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Keats Concordance
 
MAR...............1
Easily rolling so as scarce to mar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 166
 
MARBLE............28
And like fair veins in sable marble flow. To Lord Byron, Line 12
Those marble steps that through the water dip: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 68
Of liny marble , and thereto a train Sleep and Poetry, Line 364
There stood a marble alter, with a tress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 90
Aye, even as dead-still as a marble man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 405
Their marble being: now, as deep profound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 210
Into a marble gallery, passing through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 256
And when, more near against the marble cold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 265
Desponding, o'er the marble floor's cold thrill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 338
Down marble steps; pouring as easily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 814
As marble was there lavish, to the vast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 846
Why were they proud? Because their marble founts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 121
Tinting with silver wan your marble tombs. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 440
Upon rough marble diadem, that hill's eternal crown. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 44
On the marble cold and bare, Not Aladdin magian, Line 12
Than on the marble fairness of old Greece. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 61
But oh! how unlike marble was that face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 34
Of stone, or marble swart; their import gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 282
Of marble men and maidens overwrought, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 42
They pass'd, like figures on a marble urn, Ode on Indolence, Line 5
And thus a marble column do I build Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 160
Waits with high marble doors for blood and incense rare. Lamia, Part I, Line 228
And so unsullied was the marble hue, Lamia, Part I, Line 383
Betwixt two marble shafts:- there they reposed, Lamia, Part II, Line 22
Upon the marble at my feet there lay The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 72
And marble balustrade, and patient travail The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 91
These steps, die on that marble where thou art. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 108
For the broad marble knees; and who thou art, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 214
 
MARBLED...........1
Between the tree-stems, marbled plain at first, Lamia, Part II, Line 138
 
MARBLES...........1
But in old marbles ever beautiful. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 319
 
MARCH.............4
When bright processions took their airy march To George Felton Mathew, Line 29
Through which this Paphian army took its march , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 853
Go, page his dusty heels upon a march , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 81
March , little Pegasus, with pawing hoof sublime! The Jealousies, Line 639
 
MARCHING..........1
Marching a-row, each other slipshod treads; The Jealousies, Line 769
 
MARE..............3
First Willie on his sleek mare came Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 17
Has any here an old grey mare All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 9
More than against a night- mare , which a man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 233
 
MARGARET..........1
Old Meg was brave as Margaret Queen Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 25
 
MARGE.............4
Which round its marge reflected woven bowers, Imitation of Spenser, Line 8
Its rocky marge , and balances once more Sleep and Poetry, Line 378
Nibble their fill at ocean's very marge , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 204
Which kept as fixedly as rocky marge , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 224
 
MARGIN............5
Far as the slabbed margin of a well, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 870
In the fountain's pebbly margin , and she stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 99
To margin sallows, were the leaves he spied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 341
Along the margin -sand large foot-marks went, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 15
Along the margin sand large footmarks went The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 319
 
MARGRAVINES.......1
By duchesses and pearled margravines ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 90
 
MARIAN............3
Would, with his maid Marian , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 11
And if Marian should have Robin Hood, Line 40
Honour to maid Marian , Robin Hood, Line 59
 
MARIE.............3
Ah goud hair'd Marie , yeve I pray Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 5
Ah Marie , they are all gane hame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 37
Ah! Marie , they are all gone hame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 41
 
MARIGOLD..........1
The daisy and the marigold ; Fancy, Line 48
 
MARIGOLDS.........2
Ye ardent marigolds ! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 48
Or ripe October's faded marigolds , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 397
 
MARINE............1
Noiseless, sub- marine cloudlets, glittering Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 874
 
MARINER...........1
Far as the mariner on his highest mast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 866
 
MARINERS..........2
The mariners join hymn with those on land. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 25
Or side by side with whelmed mariners . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 123
 
MARK..............22
Mark the clear tumbling crystal, its passionate gushes, To Some Ladies, Line 7
This canopy mark : 'tis the work of a fay; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 25
Or thrice my palate moisten: but when I mark Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 25
'Gainst the smooth surface, and to mark anon, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 17
Mark the bright silver curling round her prow. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 134
To mark the time as they grow broad, and shorter; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 89
Might mark a lynx's eye, there glimmered light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 123
Mark me, Peona! that sometimes it brought Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 689
To mark these shadowings, and stand in awe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 217
And speak a blessing: Mark me! Thou hast thews Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 588
"Dost thou not mark a gleaming through the tide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 718
To mark if her dark eyes had yet discern'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 505
I love to mark sad faces in fair weather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 5
A robber's mark ,- and near the nape O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 80
The winged Lion of St. Mark , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 35
Upon the legend of St. Mark . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 52
Of holy Mark from youth to age; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 90
That is the top of sovereignty. Mark well! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 205
Mark how, possess'd, his lashless eyelids stretch Lamia, Part II, Line 288
Across the teaboard draws a long wet mark . Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 13
It would amaze your Highness now to mark King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 36
"I'll put a mark against some rebel names, The Jealousies, Line 137
 
MARK'D............8
And splendidly mark'd with the story divine On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 7
Mark'd with most flimsy mottos, and in large Sleep and Poetry, Line 205
Of this in heaven: I have mark'd each cheek, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 570
He mark'd their brows and foreheads; saw their hair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 741
Nor mark'd with any sign or charactery- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 762
By one mark'd out to be a noble's bride. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 456
I mark'd the goddess in fair statuary The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 336
Will Stephen's death be mark'd there, my good lord, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 6
 
MARK'S............1
Will end in St. Mark's eve;- you must away, The Jealousies, Line 503
 
MARKET............1
Of the Market Street For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 23
 
MARKETS...........1
Were seen about the markets : none knew where Lamia, Part I, Line 391
 
MARKIS............1
Of Sainte Markis life and dethe." The Eve of St. Mark, Line 114
 
MARKS.............2
Huge sea- marks ; vanward swelling in array, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 830
Along the margin-sand large foot- marks went, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 15
 
MARO'S............1
The sweet majestic tone of Maro's lyre; Ode to Apollo, Line 14
 
MARQUIS...........1
The tiptoe marquis , moral and gallant, The Jealousies, Line 150
 
MARR'D............2
Had marr'd his glossy hair which once could shoot Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 276
Pitying each form that hungry death hath marr'd , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 357
 
MARRIAGE..........15
To hear the marriage melodies, and then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 383
The Star-Queen's crescent on her marriage night: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 589
This marriage be the bond of endless peace! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 153
The Emperor on this marriage is so hot, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 48
The marriage ;- what else can I mean? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 56b
Enter, as from the Marriage , OTHO, LUDOLPH, AURANTHE, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Upon my marriage -day, and scandalise Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 79
No! What? Upon our marriage -night? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51b
She's mine by right of marriage !- she is mine! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 74
To share our marriage feast and nuptial mirth?" Lamia, Part II, Line 91
By strewn flowers, torches, and a marriage song, Lamia, Part II, Line 109
And, in its marriage robe, the heavy body wound. Lamia, Part II, Line 311
Before her marriage with great Elfinan; The Jealousies, Line 111
That after marriage too, she never joy'd The Jealousies, Line 112
You shall not throttled be in marriage noose; The Jealousies, Line 436
 
MARRIED...........5
Married to green in all the sweetest flowers- Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 10
Married to-day!- to-day! You did not say so? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 59
To-day was married . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 151a
Am I not married to a paragon Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 21
content, and at last married Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MARRIES...........1
Which marries sweet sound with the grace of form, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 443
 
MARROW............3
Hale strength, nor from my bones all marrow drain'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 614
And from the teeming marrow of thy brain Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 96
And many on their marrow -bones for death prepared. The Jealousies, Line 684
 
MARRY.............4
Of our close voices marry at their birth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 816
Hath given consent that you should marry Ludolph! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 87
To-day you marry her. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 95a
On any terms, marry Miss Bellanaine; The Jealousies, Line 461
 
MARRYING..........1
Marrying to every word a twinborn sigh; Lamia, Part I, Line 341
 
MARS..............6
Thou sweetly singest - nought thy hymning mars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 11
For this my love: for vexing Mars had teaz'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 558
Turn to some level plain where haughty Mars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 728
Of Mars , and all the soldiery shall feast Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 132
The menial of Mars , and held a spear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 18
Come, lead me to this Mars - and let us move King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 51
 
MARSH.............2
There is Newton Marsh For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 19
A mist arose, as from a scummy marsh . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 258
 
MARTIAL...........2
And as its martial notes to silence flee, Ode to Apollo, Line 31
Martial music. Enter, from the outer gate, OTHO, Nobles, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
 
MARTYRDOM.........1
Upon the fervent martyrdom ; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 116
 
MARTYRS...........1
Martyrs in a fiery blaze, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 31
 
MARVEL............4
I marvel much that thou hast never told To George Felton Mathew, Line 84
How's this? I marvel ! Yet you look not mad. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 142
I marvel , Albert, you delay so long Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 52
To crush her with my heel! Wait; wait! I marvel Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 109
 
MARVELING.........1
And enter'd marveling : for they knew the street, Lamia, Part II, Line 152
 
MARVELLOUS........1
O, marvellous ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 67b
 
MASK..............3
A thousand handicraftsmen wore the mask Sleep and Poetry, Line 200
So saying, this young soul in age's mask Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 310
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 7
 
MASKS.............1
Are then regalities all gilded masks ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 22
 
MASON.............1
Founded with many a mason -devil's groan. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 48
 
MASONS............1
Nobly as Nimrod's masons , when the towers Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 133
 
MASQUE............3
A skyey masque , a pinion'd multitude,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 558
How came ye muffled in so hush a masque ? Ode on Indolence, Line 12
In masque -like figures on the dreamy urn; Ode on Indolence, Line 56
 
MASQUERADE........1
Death doing in a turban'd masquerade . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 5
 
MASS..............3
Man's voice was on the mountains; and the mass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 104
Alone: I chant alone the holy mass , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 307
More strictly than he said the mass , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 26
 
MASSY.............2
That goblet right heavy, and massy , and gold? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 6
The embossed roof, the silent massy range The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 83
 
MAST..............3
About the great Athenian admiral's mast ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 23
Far as the mariner on his highest mast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 866
The hawks of ship- mast forests - the untired Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 133
 
MASTER............6
Kindest master ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 13b
A master -plague in the midst of miseries. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 2
"Does not your master give a rout to-night?" The Jealousies, Line 280
My master finds a monstrous horrid bore; The Jealousies, Line 285
And master is too partial, entre nous, The Jealousies, Line 299
Talk'd of one Master Hubert, deep in her esteem. The Jealousies, Line 711
 
MASTER'S..........1
While from their master's lips pour forth the inspiring words. Ode to Apollo, Line 29
 
MASTERY...........2
And of the Bear has Pollux mastery : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 592
Imagine not that greatest mastery Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 6
 
MAT...............5
And his white hair was awful, and a mat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 194
A skull upon a mat of roses lying, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 42
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 82
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 381
He's always in my way upon the mat !" The Jealousies, Line 312
 
MATCH.............3
Till from this hated match I get a free release. The Jealousies, Line 63
In trumping up this match so hastily, The Jealousies, Line 79
Bad omen - this new match can't be a happy one. The Jealousies, Line 657
 
MATERIAL..........1
From something of material sublime, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 69
 
MATERNAL..........1
In her maternal longing! Happy gloom! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 537
 
MATHEW............2
Nor can remembrance, Mathew ! bring to view To George Felton Mathew, Line 3
Yet this is vain - O Mathew , lend thy aid To George Felton Mathew, Line 53
 
MATILDA...........1
THE EMPRESS MAUD, or MATILDA King Stephen 6
 
MATIN.............1
If he could hear his lady's matin -song, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 195
 
MATINS............1
Her tears from matins until even song Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 120
 
MATRON............2
Or, it may be, ere matron Night uptook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 561
Beyond the matron -temple of Latona, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 862
 
MATS..............2
Your sceptre worth a straw, your cushions old door mats ." Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 8
She plaited mats o' rushes, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 22
 
MATTED............1
Stedfast upon the matted turf he kept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 151
 
MATTER............5
To more immediate matter . Woe, alas! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 398
Whose matter in bright gold were best be read; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 94
The whole enormous matter into life. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 197
Painful, clogg'd up and stagnate. Weigh this matter Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 186
No matter ! 'Tis a gallant enemy; King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 16
 
MATTERS...........5
Strange matters did it treat of, and drew on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 679
Matters not worth remembering, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 89
Until most easy matters take the shape Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 125
You are not? or, if so, what matters it? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 30
Not, like a subject, foolish matters mince. The Jealousies, Line 472
 
MATTING...........2
Stole through its verdurous matting of fresh trees. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 420
To a safe level matting . Now prepare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 196
 
MATURE............2
The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Whose lip mature is ever new? Fancy, Line 71
 
MATURING..........3
Maturing to a weighty diadem! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 31
My sturdier youth, maturing to the sword, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 13
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; To Autumn, Line 2
 
MAUD..............4
THE EMPRESS MAUD , or MATILDA King Stephen 6
Royal Maud King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 20b
That, on a court day bow'd to haughty Maud , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 29
QUEEN MAUD in a chair of state. The EARLS OF GLOCESTER and King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
 
MAUDLIN...........1
Built by a Lapland witch turn'd maudlin nun- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 46
 
MAUGRE............1
(I've got a conscience, maugre people's jokes:) The Jealousies, Line 697
 
MAUL..............1
Of many a maid have given thee many a maul , To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 12
 
MAURICE...........2
Then there's that old Lord Maurice , not a whit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 103
I by the banner of Saint Maurice swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 51
 
MAW...............5
To save poor lambkins from the eagle's maw ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 267
Till, weary, he sat down before the maw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 271
Until into earth's deep maw he rush'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 899
Near to a cypress grove, whose deadly maw , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 906
Too far into the sea; where every maw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 94
 
MAWKISH...........1
Knowing his mawkish honesty. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 10a
 
MAWKISHNESS.......1
proceeds mawkishness , and all the thousand bitters which those men I speak of Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
 
MAWS..............1
The sluggish wheels; solemn their toothed maws , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 644
 
MAY'S.............1
And mid- May's eldest child, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 48
 
MAY'ST............5
Am I, that thou may'st plainly see how far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 450
This fierce temptation went: and thou may'st not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 451
"Thou art no poet; may'st not tell thy dreams"? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 12
"Mortal, that thou may'st understand aright, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 1
"A simple boon!" said Elfinan, "thou may'st The Jealousies, Line 364
 
MAYEST............2
Sigh thou mayest , but bid it go Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 3
And I have told thee all thou mayest hear. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 272
 
MAYING............1
And when maidens go a maying , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 3
 
MAYOR.............1
The Common Council and my fool Lord Mayor The Jealousies, Line 768
 
MAYST.............4
That thou mayst listen the cold dews among? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 163
That thou mayst always know whither I roam, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 687
Thou haply mayst delight in, will I fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 692
Peona, mayst return to me. I own Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 867
 
MAZ'D.............1
So in they hurried all, maz'd , curious and keen: Lamia, Part II, Line 156
 
MAZE..............1
After its airy maze - God of the meridian, Line 12
 
MAZES.............4
And run in mazes of the youngest hue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 42
By all the trembling mazes that she ran, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 245
After a thousand mazes overgone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 387
Follow'd their languid mazes , till well nigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 929
 
MAZY..............5
I cannot your light, mazy footsteps attend; To Some Ladies, Line 2
And all the wonders of the mazy range To George Felton Mathew, Line 91
Thou spar'st the flowers in thy mazy dance? To G.A.W., Line 8
And moonlight; aye, to all the mazy world Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 460
Could wander in the mazy forest-house Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 468
 
MEAD..............7
From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead ; On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 4
'Tis a shady mead ; Hither, hither, love, Line 2
Again I'll linger in a sloping mead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 484
A happy wooer, to the flowery mead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 951
Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 349
And, as the lava ravishes the mead , Lamia, Part I, Line 157
As blow-ball from the mead ? To Fanny, Line 40
 
MEADOW............4
Will mingle kindly with the meadow air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 83
O who wouldn't stop in a meadow ? Over the hill and over the dale, Line 18
The meadow thou hast tramped o'er and o'er,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 11
Of glossy silk, soft, smooth, and meadow -green, The Jealousies, Line 344
 
MEADOW'S..........1
Love's silver name upon the meadow's face. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 700
 
MEADOWS...........8
Of April meadows ? Here her altar shone, Sleep and Poetry, Line 171
For meadows where the little rivers run. On The Story of Rimini, Line 4
Through sunny meadows , that outskirt the side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 250
And merry in our meadows ? How is this? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 518
The meadows runnels, runnels pebble-stones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 839
Groves, meadows , melodies, and arbour roses; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 939
Meadows sweet where flames burn under; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 8
Past the near meadows , over the still stream, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 76
 
MEADS.............6
I love your meads and I love your flowers, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 5
As grazing ox unworried in the meads ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 67
I met a lady in the meads , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 13
And in those meads where sometime she might haunt, Lamia, Part I, Line 18
Would fright a Dryad; whose harsh herbaged meads What can I do to drive away, Line 40
Are routed loose about the plashy meads , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 6
 
MEAGRE............3
Meagre from its celled sleep; Fancy, Line 56
And back returneth, meagre , barefoot, wan, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 12
Died palsy-twitch'd, with meagre face deform; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 376
 
MEAL..............2
Or tear me piece- meal with a bony saw, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 263
Which, nearer seen, seem'd refuse of a meal The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 30
 
MEALS.............1
They could not sit at meals but feel how well Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 5
 
MEALY.............2
Even with mealy gold the waters clear. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 91
Of mealy sweets, which myriads of bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 996
 
MEAN..............14
What 'tis I mean , and feel his being glow: Sleep and Poetry, Line 44
What manner I mean , will be quite clear to the reader, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
What it might mean . Perhaps, thought I, Morpheus, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 559
Greatly they wonder'd what the thing might mean : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 460
I mean the finger for the ring- All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 43
You mean not this to me? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 142a
I mean a tripple-Saladin, whose eyes, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
Those men I mean , who on my shoulders propp'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 73
Franconia's fair sister, 'tis I mean . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 113
The marriage;- what else can I mean ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 56b
Auranthe! what can he mean ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 19b
For I will never by mean hands be led King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 46
I'll knock you-" "Does your Majesty mean - down? The Jealousies, Line 408
She does not mean it really. Cheer up, hearty - there! The Jealousies, Line 459
 
MEANDER...........2
In happy silence, like the clear Meander Sleep and Poetry, Line 74
Meander gave me,- for I bubbled up Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 118
 
MEANER............3
All meaner thoughts, and take a sweet reprieve Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 5
A meaner sound than Raphael's whispering. Addressed to the Same, Line 8
A meaner summoner might do as well- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 23
 
MEANING...........3
Picture out each lovely meaning : Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 8
Breath of new buds unfolding? From the meaning Sleep and Poetry, Line 169
As her weak hand could any meaning tell, Lamia, Part II, Line 302
 
MEANINGS..........1
The meanings of all motions, shapes, and sounds; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 698
 
MEANS.............9
With hushing finger, how he means to load Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 119
What means this? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 78b
What means this, fair one? Why in such alarm? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 82
What means he, my lord? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 69b
He has, assure yourself, by some strange means , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 8
There are no other means . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 34b
I will invent what soothing means I can. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 56
"Lamia, what means this? Wherefore dost thou start? Lamia, Part II, Line 254
Tell me some means to get the lady here." The Jealousies, Line 402
 
MEANT.............3
And half forget what world or worldling meant . Happy is England! I could be content, Line 8
Meant but to fertilize my earthly root, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 907
But ye, poor tongueless things, were meant O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 11
 
MEANTIME..........7
Meantime , on shady levels, mossy fine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 312
Meantime a glorious revelry began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 924
She linger'd still. Meantime , across the moors, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 74
Solution sweet: meantime the frost-wind blows The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 322
Meantime I will keep watch on thy bright sun, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 347
Meantime touch piously the Delphic harp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 10
Meantime he sent a fluttering embassy The Jealousies, Line 28
 
MEANWHILE.........5
Feast on, and meanwhile I will let thee know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 454
Upon a calm sea drifting: and meanwhile Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 406
Love meanwhile held her dearly with his wings, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 5
Meanwhile in other realms big tears were shed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 158
Besides the goods meanwhile thou movest east and west. The Jealousies, Line 243
 
MEASURE...........2
Their measure of content; what merest whim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 846
Four seasons fill the measure of the year; Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 1
 
MEASURED..........1
For by my burning brain I measured sure The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 393
 
MEASURES..........2
Than I began to think of rhymes and measures : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 98
"I touch'd no lute, I sang not, trod no measures : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 338
 
MEDDLING..........1
As if a Naiad, like a meddling elf, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 7
 
MEDICIN'D.........2
Snapping the rein. You have medicin'd me Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 9
By such propitious parley medicin'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 183
 
MEDICINE..........1
'Tis not in medicine , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 3b
 
MEDICINED.........1
Medicined death to a lengthened drowsiness: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 484
 
MEDITATED.........1
He meditated , plotted, and even now Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 69
 
MEDITATION........1
And come instead demurest meditation , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 975
 
MEED..............3
Has been thy meed for many thousand years; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 777
But death intenser - death is life's high meed . Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 14
Yes, of thy madness thou shalt take the meed - King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 19
 
MEEK..............21
But when I see thee meek , and kind, and tender, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 9
And tell thee that my prayer is very meek ; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 62
Michael in arms, and more, meek Eve's fair slenderness. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 59
Sappho's meek head was there half smiling down Sleep and Poetry, Line 381
A meek and forlorn flower, with naught of pride, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 172
And gave meek Cynthia her Endymion. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 204
These numbers to the night and starlight meek , On The Story of Rimini, Line 7
To sudden veneration: women meek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 187
And there she sits most meek and most alone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 46
They led on first, bent to her meek surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 810
So faint a kindness, such a meek surrender Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 73
While to his lady meek the Carian turn'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 504
In self-commitment, thus that meek unknown: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 874
Alas! when passion is both meek and wild! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 48
Open thine eyes, for meek St. Agnes' sake, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 278
Or nantz, or cherry brandy, drank full meek Character of C.B., Line 22
That scar'd away the meek ethereal Hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 216
Still with the dews of piety, this meek lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
Trembled; she nothing said, but, pale and meek , Lamia, Part II, Line 65
That scar'd away the meek ethereal hours The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 60
A meek attentive ear, so that they treat King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 11
 
MEEKEST...........1
Than be - I care not what. O meekest dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 169
 
MEEKLY............3
Meekly upon the grass, as those whose sobbings This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 13
And meekly let your fair hands joined be. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 4
Meekly through billows:- when like taper-flame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 116
 
MEEKNESS..........1
Yet brought him to the meekness of a child: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 47
 
MEET..............40
And that warm-hearted Shakspeare sent to meet him To George Felton Mathew, Line 57
To meet her glorious brother's greeting beam. To George Felton Mathew, Line 83
Ah! I will taste that dew, for me 'tis meet , Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 12
That they seldom meet the eye Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 28
With careless robe, to meet the morning ray, To G.A.W., Line 7
To cluster round it when we next shall meet . Sleep and Poetry, Line 326
Bending their graceful figures till they meet Sleep and Poetry, Line 368
Into the east, to meet the smiling day: To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 4
To meet his rosy child, with feathery sails, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 379
And meet so nearly, that with wings outraught, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 866
Meet some of our near-dwellers with my car." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 989
That I may worship them? No eyelids meet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 48
To meet oblivion."- As her heart would burst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 124
When we shall meet in pure elysium. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 658
To meet us many a time." Next Cynthia bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 996
Do meet in the dusk to revel. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 24
Only to meet again more close, and share Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 75
Shall move on soberly, as it is meet ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 154
When we meet over sea and o'er land Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 7
I sped to meet them, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 14
I tread on them; that all my eye doth meet Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 12
I must - I shall - I meet not such tit bits, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 40
I meet not such sweet creatures every day. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 41
For meet adornment a full thousand years; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 2
And opposite the stedfast eye doth meet Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 51
When the Night doth meet the Noon Fancy, Line 22
One would meet in every place? Fancy, Line 74
Who dances on bubbles where brooklets meet - Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 6
Doth fear to meet the sea: but sea it met, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 302
By ear industrious, and attention meet ; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 9
It was my chance to meet his olive brow, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 54
We meet again to-day, and can confer Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 45
We'll meet upon our subject. Farewell, Count! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 63
Upon me sudden! for I cannot meet , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 17
And fragrant oils with ceremony meet Lamia, Part II, Line 194
Than I to meet the torrent of my foes. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 31
Befitting best that shade with shade should meet : The Jealousies, Line 23
For press of coaches, that to-night here meet , The Jealousies, Line 259
Still emptied, at meet distance, here and there, The Jealousies, Line 743
Of cinder wenches meet and soil each other; The Jealousies, Line 771
 
MEETING...........5
Their ruffled locks where meeting hazels darken; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 237
But meeting her blue orbs! Who, who can write Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 531
Felt parting and warm meeting every week; To J.R., Line 2
Enter SIGIFRED, GONFRID, and THEODORE, meeting . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
When, meeting Artegall and Talus grim, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 8
 
MEETS.............3
Far under-ground, a sleeper meets his friends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 894
That when his person meets again your eye, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 73
Look where we will, our bird's-eye vision meets The Jealousies, Line 732
 
MEG...............2
Old Meg she was a gipsey, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 1
Old Meg was brave as Margaret Queen Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 25
 
MELANCHOLY........24
The church bells toll a melancholy round, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 1
A melancholy spirit well might win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 98
Bethinking thee, how melancholy loth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 242
With wayward melancholy ; and I thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 688
And blushing for the freaks of melancholy . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 962
But mingled up; a gleaming melancholy ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 223
So sad, so melancholy , so bereft! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 685
With melancholy thought: O he had swoon'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 868
By the melancholy corners of that mouth. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 396
To scare thee, Melancholy ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 203
O Melancholy , linger here awhile! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 433
O Melancholy , turn thine eyes away! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 481
I floated with, about that melancholy storm. As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 14
He was to weet a melancholy carle, Character of C.B., Line 1
Why should I ope thy melancholy eyes? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 70
Until a melancholy numbs my limbs; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 89
But when the melancholy fit shall fall Ode on Melancholy, Line 11
Veil'd Melancholy has her sovran shrine, Ode on Melancholy, Line 26
Empurple fresh the melancholy blood: Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 182
A melancholy mood will haunt a man, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 124
Thou beauteous wreath, with melancholy eyes, Lamia, Part I, Line 84
Melancholy ." Part 3. Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Why should I ope thy melancholy eyes? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 370
In melancholy realms big tears are shed, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 7
 
MELLIFLUOUS.......1
Warbling for very joy mellifluous sorrow- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 471
 
MELLOW............7
And some kept up a shrilly mellow sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 146
Whose mellow reeds are touch'd with sounds forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 205
With mellow utterance, like a cavern spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 576
To mellow into words, and then there ran Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 737
The mellow ditties from a mourning tongue?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 160
The strong Iberian juice? or mellow Greek? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 121
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, To Autumn, Line 1
 
MELLOWING.........1
The creeper, mellowing for an autumn blush; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 416
 
MELODIES..........14
In melodies that even heaven fair As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 10
Hast thou a trumpet rich melodies blowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 11
In this little dome, all those melodies strange, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 33
And thy whispering melodies Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 15
Like melodies upon a sandy plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 683
His dream away? What melodies are these? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 933
Their melodies , and see their long hair glisten; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 242
To hear the marriage melodies , and then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 383
Groves, meadows, melodies , and arbour roses; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 939
And wandering sounds, slow-breathed melodies ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 208
Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 11
To ease my breast of melodies - Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 7
And in-door melodies ; nor the ruddy wine Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 49
Those melodies sung into the world's ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 188
 
MELODIOUS.........10
Then, through thy temple wide, melodious swells Ode to Apollo, Line 13
When some melodious sorrow spells mine eyes. Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 14
Ghosts of melodious prophecyings rave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 789
Melodious howsoever, can confound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 80
And with melodious chuckle in the strings Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 491
But divine melodious truth; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 19
Thus answer'd, while his white melodious throat Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 81
In some melodious plot Ode to a Nightingale, Line 8
Deaf to his throbbing throat's long, long melodious moan. Lamia, Part I, Line 75
The shadows of melodious utterance. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 6
 
MELODIOUSLY.......2
The blessings of Tighe had melodiously given; To Some Ladies, Line 20
Perplex'd, the while melodiously he said: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 49
 
MELODIST..........1
And, happy melodist , unwearied, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 23
 
MELODIZING........1
Leave melodizing on this wintry day, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 3
 
MELODY............17
Byron, how sweetly sad thy melody , To Lord Byron, Line 1
And by the wandering melody may trace This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 7
Or fed too much with cloying melody - On the Sea, Line 12
The dreary melody of bedded reeds- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 239
Dew-dropping melody , in the Carian's ear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 373
No melody was like a passing spright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 158
Fair Melody ! kind Syren! I've no choice; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 300
And melody . Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 10
While I kiss to the melody , aching all through. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 24
Of melody , and streams of flowery verge,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 4
Close to her ear touching the melody ;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 293
And slumber in the arms of melody , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 193
And murmur'd into it, and made melody - Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 271
O melody no more! for while I sang, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 272
With that new blissful golden melody . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 280
'Tis a rich sobbing melody , with reliefs Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 82
And slumber in the arms of melody , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 37
 
MELPOMENE.........1
From the deep throat of sad Melpomene ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 442
 
MELT..............18
And melt the soul to pity and to love. Ode to Apollo, Line 41
Melt my Dedalian wings, and drive me down Sleep and Poetry, Line 303
Oblivion, and melt out his essence fine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 99
Endymion's spirit melt away and thaw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 501
Ready to melt between an infant's gums: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 451
O let me melt into thee; let the sounds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 815
Would melt at thy sweet breath.- By Dian's hind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 277
Ah me, how I could love!- My soul doth melt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 71
Where didst thou melt to? By thee will I sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 632
Whither didst melt ? Ah, what of that!- all good Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 668
To melt away upon the traveller's lips. Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 10
And many once proud-quiver'd loins did melt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 109
Impossible to melt as iced stream: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 283
O, why did ye not melt , and leave my sense Ode on Indolence, Line 19
Thee to melt in the visionary air, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 85
For pity do not melt !"- "If I should stay," Lamia, Part I, Line 271
And solve and melt :- 'twas just as he foresaw. Lamia, Part II, Line 162
The tender-person'd Lamia melt into a shade. Lamia, Part II, Line 238
 
MELTED............8
Melted in dying murmurs! O how nigh Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 6
Melted into a languor. He return'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 826
It melted from his grasp: her hand he kiss'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 509
The Queen of Egypt melted , and I'll say And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 16
Into her dream he melted , as the rose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 320
Escap'd?- fled?- vanish'd? melted into air? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 24
Melted and disappear'd as suddenly; Lamia, Part I, Line 166
They melted from my sight into the woods: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 459
 
MELTETH...........2
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth , Fancy, Line 3
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth Fancy, Line 77
 
MELTING...........10
The melting softness of that face- Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 14
Soft, plaintive, and melting , for ever will sigh; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 34
Melting a burden dear, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 11
Melting into its radiance, we blend, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 810
To melting pulp, that fish would have bright mail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 837
Of o'er-head clouds melting the mirror through. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 887
Melting to silence, when upon the breeze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 80
At this the shadow wept, melting away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 456
Still fed by melting ice, he takes a draught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 535
The blossoms hang by a melting spell, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 13
 
MELTS.............1
Melts out the frozen incense from all flowers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 99
 
MEM...............1
Tow'rds Thibet. Mem .:- birds fly in the night; The Jealousies, Line 645
 
MEMB..............1
Sect. 2. Memb . 1. Subs. 1. Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MEMBERS...........1
"I'll trounce some of the members ," cried the Prince, The Jealousies, Line 136
 
MEMNON'S..........2
Of Memnon's image at the set of sun Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 374
Sighs, too, as mournful as that Memnon's harp Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 376
 
MEMOIRS...........1
In the famed memoirs of a thousand years, The Jealousies, Line 86
 
MEMORABLE.........1
a memorable instance in this kind, which I may not omit, of one Menippus Lycius, Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MEMORIAL..........3
And there shall be a kind memorial graven. Sleep and Poetry, Line 280
And leave a black memorial on the sand? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 262
But in the very next he reads his soul's memorial : There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 42
 
MEMORIED..........1
But I behold thine eyes' well- memoried light; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 6
 
MEMORIES..........4
And minstrel memories of times gone by. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 435
Ambition from their memories , and brim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 845
Live in our memories . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 122a
Of hopes, and stuff'd with many memories , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 184
 
MEMORY............12
His memory , your direst, foulest shame? Lines Written on 29 May, Line 2
The halo of my memory . Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 28
INSCRIBED TO THE MEMORY OF THOMAS CHATTERTON Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Dedication
To tunes forgotten - out of memory : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 316
Along the pebbled shore of memory ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 17
Your vision shall quite lose its memory , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 74
'Twas done in memory of my boyish days, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 40
Those days paternal from my memory , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 45
Thy memory will waste me to a shade:- Lamia, Part I, Line 270
With such a sorrow. "Shade of Memory !" The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 282
I must delay, and glean my memory The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 467
Touch has a memory . O say, Love, say, What can I do to drive away, Line 4
 
MEMPHIAN..........1
Her face was large as that of Memphian sphinx, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 31
 
MEMPHIS...........1
Memphis , and Babylon, and Nineveh. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 849
 
MEN...............58
He star'd at the Pacific - and all his men On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 12
Men were thought wise who could not understand Sleep and Poetry, Line 184
Like good men in the truth of their behaviours. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 86
That men of health were of unusual cheer; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 216
Young men , and maidens at each other gaz'd I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 231
For when men star'd at what was most divine To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 11
I have to conciliate men who are competent to look, and who do look with a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
proceeds mawkishness, and all the thousand bitters which those men I speak of Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Thus spake he: " Men of Latmos! shepherd bands! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 196
That men , who might have tower'd in the van Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 817
Left by men -slugs and human serpentry, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 821
What I know not: but who, of men , can tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 835
Where there was never sound of mortal men , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 78
How quiet death is. Where soil is men grow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 159
There are who lord it o'er their fellow- men Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1
Thou shalt not go the way of aged men ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 596
Before our forests heard the talk of men ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 6
'Mong men , are pleasures real as real may be: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 852
Since men knew nor rent nor leases. Robin Hood, Line 10
Such men to honor thee, who, worn with toil, To the Nile, Line 7
A thousand men in troubles wide and dark: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 118
How was it these same ledger- men could spy Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 137
And at the last, these men of cruel clay Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 173
To see if I might know the men , Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 15
For men , though idle, may be loth O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 23
Men so unsaintly. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 36
Yet men will murder upon holy days: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 119
From wicked men like thee. Go, go!- I deem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 143
Men han beforne they wake in bliss, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 100
Shamm'd a good snore - the monkey- men descended, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 93
Unseen before by Gods or wondering men , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 183
Not heard before by Gods or wondering men . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 185
Amaz'd and full of fear; like anxious men Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 198
For as in theatres of crowded men Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 253
In men who die.- This is the grief, O Son! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 335
As with us mortal men , the laden heart Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 101
Of men , and beasts, and fish, and apes, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 14
Two or three wise men Two or three posies, Line 5
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 24
What men or gods are these? What maidens loth? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 8
Of marble men and maidens overwrought, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 42
Those men I mean, who on my shoulders propp'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 73
All men may err. In truth I was deceived Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 45
If men , in court and camp, lie not outright, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 35
Lifted you from the crowd of common men Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 48
Men I have spurn'd, and women I have taunted? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 34
And all men ! Vanish - Oh! Oh! Oh! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 184
'Tis natural men should whisper; at the kiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 28
Men shall confess,- this prince was gull'd and cheated, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 133
As men talk in a dream, so Corinth all, Lamia, Part I, Line 350
Men , women, rich and poor, in the cool hours, Lamia, Part I, Line 355
What mortal hath a prize, that other men Lamia, Part II, Line 57
To thin the scarlet conclave of old men , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 50
Other men here: but I am here alone." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 160
A humanist, physician to all men . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 190
Like a vast giant seen by men at sea The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 457
Amaz'd, and full of fear; like anxious men The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 42
No,- wine is only sweet to happy men ; What can I do to drive away, Line 27
 
MEN'S.............3
In a green island, far from all men's knowing? Sleep and Poetry, Line 6
Men's being mortal, immortal; to shake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 844
To all men's sight, a lady innocent. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 139
 
MENE..............2
Old " Mene , Mene, Tekel, Upharsin." Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 54
Old "Mene, Mene , Tekel, Upharsin." Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 54
 
MENIAL............1
The menial of Mars, and held a spear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 18
 
MENIPPUS..........1
a memorable instance in this kind, which I may not omit, of one Menippus Lycius, Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MENTAL............2
New sudden thoughts, nor casts his mental slough? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 638
But in the world of thought and mental might. Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 14
 
MENTION...........2
And mention ('tis as well) the torture of the wasp." The Jealousies, Line 198
To mention all the Berthas in the earth;- The Jealousies, Line 375
 
MERCENARY'S.......1
Bow like some unknown mercenary's flag Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 69
 
MERCHANDIZE.......1
Enriched from ancestral merchandize , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 106
 
MERCI.............1
They cried - "La belle dame sans merci La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 39
 
MERCIFUL..........1
Merciful love that tantalises not, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 2
 
MERCILESS.........1
That it be nothing merciless ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 153a
 
MERCURY...........6
Or as the winged cap of Mercury . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 115
As though the fanning wings of Mercury I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 24
His messenger, his little Mercury . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 384
Her ebon urn, young Mercury , by stealth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 562
Foot-feather'd Mercury appear'd sublime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 331
If Mercury propitiously incline, The Jealousies, Line 619
 
MERCY.............15
My very thoughts: in mercy then away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 958
Have mercy , Goddess! Circe, feel my prayer!' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 554
She fled ere I could groan for mercy . Stung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 601
O vulture-witch, hast never heard of mercy ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 620
Cut Mercy with a sharp knife to the bone; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 174
To pray for mercy on th' elect, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 39
Him any mercy , in that mansion foul, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 89
Saying, " Mercy , Porphyro! hie thee from this place; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 98
In Provence call'd, "La belle dame sans mercy ": The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 292
And then to me no mercy had been shown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 169
My soft Auranthe, her sweet mercy would Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 169
And, in the name of mercy , give command Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 188
As I will be of mercy ! So, at last, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 128
Are equal shared, and mercy is- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 45a
I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 1
 
MERE..............12
Than the mere nothing that engenders them! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 756
The mere commingling of passionate breath, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 833
For the mere sake of truth; as 'tis a ditty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 829
At mere remembering her pale laugh, and curse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 569
For what poor mortals fragment up, as mere Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 845
Hast thou, as a mere shadow?- But how great, Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 13
Could do you better service than mere words! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
For a mere act of duty. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 181a
A trifle mere ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 279b
At the mere touch of cold philosophy? Lamia, Part II, Line 230
gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
He lov'd girls smooth as shades, but hated a mere shade. The Jealousies, Line 9
 
MERELY............7
Nor do we merely feel these essences Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 25
No merely slumberous phantasm, could unlace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 771
And merely given to the cold bleak air. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 553
Yet did she merely weep - her gentle soul Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 470
Not as their leader merely , but their king; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 133
"In preference to these, I'll merely taste The Jealousies, Line 362
"What shall I do with this same book?" "Why merely The Jealousies, Line 523
 
MEREST............1
Their measure of content; what merest whim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 846
 
MERIDIAN..........2
God of the meridian ! God of the meridian, Line 1
Soon was God Bacchus at meridian height; Lamia, Part II, Line 213
 
MERIT.............2
By telling what he sees from native merit . Sleep and Poetry, Line 46
Whether they merit death, or should be plac'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 243
 
MERLIN............1
Since Merlin paid his Demon all the monstrous debt. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 171
 
MERLIN'S..........1
A mossy place, a Merlin's hall, a dream. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 34
 
MERMAID...........4
Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 4
The Mermaid in the zodiac. Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 22
Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 26
Half-hidden, like a mermaid in sea-weed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 231
 
MERMAID'S.........1
No wild boar tushes, and no mermaid's toes: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 16
 
MERRILY...........2
Snapping his lucid fingers merrily !- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 569
And as he went she chanted merrily . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 208
 
MERRIMENT.........4
Heart's lightness from the merriment of May?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 166
To fair hostess Merriment , Robin Hood, Line 29
The sound of merriment and chorus bland: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 95
And all his smiles upon my merriment . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 43
 
MERRY.............13
The earth is glad: the merry lark has pour'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 220
And merry in our meadows? How is this? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 518
Went swift beneath the merry -winged guide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 83
From kissing cymbals made a merry din- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 198
"Whence came ye, merry Damsels! whence came ye! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 218
Stood smiling; merry Hebe laughs and nods; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 437
For he left the merry tale Robin Hood, Line 31
Gone, the merry morris din; Robin Hood, Line 33
And hear a merry laugh amid the thunder; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 6
Was as merry , There was a naughty boy, Line 102
That, after such a merry battle fought, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 14
Come from the gloomy tun with merry shine. Lamia, Part II, Line 188
No more so strange; for merry wine, sweet wine, Lamia, Part II, Line 211
 
MESH..............5
The vine of glossy sprout; the ivy mesh , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 412
And mesh my dewy flowers all the night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 157
From this gross, detestable, filthy mesh , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 552
And Jove grew languid.- Break the mesh Fancy, Line 89
The life she had so tangled in her mesh : Lamia, Part I, Line 295
 
MESHES............1
Can burst the meshes . Not the eagle more King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 29
 
MESS..............1
And as for aqua vitae - there's a mess ! The Jealousies, Line 291
 
MESSAGE...........6
On holy message sent. - What pleasures higher? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 13
The message certain to be done to-morrow- Sleep and Poetry, Line 323
A Paphian dove upon a message sent? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 510
Your message , sir! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 141b
Bear a soft message for me; for the hour Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 129
What message from her Highness? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 20a
 
MESSAGES..........1
Waiting for silver-footed messages . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 51
 
MESSENGER.........4
His messenger , his little Mercury. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 384
Messenger for spicy ale. Robin Hood, Line 32
Where! Where! Where shall I find a messenger ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 1
I hasten'd back, your grieving messenger , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 117
 
MESSENGERS........1
They are messengers Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 122b
 
MET...............27
And springing up, they met the wond'ring sight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 227
Met palsy half way: soon these limbs became Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 637
Moved either host. On a wide sand they met , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 822
I met thee in earth's bosom, all my power Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 905
All close they met again, before the dusk Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 81
All close they met , all eves, before the dusk Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 83
She met among the bushes. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 24
Ah! ken ye what I met the day Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 1
For that I met upon the way Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 7
In silent barren synod met O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 1
Never on such a night have lovers met , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 170
Which met at thy creating; at whose joys Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 312
But that he met Enceladus's eye, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 107
Doth fear to meet the sea: but sea it met , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 302
I met a lady in the meads, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 13
When in the glorious scuffle they met mine, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 60
If you, in all your wandering, ever met Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 119
We met could answer any certainty. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 275
Ere I met you, I sought him every where; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 131
As those who, safe together met alone Lamia, Part I, Line 302
Lycius shrank closer, as they met and past, Lamia, Part I, Line 366
Of palm and plantain, met from either side, Lamia, Part II, Line 126
He met within the murmurous vestibule Lamia, Part II, Line 163
twenty-five years of age, that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
My sword met his and snapp'd off at the hilts. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 50
Till this oracular couplet met his eye The Jealousies, Line 454
I met , far gone in liquor, that old man, The Jealousies, Line 786
 
METAL.............3
Through a vast antre; then the metal woof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 230
Savour of poisonous brass and metal sick: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 189
Lock'd up like veins of metal , crampt and screw'd; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 25
 
METALS............1
Savour of poisonous brass and metals sick. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 33
 
METAPHYSIC........1
With metaphysic swiftness, at the mouse; The Jealousies, Line 56
 
METEOR............4
That balances the heavy meteor -stone;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 644
Out-shooting sometimes, like a meteor -star, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 229
That Saracenic meteor of the fight, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 20
'Tis as portentous as a meteor . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 65
 
METEORS...........1
And tassell'd round with weeping meteors ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 39
 
METHINKS..........8
Methinks it now is at my will to start Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 695
Methinks 'twould be a guilt - a very guilt- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 134
Methinks by his stout bearing he should be- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 15
No, no more wine; methinks you've had enough. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 39
Methinks , if't now were night, I could intrigue Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 26
When I have wept for sorrow; but methinks Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 88
Secure! Methinks I have her in my fist, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 108
Has anger'd me. The noble Earl, methinks , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 30
 
METHOUGHT.........8
All I beheld and felt. Methought I lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 578
Whereat, methought , the lidless-eyed train Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 598
Methought I fainted at the charmed touch, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 637
Methought I had beheld it from the Flood. Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 41
To give fit salutation. Methought I heard, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 26
Methought I stood where trees of every clime, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 19
And every day by day methought I grew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 395
Methought I heard some old man of the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 440
 
METRE.............1
"The stretched metre of an antique song" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Epigraph
 
METROPOLITAN......2
Upon the gold clouds metropolitan , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 129
A metropolitan murmur, lifeful, warm, The Jealousies, Line 573
 
MEW...............1
Thy gentle mew - and tell me all thy frays To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 7
 
MEW'S.............1
And craggy isles, and sea- mew's plaintive cry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 341


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Published @ RC

March 2005