
Listen, stars' light, listen , listen, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 24
Listen, stars' light, listen, listen , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 24
Yet listen , ye who will, whilst I bring proof Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 177
"Or shall we listen to the over-wise, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 309
While I here idle listen on the shores Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 106
Darkling I listen ; and, for many a time Ode to a Nightingale, Line 51
In such a mood as now you listen to me: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 36
And listen to me; know me once for all. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 134
To listen with no common interest; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 53
Yet you were about to advise more,- I listen . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 28
My thoughts! shall I unveil them? Listen then! Lamia, Part II, Line 56
Or thou might'st better listen to the wind, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 4
"And listen to my words. You say you won't, The Jealousies, Line 460
 
LISTEN'D..........6
The Latmian listen'd , but he heard no more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1010
Each third step did he pause, and listen'd oft Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 194
And listen'd to her breathing, if it chanced The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 246
And listen'd in sharp pain for Saturn's voice. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 163
He listen'd , and he wept, and his bright tears Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 42
Listen'd in pain and pleasure at the birth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 66
 
LISTENED..........3
Wild strains to which, spell-bound, the nightingales listened ; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 30
As if he always listened to the sighs Sleep and Poetry, Line 386
And listened to the wind that now did stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 294
 
LISTENER..........1
Most happy listener ! when the morning blesses Sleep and Poetry, Line 16
 
LISTENERS.........1
Look! how those winged listeners all this while Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 493
 
LISTENEST.........1
And so remain, because thou listenest : To G.A.W., Line 10
 
LISTENING.........9
Such as sat listening round Apollo's pipe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 141
My foolish tongue, and listening , half afraid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 960
Of the lone woodcutter; and listening still, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 51
When mad Eurydice is listening to't; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 165
There was a listening fear in her regard, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 37
Sat listening ; when presently came by Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 121
While his bow'd head seem'd listening to the Earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 325
There was a listening fear in her regard, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 339
Listening in their doom for Saturn's voice. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 12
 
LISTENS...........3
Yon centinel stars; and he who listens to it Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 842
And yet the evening listens . He who saddens O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 12
[Goes to the door, listens , and opens it. Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 106
 
LISTLESS..........2
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless , dead, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 18
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless , dead, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 323
 
LISTLESSNESS......1
Than speak against this ardent listlessness : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 825
 
LISTS.............2
Still is that fur as soft as when the lists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 13
The heralds have prepared a royal lists ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 33
 
LITERATURE........1
to the honour of English literature . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
 
LITHE.............2
How lithe ! When this thy chariot attains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 191
Like a lithe serpent vast and muscular Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 261
 
LITLING...........1
And how a litling child mote be The Eve of St. Mark, Line 103
 
LITTER............2
His litter of smooth semilucent mist, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 385
That 'tis of modern use to travel in a litter . The Jealousies, Line 234
 
LITTLE............121
By many streams a little lake did fill, Imitation of Spenser, Line 7
Yes! patient plume thy little wing, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 7
In this little dome, all those melodies strange, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 33
Of the little loves that fly Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 29
And now the sharp keel of his little boat Calidore: A Fragment, Line 19
Near to a little island's point they grew; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 24
The little chapel with the cross above Calidore: A Fragment, Line 42
A little brook. The youth had long been viewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 52
Delicious sounds! those little bright-eyed things Calidore: A Fragment, Line 73
From little cares:- to find, with easy quest, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 6
A little book,- and then a joy awakes To My Brother George (epistle), Line 94
And little fit to please a classic ear; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 24
And sips its freshness from the little rills; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 91
Yet feel I little of the cool bleak air, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 5
That in a little cottage I have found; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 10
Nibble the little cupped flowers and sing. Sleep and Poetry, Line 254
Over the trippings of a little child: Sleep and Poetry, Line 369
I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 1
A little noiseless noise among the leaves, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 11
Where swarms of minnows show their little heads, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 72
From low hung branches; little space they stop; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 88
A little space, with boughs all woven round; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 166
This pleasant tale is like a little copse: This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 1
For meadows where the little rivers run. On The Story of Rimini, Line 4
I've left my little queen, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 2
My little boat, for many quiet hours, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 47
A little cloud would move across the blue. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 88
A troop of little children garlanded; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 110
Within a little space again it gave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 117
Udderless lambs, and in a little cup Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 210
His messenger, his little Mercury. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 384
Along a path between two little streams,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 415
A little shallop, floating there hard by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 423
Of little eyes, as though thou wert to shed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 630
That needs must die, although its little beam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 676
In little journeys, I beheld in it Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 700
Widened a little , as when Zephyr bids Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 763
A little breeze to creep between the fans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 764
Down twenty little falls, through reeds and bramble, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 934
Lightly this little herald flew aloft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 64
Glance but one little beam of temper'd light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 172
A little lower than the chilly sheen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 207
Over a bower, where little space he stood; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 381
And doubling over head their little fists Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 509
Me even to tears: thence, when a little eas'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 559
Came swelling forth where little caves were wreath'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 665
The little flowers felt his pleasant sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 677
That thou wouldst spout a little streamlet o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 718
One obscure hiding-place, one little spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 62
And shew his little eye's anatomy. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 209
But first a little patience; first undo Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 755
A little patience, youth! 'twill not be long, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 908
Schooling its half-fledg'd little ones to brush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 130
And little rills of crimson wine imbrued Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 212
The moon put forth a little diamond peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 497
Her steed a little higher soar'd, and then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 511
See, through the trees, a little river go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 680
A little onward ran the very stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 785
His skill in little stars. The teeming tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 789
Well then, I see there is no little bird, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 877
After a little sleep: or when in mine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 893
Little John, or Robin bold; Robin Hood, Line 24
Honour to tight little John, Robin Hood, Line 55
In haste to teach the little thing to walk, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 8
Asleep! O sleep a little while, white pearl, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 1
Ye tight little fairy, just fresh from the dairy, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 3
You know the clear lake, and the little isles, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 35
Then there's a little wing, far from the sun, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 45
So could we live long life in little space; To J.R., Line 5
In little time a host of joys to bind, To J.R., Line 11
The little sweet doth kill much bitterness; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 98
Even bees, the little almsmen of spring-bowers, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 103
While little sounds of life are round me knelling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 308
Leaving great verse unto a little clan? Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 8
He kept little fishes There was a naughty boy, Line 61
Little baby's There was a naughty boy, Line 84
Little finger- There was a naughty boy, Line 85
And put thee to a little pain All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 27
O let a gadfly's little sting All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 49
The gadfly's little sting. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 56
Upon the little cradle's top 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 35
It lifts its little hand into the flame 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 44
Paddles a little tune and sings 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 46
Little child 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 49
Little child 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 54
To mortals, of their little week; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 30
Sweet little red feet! why would you die? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 5
We are dead if that latchet gives one little chink. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 18
Northward he turneth through a little door, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 19
He found him in a little moonlight room, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 112
Its little smoke, in pallid moonshine, died: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 200
Women gain little from experience When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 57
A little time, and then again he snatch'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 140
What little town by river or sea shore, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 35
And, little town, thy streets for evermore Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 38
From a man's little heart's short fever-fit; Ode on Indolence, Line 34
The little prologue to a line of kings. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
Cowards, who never knew their little hearts, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 79
This little ball of earth, and chuck it them Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 24
This is a little painful; just too much. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 45
Of little moment. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 117a
The little thunder of your fretful tongue, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 60
A little talk with her - no harm - haste! haste! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 181
The little struggler, sav'd from perils dark, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 12
While little harps were touch'd by many a lyric fay. The Jealousies, Line 36
Writhing her little body with ennui, The Jealousies, Line 74
Caught up his little legs, and, in a fret, The Jealousies, Line 201
Convey'd in little solder'd pipes by stealth, The Jealousies, Line 212
"He's not asleep, and you have little wit," The Jealousies, Line 329
Replied the page; "that little buzzing noise, The Jealousies, Line 330
Without a little conjuring." "'Tis Pearl, The Jealousies, Line 382
The little Bertha's eyes ope on the stars serene." The Jealousies, Line 396
Although her story sounds at first a little queer." The Jealousies, Line 405
But let me cool your brandy with a little wine." The Jealousies, Line 414
In loving pretty little Bertha, since The Jealousies, Line 475
The little birds I hear are all alive; The Jealousies, Line 480
Tighten my belt a little ,- so, so,- not The Jealousies, Line 548
Hark! hark! the bells!" "A little further get, The Jealousies, Line 564
O, little faery Pegasus! rear - prance- The Jealousies, Line 637
March, little Pegasus, with pawing hoof sublime! The Jealousies, Line 639
To scrape a little favour, 'gan to coax The Jealousies, Line 698
 
LIV'D.............11
Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 1
Hadst thou liv'd when chivalry Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 41
Down whose green back the short- liv'd foam, all hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 349
There never liv'd a mortal man, who bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 646
And liv'd upon the moors; Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 2
She liv'd as she did please. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 12
You liv'd alone on the forest tree, I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 7
Unruffled, like high Gods, ye liv'd and ruled: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 331
Set my life's star! I have liv'd long enough, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
Had Lycius liv'd to hand his story down, Lamia, Part II, Line 7
Where liv'd the youth, who worried and annoy'd The Jealousies, Line 115
 
LIVE..............47
To the coy muse, with me she would not live To George Felton Mathew, Line 32
Might live , and show itself to human eyes. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 121
And moisture, that the bowery green may live : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 84
And live for that honor to stoop to thee now, God of the golden bow, Line 35
Before he went to live with owls and bats, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 1
for verses fit to live . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
With the green world they live in; and clear rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 16
My eyes at once to death: but 'twas to live , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 655
O did he ever live , that lonely man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 364
That I can think away from thee and live !- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 184
Here, that I too may live : but if beyond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 437
But live and wither, cripple and still breathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 597
Ye shall for ever live and love, for all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 609
Us live in peace, in love and peace among Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 635
O thou wouldst joy to live in such a place; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 675
A hermit young, I'll live in mossy cave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 860
Live temple of sweet noise; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 12
And think that I may never live to trace When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 7
And hedge for the thrush to live in, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 27
So could we live long life in little space; To J.R., Line 5
Thine eyes by gazing; but I cannot live Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 63
For Jove uncurtain'd heaven to let thee live , To Homer, Line 6
To live on gaping. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 24
Thus ye live on high, and then Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 23
On the earth ye live again; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 24
Why, pretty thing, could you not live with me? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 8
Why not live sweetly as in the green trees? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 10
And so live ever - or else swoon to death. Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 14
And anger their live tapestries; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 20
Huzza! Huzza! Long live the Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Voices without, Line 83
Live in our memories. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 122a
Yet be that hour far off; and may he live , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 32
You live alone in my security: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
A glorious clamour! Now I live again! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 32
Blush'd a live damask, and swift-lisping said, Lamia, Part I, Line 116
In human climes, and live : Alas! poor youth, Lamia, Part I, Line 281
molest him; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Where may your taylor live ?" "I may not tell- Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 19
Where might my taylor live ?- I say again Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 21
He lives in Wapping, might live where he pleas'd." Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 23
But bare of laurel they live , dream, and die; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 7
What 'tis to die and live again before The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 142
Where they were wreck'd and live a wretched life; What can I do to drive away, Line 33
The Viscount B. shall live at cut-and-run; The Jealousies, Line 157
As many a poor felon does not live to tell. The Jealousies, Line 180
"Where does she live ?" ask'd Hum. "Her fair locks curl The Jealousies, Line 385
Live !- O! at Canterbury, with her old grand-dame." The Jealousies, Line 387
 
LIVED.............3
The short- lived , paly summer is but won On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 5
Double- lived in regions new? Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 4
Double- lived in regions new! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 40
 
LIVELY............5
Of thy lively countenance, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 3
A lively prelude, fashioning the way Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 492
And, ere one lively bead could burst and flit, The Jealousies, Line 419
Where from the earth we heard a lively tune The Jealousies, Line 687
And into many a lively legend look; In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 5
 
LIVERS............1
Of this fair world, and all its gentle livers ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 117
 
LIVES.............14
To where the great God lives for evermore. To Kosciusko, Line 14
Of nature's lives and wonders puls'd tenfold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 105
But renovates and lives ?- Thus, in the bower, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 463
Within my breast there lives a choking flame- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 317
"In the wide sea there lives a forlorn wretch, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 689
Of our dull, uninspired, snail-paced lives . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 25
Who lives beyond earth's boundary, grief is dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 620
And bless our simple lives . My Indian bliss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 663
P'rhaps one or two, whose lives have patient wings, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 14
Love never dies, but lives , immortal Lord: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 397
Till Cleopatra lives at Number Seven, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 9
On your lives ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Second Voice, Line 55a
He lives in Wapping, might live where he pleas'd." Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 23
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies; To Autumn, Line 29
 
LIVEST............1
There livest blissfully. Ah, if to thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 314
 
LIVID.............1
The thing was vile with green and livid spot, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 475
 
LIVING............11
In shape, that sure no living man had thought Calidore: A Fragment, Line 117
These are the living pleasures of the bard: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 67
Aye, those fair living forms swam heavenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 315
Upon these living flowers. Here is wine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 441
And now I find thee living , I will pour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 433
And warm with dew at ooze from living blood! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 667
To any living thing, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 2
Then living on the earth, with labouring thought Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 279
A living death was in each gush of sounds, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 281
Or living on perhaps, your wretched thrall, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 11
This living hand, now warm and capable This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 1
 
LIZARD............1
Freckle-wing'd and lizard -sided! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 73
 
LLOYD.............1
A Faery Tale, by Lucy Vaughan Lloyd of China Walk, Lambeth The Jealousies, Subtitle
 
LO................33
Lo ! I must tell a tale of chivalry; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 1
Lo ! I must tell a tale of chivalry; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 11
And lo ! - whose stedfastness would never take Addressed to the Same, Line 7
Of human hearts: for lo ! I see afar, Sleep and Poetry, Line 125
Lo ! how they murmur, laugh, and smile, and weep: Sleep and Poetry, Line 142
Lo ! who dares say, "Do this"?- Who dares call down To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 9
And lo ! from opening clouds, I saw emerge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 591
My clenched hands;- for lo ! the poppies hung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 682
I started up, when lo ! refreshfully, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 898
A bud which snares his fancy: lo ! but now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 57
The deadly feel of solitude: for lo ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 284
Through winding alleys; and lo , wonderment! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 384
Each summer time to life. Lo ! this is he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 478
For their sweet queen: when lo ! the wreathed green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 516
Towards it by a sandy path, and lo ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1020
Or what a thing is love! 'Tis She, but lo ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 79
Look'd high defiance. Lo ! his heart 'gan warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 282
These phantoms with a nod. Lo ! from the dark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 533
I fled three days - when lo ! before me stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 566
Lo ! while slow carried through the pitying crowd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1019
Waiting for some destruction - when lo , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 330
Its mistress' lips? Not thou?- 'Tis Dian's: lo ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 429
Not Hesperus: lo ! upon his silver wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 567
Lo ! I saw one sleeping there Not Aladdin magian, Line 11
And 'tween the curtains peep'd, where, lo !- how fast she slept. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 252
Hyperion, lo ! his radiance is here!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 345
For lo ! 'tis for the Father of all verse. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 13
Apollo shriek'd; and lo ! from all his limbs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 135
For lo ! the toils are spread around your den, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 67
O let me catch his voice - for lo ! I hear Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 44
Inverts it - dips the handle, and lo , soon Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 11
Moan, brethren, moan; for lo ! the rebel spheres The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 418
All down the steps; and, as we enter'd, lo ! The Jealousies, Line 754
 
LOAD..............9
Growing, like Atlas, stronger from its load ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 63
And plunder'd of its load of blessedness. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 660
And Tellus feels his forehead's cumbrous load . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 71
O what a load of misery and pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 684
With hushing finger, how he means to load Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 119
I will from her turn off, and put the load Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 143
Give him his proof! A camel's load of proofs! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 208
Conspiring with him how to load and bless To Autumn, Line 3
The load of this eternal quietude, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 390
 
LOADED............1
Thus loaded with a feast the tables stood, Lamia, Part II, Line 189
 
LOAM..............1
Pointed each fringed lash; the smeared loam Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 405
 
LOAMED............1
From his lorn voice, and past his loamed ears Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 279
 
LOATH.............1
Which seem'd full loath this happy world to leave: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 4
 
LOATH'D...........1
His loath'd existence through ten centuries, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 691
 
LOATHES...........1
Who doubly loathes a father's tyranny; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 96
 
LOATHING..........1
And throw these jewels from my loathing sight,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 96
 
LOCK..............2
A lock of thy bright hair- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 36
Touch'd a spring- lock , and there in wool, or snow The Jealousies, Line 511
 
LOCK'D............1
Lock'd up like veins of metal, crampt and screw'd; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 25
 
LOCKS.............14
Thy locks in a knightly casque are rested: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 52
Her fair eyes looking through her locks auburne. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 106
Their ruffled locks where meeting hazels darken; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 237
Indeed, locks bright enough to make me mad; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 613
About his large dark locks , and faultering spake: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 291
And so she kneeled, with her locks all hoar, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 380
Locks shining black, hair scanty grey, and passions manifold. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 38
On his neck his well-grown locks , Not Aladdin magian, Line 16
His Druid locks to shake and ooze with sweat, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 137
Arose, with locks not oozy, and began, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 170
But splendider in Saturn's, whose hoar locks Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 353
They told the truth, though, round, the snowy locks The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 452
Or kiss thine eyes, or count thy locks , tress after tress?" The Jealousies, Line 171
"Where does she live?" ask'd Hum. "Her fair locks curl The Jealousies, Line 385
 
LODGE.............2
"Be still the unimaginable lodge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 293
Shall lodge in shabby taverns upon tick; The Jealousies, Line 151
 
LODGES............1
Lodges soft? King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 29a
 
LODGING...........2
To some securest lodging - cold perhaps! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 98
Or that we gave him lodging in yon towers? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 7
 
LOFTIEST..........2
Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1
From forth the loftiest fashion of his sleep The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 3
 
LOFTY.............9
Nor move, till ends the lofty strain, Ode to Apollo, Line 21
Yet shall my spirit lofty converse hold To My Brother George (epistle), Line 72
With lofty periods when my verses fire him, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 79
That crowns a lofty clift, which proudly towers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 124
Among the conchs and shells of the lofty grot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 921
Brushing the cobwebs with his lofty plume, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 110
A pillar'd porch, with lofty portal door, Lamia, Part I, Line 379
Even so that lofty sacrificial fire, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 102
Can size and shape pervade. The lofty theme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 306
 
LOGGERHEADS.......1
Of loggerheads and chapmen;- we are told Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 11
 
LOGS..............1
Of logs piled solemnly.- Ah, well-a-day, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 183
 
LOINS.............2
O'er his loins , his trappings glow Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 59
And many once proud-quiver'd loins did melt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 109
 
LOITER'D..........2
Loiter'd around us; then of honey cells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 668
Who hath not loiter'd in a green church-yard, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 353
 
LOITERING.........2
Alone and palely loitering ? La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 2
Alone and palely loitering , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 46
 
LOLL..............1
Again my trooping hounds their tongues shall loll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 480
 
LONE..............22
Which linger yet about lone gothic arches, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 33
Through its lone vales; and where I found a spot Sleep and Poetry, Line 75
To some lone spirits who could proudly sing Sleep and Poetry, Line 218
On a lone winter evening, when the frost On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 10
Than Dryope's lone lulling of her child; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 495
Of the lone woodcutter; and listening still, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 51
In lone Endymion's ear, now he has raught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 282
And left him once again in twilight lone . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 587
How lone he was once more, and sadly press'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 857
I sue not for my lone , my widow'd wife; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 545
Are cloudy phantasms. Caverns lone , farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 651
To sit beneath a fair lone beechen tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 767
And monitor me nightly to lone slumber. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 884
Where lone Echo gives the half Robin Hood, Line 16
Will die a death too lone and incomplete, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 487
Amid the woods they were, so lone and wild, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 5
Not in lone splendor hung aloft the night, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 2
All pain but pity: thus the lone voice spake: Lamia, Part I, Line 37
The amorous promise of her lone complain, Lamia, Part I, Line 288
A haunting music, sole perhaps and lone Lamia, Part II, Line 122
Long treasured tears. "This temple sad and lone The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 221
He sole and lone maintains King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 10b
 
LONELINESS........4
Lover of loneliness , and wandering, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 121
The darkness,- loneliness ,- the fearful thunder; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 148
And he in loneliness : he felt assur'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 590
It aches in loneliness - is ill at peace Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 220
 
LONELY............17
The lonely turret, shatter'd, and outworn, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 38
And on the bank a lonely flower he spied, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 171
The surgy murmurs of the lonely sea. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 121
And frantic gape of lonely Niobe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 338
Poor, lonely Niobe! when her lovely young Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 339
O did he ever live, that lonely man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 364
My lonely madness. Speak, delicious fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 748
Ripe fruits, and lonely couch, contentment gave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 968
Mutter'd: "What lonely death am I to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 258
I was a lonely youth on desert shores. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 339
My sports were lonely , 'mid continuous roars, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 340
But thee to comfort a poor lonely maid; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 287
Temper my lonely hours God of the meridian, Line 23
Thy lips, and antheming a lonely grief. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 6
To one who in this lonely isle hath been Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 71
O tell me, lonely Goddess, by the harp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 108
And so he rested, on the lonely ground, Lamia, Part I, Line 32
 
LONG..............110
In the long vista of the years to roll, To Hope, Line 31
For that to love, so long , I've dormant lain: Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 8
And hold my faculties so long in thrall, To George Felton Mathew, Line 19
Greeted, as he had known them long before. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 33
Its long lost grandeur: fir trees grow around, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 40
Of delicate birch trees, or long grass which hems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 51
A little brook. The youth had long been viewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 52
To one who has been long in city pent, To one who has been long in city pent, Line 1
Nor should I now, but that I've known you long ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 52
For I have long time been my fancy feeding To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 80
In long perspective, and continually Sleep and Poetry, Line 100
And let long grass grow round the roots to keep them I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 32
Nor was it long ere he had told the tale I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 179
For a long dreary season, comes a day After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 2
Takes as a long lost right the feel of May, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 6
In times long past; to sit with them, and talk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 387
Where long ago a giant battle was; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 792
To brood so long upon one luxury, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 855
Too long , alas, hast thou starv'd on the ruth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 104
The bitterness of love: too long indeed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 105
After long toil and travelling, to miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 145
Through a long pillar'd vista, a fair shrine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 260
And long he travers'd to and fro, to acquaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 269
But 'twas not long ; for, sweeter than the rill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 339
In a long whispering birth enchanted grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 346
The first long kiss, warm firstling, to renew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 491
Welcome the float of Thetis. Long he dwells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 611
Long time in silence did their anxious fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 733
Question that thus it was; long time they lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 734
Long time ere soft caressing sobs began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 736
And so long absence from thee doth bereave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 775
Ere long I will exalt thee to the shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 809
Not of these days, but long ago 'twas told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 830
"How long must I remain in jeopardy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 902
With long -forgotten story, and wherein Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 127
Their melodies, and see their long hair glisten; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 242
The prison gates that have so long opprest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 296
Long years of misery have told me so. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 325
My long captivity and moanings all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 334
Of all his kingdom. Long in misery Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 378
If thou art ripe to taste a long love dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 440
So vanish'd: and not long , before arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 651
A little patience, youth! 'twill not be long , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 908
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 4
Long didst thou sit amid our regions wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 8
Long have I said, how happy he who shrives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 26
At last he said: "Poor lady, how thus long Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 298
And tantalizes long ; at last he drinks, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 417
Of gold, and lines of Naiads' long bright tress. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 709
And bid a long adieu." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 763a
Thy lute-voic'd brother will I sing ere long , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 774
Long have I sought for rest, and, unaware, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 879
All the long day; save when he scantly lifted Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 920
Her long black hair swell'd ampler, in display Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 984
Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 2
And the green bud's as long as the spike end. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 36
So could we live long life in little space; To J.R., Line 5
A whole long month of May in this sad plight Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 25
But Selfishness, Love's cousin, held not long Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 241
Not long - for soon into her heart a throng Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 245
Could keep him off so long ? They spake a tale Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 260
Why linger at the yawning tomb so long ? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 386
This hidden whim; and long they watch'd in vain; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 466
I dreamed long ago. Now new begun, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 4
She died full long agone! Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 30
Was as long , There was a naughty boy, Line 100
His long hair rustled like a flame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 19
How long is't since the mighty power bid To Ailsa Rock, Line 5
Toward the castle or the cot where long ago was born There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 11
Even so long my sleep has been secure, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 23
Long time this sconce a helmet wore, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 49
Yawning and doating a whole summer long , And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 6
He play'd an ancient ditty, long since mute, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 291
And the long carpets rose along the gusty floor. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 360
And they are gone: ay, ages long ago The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 370
Were long be-nightmar'd. Angela the old The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 375
That all day long , from earliest morn, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 26
And diamond-paved lustrous long arcades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 220
Their wisdom long since fled.- Two wings this orb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 283
Not long delay'd, that scar'd the younger Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 71
Her hair was long , her foot was light, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 15
And nothing else saw all day long , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 22
Cool'd a long age in the deep-delved earth, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 12
Huzza! Huzza! Long live the Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Voices without, Line 83
Long toil'd in foreign wars, and whose high deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 26
Set my life's star! I have liv'd long enough, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
I marvel, Albert, you delay so long Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 52
My eyes, too long poor exiles from thy face, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
Long have I loved thee, yet till now not loved: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 19
A long life in the foulest sink o' the world! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
Deaf to his throbbing throat's long , long melodious moan. Lamia, Part I, Line 75
Deaf to his throbbing throat's long, long melodious moan. Lamia, Part I, Line 75
Their pleasures in a long immortal dream. Lamia, Part I, Line 128
It seem'd he had lov'd them a whole summer long : Lamia, Part I, Line 250
Her face so long in Corinth, where, she said, Lamia, Part I, Line 311
Of conscience, for their long offended might, Lamia, Part II, Line 284
Across the teaboard draws a long wet mark. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 13
And, after not long , thirsted, for thereby The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 41
How long I slumber'd 'tis a chance to guess. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 57
Long treasured tears. "This temple sad and lone The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 221
Foughten long since by giant hierarchy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 223
Had rested, and there slept, how long a sleep! The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 321
Long , long, those two were postured motionless, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 382
Long, long , those two were postured motionless, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 382
Of their own power. A long awful time The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 384
And diamond paved lustrous long arcades. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 56
Not liking in her heart an hour- long pinch, The Jealousies, Line 71
Where, after a long hypercritic howl The Jealousies, Line 91
from Bayle's Dictionary, and had copied a long Latin note from that work. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
And long -tail'd pheasants, and a rising sun, The Jealousies, Line 448
 
LONG'D............1
"Peona! ever have I long'd to slake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 769
 
LONGER............14
When pleasure's tree no longer bears, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 22
Pan is no longer sought, I feel a free, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 12
That, any longer , I will pass my days Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 476
My chain of grief: no longer strive to find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 979
Had pass'd away: no longer did he wage Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 863
I saw thee, and my blood no longer cold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 304
Yes: now I am no longer wretched thrall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 333
Not longer than the May-fly's small fan-horns; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 5
Scanty the hour and few the steps, because a longer stay There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 31
A longer skein of wit in Convent Garden. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 4
Let me no longer be the wondering food Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 111
Conrad, if he flames longer in this wise Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 46
Will sharpen more the longer 'tis conceal'd. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 73
Lamia, no longer fair, there sat a deadly white. Lamia, Part II, Line 276
 
LONGEST...........1
Their lids shut longest in a dreamless sleep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 542
 
LONGING...........3
In her maternal longing ! Happy gloom! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 537
And with sick longing all the night outwear, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 23
In such a sickly longing for his son. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 104
 
LONGINGS..........1
To feel distemper'd longings : to desire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 375
 
LONGS.............1
As one who sits ashore and longs perchance To Homer, Line 3


Published @ RC

March 2005