M-Man - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
MACAW.............1
Macaw , and tender av'davat, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 81
 
MACE..............2
Creus was one; his ponderous iron mace Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 41
Smote 'twixt the horns by the death-stunning mace Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 131
 
MACEDONIAN........1
The Indus with his Macedonian numbers? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 25
 
MAD...............28
Could I, at once, my mad ambition smother, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 110
Indeed, locks bright enough to make me mad ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 613
When mad Eurydice is listening to't; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 165
A mad -pursuing of the fog-born elf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 277
But my poor mistress went distract and mad , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 473
Swift, mad , fantastic round the rocks, and lash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 920
No housing from the storm and tempests mad , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 322
Old Eolus would stifle his mad spleen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 653
To our mad minstrelsy!' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 238
Most like with joy gone mad , with sorrow cloy'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 495
O, what a mad endeavour Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 6
And mad with glimpses at futurity! Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 31
Both together, sane and mad ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 19
Gone mad through olden songs and poesies. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 54
There is no other crime, no mad assail Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 155
His bitter thoughts to other, well nigh mad Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 164
And I should rage, if spirits could go mad ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 314
The pleasant valleys - have I not, mad brain'd, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 12
What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 9
Must needs exclaim that I am mad forsooth, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
Or the mad -fumed wine-? Nay, do not frown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 35
How's this? I marvel! Yet you look not mad . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 142
It is so mad a deed, I must reflect Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 240
I was a mad conspirator, chiefly too Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 141
Half mad - not right here - I forget my purpose. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 176
Let the mad poets say whate'er they please Lamia, Part I, Line 328
His foolish heart from its mad pompousness, Lamia, Part II, Line 114
With mad -cap pleasure, or hand-clasp'd amaze: The Jealousies, Line 724
 
MAD'ST............1
When to the folks thou mad'st a bow All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 23
 
MADAM.............3
A nightmare sure - What, madam , was it you? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 27
Red-Crag!- What, madam , can you then repent Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 44
Dear madam , I must kiss you, faith I must! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 51
 
MADDEN............1
Such power to madden thee? And is it true- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 956
 
MADDEN'D..........2
By Arne delighted, or by Handel madden'd ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 111
Will gulph me - help!" - At this with madden'd stare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 195
 
MADE..............104
Made him delay to let their tender feet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 85
A hand heaven made to succour the distress'd; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 106
And tearful ladies made for love, and pity: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 47
Made by some mighty oaks: as they would chase Sleep and Poetry, Line 140
Made great Apollo blush for this his land. Sleep and Poetry, Line 183
Is made of the four seasons - manifest Sleep and Poetry, Line 295
Made Ariadne's cheek look blushingly. Sleep and Poetry, Line 336
"Places of nestling green for Poets made ." Story of Rimini I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Epigraph
For what has made the sage or poet write I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 125
Made silken ties, that never may be broken. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 238
Made a naumachia for mice and rats: Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 4
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 11
Made every eastern cloud a silvery pyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 96
His friends, the dearest. Hushing signs she made , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 409
On her own couch, new made of flower leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 438
Made delicate from all white-flower bells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 669
And fitful whims of sleep are made of, streams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 749
Is made of love and friendship, and sits high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 801
Has made me scruple whether that same night Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 860
Of weary days, made deeper exquisite, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 911
The mighty ones who have made eternal day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 253
Or than the west, made jealous by the smiles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 361
Are swallow'd all, and made a seared dearth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 368
On soft Adonis' shoulders, made him still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 521
Of mighty Poets is made up; the scroll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 724
Half lost, and all old hymns made nullity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 794
Made fiercer by a fear lest any part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 845
Of mine was once made perfect in these woods. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 966
Made of rose leaves and thistledown, express, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 571
This mighty consummation made , the host Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 828
And made those dazzled thousands veil their eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 858
Made a delighted way. Then dance, and song, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 933
To what my own full thoughts had made too tender, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 74
Sweet as a muskrose upon new- made hay; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 102
From kissing cymbals made a merry din- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 198
Made for the soul to wander in and trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 514
Many upon thy death have ditties made ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 836
Made their cheeks paler by the break of June: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 26
And to the silence made a gentle moan, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 238
Had made a miry channel for his tears. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 280
It made sad Isabella's eyelids ache, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 327
Those dainties made to still an infant's cries: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 374
And Neptune made for thee a spumy tent, To Homer, Line 7
And Pan made sing for thee his forest-hive; To Homer, Line 8
Unbosom'd so and so eternal made , Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 13
She made her garlanding, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 18
O he made There was a naughty boy, Line 86
Drown'd wast thou till an earthquake made thee steep- To Ailsa Rock, Line 13
There is a joy in every spot made known by times of old, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 5
And then, from twelve till two, this Eden made is Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 12
Been made for Cleopatra's winding sheet; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 50
Till Miss's comb is made a pearl tiara, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 7
Made purple riot: then doth he propose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 138
Made a dim, silver twilight, soft he set The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 254
Made tuneable with every sweetest vow; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 309
I made a whipstock of a faery's wand; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 26
You see: I made a whipstock of a wand; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 31
They saw her highness had made up her mind, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 45
How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 35
Beautiful things made new, for the surprise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 132
And made his hands to struggle in the air, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 136
Found way unto Olympus, and made quake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 146
Oft made Hyperion ache. His palace bright, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 176
And made their dove-wings tremble. On he flared, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 217
Made a fit roofing to this nest of woe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 14
By noble winged creatures he hath made ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 235
Of what I heard, and how it made me weep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 260
And murmur'd into it, and made melody- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 271
Now saw the light and made it terrible. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 366
Soon wild commotions shook him, and made flush Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 124
I made a garland for her head, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 17
And made sweet moan. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 20
What made you then, with such an anxious love, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 32
made at parting, and I will forget to send the Emperor letters Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
You may be made a duke. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 54a
Ere, by one grasp, this common hand is made Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 86
Auranthe, you have made Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 156b
As yesterday the Arab made thee stoop. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 110
Made iron-stern by habit! Thou shalt see Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 148
Of his great summoner, and made retreat Lamia, Part I, Line 11
Made gloom of all her frecklings, streaks and bars, Lamia, Part I, Line 159
For by some freakful chance he made retire Lamia, Part I, Line 230
Lycius to all made eloquent reply, Lamia, Part I, Line 340
Made , by a spell, the triple league decrease Lamia, Part I, Line 345
Where use had made it sweet, with eyelids closed, Lamia, Part II, Line 23
Made close inquiry; from whose touch she shrank, Lamia, Part II, Line 103
Supportress of the faery-roof, made moan Lamia, Part II, Line 123
Unweave a rainbow, as it erewhile made Lamia, Part II, Line 237
And shall I see thee made a serpent's prey?" Lamia, Part II, Line 298
With plantane, and spice blossoms, made a screen; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 21
That made my heart too small to hold its blood. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 254
Beautiful things made new for the surprize The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 437
And made their dove-wings tremble: on he flared The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 61
Whose lips were solid, whose soft hands were made The Jealousies, Line 6
'Twas not the glance itself made nursey flinch, The Jealousies, Line 69
An article made up of calumny The Jealousies, Line 104
I'll show him that his speeches made me sick, The Jealousies, Line 148
Just as he made his vow, it 'gan to rain, The Jealousies, Line 224
" Made racy - (sure my boldness is misplaced!)- The Jealousies, Line 367
(I own it,)- have made too free with his wine; The Jealousies, Line 614
And made a very tolerable broth- The Jealousies, Line 651
"From two to half-past, dusky way we made , The Jealousies, Line 658
She wish'd a game at whist - made three revokes- The Jealousies, Line 700
And made him read in many a learned book, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 4
 
MADEIRA...........1
Away with old hock and madeira ! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 2
 
MADELINE..........10
Full of this whim was thoughtful Madeline : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 55
For Madeline . Beside the portal doors, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 76
All saints to give him sight of Madeline , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 78
"Now tell me where is Madeline ," said he, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 114
And Madeline asleep in lap of legends old. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 135
When Madeline , St. Agnes' charmed maid, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 192
At which fair Madeline began to weep, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 302
"This is no dream, my bride, my Madeline !" The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 326
"My Madeline ! sweet dreamer! lovely bride! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 334
To trust, fair Madeline , to no rude infidel. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 342
 
MADELINE'S........2
Even to Madeline's chamber, and there hide The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 164
And threw warm gules on Madeline's fair breast, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 218
 
MADEST............1
Thou madest Pluto bear thin element; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 99
 
MADLY.............6
Should madly follow that bright path of light Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 60
I was distracted; madly did I kiss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 653
To some black cloud; thence down I'll madly sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 247
Sprang to each other madly ; and the rest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 794
All madly dancing through the pleasant valley, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 202
So most maliciously, so madly striven Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 227
 
MADMAN............3
Ah! rather let me like a madman run Sleep and Poetry, Line 301
Aye, if a madman could have leave to pass a healthful day, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 25
O senseless Lycius! Madman ! wherefore flout Lamia, Part II, Line 147
 
MADMEN............1
Ye artists lovelorn, madmen that ye are! On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 12
 
MADNESS...........12
There is for madness - cruel or complying? Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 6
Are gone in tender madness , and anon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 949
My madness impious; for, by all the stars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 184
From the clear moon, the trees, and coming madness . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 218
My lonely madness . Speak, delicious fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 748
Sat silently. Love's madness he had known: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 860
My madness ! let it mantle rosy-warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 313
Of madness ?- God of Song, God of the meridian, Line 17
Dazzled his madness ! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 66
To change; her elfin blood in madness ran, Lamia, Part I, Line 147
Is't madness or a hunger after death King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 14
Yes, of thy madness thou shalt take the meed- King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 19
 
MAGAZIN...........1
The Magazin des Modes now open is The Jealousies, Line 283
 
MAGIAN............3
His magian fish through hated fire and flame? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 265
Not Aladdin magian Not Aladdin magian, Line 1
"Leave her to me," rejoin'd the magian : The Jealousies, Line 532
 
MAGIC.............24
O magic sleep! O comfortable bird, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 453
There blossom'd suddenly a magic bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 554
Eolian magic from their lucid wombs: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 786
Arion's magic to the Atlantic isles; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 360
The streams with changed magic interlace: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 613
Then all its buried magic , till it flush'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 900
Of ambitious magic : every ocean-form Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 199
Went arching up, and like two magic ploughs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 222
Scans all the depths of magic , and expounds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 697
Of his swift magic . Diving swans appear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 339
Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 8
From some old magic like Urganda's sword. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 29
From the poor girl by magic of their light, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 291
And why it flourish'd, as by magic touch; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 459
All the magic of the place. Not Aladdin magian, Line 49
Hurry along to some less magic shade. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 8
Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Ode to a Nightingale, Line 69
Silence! and hear the magic of a name- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 92
Delicate, godlike, magic ! must I leave Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 84
And wonder that 'tis so,- the magic chance! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 69
Unlawful magic , and enticing lies. Lamia, Part II, Line 286
Cham is said to have been the inventor of magic . The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
This is the magic , this the potent charm, The Jealousies, Line 518
Under one arm the magic book he bore, The Jealousies, Line 606
 
MAGICAL...........2
In magical powers to bless, and to sooth. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 20
In magical powers, to bless and to sooth. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 44
 
MAGICIAN..........3
It was indeed the great magician , The Jealousies, Line 307
For the rose-water vase, magician mine! The Jealousies, Line 431
Then the magician solemnly 'gan frown, The Jealousies, Line 505
 
MAGICIAN'S........2
"That curst magician's name fell icy numb Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 555
Until he knock'd at the magician's door; The Jealousies, Line 275
 
MAGNIFICENCE......8
Leading afar past wild magnificence , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 598
A new magnificence . On oozy throne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 993
Of Haydon's in its fresh magnificence . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 69
That inlet to severe magnificence Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 211
magnificence , with supper-tables, laden with services of gold and silver. A Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Some wider-domed high magnificence ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 34
The misery in fit magnificence . Lamia, Part II, Line 116
For there was more magnificence behind: The Jealousies, Line 595
 
MAGNIFICENT.......2
Their doming curtains, high, magnificent , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 870
Of all she list, strange or magnificent : Lamia, Part I, Line 204
 
MAGNIFIED.........1
Upon thy vaporous bosom, magnified Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 19
 
MAGNITUDE.........1
A sun - a shadow of a magnitude . On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 14
 
MAGO..............2
Rejoin'd the mago , "but on Bertha muse; The Jealousies, Line 434
For we have proved the mago never fell The Jealousies, Line 788
 
MAIA..............1
Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia ! Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 1
 
MAIAN.............1
Sending forth Maian incense, spread around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 103
 
MAID..............31
Should e'er the fine-eyed maid to me be kind, To George Felton Mathew, Line 35
To find a place where I may greet the maid - To George Felton Mathew, Line 54
Keeping a silence round a sleeping maid ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 68
Windingly by it, so the quiet maid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 448
And then, towards me, like a very maid , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 634
Sat silent: for the maid was very loth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 711
Old Atlas' children? Art a maid of the waters, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 690
Fair maid , be pitiful to my great woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 949
Thou wouldst bathe once again. Innocent maid ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 978
From my dear native land! Ah, foolish maid ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 31
I was to top the heavens. Dear maid , sith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 110
But thee to comfort a poor lonely maid ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 287
Can I prize thee, fair maid , all price above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 473
"I would have thee my only friend, sweet maid ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 849
And, for my sake, let this young maid abide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 865
Of many a maid have given thee many a maul, To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 12
Would, with his maid Marian, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 11
Honour to maid Marian, Robin Hood, Line 59
My lady's maid had a silken scarf, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 13
Where be ye going, you Devon maid , Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 1
Of the maid There was a naughty boy, Line 65
So far into your bosom - gentle maid Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 36
Too much gaz'd at? Where's the maid Fancy, Line 70
When Madeline, St. Agnes' charmed maid , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 192
Through all their labyrinths; and let the maid Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 21
The first was a fair maid , and Love her name; Ode on Indolence, Line 25
If you have any pity for a maid , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 44
Too gentle Hermes, hast thou found the maid ?" Lamia, Part I, Line 80
Ah, happy Lycius!- for she was a maid Lamia, Part I, Line 185
She sha'n't be maid of honour,- by heaven that she sha'n't! The Jealousies, Line 153
For on that eve alone can you the maid convey." The Jealousies, Line 504
 
MAIDEN............9
Tenderly her fancy from its maiden snow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 29
Each tender maiden whom he once thought fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 892
Sometimes these very pangs. Dear maiden , steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 985
The maiden sobb'd awhile, and then replied: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 125
To give maiden blushes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 149
To lose in grieving all my maiden prime. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 278
She scarcely heard: her maiden eyes divine, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 57
Bertha was a maiden fair The Eve of St. Mark, Line 39
Is heap'd upon her, maiden most unmeek,- Ode on Indolence, Line 29
 
MAIDEN'S..........6
Whose lips have trembled with a maiden's eyes. Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 8
The light uplifting of a maiden's veil; Sleep and Poetry, Line 92
Than the soft rustle of a maiden's gown I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 95
Or maiden's sigh, that grief itself embalms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 402
Doth catch at the maiden's gown. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 18
The maiden's chamber, silken, hush'd, and chaste; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 187
 
MAIDENHEADS.......1
The maidenheads are going. O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 4
 
MAIDENHOOD........3
No higher bard than simple maidenhood , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 726
All fancy, pride, and fickle maidenhood , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 742
And robs his fair name of its maidenhood ; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 4
 
MAIDENS...........10
Fondled the maidens with the breasts of cream; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 34
Young men, and maidens at each other gaz'd I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 231
Come hither all sweet maidens , soberly On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 1
Adieu!" Whereat those maidens , with wild stare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 903
He saw not the two maidens , nor their smiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 969
And when maidens go a maying, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 3
Where the maidens sweet For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 22
What men or gods are these? What maidens loth? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 8
Of marble men and maidens overwrought, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 42
For love of mortal women, maidens fair, The Jealousies, Line 5
 
MAIDS.............4
That maids will sing them on their bridal night. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 82
New singing for our maids shalt thou devise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 839
The restoration of some captive maids , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 191
To waiting- maids , and bed-room coteries, The Jealousies, Line 119
 
MAIL..............3
To melting pulp, that fish would have bright mail , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 837
Spoilt all her silver mail , and golden brede; Lamia, Part I, Line 158
Curricles, or mail -coaches, swift beyond compare." The Jealousies, Line 252
 
MAIL'D............1
Of shields upon the pavement, when bright mail'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 15
 
MAILED............2
And mailed hand held out, ready to greet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 126
Of mailed heroes should tear off my crown:- To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 13
 
MAILS.............1
To think how they may ache in icy hoods and mails . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 18
 
MAIM..............1
What doth strengthen and what maim . Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 34
 
MAIN..............8
Wasting of old time - with a billowy main - On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 13
Or to tread breathless round the frothy main , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 270
And snatch thee from the morning; o'er the main Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 697
I was a fisher once, upon this main , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 318
Lifted dry above the main , Not Aladdin magian, Line 17
Until he reach'd the great main cupola; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 221
But for the main , here found they covert drear. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 32
Somewhat in sadness, but pleas'd in the main , The Jealousies, Line 453
 
MAINLY............1
And I love your junkets mainly ; Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 6
 
MAINTAIN..........1
This way he comes, and if you would maintain King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 24
 
MAINTAIN'D........1
While still the dazzling globe maintain'd eclipse, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 288
 
MAINTAINS.........1
He sole and lone maintains King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 10b
 
MAJESTIC..........6
How soon that voice, majestic and elate, Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 5
The sweet majestic tone of Maro's lyre; Ode to Apollo, Line 14
Regal his shape majestic , a vast shade Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 372
Full and majestic ; it is well enough, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 83
Majestic shadow, tell me: sure not all The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 187
Majestic shadow, tell me where I am: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 211
 
MAJESTICAL........1
But lets it sometimes pace abroad majestical , Lamia, Part II, Line 59
 
MAJESTIES.........2
Yet few of these far majesties , ah, few! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 34
Majesties , sovran voices, agonies, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 115
 
MAJESTY...........23
And oar'd himself along with majesty ; Imitation of Spenser, Line 15
And as, in sparkling majesty , a star To Hope, Line 43
Whose congregated majesty so fills Sleep and Poetry, Line 208
From majesty : but in clear truth the themes Sleep and Poetry, Line 233
About her majesty , and front death-pale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 642
Subdued majesty with this glad time. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 964
Afloat, and pillowing up the majesty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 999
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 59
His sov'reignty, and rule, and majesty ;- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 165
That such neglect of our high Majesty Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 62
No syllable of a fit majesty The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 230
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 361
His sov'reignty, and rule, and majesty ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 14
That 's Majesty was in a raving fit." The Jealousies, Line 326
Of majesty , by dint of passion keen, The Jealousies, Line 349
I'll knock you-" "Does your Majesty mean - down? The Jealousies, Line 408
Your Majesty there is no crime at all The Jealousies, Line 474
"I fetch her!"- "Yes, an't like your Majesty ; The Jealousies, Line 487
"Behold, your Majesty , upon the brow The Jealousies, Line 543
His Majesty will know her temper time enough. The Jealousies, Line 702
It bodes ill to his Majesty - (refer The Jealousies, Line 705
"'Stead of his anxious Majesty and court The Jealousies, Line 757
' Where is his Majesty ?' No person feels The Jealousies, Line 781
 
MAJESTY'S.........1
"Your Majesty's in love with some fine girl The Jealousies, Line 380
 
MAK'ST............1
Thou mak'st me boil as hot as thou canst flame! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
 
MAKE..............106
And make superiour each delight. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 16
O'ershading sorrow doth not make thee less To Lord Byron, Line 6
And make "a sun-shine in a shady place": To George Felton Mathew, Line 75
Would never make a lay of mine enchanting, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 16
'Twould make the Poet quarrel with the rose. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 46
Make pleasing music, and not wild uproar. How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 14
As hard as lips can make it: till agreed, Sleep and Poetry, Line 109
Of summer nights collected still to make Sleep and Poetry, Line 191
Can make their lying lips turn pale of hue, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 13
produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
That for themselves a cooling covert make Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 17
Be all about me when I make an end. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 57
Make my horn parley from their foreheads hoar: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 479
Indeed, locks bright enough to make me mad; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 613
"Now, if this earthly love has power to make Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 843
So reaching back to boy-hood: make me ships Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 881
What a calm round of hours shall make my days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 983
To make us feel existence, and to shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 158
To make a coronal; and round him grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 409
Content, O fool! to make a cold retreat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 465
And make my branches lift a golden fruit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 908
And make them happy in some happy plains." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1017
Can make a ladder of the eternal wind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 26
Of pains resistless! make my being brief, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 540
Of recollection! make my watchful care Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 307
Shew cold through watery pinions; make more bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 588
Is sure enough to make a mortal man Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 960
Fire-wing'd, and make a morning in his mirth: Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 8
Each step he took should make his lady's hand Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 5
And make the wild fern for a bed do? Over the hill and over the dale, Line 20
To make old prose in modern rhyme more sweet: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 156
To make the youngster for his crime atone; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 172
To make all bare before he dares to stray Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 254
And make a pale light in your cypress glooms, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 439
O let his neighbour make a rent All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 19
He might make tremble many a man whose spirit had gone forth There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 27
Would bar return and make a man forget his mortal way. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 32
Blockhead, d'ye hear - Blockhead, I'll make her feel. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 53
Blockhead, make haste! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 68a
That silly youth doth think to make itself And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 4
Fools! make me whole again that weighty pearl And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 15
Though the rushes that will make 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 18
Who as they walk abroad make tinkling with their feet. Character of C.B., Line 27
To make me desolate? whence came the strength? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 103
To hover round my head, and make me sick Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 288
And make its silvery splendour pant with bliss. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 102
And too unlucent for thee make . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 61
Nor virgin-choir to make delicious moan Ode to Psyche, Line 30
So let me be thy choir, and make a moan Ode to Psyche, Line 44
Make your best bow to her and bid adieu; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 13
Make not your rosary of yew-berries, Ode on Melancholy, Line 5
And precious goblets that make rich the wine. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
To make our golden fortune known to you. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 24
Concerning what will make that sin-worn cheek Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
You must make here a solemn vow to me. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 29
Make me this vow- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 60a
He is! but here make oath Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 69b
And make the widening circlets of your eyes Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 85
Lady Auranthe, I would not make you blush, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 64
Both for his sake and mine, and to make glad Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 69
May in few hours make pleasures of them all. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 80
And make the politic smile; no, I have heard Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 146
Not to thine ear alone I make confession, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 173
We will make trial of your house's welcome, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 183
With silver index, bidding thee make peace? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 9
I do believe you. No 'twas not to make Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 37
Will you make Titan play the lackey-page Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 60
Are all my counsellors. If they can make Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 108
Make not your father blind before his time; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 122
We'll make it so. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 129a
How? Make it clear; if it be possible, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 50
An injury may make of a staid man! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 41
To summon harmful lightning, and make yawn Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 83
Will make thy bold tongue quiver to the roots, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 87
To make a greater. His young Highness here Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 150
May carry that with him shall make him die Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
So trusting in thy love; that should not make Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 117
It doth make me freeze. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 118b
But make your own heart monitor, and save Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 120
You make me tremble; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 130b
Draw not the sword; 'twould make an uproar, Duke, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 169
Make soft inquiry; pr'ythee, be not stay'd Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 6
Than to make guesses at me. 'Tis enough. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 69
Poor cheated Ludolph! Make the forest hiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Nay, linger not; make no resistance, sweet;- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 57
Not make them tenser. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 27a
Draws near when I must make a winding up Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 130
To breed distrust and hate, that make the soft voice hiss. Lamia, Part II, Line 10
Will make Elysian shades not too fair, too divine. Lamia, Part II, Line 212
To make rejoinder to Moneta's mourn. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 231
Make great Hyperion ache. His palace bright, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 24
And make him cower lowly while I soar? What can I do to drive away, Line 23
Make lean and lank the starv'd ox while he feeds; What can I do to drive away, Line 41
Why do you make such echoing of his name? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 30
And make a heaven of his purgatory, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 50
Can make his June December - here he comes. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 58
From mortal tempters all to make retreat,- The Jealousies, Line 25
I'll make the opposition-benches wince, The Jealousies, Line 138
And make it flare in many a brilliant form, The Jealousies, Line 213
Whate'er your palmistry may make of it, The Jealousies, Line 331
And sponge my forehead,- so my love doth make me pine." The Jealousies, Line 432
Use of some soft manoeuvre you must make , The Jealousies, Line 490
See scraps of mine will make it worth your while, The Jealousies, Line 562
At his sweet prose, and, if we can, make dance The Jealousies, Line 635
Of lords and ladies, on each hand, make show The Jealousies, Line 752
Of moth's down, to make soft the royal beds, The Jealousies, Line 767
 
MAKER.............1
O Maker of sweet poets, dear delight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 116
 
MAKER'S...........1
For his great Maker's presence, but must know Sleep and Poetry, Line 43
 
MAKES.............14
And makes the gazers round about the ring Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 29
To embracements warm as theirs makes coy excuse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 533
'Tis ignorance that makes a barren waste To the Nile, Line 10
To be my spouse: thy paleness makes me glad; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 318
A stratagem, that makes the beldame start: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 139
Makes this alarum in the elements, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 105
Knowledge enormous makes a God of me. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 113
But makes surrender to some thoughtless boy, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 3
And now your favour makes me but more humble; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 25
But this so sudden kindness makes me dumb. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 30
You know full well what makes me look so pale. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 112
Escapes, makes fiercer onset, the anew King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 13
That makes thee thus unarm'd throw taunts at us? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 15
'Tis Bertha Pearl! What makes my brain so whirl? The Jealousies, Line 383
 
MAKING............12
Making the triple kingdom brightly smile? On Peace, Line 4
Making directly for the woodland altar. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 127
Making me quickly veil my eyes and face: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 603
Odorous and enlivening; making all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 514
Making the best of 's way towards Soho. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 12
Is making free when they are not at home. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 29
A certain shape or shadow, making way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 122
Making slow way, with head and neck convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 262
Making our bright hours muddy, be a thing Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 116
Making comparisons of earthly things; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 3
A flight of starlings making rapidly The Jealousies, Line 644
"About this time,- making delightful way,- The Jealousies, Line 712
 
MALADY............3
Striving their ghastly malady to cheer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 897
Without some stir of heart, some malady ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 4
Shook horrid with such aspen- malady : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 94
 
MALAY.............1
Great wits in Spanish, Tuscan, and Malay . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 136
 
MALICE............3
Envy, and Malice to their native sty? Addressed to Haydon, Line 12
Had spent their malice , and the sullen rear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 40
Had spent their malice , and the sullen rear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 342
 
MALICIOUSLY.......1
So most maliciously , so madly striven Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 227
 
MALIGNANT.........2
And canst oppose to each malignant hour Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 339
Foul, poisonous, malignant whisperings; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 130
 
MAMMOTH...........1
But one of the whole mammoth -brood still kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 164
 
MAN...............105
On earth the good man base detraction bars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 13
And light blue mountains: but no breathing man Calidore: A Fragment, Line 28
A man of elegance, and stature tall: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 112
In shape, that sure no living man had thought Calidore: A Fragment, Line 117
Said the good man to Calidore alert; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 123
To sooth the cares, and lift the thoughts of man . Sleep and Poetry, Line 247
Of man : though no great minist'ring reason sorts Sleep and Poetry, Line 288
Surely the mind of man is closely bound Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 5
With these poor offerings, a man like thee. To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 14
punishment: but no feeling man will be forward to inflict it: he will leave me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
of a man is healthy; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Where no man went; and if from shepherd's keep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 68
Aye, even as dead-still as a marble man , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 405
No man e'er panted for a mortal love. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 526
O did he ever live, that lonely man , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 364
Of ancient Nox;- then skeletons of man , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 133
An old man sitting calm and peacefully. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 192
Upon a weeded rock this old man sat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 193
Beside this old man lay a pearly wand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 213
The old man rais'd his hoary head and saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 218
"Thou art the man ! Now shall I lay my head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 234
Thou art the man !" Endymion started back Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 255
I care not for this old mysterious man !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 280
"Young man of Latmos! thus particular Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 449
"What more there is to do, young man , is thine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 754
There came a dream, shewing how a young man , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 376
Of every ill: the man is yet to come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 522
There never liv'd a mortal man , who bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 646
Cresses that grow where no man may them see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 684
Is sure enough to make a mortal man Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 960
That when a man doth set himself in toil Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 3
Four seasons are there in the mind of man . Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 2
So the two brothers and their murder'd man Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 209
Which saves a sick man from the feather'd pall Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 268
Is there a man in Parliament All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 17
He might make tremble many a man whose spirit had gone forth There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 27
Would bar return and make a man forget his mortal way. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 32
Man feels the gentle anchor pull and gladdens in its strength. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 40
That man may never lose his mind on mountains bleak and bare; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 46
I have hid from mortal man ; Not Aladdin magian, Line 43
A younger brother this! a man O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 67
Which any man may number for his sport, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 18
'Tis the man who with a man Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 3
'Tis the man who with a man Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 3
A man may be 'twixt ape and Plato; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 7
'Tis the man who with a bird, Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 8
The old man may sleep, and the planets may wink; Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 20
His prayer he saith, this patient, holy man ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 10
Flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 21
"A cruel man and impious thou art: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 140
Beyond a mortal man impassion'd far The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 316
From man to the sun's God; yet unsecure: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 168
How fever'd is the man who cannot look On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 1
Why then should man , teasing the world for grace, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 13
Than ours, a friend to man , to whom thou say'st, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 48
From no less man than Otho, who has sent Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 135
Seem'd to say- "Sleep, old man , in safety sleep; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 61
For what can any man on earth do more? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 182
A trusty soul? A good man in the camp? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 2
Yes, he was ever known to be a man Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 22
O proof! proof! proof! Albert's an honest man ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 24
Young man , you heard this virgin say 'twas false,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
Peace! peace, old man ! I cannot think she is. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130
What, man , do you mistake the hollow sky Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 34
For a poor waiter? Why, man , how you stare! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 37
An injury may make of a staid man ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 41
No ounce of man in thy mortality? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 85
To beard us for no cause; he's not the man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
A cud for the repentance of a man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 176
Albert, I speak to you as to a man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 209
More than against a night-mare, which a man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 233
That I, by happy chance, hit the right man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 252
Of a man drowning on his hateful throat. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 272
You need not be his sexton too: a man Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
A melancholy mood will haunt a man , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 124
A man detesting all inhuman crime; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 137
It seems then, sir, you have found out the man Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 45
Aye, and the man . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 8b
Sometimes the counsel of a dying man Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 41
Oh! thou good man , against whose sacred head Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 140
Wilt thou forgive me? And thou, holy man , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 171
Is that old man ? I cannot bring to mind Lamia, Part I, Line 372
The old man through the inner doors broad-spread; Lamia, Part II, Line 170
Know'st thou that man ?" Poor Lamia answer'd not. Lamia, Part II, Line 255
And not a man but felt the terror in his hair. Lamia, Part II, Line 268
"Shut, shut those juggling eyes, thou ruthless man ! Lamia, Part II, Line 277
a young man Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
man should Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
to behold. The young man , a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet, able to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Since every man whose soul is not a clod The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 13
That even the dying man forgets his shroud; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 101
Every sole man hath days of joy and pain, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 172
Methought I heard some old man of the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 440
From man to the Sun's God: yet unsecure; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 17
Because I think, my lord, he is no man , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 31
How dare, against a man disarm'd? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 20b
To any but the second man of the realm, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 25
To whisper, there's the man who took alive King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 31
His running, lying, flying foot- man too,- The Jealousies, Line 53
There he says plainly that she loved a man ! The Jealousies, Line 109
Like, saving shoe for sock or stocking, my man John!" The Jealousies, Line 306
From a Man -Tiger-Organ, prettiest of his toys." The Jealousies, Line 333
Than the Emperor when he play'd on his Man -Tiger-Organ. The Jealousies, Line 342
Kill'd a man -cook, a page, and broke a jar, The Jealousies, Line 669
I met, far gone in liquor, that old man , The Jealousies, Line 786
 
MAN'S.............15
For man's protection. Surely the All-seeing, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 32
Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 1
A loving-kindness for the great man's fame, Addressed to Haydon, Line 2
Man's voice was on the mountains; and the mass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 104
When at my feet emerg'd an old man's hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 669
'Tis well nigh past man's search their hearts to see; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 493
Even so vague is man's sight of himself. Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 9
Of peaceful sway above man's harvesting, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 110
From a man's little heart's short fever-fit; Ode on Indolence, Line 34
Ever cures the good man's ill. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 14
The charters of man's greatness, at this hour Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 15
A young man's heart, by heaven's blessing, is Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 180
But an old man's is narrow, tenantless Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 183
High as the level of a man's breast rear'd Lamia, Part II, Line 184
And peaceful sway above man's harvesting, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 415
 
MANACLE...........1
Manacle them both! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 258b
 
MANAGE............2
Can manage those hard rivets to set free Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
To manage stairs reversely, like a peach The Jealousies, Line 628
 
MANAGED...........2
Intreated, managed ! When can you contrive Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 20
Those nows you managed in a special style." The Jealousies, Line 560
 
MANAGEMENT........1
She is a changeling of my management ; The Jealousies, Line 389
 
MANE..............3
Hast thou a steed with a mane richly flowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 9
Of his proud horse's mane : he was withal Calidore: A Fragment, Line 111
The eagle's feathery mane God of the golden bow, Line 15
 
MANE'S............1
The Lion's mane's on end: the Bear how fierce! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 596
 
MANED.............1
With turrets crown'd. Four maned lions hale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 643
 
MANES.............3
And steeds with streamy manes - the charioteer Sleep and Poetry, Line 127
"Mounted on panthers' furs and lions' manes , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 251
Throw your slack bridles o'er the flurried manes , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 10
 
MANHOOD...........2
In the present strength of manhood , that the high Sleep and Poetry, Line 163
Shewing like Ganymede to manhood grown; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 170
 
MANIFEST..........2
Is made of the four seasons - manifest Sleep and Poetry, Line 295
The Heavens and the Earth, were manifest : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 199
 
MANIFESTATIONS....1
Manifestations of that beauteous life Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 317
 
MANIFOLD..........2
And terrors manifold divided me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 563
Locks shining black, hair scanty grey, and passions manifold . There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 38
 
MANKIND...........4
Mankind do know of hell: I look o'erhead, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 5
Mankind can tell of heaven: mist is spread Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 7
Is plain, and in the eye of all mankind Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 7
Iced in the great lakes, to afflict mankind ; What can I do to drive away, Line 38
 
MANLY.............1
And had such manly ardour in his eye, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 148
 
MANNA.............4
He seem'd to taste a drop of manna -dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 766
And here is manna pick'd from Syrian trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 452
Manna and dates, in argosy transferr'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 268
And honey wild, and manna dew, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 26
 
MANNER............2
Knowing within myself the manner in which this Poem has Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
What manner I mean, will be quite clear to the reader, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
MANNERLY..........1
Not mine, and be more mannerly . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 65a
 
MANNERS...........2
Against the vicious manners of the age, The Jealousies, Line 92
"Besides, manners forbid that I should pass any The Jealousies, Line 469
 
MANOEUVRE.........1
Use of some soft manoeuvre you must make, The Jealousies, Line 490
 
MANSION...........2
They could not in the self-same mansion dwell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 3
Him any mercy, in that mansion foul, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 89
 
MANTLE............8
Of a light mantle ; and while Clerimond Calidore: A Fragment, Line 140
Ocean's blue mantle streak'd with purple, and green. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 132
A fold of lawny mantle dabbling swims Sleep and Poetry, Line 374
My madness! let it mantle rosy-warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 313
His rugged forehead in a mantle pale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 395
Sceptre, and mantle , clasp'd with dewy gem, Lamia, Part I, Line 4
His mind wrapp'd like his mantle , while her eyes Lamia, Part I, Line 242
Into his mantle , adding wings to haste, Lamia, Part I, Line 367
 
MANTLED...........2
When were thy shoulders mantled in huge streams? To Ailsa Rock, Line 3
Mantled before in darkness and huge shade, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 365
 
MANTLES...........1
Where mantles grey have rustled by and swept the nettles green: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 4
 
MANTLING..........1
Mantling the east, by Aurora's peering hand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 113
 
MANY..............155
By many streams a little lake did fill, Imitation of Spenser, Line 7
Embroidered with many a spring peering flower? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 14
Full many the glories that brighten thy youth! On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 18
Full many the glories that brighten thy youth; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 42
Into many graceful bends: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 14
Downward too flows many a tress Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 19
With many joys for him: the warder's ken Calidore: A Fragment, Line 56
Many the wonders I this day have seen: To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 1
Full many a dreary hour have I past, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 1
These wonders strange he sees, and many more, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 53
With many else which I have never known. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 48
And so I did. When many lines I'd written, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 101
But many days have past since last my heart To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 109
How many bards gild the lapses of time! How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 1
And many goodly states and kingdoms seen; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 2
Round many western islands have I been On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 3
And I have many miles on foot to fare. Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 4
And let there glide by many a pearly car, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 6
And full of many wonders of the spheres: On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 12
Many such eves of gently whisp'ring noise To My Brothers, Line 11
Whence I may copy many a lovely saying Sleep and Poetry, Line 65
And many a verse from so strange influence Sleep and Poetry, Line 69
In many places;- some has been upstirr'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 224
An ocean dim, sprinkled with many an isle, Sleep and Poetry, Line 306
How many days! what desperate turmoil! Sleep and Poetry, Line 308
Many delights of that glad day recalling, Sleep and Poetry, Line 329
With over pleasure - many , many more, Sleep and Poetry, Line 345
With over pleasure - many, many more, Sleep and Poetry, Line 345
And many pleasures to my vision started; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 26
On many harps, which he has lately strung; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 52
And many glories of immortal stamp. Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 14
Of all the many glories that may be. On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 14
My little boat, for many quiet hours, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 47
Many and many a verse I hope to write, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 49
Many and many a verse I hope to write, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 49
Who thus one lamb did lose. Paths there were many , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 79
For many moments, ere their ears were sated Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 114
The many that are come to pay their vows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 291
Many might after brighter visions stare: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 346
By many a summer's silent fingering; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 432
Chatted with thee, and many days exil'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 926
Faints into sleep, with many a dying tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 950
Many old rotten-timber'd boats there be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 18
To goodly vessels; many a sail of pride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 20
Alas! 'tis his old grief. For many days, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 47
O'er many a heath, through many a woodland dun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 72
O'er many a heath, through many a woodland dun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 72
At these enchantments, and yet many more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 428
So thou wouldst thus, for many sequent hours, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 797
Hereat, with many sobs, her gentle strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 825
Convulsion to a mouth of many years? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 287
And roar'd for more; with many a hungry lick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 512
And there, ere many days be overpast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 594
With many a scalding tear and many a groan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 668
With many a scalding tear and many a groan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 668
His even breast: see, many steeled squares, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 731
Of gladness in the air - while many , who Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 792
Mov'd on for many a league; and gain'd, and lost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 829
Joyous, and many as the leaves in spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 839
So many , and so many, and such glee? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 219
So many, and so many , and such glee? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 219
So many , and so many, and such glee? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 229
So many, and so many , and such glee? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 229
And in these regions many a venom'd dart Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 520
Has been thy meed for many thousand years; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 777
Many upon thy death have ditties made; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 836
And many , even now, their foreheads shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 837
To meet us many a time." Next Cynthia bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 996
Ah! would 'twere so with many In drear nighted December, Line 17
The many , many wonders see, Apollo to the Graces, Line 10
The many, many wonders see, Apollo to the Graces, Line 10
How many mice and rats hast in thy days To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 2
Destroy'd?- how many tit bits stolen? Gaze To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 3
Of many a maid have given thee many a maul, To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 12
Of many a maid have given thee many a maul, To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 12
For many years my offerings must be hush'd. Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 32
Of the leaves of many years: Robin Hood, Line 5
Many times have winter's shears, Robin Hood, Line 6
And freckles many ; ah! a careless nurse, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 7
Both turning many a mill, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 9
And many other juts of aged stone Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 47
Founded with many a mason-devil's groan. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 48
Too many tears for lovers have been shed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 90
Too many sighs give we to them in fee, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 91
Too many doleful stories do we see, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 93
And for them many a weary hand did swelt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 107
And many once proud-quiver'd loins did melt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 109
Many all day in dazzling river stood, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 111
These brethren having found by many signs Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 161
And many a jealous conference had they, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 169
And many times they bit their lips alone, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 170
And many a chapel bell the hour is telling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 310
From her dead eyes; and many a curious elf, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 453
No breakfast had she many a morn, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 13
No dinner many a noon, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 14
But we have many a horrid bore All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 7
He might make tremble many a man whose spirit had gone forth There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 27
Many a mortal of these days Not Aladdin magian, Line 35
And yonder twice as many more O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 93
I have, by many yards at least, been carding Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 3
And so it chanc'd, for many a door was wide, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 29
As she had heard old dames full many times declare. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 45
Fix'd on the floor, saw many a sweeping train The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 58
Came many a tiptoe, amorous cavalier, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 60
Through many a dusky gallery, they gain The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 186
And moan forth witless words with many a sigh; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 303
After so many hours of toil and quest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 338
That night the Baron dreamt of many a woe, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 372
With its many mysteries, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 37
On which were many monsters seen, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 78
Rejoicing for his many pains. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 92
He writith; and thinges many mo: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 109
Buckled and tied with many a twist and plait? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 88
By many a damsel hoarse and rouge of cheek; Character of C.B., Line 23
Won from the gaze of many centuries: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 280
With many more, the brawniest in assault, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 21
And many else were free to roam abroad, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 31
And many else whose names may not be told. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 81
Not savage, for he saw full many a God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 350
And many hid their faces from the light: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 381
Many a fallen old Divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 8
Though scarcely heard in many a green recess. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 41
Portray'd in many a fiery den Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 15
Upon my pillow, breeding many woes: Sonnet to Sleep, Line 10
Darkling I listen; and, for many a time Ode to a Nightingale, Line 51
Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 53
On all the many bounties of your hand,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 113
And pitying forsooth my many wrongs; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 75
From interchanged love through many years. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 101
Seeing so many vigilant eyes explore Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 125
For I am sick and faint with many wrongs, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 115
Of hopes, and stuff'd with many memories, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 184
How many whisperers there are about, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 32
And wound with many a river to its head, Lamia, Part I, Line 29
Wind into Thetis' bower by many a pearly stair; Lamia, Part I, Line 208
Where I may all my many senses please, Lamia, Part I, Line 284
For the first time through many anguish'd days, Lamia, Part I, Line 303
Companion'd or alone; while many a light Lamia, Part I, Line 357
'Twould humour many a heart to leave them thus, Lamia, Part I, Line 396
Even as you list invite your many guests; Lamia, Part II, Line 98
The many heard, and the loud revelry Lamia, Part II, Line 262
house, and all that was in it, vanished in an instant: many thousands took Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Faggots of cinnamon, and many heaps The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 235
Love, love alone, has pains severe and many ; To Fanny, Line 46
While little harps were touch'd by many a lyric fay. The Jealousies, Line 36
As many a poor felon does not live to tell. The Jealousies, Line 180
Though I have bowstrung many of his sect; The Jealousies, Line 193
And make it flare in many a brilliant form, The Jealousies, Line 213
Many as bees about a straw-capp'd hive, The Jealousies, Line 260
"I know a many Berthas!" "Mine's above The Jealousies, Line 372
Then slaves, as presents bearing many a gem; The Jealousies, Line 588
And many on their marrow-bones for death prepared. The Jealousies, Line 684
Frill-rumpling elbows brew up many a bother, The Jealousies, Line 773
And made him read in many a learned book, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 4
And into many a lively legend look; In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 5


Published @ RC

March 2005