Loo-Lz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

Printer-friendly versionSend by email
Keats Concordance
 
LOOK..............89
'Tis very sweet to look into the fair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 2
The stars look very cold about the sky, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 3
So that we look around with prying stare, Sleep and Poetry, Line 32
Nought more ungentle than the placid look Sleep and Poetry, Line 261
Made Ariadne's cheek look blushingly. Sleep and Poetry, Line 336
Watch her half-smiling lips, and downward look ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 102
That we might look into a forest wide, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 152
And grin and look proudly, God of the golden bow, Line 33
Do not look so sad, sweet one, Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 5
I have to conciliate men who are competent to look , and who do look with a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
I have to conciliate men who are competent to look, and who do look with a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Stood silent round the shrine: each look was chang'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 186
To put on such a look as would say, Shame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 717
Look not so wilder'd; for these things are true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 850
Where'er I look : but yet, I'll say 'tis naught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 985
And, ever and anon, uprose to look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 422
Look ! how those winged listeners all this while Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 493
Look full upon it feel anon the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 543
Too palpable before me - the sad look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 790
He stept upon his shepherd throne: the look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 889
Yet look upon it, and 'twould size and swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 206
In beauteous vassalage, look up and wait. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 212
Until the gods through heaven's blue look out!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 268
To look so plainly through them? to dispel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 328
And tyrannizing was the lady's look , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 507
Had we both perish'd?"- " Look !" the sage replied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 717
And look , quite dead to every worldly thing! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 292
Of vision search'd for him, as one would look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 391
Forgiveness: yet he turn'd once more to look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 452
Her dawning love- look rapt Endymion blesses Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 463
Thank the great gods, and look not bitterly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 807
Apollo's summer look ; In drear nighted December, Line 12
Nay, look not down, nor lick thy dainty wrists- To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 9
That I shall never look upon thee more, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 10
And yet I never look on midnight sky, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 5
I cannot look upon the rose's dye, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 7
I cannot look on any budding flower, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 9
I look where no one dares, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 9
Are folded up, and he content to look Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 10
O look not so disdainly! Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 8
Here do they look alive to love and hate, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 38
The doors all look as if they oped themselves, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 49
But in her tone and look he read the rest. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 56
I look into the chasms, and a shroud Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 3
Mankind do know of hell: I look o'erhead, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 5
Should look through four large windows, and display Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 28
Spirit! I look , Spirit here that reignest, Line 8
Nor look behind, nor sideways, but require The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 53
While Porphyro upon her face doth look , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 128
Or look with ruffian passion in her face: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 149
But dares not look behind, or all the charm is fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 234
Try'd to look unconcern'd with beating heart. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 44
Her pocket mirror and began to look When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 52
"Saturn, look up!- though wherefore, poor old King? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 52
Look up, and let me see our doom in it; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 97
Look up, and tell me if this feeble shape Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 98
Or word, or look , or action of despair. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 40
How fever'd is the man who cannot look On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 1
Over head - look over head, Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 9
Look up, look up - I flutter now Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 11
Look up, look up - I flutter now Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 11
Look , woman, look, your Albert is quite safe! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 120
Look, woman, look , your Albert is quite safe! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 120
Let me look well: your features are the same, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 39
Shall be a hell to look upon, and she- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 92
Blessings upon you, daughter! Sure you look Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 120
How's this? I marvel! Yet you look not mad. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 142
Look at the Emperor's brow upon me bent! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 62
You look not so, alas! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 110b
You know full well what makes me look so pale. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 112
Look there to the door! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 158b
Look ! look at this bright sword; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 106
Look! look at this bright sword; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 106
Now to be punish'd,- do not look so sad! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 143
Lycius, look back! and be some pity shown." Lamia, Part I, Line 246
Her soft look growing coy, she saw his chain so sure: Lamia, Part I, Line 256
"Leave thee alone! Look back! Ah, Goddess, see Lamia, Part I, Line 257
Full brimm'd, and opposite sent forth a look Lamia, Part II, Line 242
Corinthians! look upon that gray-beard wretch! Lamia, Part II, Line 287
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look , To Autumn, Line 21
"Saturn! look up - and for what, poor lost King? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 354
Dry up your tears, and do not look so blue; The Jealousies, Line 51
But swift of look , and foot, and wing was he,)- The Jealousies, Line 186
Upon the mirror'd walls, wherever he might look . The Jealousies, Line 270
Admired it with a connoisseuring look , The Jealousies, Line 417
Look in the Almanack - Moore never lies- The Jealousies, Line 500
Castled her king with such a vixen look , The Jealousies, Line 704
Look where we will, our bird's-eye vision meets The Jealousies, Line 732
And into many a lively legend look ; In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 5
 
LOOK'D............31
Objects that look'd out so invitingly Calidore: A Fragment, Line 31
That each at other look'd half staringly; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 149
Look'd at each other with a wild surmise- On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 13
Endymion look'd at her, and press'd her hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 516
Again I look'd , and, O ye deities, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 604
Look'd up: a conflicting of shame and ruth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 761
Look'd high defiance. Lo! his heart 'gan warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 282
I rear'd my head, and look'd for Phoebus' daughter. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 414
The fairest face that morn e'er look'd upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 424
I look'd - 'twas Scylla! Cursed, cursed Circe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 619
Piteous she look'd on dead and senseless things, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 489
Fearing to move or speak, she look'd so dreamingly. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 306
When sages look'd to Egypt for their lore. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 33
Look'd down on him with pity, and the voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 306
Wroth as himself. He look'd upon them all, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 351
She look'd at me as she did love, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 19
Your prayers, though I look'd for you in vain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 119
But, Conrad, now be gone; the host is look'd for; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 68
Save one, who look'd thereon with eye severe, Lamia, Part II, Line 157
He look'd and look'd again a level - No! Lamia, Part II, Line 304
He look'd and look'd again a level - No! Lamia, Part II, Line 304
I look'd around upon the carved sides The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 61
Then to the west I look'd , and saw far off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 87
I heard, I look'd : two senses both at once The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 118
Was fainting for sweet food: I look'd thereon The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 233
I look'd upon the altar and its horns The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 237
Onward I look'd beneath the gloomy boughs, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 297
I look'd upon them; still they were the same; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 385
And look'd around, and saw his kingdom gone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 401
From the throng'd towers of Lincoln hath look'd down, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 21
Pale was his face, he still look'd very ill: The Jealousies, Line 608
 
LOOKERS...........1
To common lookers on, like one who dream'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 176
 
LOOKEST...........1
Feel palpitations when thou lookest in: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 53
 
LOOKING...........13
With love- looking eyes, and with voice sweetly bland. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 20
Is looking round about him with a fond, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 141
Some looking back, and some with upward gaze; Sleep and Poetry, Line 147
Her fair eyes looking through her locks auburne. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 106
As Venus looking sideways in alarm. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 220
Like a sick eagle looking at the sky. On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 5
Down- looking - aye, and with a chastened light On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 2
To faint once more by looking on my bliss- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 652
Down- looking , vacant, through a hazy wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 560
When, looking up, he saw her features bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 199
And, after looking round the champaign wide, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 347
A spacious looking -glass, upon whose face, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 52
With hectic lips, and eyes up- looking mild, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 250
 
LOOKS.............21
His soul looks out through renovated eyes. Ode to Apollo, Line 12
While his proud eye looks through the film of death? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 70
Looks out upon the winds with glorious fear: Sleep and Poetry, Line 128
The Gothic looks solemn, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 1
A crowd of shepherds with as sunburnt looks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 139
Begirt with ministring looks : alway his eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 150
'Mong shepherds gone in eld, whose looks increas'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 358
Of kind and passionate looks ; to count, and count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 657
With leaden looks : the solitary breeze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 686
She rises crescented!" He looks , 'tis she, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 430
If looks speak love-laws, I will drink her tears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 39
'Mid looks of love, defiance, hate, and scorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 69
Those looks immortal, those complainings dear! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 313
And there was purport in her looks for him, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 47
Aye, spite of her sweet looks . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 148b
When to the stream she launches, looks not back Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
In thy resolved looks ! Yes, I could kneel Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 5
Put on your brightest looks ; smile if you can; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 14
Use other speech than looks ; bidding him raise Lamia, Part I, Line 304
Who now, with greedy looks , eats up my feast? To Fanny, Line 17
With hasty steps, wrapp'd cloak, and solemn looks , The Jealousies, Line 219
 
LOOM..............3
"O tell me, Angela, by the holy loom The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 115
But new he was and bright as scarf from Persian loom . Character of C.B., Line 9
Ran imageries from a sombre loom . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 77
 
LOOP'D............1
Loop'd up with cords of twisted wreathed light, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 38
 
LOOPHOLES.........1
Spiral through ruggedest loopholes , and thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 599
 
LOOS'D............2
Until their tongues were loos'd in poesy. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 235
His limbs are loos'd , and eager, on he hies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 67
 
LOOSE.............6
O sweet Fancy! let her loose ; Fancy, Line 9
Oh, sweet Fancy! let her loose ; Fancy, Line 67
And shall I let a rebel loose again Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 86
Still in extremes! No, they must not be loose . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 235
Are routed loose about the plashy meads, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 6
But retail dealers, diligent, let loose The Jealousies, Line 210
 
LOOSEN'D..........1
By those loosen'd hips, you have tasted the pips, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 11
 
LOOSENED..........1
Were slanting out their necks with loosened rein; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 78
 
LOOSENS...........1
Loosens her fragrant boddice; by degrees The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 229
 
LORD..............35
Great bounty from Endymion our lord . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 219
There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1
Thou, Carian lord , hadst better have been tost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 52
Why, I have been a butterfly, a lord Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 937
Love never dies, but lives, immortal Lord : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 397
Enchanted has it been the Lord knows where. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 18
Then there's that old Lord Maurice, not a whit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 103
And be liege- lord of all the Elves and Fays, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 121
My lord , I was a vassal to your frown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 24
Aye, my lord . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 73b
My lord , forgive me that I cannot see Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 30
Because some dozen vassals cry'd - my lord ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 78
No, my good lord , I cannot say I did. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 121
I grieve, my lord , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 89b
Spare, spare me, my lord ; I swoon else. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 12b
Nay, my lord , I do not know. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 25b
My lord ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 36a
What means he, my lord ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 69b
Still very sick, my lord ; but now I went, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 1
My lord ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 115b
My lord , a noise! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 30b
My lord , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 48b
Die, my lord ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Erminia, Line 173a
My lord ! My lord! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Several Voices, Line 183a
My lord! My lord ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Several Voices, Line 183a
Alas! My lord , my lord! they cannot move her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 187
Alas! My lord, my lord ! they cannot move her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 187
Take horse, my lord . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 26a
Will Stephen's death be mark'd there, my good lord , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 6
My lord ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 9a
Because I think, my lord , he is no man, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 31
My Lord of Chester, is't true what I hear King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 24
To our late sovereign lord , your noble sire, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 40
"He's in the kitchen, or the Lord knows where,"- The Jealousies, Line 313
The Common Council and my fool Lord Mayor The Jealousies, Line 768
 
LORD'S............1
Where my lord's roses blow. Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 12
 
LORDED............1
And all the revels he had lorded there: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 891
 
LORDS.............10
Hyena foemen, and hot-blooded lords , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 86
The rebel- lords , on bended knees, received Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 100
Remember how he spared the rebel- lords . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 54
I would you had appear'd among those lords , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 61
Cringe to the Emperor, entertain the lords , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 69
back scene, guarded by two Soldiers. Lords , Ladies, Knights, Gentlemen, etc., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
CHESTER, Lords , Attendants. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
Then lords in waiting; then (what head not reels The Jealousies, Line 591
Of lords and ladies, on each hand, make show The Jealousies, Line 752
Lords , scullions, deputy-scullions, with wild cries The Jealousies, Line 763
 
LORDSHIP..........2
For every lie a lordship . Nor yet has Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 4
For lordship . King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 38a
 
LORDSHIP'S........1
Pray what demesne? Whose lordship's legacy? Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 6
 
LORE..............13
The classic page - the muse's lore . Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 20
There warm my breast with patriotic lore , Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 9
Whose head is pregnant with poetic lore . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 54
Upon the lore so voluble and deep, To My Brothers, Line 7
In Dian's face they read the gentle lore : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 833
High reason, and the lore of good and ill, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 75
When sages look'd to Egypt for their lore . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 33
Wherefrom I take strange lore , and read it deep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 148
For though I scorn Oceanus's lore , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 333
With vases, to one deep in Phidian lore . Ode on Indolence, Line 10
A virgin purest lipp'd, yet in the lore Lamia, Part I, Line 189
To hear her whisper woman's lore so well; Lamia, Part I, Line 325
In after time a sage of mickle lore , In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 1
 
LORENZO...........13
Lorenzo , a young palmer in Love's eye! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 2
Lorenzo , if thy lips breathe not love's tune."- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 30
" Lorenzo !"- here she ceas'd her timid quest, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 55
Though young Lorenzo in warm Indian clove Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 101
What love Lorenzo for their sister had, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 162
To kill Lorenzo , and there bury him. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 176
Lorenzo , and we are most loth to invade Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 182
Lorenzo , courteously as he was wont, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 189
There was Lorenzo slain and buried in, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 217
Lorenzo had ta'en ship for foreign lands, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 226
Because Lorenzo came not, Oftentimes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 257
Lorenzo stood, and wept: the forest tomb Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 275
When Isabella by Lorenzo knelt. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 360
 
LORENZO'S.........4
How could they find out in Lorenzo's eye Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 139
Lorenzo's flush with love.- They pass'd the water Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 215
And they had found Lorenzo's earthy bed; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 351
And yet they knew it was Lorenzo's face: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 476
 
LORN..............5
When love- lorn hours had left me less a child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 885
And thus to be cast out, thus lorn to die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 959
From his lorn voice, and past his loamed ears Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 279
Of her lorn voice, she oftentimes would cry Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 492
Upon all space: space starr'd, and lorn of light; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 118
 
LOSE..............11
Then why, lovely girl, should we lose all these blisses? O come, dearest Emma!, Line 17
Who thus one lamb did lose . Paths there were many, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 79
Thou wast to lose fair Syrinx - do thou now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 243
To lose , at once, all my toil breeding fire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 537
To lose in grieving all my maiden prime. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 278
Ah! what if I should lose thee, when so fain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 203
O horrible! to lose the sight of well remember'd face, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 33
That man may never lose his mind on mountains bleak and bare; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 46
Your vision shall quite lose its memory, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 74
Albert, you have fame to lose . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 34b
Tiptoe with white arms spread. He, sick to lose Lamia, Part I, Line 287
 
LOSING............1
Losing its gust, and my ambition blind. I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 14
 
LOSS..............4
Just like that bird am I in loss of time, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 15
Thy brain to loss of reason: and next tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 643
Much pain have I for more than loss of realms: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 334
Bewailing earthly loss ; nor could my eyes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 441
 
LOST..............40
For all I see has lost its zest; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 18
Its long lost grandeur: fir trees grow around, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 40
Sometimes I lost them, and then found again; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 125
Had not yet lost those starry diadems I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 6
The soul is lost in pleasant smotherings: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 132
And seems to one in drowsiness half lost , On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 13
Takes as a long lost right the feel of May, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 6
The lark was lost in him; cold springs had run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 102
Lay a lost thing upon her paly lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 341
Would all be lost , unheard, and vain as swords Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 713
Vex'd like a morning eagle, lost and weary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 635
Abrupt, in middle air, his way was lost ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 656
At my lost brightness, my impassion'd wiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 783
Half lost , and all old hymns made nullity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 794
Rudders that for a hundred years had lost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 125
And in the savage overwhelming lost , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 704
Mov'd on for many a league; and gain'd, and lost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 829
All mountain-rivers lost in the wide home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 949
Redemption sparkles!- I am sad and lost ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 51
And lost in pleasure at her feet he sinks, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 418
Lost in a sort of purgatory blind, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 80
Asking for her lost basil amorously; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 490
Beauties that the earth hath lost ; Fancy, Line 30
I curse not, for my heart is lost in thine, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 331
A dove forlorn and lost with sick unpruned wing." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 333
A heaven he lost erewhile: it must - it must Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 124
Now lost , save what we find on remnants huge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 281
O joy! for now I see ye are not lost : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 322
Victory, might be lost , or might be won. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 342
A poor court-bankrupt, outwitted and lost , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
But you must taunt this dove, for she hath lost Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 125
O wretched woman! lost , wreck'd, swallow'd up, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 77
Open it straight;- hush!- quiet!- my lost boy! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 37
I am lost ! Hush, hush! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 102b
"Too frail of heart! for this lost nymph of thine, Lamia, Part I, Line 93
His phantasy was lost , where reason fades, Lamia, Part I, Line 235
From Lycius answer'd, as heart-struck and lost , Lamia, Part II, Line 293
When he had lost his realms."- Whereon there grew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 302
"Saturn! look up - and for what, poor lost King? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 354
Lost in a soft amaze, To Fanny, Line 15
 
LOT...............3
Was now his lot . And must he patient stay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 293
'Tis not through envy of thy happy lot , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 5
Which, being noble, fell to Gersa's lot . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 67
 
LOTH..............10
Bethinking thee, how melancholy loth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 242
A lion into growling, loth retire- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 536
I became loth and fearful to alight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 583
Sat silent: for the maid was very loth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 711
On the deer's tender haunches: late, and loth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 908
Cathedrals call'd. He bade a loth farewel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 626
Henceforth was dove-like.- Loth was he to move Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 870
Lorenzo, and we are most loth to invade Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 182
For men, though idle, may be loth O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 23
What men or gods are these? What maidens loth ? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 8
 
LOUD..............19
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 8
To a loud hymn, that sounds far, far away To Kosciusko, Line 13
"O Hearkener to the loud clapping shears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 279
By one, who at a distance loud halloo'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 344
With dancing and loud revelry,- and went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 535
I heard their cries amid loud thunder-rolls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 660
No sound so loud as when on curtain'd bier Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 530
Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 1
While play'd the organs loud and sweet. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 22
As fire with air loud warring when rain-floods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 144
Voiceless, or hoarse with loud tormented streams: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 362
Hyperion from the peak loud answered, "Saturn!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 388
Heard his loud laugh, and answer'd in full choir. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 51
Join a loud voice to mine, and so denounce Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 150
The many heard, and the loud revelry Lamia, Part II, Line 262
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; To Autumn, Line 30
"Dear Princess, do not whisper me so loud ," The Jealousies, Line 46
The morn was full of holiday; loud bells The Jealousies, Line 568
Of tambourines and pipes, serene and loud , The Jealousies, Line 688
 
LOUDER............4
Came louder , and behold, there as he lay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 917
Poisonous about my ears, and louder grew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 491
Louder they talk, and louder come the strains Lamia, Part II, Line 204
Louder they talk, and louder come the strains Lamia, Part II, Line 204
 
LOUDEST...........1
In which the Zephyr breathes the loudest song, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 26
 
LOUDLY............5
Who read for me the sonnet swelling loudly To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 60
And blaspheme so loudly , God of the golden bow, Line 34
No! loudly echoed times innumerable. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 296
Thus ending loudly , as he would o'erleap Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 333
To laugh, and play, and sing, and loudly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 515
 
LOUTED............2
Was't to this end I louted and became Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 17
Louted full low, and hoarsely did him greet: The Jealousies, Line 256
 
LOV'D.............16
Trac'd by thy lov'd Libertas; he will speak, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 61
Stretch'd on the grass at my best lov'd employment To My Brother George (epistle), Line 120
Who lov'd - and music slew not? 'Tis the pest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 365
Yet mutter'd wildly. I could hear he lov'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 567
Aye, hadst thou never lov'd an unknown power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 301
I lov'd her to the very white of truth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 402
Because I lov'd her?- Cold, O cold indeed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 623
A youth, by heavenly power lov'd and led, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 708
To nothing, lov'd a nothing, nothing seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 637
And how she lov'd him too, each unconfines Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 163
And lov'd to see a tempting lass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 27
He hath lov'd me, and I have shown him kindness; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 59
It seem'd he had lov'd them a whole summer long: Lamia, Part I, Line 250
Was none. She burnt, she lov'd the tyranny, Lamia, Part II, Line 81
Hath visions, and would speak, if he had lov'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 14
He lov'd girls smooth as shades, but hated a mere shade. The Jealousies, Line 9
 
LOV'ST............1
Who lov'st to see the hamadryads dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 236
 
LOVE..............261
That thou of love an emblem art; Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 6
The tones of love our joys enhance, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 15
E'en so the words of love beguile, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 21
Regions of peace and everlasting love ; As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 5
Should e'er unhappy love my bosom pain, To Hope, Line 25
And melt the soul to pity and to love . Ode to Apollo, Line 41
While my story of love I enraptur'd repeat. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 12
With love -looking eyes, and with voice sweetly bland. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 20
For that to love , so long, I've dormant lain: Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 8
And gentle tale of love and languishment? To one who has been long in city pent, Line 8
Oh! how I love , on a fair summer's eve, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 1
Some tale of love and arms in time of old. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 18
But there are times, when those that love the bay, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 19
And tearful ladies made for love , and pity: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 47
And all his love for gentle Lycid drown'd; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 12
What Psyche felt, and Love , when their full lips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 143
But still would seem to droop, to pine, to love . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 176
How " love doth know no fulness nor no bounds." Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 12
Hither, hither, love , Hither, hither, love, Line 1
Hither, hither, love , Hither, hither, love, Line 3
Love this boon has sent; Hither, hither, love, Line 22
You say you love ; but with a voice You say you love; but with a voice, Line 1
O love me truly! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 5
You say you love ; but with a smile You say you love; but with a voice, Line 6
O love me truly! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 10
You say you love ; but then your lips You say you love; but with a voice, Line 11
O love me truly! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 15
You say you love ; but then your hand You say you love; but with a voice, Line 16
O love me truly! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 20
O love me truly! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 25
Than Leda's love , and cresses from the rill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 158
His quick gone love , among fair blossom'd boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 375
He said: "I feel this thine endearing love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 466
No man e'er panted for a mortal love . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 526
If any said 'twas love : and yet 'twas love; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 730
If any said 'twas love: and yet 'twas love ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 730
What could it be but love ? How a ring-dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 731
And how he died: and then, that love doth scathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 733
Is made of love and friendship, and sits high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 801
Of light, and that is love : its influence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 807
She sings but to her love , nor e'er conceives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 830
Just so may love , although 'tis understood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 832
"Now, if this earthly love has power to make Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 843
A love immortal, an immortal too. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 849
When love -lorn hours had left me less a child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 885
May sigh my love unto her pitying! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 957
O sovereign power of love ! O grief! O balm! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1
The path of love and poesy. But rest, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 38
The bitterness of love : too long indeed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 105
Into the gentle bosom of thy love . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 127
But the soft shadow of my thrice-seen love , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 168
And tyranny of love be somewhat scar'd! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 174
O think how I should love a bed of flowers!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 330
Of love , that fairest joys give most unrest; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 366
When on the pleasant grass such love , lovelorn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 466
Aye, sleep; for when our love -sick queen did weep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 481
With love - he - but alas! too well I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 550
For this my love : for vexing Mars had teaz'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 558
Yet still I feel immortal! O my love , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 686
How he does love me! His poor temples beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 764
To the very tune of love - how sweet, sweet, sweet. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 765
Until we taste the life of love again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 772
I love thee, youth, more than I can conceive; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 774
But what is this to love ? O I could fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 795
Perhaps her love like mine is but unknown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 800
With fingers cool as aspen leaves. Sweet love , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 804
My happy love will overwing all bounds! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 814
Drunken from pleasure's nipple; and his love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 869
High with excessive love . "And now," thought he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 901
And call it love ? Alas, 'twas cruelty. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 972
Or what a thing is love ! 'Tis She, but lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 79
Of love -spangles, just off yon cape of trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 83
O love ! how potent hast thou been to teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 92
About the labyrinth in his soul of love . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 141
My strange love came - Felicity's abyss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 176
My sovereign vision.- Dearest love , forgive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 183
My head, and kiss death's foot. Love ! love, farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 275
My head, and kiss death's foot. Love! love , farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 275
I am a friend to love , to loves of yore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 300
More did I love to lie in cavern rude, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 354
That love should be my bane! Ah, Scylla fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 399
If thou art ripe to taste a long love dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 440
But such a love is mine, that here I chase Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 590
Adieu, sweet love , adieu!' - As shot stars fall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 600
For each their old love found. A murmuring rose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 824
At his right hand stood winged Love , and on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 864
Then Love took wing, and from his pinions shed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 891
Of love ? Now this is cruel. Since the hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 904
Some pleasant words:- but Love will have his day. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 915
Dearest Endymion! my entire love ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1022
Ah me, how I could love !- My soul doth melt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 71
For the unhappy youth - Love ! I have felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 72
But in the eye of love : there's not a sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 79
As doth the voice of love : there's not a breath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 82
Thirst for another love : O impious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 87
Goddess! I love thee not the less: from thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 92
For both, for both my love is so immense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 96
I love thee! and my days can never last. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 138
But now of all the world I love thee best. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 284
With the tinge of love , panting in safe alarm.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 314
Good-bye to all but love ! Then doth he spring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 433
Her dawning love -look rapt Endymion blesses Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 463
In tenderness, would I were whole in love ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 472
Ye shall for ever live and love , for all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 609
Let us ay love each other; let us fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 626
Us live in peace, in love and peace among Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 635
Presumptuous against love , against the sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 639
My love is still for thee. The hour may come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 657
On earth I may not love thee; and therefore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 659
To listen and think of love . Still let me speak; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 689
'Fore which I'll bend, bending, dear love , to thee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 712
Or the sweet name of love had pass'd away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 729
To the void air, bidding them find out love : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 740
I may not be thy love : I am forbidden- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 752
Nor may I be thy love . We might commit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 757
This sister's love with me?" Like one resign'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 872
Of flowers, garlands, love -knots, silly posies, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 938
And said, in a new voice, but sweet as love , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 978
Dawn'd in blue and full of love . Aye, he beheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 986
Thou shouldst, my love , by some unlook'd for change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 992
And by the kernel of thine earthly love , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 20
Of unreflecting love ;- then on the shore When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 12
Till love and fame to nothingness do sink. When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 14
I do love you both together! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 4
I love to mark sad faces in fair weather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 5
Fair and foul I love together; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 7
And hearkening for a love -sound, doth devour Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 11
A kiss should bud upon the tree of love , Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 8
My sudden adoration, my great love ! Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 7
I love your meads and I love your flowers, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 5
I love your meads and I love your flowers, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 5
And I love your junkets mainly; Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 6
But 'hind the door, I love kissing more- Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 7
I love your hills and I love your dales, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 9
I love your hills and I love your dales, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 9
And I love your flocks a bleating- Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 10
Here do they look alive to love and hate, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 38
With every morn their love grew tenderer, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 9
And yet I will, and tell my love all plain: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 38
If looks speak love -laws, I will drink her tears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 39
A dreary night of love and misery, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 50
Believe how I love thee, believe how near Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 60
" Love ! thou art leading me from wintry cold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 65
Sang, of delicious love and honey'd dart; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 78
But, for the general award of love , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 97
What love Lorenzo for their sister had, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 162
Should in their sister's love be blithe and glad, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 166
" Love , Isabel!" said he, "I was in pain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 201
Lorenzo's flush with love .- They pass'd the water Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 215
There in that forest did his great love cease; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 218
And then, instead of love , O misery! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 235
And sorrow for her love in travels rude. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 248
With love , and kept all phantom fear aloof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 290
A greater love through all my essence steal." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 320
Love never dies, but lives, immortal Lord: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 397
If Love impersonate was ever dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 398
'Twas love ; cold,- dead indeed, but not dethroned. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 400
In pity of her love , so overcast. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 500
Great love in me for thee and Poesy. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 5
And surety give to love and brotherhood. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 9
Too apt to fall in love with care All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 39
Sweet Nevis, do not quake, for though I love Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 33
Love meanwhile held her dearly with his wings, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 5
Love pour'd her beauty into my warm veins. Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 12
Beside a crumple-leaved tale of love ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 37
That I should rather love a Gothic waste Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 59
And what is Love ?- It is a doll dress'd up And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 1
That ye may love in spite of beaver hats. And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 17
On love , and wing'd St. Agnes' saintly care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 44
'Mid looks of love , defiance, hate, and scorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 69
"And now, my love , my seraph fair, awake! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 276
For if thou diest, my love , I know not where to go." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 315
Let us away, my love , with happy speed; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 347
Awake! arise! my love , and fearless be, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 350
Of Goddis love and Sathan's force The Eve of St. Mark, Line 108
And dance and kiss and love as faeries do, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 3
Doth ease its heart of love in. - I am gone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 112
She look'd at me as she did love , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 19
I love thee true. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 28
Love me, blue-eyed fairy true, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 39
I love thee, chrystal fairy true; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 62
At tender eye-dawn of aurorean love : Ode to Psyche, Line 20
To let the warm Love in! Ode to Psyche, Line 67
Ye love -sick bards, repay her scorn for scorn; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 11
Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 30
I have been half in love with easeful Death, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 52
For ever wilt thou love , and she be fair! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 20
More happy love ! more happy, happy love! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 25
More happy love! more happy, happy love ! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 25
The first was a fair maid, and Love her name; Ode on Indolence, Line 25
The last, whom I love more, the more of blame Ode on Indolence, Line 28
O folly! What is Love ? and where is it? Ode on Indolence, Line 32
What made you then, with such an anxious love , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 32
And will be, for I love such fair disgrace. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 85
Where lions tug adverse, if love grow not Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 100
From interchanged love through many years. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 101
And, Sigifred, with all his love of justice, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 118
That, by my love I swear, shall soon be his? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 120
Could not see all his parent's love aright, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 101
Of my great love for thee, my supreme child! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 125
The solitary warfare, fought for love Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 11
My love of fame, my prided honesty Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 23
More than my love , and these wide realms in fee? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
Auranthe! I have! O, my bride,- my love ,- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 5
From uttering soft responses to the love Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
Ask you for her receipt for love philtres. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 15
So trusting in thy love ; that should not make Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 117
Why should it, love ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 119a
Untun'd, and harsh, and barren of all love . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 132
O, unbenignest Love , why wilt thou let Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 29
Were clogg'd in some thick cloud? O, changeful Love , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 32
Kiss down his eyelids! Was he not thy love ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
Of Psyche given by Love , there was a buzz Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 29
What is it? By your father's love , I sue Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 152
Ah, what a world of love was at her feet! Lamia, Part I, Line 21
And love , and pleasure, and the ruddy strife Lamia, Part I, Line 40
By the love -glances of unlovely eyes, Lamia, Part I, Line 102
I love a youth of Corinth - O the bliss! Lamia, Part I, Line 119
Of love deep learned to the red heart's core: Lamia, Part I, Line 190
And fell into a swooning love of him. Lamia, Part I, Line 219
Swoon'd, murmuring of love , and pale with pain. Lamia, Part I, Line 289
Happy in beauty, life, and love , and every thing, Lamia, Part I, Line 298
A song of love , too sweet for earthly lyres, Lamia, Part I, Line 299
Without the aid of love ; yet in content Lamia, Part I, Line 314
That Lycius could not love in half a fright, Lamia, Part I, Line 335
"Why do you shudder, love , so ruefully? Lamia, Part I, Line 369
Love in a hut, with water and a crust, Lamia, Part II, Line 1
Is- Love , forgive us!- cinders, ashes, dust; Lamia, Part II, Line 2
Love in a palace is perhaps at last Lamia, Part II, Line 3
Love , jealous grown of so complete a pair, Lamia, Part II, Line 12
Saving a tythe which love still open kept, Lamia, Part II, Line 24
Besides, for all his love , in self despite, Lamia, Part II, Line 72
Till, checking his love trance, a cup he took Lamia, Part II, Line 241
passions, though not this of love , tarried with her a while to his great Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
"Who love their fellows even to the death; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 156
Aye, and could weep for love of such award." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 185
Doth ease its heart of love in. Moan and wail. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 417
Of fragrant curtain'd Love begins to weave The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 11
I cry your mercy - pity - love !- aye, love, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 1
I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love , I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 1
Merciful love that tantalises not, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 2
One-thoughted, never wand'ring, guileless love , I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 3
Of love , your kiss, those hands, those eyes divine, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 7
Touch has a memory. O say, Love , say, What can I do to drive away, Line 4
The reach of fluttering Love , What can I do to drive away, Line 22
Foisted into the canon law of love ;- What can I do to drive away, Line 26
Ah! dearest love , sweet home of all my fears To Fanny, Line 9
Save it for me, sweet love ! though music breathe To Fanny, Line 25
To one who loves you as I love , sweet Fanny, To Fanny, Line 42
Love , love alone, has pains severe and many; To Fanny, Line 46
Love, love alone, has pains severe and many; To Fanny, Line 46
Let none profane my Holy See of Love , To Fanny, Line 51
Love , on their last repose! To Fanny, Line 56
For love of mortal women, maidens fair, The Jealousies, Line 5
Of love , retired, vex'd and murmuring The Jealousies, Line 131
Love thwarted in bad temper oft has vent: The Jealousies, Line 176
"I pledge you, Hum! and pledge my dearest love , The Jealousies, Line 370
"Your Majesty's in love with some fine girl The Jealousies, Line 380
Feel, feel my pulse, how much in love I am; The Jealousies, Line 400
And sponge my forehead,- so my love doth make me pine." The Jealousies, Line 432
You say you love a mortal. I would fain The Jealousies, Line 463
 
LOVE'S............19
By thy love's milky brow! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 244
Whilst they did sleep in love's elysium. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 823
Love's standard on the battlements of song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 41
My love's far dwelling. Though the playful rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 179
Not to have dipp'd in love's most gentle stream. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 182
And soon, returning from love's banishment, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 525
Saving Love's self, who stands superb to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 535
Sat silently. Love's madness he had known: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 860
No, nor the Eolian twang of Love's own bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 973
Love's silver name upon the meadow's face. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 700
Lorenzo, a young palmer in Love's eye! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 2
Lorenzo, if thy lips breathe not love's tune."- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 30
But Selfishness, Love's cousin, held not long Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 241
And even remembrance of her love's delay. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 464
Will storm his heart, Love's fev'rous citadel: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 84
Like Love's alarum pattering the sharp sleet The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 323
Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 10
Came, as through bubbling honey, for Love's sake, Lamia, Part I, Line 65
But, as I've read Love's missal through to-day, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 13
 
LOVED.............4
Might I be loved by thee like these of yore. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 14
Long have I loved thee, yet till now not loved: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 19
Long have I loved thee, yet till now not loved : Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 19
There he says plainly that she loved a man! The Jealousies, Line 109
 
LOVELIEST.........4
One, loveliest , holding her white hand toward Sleep and Poetry, Line 366
The loveliest moon, that ever silver'd o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 592
O latest born and loveliest vision far Ode to Psyche, Line 24
Then, loveliest ! keep me free To Fanny, Line 47
 
LOVELINESS........13
Enough their simple loveliness for me, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 10
Of flowers, and fearful from its loveliness , Sleep and Poetry, Line 78
Glory and loveliness have passed away; To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 1
Its loveliness increases; it will never Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 2
Thy loveliness in dismal elements; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 312
She dies at the thinnest cloud; her loveliness Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 81
Heaven shield thee for thine utter loveliness ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 710
Of loveliness new born."- Apollo then, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 79
Fetter'd, in spite of pained loveliness ; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 3
For loveliness you may - and for the rest Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 98
Her loveliness invisible, yet free Lamia, Part I, Line 108
Some hungry spell that loveliness absorbs; Lamia, Part II, Line 259
Ah, fairest of all human loveliness ! The Jealousies, Line 168
 
LOVELORN..........4
When on the pleasant grass such love, lovelorn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 466
No word return'd: both lovelorn , silent, wan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 764
Ye artists lovelorn , madmen that ye are! On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 12
Own'd they the lovelorn piteous appeal: Lamia, Part II, Line 257
 
LOVELS............1
And charming Mister Lovels ? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 40
 
LOVELY............37
When lovely Titania was far, far away, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 27
Then why, lovely girl, should we lose all these blisses? O come, dearest Emma!, Line 17
In lovely modesty, and virtues rare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 22
Picture out each lovely meaning: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 8
From lovely woman: while brimful of this, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 146
Lovely the moon in ether, all alone: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 157
And plac'd in midst of all that lovely lass To My Brother George (epistle), Line 86
And lovely Una in a leafy nook, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 36
Of lovely Laura in her light green dress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 13
Art thou most lovely ? When gone far astray To G.A.W., Line 3
Whence I may copy many a lovely saying Sleep and Poetry, Line 65
A lovely tale of human life we'll read. Sleep and Poetry, Line 110
Flit onward - now a lovely wreath of girls Sleep and Poetry, Line 149
Into most lovely labyrinths will be gone, Sleep and Poetry, Line 266
Scarce can I scribble on; for lovely airs Sleep and Poetry, Line 327
Babbling so wildly of its lovely daughters I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 42
Closer of lovely eyes to lovely dreams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 120
Closer of lovely eyes to lovely dreams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 120
Nought but a lovely sighing of the wind I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 160
Queen of the wide air; thou most lovely queen I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 205
And lovely women were as fair and warm, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 219
More lovely than a wreath from the bay tree? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 2
And tell me lovely Jesus Y O grant that like to Peter I, Line 3
All lovely tales that we have heard or read: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 22
Poor, lonely Niobe! when her lovely young Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 339
Thou wast the charm of women, lovely Moon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 169
My children fair, my lovely girls and boys! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 547
I told thee of, where lovely Scylla lies; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 720
Where is my lovely mistress? Well-away! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1011
To see such lovely eyes in swimming search Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 63
The youth of Caria plac'd the lovely dame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 345
Pillow'd in lovely idleness, nor dream'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 467
"My Madeline! sweet dreamer! lovely bride! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 334
Besides, I thirst to pledge my lovely bride Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 119
Sweet days a lovely graduate, still unshent, Lamia, Part I, Line 198
molest him; but she, being fair and lovely , would live and die with him, that Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
was fair and lovely Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
LOVER.............8
Lover of loneliness, and wandering, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 121
He was a Poet, sure a lover too, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 193
Therefore no lover did of anguish die: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 236
"Young lover , I must weep - such hellish spite Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 615
A lover would not tread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 167
A lover shaded; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 58
Bold lover , never, never canst thou kiss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 17
Great Emperor! to adventure, like a lover true." The Jealousies, Line 486
 
LOVER'S...........2
More boisterous than a lover's bended knee; Sleep and Poetry, Line 260
The lover's endless minutes slowly pass'd; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 182
 
LOVERS............15
Are emblems true of hapless lovers dying: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 90
Squeeze as lovers should - O kiss You say you love; but with a voice, Line 23
These lovers did embrace, and we must weep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 730
Most piously;- all lovers tempest-tost, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 703
All lovers , whom fell storms have doom'd to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 722
Poor lovers lay at rest from joys and woes.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 736
Too many tears for lovers have been shed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 90
Never on such a night have lovers met, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 170
These lovers fled away into the storm. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 371
For faeries be as humans, lovers true. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 4
Either in lovers , husbands, or expence. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 58
Of rain and hail-stones, lovers need not tell As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 11
Chilly lovers , what a rout Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 64
Of all these lovers , and she grieved so Lamia, Part I, Line 105
Nor grew they pale, as mortal lovers do. Lamia, Part I, Line 145
 
LOVERS'...........1
If thou art powerful, these lovers' pains; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1016
 
LOVES.............14
Of the little loves that fly Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 29
Who loves to peer up at the morning sun, On The Story of Rimini, Line 1
Who loves to linger with that brightest one On The Story of Rimini, Line 5
I am a friend to love, to loves of yore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 300
She loves me dearly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 177
Dusk for our loves , yet light enough to grace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 676
Loves not too rough a treatment, gentle sir; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 37
The shut rose shall dream of our loves and awake Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 21
And soft adorings from their loves receive The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 48
I shall believe in wizard-woven loves Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 47
Out of his sight a father whom he loves ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 22
To wander as she loves , in liberty. Lamia, Part I, Line 109
To one who loves you as I love, sweet Fanny, To Fanny, Line 42
Loves to beat up against a tyrannous blast, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 30
 
LOVING............10
Over the genius loving heart, a feeling To George Felton Mathew, Line 9
A loving -kindness for the great man's fame, Addressed to Haydon, Line 2
Loving and hatred, misery and weal, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 112
Divine by loving , and so goes on And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 5
I come to greet you as a loving son, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 78
Then grant me loving pardon,- but not else,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 110
For loving Conrad, see you fawn on him. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 175
To that crime- loving rebel; that Boulogne- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 38
In loving pretty little Bertha, since The Jealousies, Line 475
To your so loving courtiers for one day; The Jealousies, Line 536
 
LOW...............33
From their low palfreys o'er his neck they bent: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 87
Low murmurer of tender lullabies! Sleep and Poetry, Line 12
Or the low rumblings earth's regions under; Sleep and Poetry, Line 28
From low hung branches; little space they stop; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 88
Or was I a worm too low -creeping for death, God of the golden bow, Line 11
To sing for thee; low creeping strawberries Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 257
The sudden silence, or the whispers low , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 399
From low -grown branches, and his footsteps slow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 417
And, when the pleasant sun is getting low , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 483
And sink thus low ! but I will ease my breast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 538
Said I, low voic'd: ' Ah, whither! 'Tis the grot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 943
The burning prayer within him; so, bent low , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 546
And my couch a low grass tomb. Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 33
And on her couch low murmuring "Where? O where?" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 240
Pale Isabella kiss'd it, and low moan'd. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 399
Sound mournfully upon the winds and low ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 445
But their low voices are not heard, though come on travels drear; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 16
To find a bard's low cradle place about the silent north. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 28
My forehead low , Spirit here that reignest, Line 6
Each arched porch and entry low The Eve of St. Mark, Line 19
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 24
Thus whisper'd low and solemn in his ear. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 308
Low -ebb'd still hid it up in shallow gloom;- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 136
The other cursing low , whose voice I knew Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 123
Kept up among the guests, discoursing low Lamia, Part II, Line 201
Where the white heifers low . And appetite The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 38
Whether his labours be sublime or low - The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 173
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 329
With sad low tones, while thus he spake, and sent The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 410
Louted full low , and hoarsely did him greet: The Jealousies, Line 256
Your voice low ," said the Emperor, "and steep The Jealousies, Line 428
So that his frost-white eyebrows, beetling low , The Jealousies, Line 506
Bow'd low with high demeanour, and, to pay The Jealousies, Line 741
 
LOWER.............1
A little lower than the chilly sheen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 207
 
LOWERS............2
And, in its middle space, a sky that never lowers . Imitation of Spenser, Line 9
Far in the west where the May-cloud lowers , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 97
 
LOWEST............3
I thought her dead, and on the lowest step Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 120
The numbness; strove to gain the lowest step. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 128
The lowest stair; and as it touch'd, life seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 133
 
LOWING............2
Are not our lowing heifers sleeker than Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 214
Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 33
 
LOWLAND...........2
With lowland blood; and lowland blood she thought The Jealousies, Line 80
With lowland blood; and lowland blood she thought The Jealousies, Line 80
 
LOWLINESS.........1
I move to the end in lowliness of heart.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 29
 
LOWLY.............6
Of heaven, Hesperus - let him lowly speak On The Story of Rimini, Line 6
With uplift hands our foreheads, lowly bending, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 303
And airy cradle, lowly bow'd his face Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 337
Safe on the lowly ground, she bless'd her fate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 73
He follow'd through a lowly arched way, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 109
And make him cower lowly while I soar? What can I do to drive away, Line 23
 
LOWS..............1
Gleams in the sun, the milk-white heifer lows , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 21
 
LOWTHER...........1
O Lowther , how much better thou All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 21
 
LOYAL.............1
Of loyal homage now! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 81a
 
LOYALTY...........2
But, calling interest loyalty , swore faith Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
Their new-blown loyalty with guerdon fair, The Jealousies, Line 742
 
LUCENT............5
In lucent Thames reflected:- warm desires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 85
And lucent syrops, tinct with cinnamon; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 267
Of all my lucent empire? It is left Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 239
From happy pieties, thy lucent fans, Ode to Psyche, Line 41
That warm, white, lucent , million-pleasured breast,- I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 8
 
LUCID.............7
Eolian magic from their lucid wombs: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 786
Of lucid depth the floor, and far outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 879
To muse for ever - Then a lucid wave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 997
Snapping his lucid fingers merrily!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 569
Her lucid bow, continuing thus: "Drear, drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 988
Before each lucid pannel fuming stood Lamia, Part II, Line 175
That in its lucid depth reflected pure The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 52
 
LUCIFER...........2
Out-facing Lucifer , and then had hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 531
To Lucifer or Baal, when he'd pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 892
 
LUCKLESS..........1
Seeing all their luckless race are dead, save me, Lamia, Part II, Line 96
 
LUCKY.............2
If lucky gadfly had but ta'en All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 25
Wring hands; embrace; and swear how lucky 'twas Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 251
 
LUCY..............2
A Faery Tale, by Lucy Vaughan Lloyd of China Walk, Lambeth The Jealousies, Subtitle
Lucy learnt this The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
LUDOLPH...........39
LUDOLPH , his Son Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 2
SIGIFRED, an Officer, friend of Ludolph Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 5
What tidings of the battle? Albert? Ludolph ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 19
Hath given consent that you should marry Ludolph ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 87
His Highness Ludolph - where is he? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 98a
The Emperor's pardon, Ludolph kept aloof, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 101
But for poor Ludolph , he is food for sorrow; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 153
But can you give a guess where Ludolph is? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 65
I must see Ludolph or the - What's that shout? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 82
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
Ludolph and the swift Arab are the same; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 3
Ludolph , that blast of the Hungarians, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 19
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
stage, bowing with respect to LUDOLPH , he frowning on them. CONRAD follows. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
Princely Ludolph , hail! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 26b
Ludolph , you have no saving plea in store? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 104
Ludolph , I will! I will! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 117b
But, Ludolph , ere you go, I would enquire Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 118
No more of her. Auranthe - Ludolph , come! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 152
Enter, as from the Marriage, OTHO, LUDOLPH , AURANTHE, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Now, Ludolph ! Now, Auranthe, daughter fair! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 1
Well, Ludolph , what say you? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 35b
Ludolph ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 49a
Me - the Prince Ludolph , in this presence here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 78
Ludolph , be calm. Ethelbert, peace awhile. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 103
Ludolph , old Ethelbert, be sure, comes not Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 107
My gentle Ludolph , harbour not a fear; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 195
[Exit LUDOLPH . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 235
Young Ludolph , like a fiery arrow, shot Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 276
Condoling with Prince Ludolph . In fit time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 72
Ludolph ! Erminia! Proofs! O heavy day! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 92
Enter LUDOLPH and Page. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Seeing no Ludolph comes. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 66a
Enter LUDOLPH and Page. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D.b to Line 16
Enter LUDOLPH . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 2b
Poor cheated Ludolph ! Make the forest hiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Of Ludolph with the Princess. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 6a
O, my poor boy! My son! My son! My Ludolph ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 1
Enter LUDOLPH , followed by SIGIFRED and Page. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 22
 
LUDOLPH'S.........3
E'en for his Highness Ludolph's sceptry hand, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
Daughter, your hand; Ludolph's would fit it best. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 201
My friend had held poor Ludolph's honour dear. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 63
 
LULL..............4
On some bright essence could I lean, and lull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 172
To cradle thee, my sweet, and lull thee: yes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 572
Warbling the while as if to lull and greet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 560
By every lull to cool her infant's pain: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 36
 
LULL'D............5
Be lull'd with songs of mine. Fair world, adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 103
But lapp'd and lull'd along the dangerous sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 646
Lull'd with its simple song his fluttering breast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1031
Aye, his lull'd soul was there, although upborne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 549
The moss-lain Dryads shall be lull'd to sleep; Ode to Psyche, Line 57
 
LULLABIES.........2
Low murmurer of tender lullabies ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 12
So, fairy-thing, it shall have lullabies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 575
 
LULLABY...........8
And, from the turf, a lullaby doth pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 793
A lullaby to silence.- "Youth! now strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 768
Lambs bleat my lullaby . Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 12
And sing to it one latest lullaby ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 340
I sing an infant's lullaby , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 13
A pretty lullaby ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 14
And hear my lullaby ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 17
And hear my lullaby ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 26
 
LULLED............2
When lulled Argus, baffled, swoon'd and slept, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 2
And there she lulled me asleep, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 33
 
LULLING...........3
Than Dryope's lone lulling of her child; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 495
A breeze, most softly lulling to my soul; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 567
Around my bed its lulling charities. Sonnet to Sleep, Line 8
 
LURCH.............1
Than with these horrid moods be left in lurch . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 109
 
LURE..............1
To lure - Endymion, dear brother, say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 845
 
LURED.............1
Lured by the innocent dimples. To sweet rest To My Brother George (epistle), Line 101
 
LURES.............1
These lures I straight forget, - e'en ere I dine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 24
 
LURK'D............1
As daisies lurk'd in June-grass, buds in treen; The Jealousies, Line 347
 
LURKING...........2
A lurking trouble in his nether lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 179
"Do not you see there, lurking in a cloud, The Jealousies, Line 48
 
LUSCIOUS..........2
And reaching fingers, 'mid a luscious heap Sleep and Poetry, Line 362
Between her luscious lips and eyelids thin. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 942
 
LUSH..............5
From his lush clover covert; - when anew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 3
And let a lush laburnum oversweep them, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 31
Grows lush in juicy stalks, I'll smoothly steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 46
Hung a lush screen of drooping weeds, and spread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 940
Hour after hour, to each lush -leav'd rill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 52
 
LUSHEST...........1
Over the darkest, lushest blue-bell bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 631
 
LUSTRE............3
Pours with the lustre of a falling star. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 42
Lustre into the sun, and put cold doom Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 277
Of wealthy lustre was the banquet-room, Lamia, Part II, Line 173
 
LUSTRES...........2
Reflect athwart the stream their yellow lustres , To George Felton Mathew, Line 42
Their lustres with the gloomier tapestries- Lamia, Part I, Line 53
 
LUSTROUS..........7
The lustrous passion from a falcon-eye?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 154
The lustrous salvers in the moonlight gleam; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 284
And diamond-paved lustrous long arcades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 220
Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 29
And thou, bright sceptre, lustrous in my eyes,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 81
And diamond paved lustrous long arcades. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 56
Speed giving to the winds her lustrous hair; The Jealousies, Line 41
 
LUSTY.............3
He hath his lusty spring, when fancy clear Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 3
But flowers bursting out with lusty pride, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 17
Grew, like a lusty flower in June's caress. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 72
 
LUTE..............21
Had touch'd her plaintive lute ; and thou, being by, To Lord Byron, Line 4
There, oft would he bring from his soft sighing lute On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 29
Why touch thy soft lute God of the golden bow, Line 21
And, if thy lute is here, softly intreat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 487
And took a lute , from which there pulsing came Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 491
Her self-possession - swung the lute aside, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 504
The seed its harvest, or the lute its tones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 840
Alone? No, no; and by the Orphean lute , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 164
Thine honied tongue - lute -breathings, which I gasp Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 820
"I touch'd no lute , I sang not, trod no measures: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 338
Theban Amphion leaning on his lute : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1002
Thy lute -voic'd brother will I sing ere long, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 774
O golden-tongued Romance, with serene lute ! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 1
Her lute -string gave an echo of his name, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 15
Upon his lips, and taken the soft lute Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 278
Her own lute thou wilt see: no time to spare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 175
Awakening up, he took her hollow lute ,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 289
No voice, no lute , no pipe, no incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 32
Thy voice, thy lute , thy pipe, thy incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 46
The soft, lute -finger'd Muses chaunting clear, Lamia, Part I, Line 73
By faint degrees, voice, lute , and pleasure ceased; Lamia, Part II, Line 265
 
LUTES.............3
Be tender of your strings, ye soothing lutes ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 969
Your lutes , and gentler fate?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 221
When he shall hear the wedding lutes a playing.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 601
 
LUTING............1
And in the air, her new voice luting soft, Lamia, Part I, Line 167
 
LUXURIANCE........1
This calm luxuriance of blissful light, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 237
 
LUXURIANT.........1
Parting luxuriant curls;- and the swift bound Sleep and Poetry, Line 334
 
LUXURIES..........3
Of luxuries : yet I must not forget Sleep and Poetry, Line 347
Of luxuries bright, milky, soft and rosy. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 28
One thought beyond thy argent luxuries ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 186
 
LUXURIOUS.........3
When it is moving on luxurious wings, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 131
A humid eye, and steps luxurious , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 910
Luxurious in her sorrows, soft and new. Lamia, Part II, Line 74
 
LUXURIOUSLY.......3
And all around it dipp'd luxuriously Imitation of Spenser, Line 28
Was warm'd luxuriously by divine Mozart; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 110
He hath his summer, when luxuriously Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 5
 
LUXURY............10
All the soft luxury Calidore: A Fragment, Line 92
Of luxury , and my young spirit follow Sleep and Poetry, Line 59
To taste the luxury of sunny beams I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 74
In summer luxury ,- he has never done On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 6
A leafy luxury , seeing I could please To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 13
Yet 'tis a gentle luxury to weep On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 6
To brood so long upon one luxury , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 855
In all this quiet luxury ; and hath set Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 486
A dewy luxury was in his eyes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 676
She brooded o'er the luxury alone: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 236
 
LYCEAN............1
Upon thy Mount Lycean !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 306
 
LYCID.............1
And all his love for gentle Lycid drown'd; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 12
 
LYCIDAS...........1
"I am Lycidas ," said he, Not Aladdin magian, Line 25
 
LYCIUS............26
Cried, " Lycius ! gentle Lycius!"- Borne aloft Lamia, Part I, Line 168
Cried, "Lycius! gentle Lycius !"- Borne aloft Lamia, Part I, Line 168
Ah, happy Lycius !- for she was a maid Lamia, Part I, Line 185
She saw the young Corinthian Lycius Lamia, Part I, Line 216
Turn'd - syllabling thus, "Ah, Lycius bright, Lamia, Part I, Line 244
Lycius , look back! and be some pity shown." Lamia, Part I, Line 246
Thou art a scholar, Lycius , and must know Lamia, Part I, Line 279
Lycius from death awoke into amaze, Lamia, Part I, Line 322
That Lycius could not love in half a fright, Lamia, Part I, Line 335
Lycius to all made eloquent reply, Lamia, Part I, Line 340
By blinded Lycius , so in her comprized. Lamia, Part I, Line 347
Lycius shrank closer, as they met and past, Lamia, Part I, Line 366
His features:- Lycius ! wherefore did you blind Lamia, Part I, Line 373
Yourself from his quick eyes?" Lycius replied, Lamia, Part I, Line 374
Had Lycius liv'd to hand his story down, Lamia, Part II, Line 7
Of trumpets - Lycius started - the sounds fled, Lamia, Part II, Line 28
Lycius , perplex'd at words so blind and blank, Lamia, Part II, Line 102
( Lycius was gone to summon all his kin) Lamia, Part II, Line 112
O senseless Lycius ! Madman! wherefore flout Lamia, Part II, Line 147
Lycius ," said he, "for uninvited guest Lamia, Part II, Line 165
And you forgive me." Lycius blush'd, and led Lamia, Part II, Line 169
What wreath for Lamia? What for Lycius ? Lamia, Part II, Line 221
By her glad Lycius sitting, in chief place, Lamia, Part II, Line 239
Lycius then press'd her hand, with devout touch, Lamia, Part II, Line 249
From Lycius answer'd, as heart-struck and lost, Lamia, Part II, Line 293
a memorable instance in this kind, which I may not omit, of one Menippus Lycius , Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
LYCIUS'...........1
And Lycius' arms were empty of delight, Lamia, Part II, Line 307
 
LYDIAN............2
Beckon me sternly from soft " Lydian airs," To George Felton Mathew, Line 18
Himself from fireside joys, and Lydian airs, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 7
 
LYING.............5
Ah! when I hear each traitorous lying bell, Lines Written on 29 May, Line 4
Can make their lying lips turn pale of hue, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 13
Dovelike in the dim cell lying beyond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 65
A skull upon a mat of roses lying , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 42
His running, lying , flying foot-man too,- The Jealousies, Line 53
 
LYMNING...........1
Perhaps to see shapes of light, aerial lymning , Sleep and Poetry, Line 33
 
LYNX'S............1
Might mark a lynx's eye, there glimmered light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 123
 
LYRE..............22
The sweet majestic tone of Maro's lyre ; Ode to Apollo, Line 14
'Tis still! - Wild warblings from the AEolian lyre Ode to Apollo, Line 34
The golden lyre itself were dimly seen: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 12
And of the golden lyre , God of the golden bow, Line 2
Of thron'd Apollo, could breathe back the lyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 362
One, kneeling to a lyre , touch'd the strings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 420
Still brooding o'er the cadence of his lyre ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 456
The lyre of his soul Eolian tun'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 866
How sweet, and sweeter! for I heard a lyre , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 421
This wand against yon lyre on the pedestal." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 765
New growth about each shell and pendent lyre ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 928
And to god Phoebus, for a golden lyre ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 702
And thy lyre shall never have a slacken'd string; Apollo to the Graces, Line 12
With the hot lyre and thee God of the meridian, Line 21
Through bronzed lyre in tragic order go, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 443
See, see the lyre , the lyre, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 33
See, see the lyre, the lyre , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 33
Didst find a lyre all golden by thy side, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 63
And I will flit into it with my lyre , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 101
Too, too late for the fond believing lyre , Ode to Psyche, Line 37
Let us inspect the lyre , and weigh the stress If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 7
Amphion's utterance, toned with his lyre , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 24
 
LYRES.............2
With fervour seize their adamantine lyres , Ode to Apollo, Line 5
A song of love, too sweet for earthly lyres , Lamia, Part I, Line 299
 
LYRIC.............1
While little harps were touch'd by many a lyric fay. The Jealousies, Line 36
 
LYRIST............2
That blasphemed the bright Lyrist to his face, Sleep and Poetry, Line 202
To that same feather'd lyrist , who straightway, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 432
 
LYRISTS...........1
Of all mock lyrists , large self worshipers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 207
 
LYTHE.............1
Delicate, put to the proof the lythe Caducean charm. Lamia, Part I, Line 133


Published @ RC

March 2005