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Keats Concordance
 
MICE..............7
Made a naumachia for mice and rats: Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 4
How many mice and rats hast in thy days To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 2
Of fish and mice and rats and tender chick. To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 8
Cherubim and golden mice . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 38
Call'd doves of Siam, Lima mice , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 79
And two or three mice Two or three posies, Line 14
The dentes sapientiae of mice The Jealousies, Line 292
 
MICHAEL...........1
Michael in arms, and more, meek Eve's fair slenderness. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 59
 
MICKLE............2
But let me laugh awhile, I've mickle time to grieve." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 126
In after time a sage of mickle lore, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 1
 
MID...............22
Mid -way between our homes:- your accents bland To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 122
Sinking bewilder'd mid the dreary sea: On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 8
'Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 18
Another wish'd, mid that eternal spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 378
When all above was faint with mid -day heat. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 878
Thy shepherd vest, and woo thee mid fresh leaves. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 700
Who had not from mid -life to utmost age Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 228
Scoop'd from its trembling sisters of mid -sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 998
And on those pinions, level in mid air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 403
All in its mid -day gold and glimmering. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 681
There is no mid -forest laugh, Robin Hood, Line 15
In the mid days of autumn, on their eves Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 249
As palmer's that with weariness mid -desert shrine hath found. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 22
Just in its mid -life in the midst of June, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 27
Sapphire queen of the mid -May; Fancy, Line 52
Seen mid the sapphire heaven's deep repose; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 319
Azure saints mid silver rays, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 32
In cool mid -forest. Surely I have traced Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 55
And mid -May's eldest child, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 48
From the first shoot till the unripe mid -May, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 134
When in mid -May the sickening east wind The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 97
Spreading more shade: the Naiad mid her reeds The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 317
 
MIDAS.............1
Than Midas of his coinage, let us be If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 11
 
MIDDAY............1
A midday fleece of clouds. Thea arose The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 454
 
MIDDLE............11
And, in its middle space, a sky that never lowers. Imitation of Spenser, Line 9
From out the middle air, from flowery nests, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 187
I must be near the middle of my story. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 53
Full in the middle of this pleasantness Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 89
That one who through this middle earth should pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 723
In the middle of a brook,- whose silver ramble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 933
And, in the middle , there is softly pight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 60
Abrupt in middle air? Yet earthward bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 653
Abrupt, in middle air, his way was lost; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 656
Upon the honey'd middle of the night, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 49
Buds gather'd from the green spring's middle -days, The Jealousies, Line 727
 
MIDMOST...........3
Sitting beneath the midmost forest tree, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 144
A forester deep in thy midmost trees, Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 2
In midmost Ind, beside Hydaspes cool, The Jealousies, Line 1
 
MIDNIGHT..........23
To sigh out sonnets to the midnight air! To Hope, Line 28
She led him, like some midnight spirit nurse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 413
And purblind amid foggy, midnight wolds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 636
Wan as primroses gather'd at midnight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 970
And yet I never look on midnight sky, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 5
The dull of midnight , at her couch's foot Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 274
As when of healthful midnight sleep bereft, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 323
There is a budding morrow in midnight , To Homer, Line 11
Whose passing-bell may ere the midnight toll; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 156
The boisterous, midnight , festive clarion, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 258
By the dusk curtains:- 'twas a midnight charm The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 282
Yet could I on this very midnight cease, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 11
Or prophesyings of the midnight lamp; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 174
When the prow sweeps into a midnight cove. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 355
O soft embalmer of the still midnight , Sonnet to Sleep, Line 1
Upon the midnight hours; Ode to Psyche, Line 31
Upon the midnight hours; Ode to Psyche, Line 45
To cease upon the midnight with no pain, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 56
Among the midnight rumours from the camp. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
About a midnight -gallant, seen to climb Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 141
Whispering in midnight silence, said the youth, Lamia, Part II, Line 84
To grow pale from the waves at dull midnight . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 458
She was born at midnight in an Indian wild; The Jealousies, Line 390
 
MIDST.............20
In the midst of their own brightness; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 5
And plac'd in midst of all that lovely lass To My Brother George (epistle), Line 86
And in the midst of all, a clearer pool I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 167
In midst of all, the venerable priest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 193
In midst of all this heaven? Why not see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 673
In midst of all, there lay a sleeping youth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 393
Just in its mid-life in the midst of June, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 27
Midst of the quiet all around thee! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 28
And in the midst , 'mong thousand heraldries, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 214
In midst of all lay Themis, at the feet Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 77
So Saturn, as he walk'd into the midst , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 105
In midst of this dethronement horrible. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 315
In midst of his own brightness, like the bulk Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 373
In midst of this thine hymn, my willing eyes, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 6
And in the midst of this wide quietness Ode to Psyche, Line 58
Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 47
A master-plague in the midst of miseries. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 2
High in the midst , in honour of the bride: Lamia, Part II, Line 127
Each shrining in the midst the image of a God. Lamia, Part II, Line 190
this fact, for it was done in the midst of Greece." Burton's "Anatomy of Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MIDSUMMER.........1
Her name, see here, Midsummer , ninety-one." The Jealousies, Line 443
 
MIDWAY............1
Now past the midway from mortality, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 315
 
MIEN..............3
Or hath that antique mien and robed form Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 51
With reconciling words and courteous mien Lamia, Part II, Line 171
"By thy ungallant bearing and sad mien , The Jealousies, Line 244
 
MIGHT.............102
Might I be loved by thee like these of yore. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 14
But might I now each passing moment give To George Felton Mathew, Line 31
We well might drop a tear for him, and Burns. To George Felton Mathew, Line 71
Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 1
To show this wonder of its gentle might . Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 10
Rein in the swelling of his ample might ? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 48
Whence Calidore might have the goodliest view Calidore: A Fragment, Line 25
Might live, and show itself to human eyes. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 121
The might of Alfred, and the shaft of Tell; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 70
Or known your kindness, what might I have been? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 73
Which, had I felt, these scribblings might have been To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 107
These thoughts now come o'er me with all their might :- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 131
might / Rest I ne wist, for there n'as erthly wight/ [As I suppose] had more of Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
And seems to listen: O that I might know Sleep and Poetry, Line 153
'Tis might half slumb'ring on its own right arm. Sleep and Poetry, Line 237
Might I indulge at large in all my store Sleep and Poetry, Line 346
The very sense of where I was might well Sleep and Poetry, Line 396
Why, you might read two sonnets, ere they reach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 69
That nought less sweet might call my thoughts away, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 94
O'er which it well might take a pleasant sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 109
That we might look into a forest wide, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 152
O for three words of honey, that I might I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 209
A melancholy spirit well might win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 98
Might mark a lynx's eye, there glimmered light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 123
Or they might watch the quoit-pitchers, intent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 326
Many might after brighter visions stare: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 346
Might turn their steps towards the sober ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 356
Among sere leaves and twigs, might all be heard. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 452
What it might mean. Perhaps, thought I, Morpheus, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 559
A second self, that each might be redeem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 659
That men, who might have tower'd in the van Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 817
For I have ever thought that it might bless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 826
Into my bosom, that the dreadful might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 173
Might seem unholy, be of happy cheer! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 435
Half seeing visions that might have dismay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 874
Thyself to choose the richest, where we might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 998
He might have died: but now, with cheered feel, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 139
Might seem a work of pain; so not enough Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 382
It flash'd, that Circe might find some relief- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 412
With dry cheek who can tell? While thus my might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 616
As hour-glass sand,- and fast, as you might see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 815
To utter secrets, haply I might say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 914
Yet with as sweet a softness as might be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 296
That he might at the threshold one hour wait Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 382
Nor may I be thy love. We might commit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 757
Ourselves at once to vengeance; we might die; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 758
We might embrace and die: voluptuous thought! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 759
Of joy he might have felt. The spirit culls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 782
Some English that might strive thine ear to please. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 4
And for each briar-berry he might eat, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 7
Might as well be in a cloud. Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 4
He might not in house, field, or garden stir, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 11
How she might secret to the forest hie; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 338
How she might find the clay, so dearly prized, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 339
How her short absence might be unsurmised, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 341
Greatly they wonder'd what the thing might mean: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 460
Therefore they watch'd a time when they might sift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 465
Of the might There was a naughty boy, Line 64
To see if I might know the men, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 15
That gods might know my own particular taste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 4
He might make tremble many a man whose spirit had gone forth There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 27
But in the world of thought and mental might . Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 14
Young virgins might have visions of delight, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 47
That he might gaze and worship all unseen; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 80
That he might see her beauty unespied, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 166
Just where her falling hair might be outspread, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 81
From over-strained might . Releas'd, he fled Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 263
He might not:- No, though a primeval God: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 292
The sacred seasons might not be disturb'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 293
Is untremendous might . Yet ye are here, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 155
That first in beauty should be first in might : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 229
Had wrought upon ye; and how I might best Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 241
Victory, might be lost, or might be won. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 342
Victory, might be lost, or might be won. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 342
That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 19
His soul shall taste the sadness of her might , Ode on Melancholy, Line 29
Unto thine anger I might well have spoken, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 28
For, without thee, this day I might have been Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 166
Unless perchance I might rejoice to win Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 23
That I might give it to my hounds to tear! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 94
Each one a life, that I might , every day, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 97
Might have been trodden out, all sure and hush'd; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 18
It might affright him, fill him with suspicion Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 54
And in those meads where sometime she might haunt, Lamia, Part I, Line 18
In vain; the sweet nymph might nowhere be found, Lamia, Part I, Line 31
One warm, flush'd moment, hovering, it might seem Lamia, Part I, Line 129
He might have given the moral a fresh frown, Lamia, Part II, Line 8
That they might see each other while they almost slept; Lamia, Part II, Line 25
Throughout, as fearful the whole charm might fade. Lamia, Part II, Line 124
Might fancy-fit his brows, silk-pillow'd at his ease. Lamia, Part II, Line 220
Of conscience, for their long offended might , Lamia, Part II, Line 284
Where might my taylor live?- I say again Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 21
He lives in Wapping, might live where he pleas'd." Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 23
Might spread beneath, as o'er the stars of heaven; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 64
Upon an eagle's watch, that I might see, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 309
Just where her fallen hair might spread in curls, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 380
A meaner summoner might do as well- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 23
So in my veins red life might stream again, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 6
Upon the mirror'd walls, wherever he might look. The Jealousies, Line 270
Where, till the porter answer'd, might be seen, The Jealousies, Line 276
Where the close eye in deep rich fur might trace The Jealousies, Line 345
Conjectured, on the instant, it might be The Jealousies, Line 678
 
MIGHT'ST..........1
Or thou might'st better listen to the wind, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 4
 
MIGHTIEST.........1
Is of all these the gentlier- mightiest . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 43
 
MIGHTILY..........1
By horrid suffrance - mightily forlorn. Sleep and Poetry, Line 388
 
MIGHTINESS........1
Whose mightiness , and awe of him, at once Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 108
 
MIGHTST...........1
Hush! no exclaim - yet, justly mightst thou call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 471
 
MIGHTY............38
Of mighty workings? - Addressed to the Same, Line 13
Made by some mighty oaks: as they would chase Sleep and Poetry, Line 140
Its mighty self of convoluting sound, Sleep and Poetry, Line 175
The shiftings of the mighty winds that blow Sleep and Poetry, Line 286
His mighty voice may come upon the gale. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 56
Phoebus awhile delayed his mighty wheels, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 212
What mighty power has this gentle story! This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 10
Definitively on these mighty things; To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 2
Desolate shores, and with its mighty swell On the Sea, Line 2
We have imagined for the mighty dead; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 21
A mighty forest; for the moist earth fed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 64
"O thou, whose mighty palace roof doth hang Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 232
The mighty ones who have made eternal day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 253
Would seem a feather to the mighty prize. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 592
Of mighty Poets is made up; the scroll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 724
Of the old bards to mighty deeds: his plans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 895
Within its pearly house.- The mighty deeps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 68
Gave mighty pulses: in this tottering case Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 305
Moving but with the mighty ebb and flow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 387
This mighty consummation made, the host Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 828
A toying with the doves. Then,- " Mighty crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 897
How long is't since the mighty power bid To Ailsa Rock, Line 5
Here his mighty waters play Not Aladdin magian, Line 29
So shelter'd by the mighty pile. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 47
"O mighty Princess, did you ne'er hear tell When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 22
Those green-rob'd senators of mighty woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 73
Which by just right should come of mighty Gods; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 258
No, nor great, nor mighty ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 76b
None, mighty Otho. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 37a
Mighty monarch, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 51b
Most mighty Otho? Will not my great host Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
Pause but one moment, mighty conqueror, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
Ay, a sweet kiss - you see your mighty woes. Lamia, Part II, Line 55
Whence all this mighty cost and blaze of wealth could spring. Lamia, Part II, Line 198
A mighty soldier. Does he still hold out? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 34
Talks off the mighty frowning from his brow, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 43
Good Hum, and let me view this mighty coil." The Jealousies, Line 565
Far in the west a mighty fire broke out- The Jealousies, Line 677
 
MIGNIONETTE.......1
His elbow for a prop, and snuff'd his mignionette . The Jealousies, Line 567
 
MILD..............11
That its mild light creates to heal again: Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 5
Such charms with mild intelligences shine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 26
Nested and quiet in a valley mild , Sleep and Poetry, Line 227
A mild hood For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 14
Shadow'd Enceladus; once tame and mild Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 66
With hectic lips, and eyes up-looking mild , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 250
An old lion sugar-cates of mild reprieve? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 172
Being a wife most mild and dutiful. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 77
Mild as a star in water; for so new, Lamia, Part I, Line 382
But in blank splendor beam'd like the mild moon, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 269
Sweet in the air a mild -toned music plays, The Jealousies, Line 725
 
MILDER............3
And languish'd there three days. Ye milder powers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 747
Are shed through the rain and the milder mist, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 99
Of all her milder -mooned body's grace; Lamia, Part I, Line 156
 
MILDEST...........1
And still she governs with the mildest sway: Sleep and Poetry, Line 240
 
MILDEWS...........1
To keep off mildews , and all weather harms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 284
 
MILES.............2
And I have many miles on foot to fare. Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 4
Two or three miles Two or three posies, Line 23
 
MILITANT..........1
He's Elfinan's great state-spy militant , The Jealousies, Line 52
 
MILITARY..........1
No military swagger of my mind, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 155
 
MILK..............9
God! she is like a milk -white lamb that bleats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 31
Bring home increase of milk . And, as the year Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 45
From his right hand there swung a vase, milk -white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 153
When a milk -pail is upset, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 5
Gleams in the sun, the milk -white heifer lows, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 21
Has not yet mitigated into milk . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 81
If with thy mother's milk thou hast suck'd in Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
Turning into sweet milk the sophist's spleen. Lamia, Part II, Line 172
A fly is in the milk pot - must he die Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 8
 
MILKY.............7
O'er which bend four milky plumes Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 53
In milky nest, and sip them off at leisure. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 10
Of luxuries bright, milky , soft and rosy. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 28
By thy love's milky brow! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 244
Watching the zenith, where the milky way Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 579
And by these tenderest, milky sovereignties- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 759
With lily shells, and pebbles milky white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 103
 
MILL..............1
Both turning many a mill , For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 9
 
MILLER'S..........1
Miller's thumb There was a naughty boy, Line 75
 
MILLINER'S........1
As a milliner's thimble. I am as brisk, Line 4
 
MILLION...........5
Spangling those million poutings of the brine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 351
'Tis blue, and over-spangled with a million Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 629
Circled a million times within the space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 752
One million times ocean must ebb and flow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 694
That warm, white, lucent, million -pleasured breast,- I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 8
 
MILLIONS..........1
Aye, millions sparkled on a vein of gold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 226
 
MILTON............2
With daring Milton through the fields of air: Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 11
atoms." Milton Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Epigraph
 
MILTON'S..........4
Nor move till Milton's tuneful thunders cease, Ode to Apollo, Line 22
And thou shouldst moralize on Milton's blindness, To George Felton Mathew, Line 61
Musing on Milton's fate - on Sydney's bier- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 10
Of fair-hair'd Milton's eloquent distress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 11
 
MILTONIAN.........2
Miltonian storms, and more, Miltonian tenderness; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 58
Miltonian storms, and more, Miltonian tenderness; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 58
 
MIMIC.............1
A mimic temple, so complete and true Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 257
 
MIMICK'D..........2
Collecting, mimick'd the wrought oaken beams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 623
To the high roof, still mimick'd as they rose Lamia, Part II, Line 181
 
MIMICKING.........2
Plump infant laughers mimicking the coil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 247
Fresh carved cedar, mimicking a glade Lamia, Part II, Line 125
 
MINCE.............1
Not, like a subject, foolish matters mince . The Jealousies, Line 472
 
MINCED............2
These minced leaves on me, and passing through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 769
And rifled,- stuff! the horses' hoofs have minced it! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 68
 
MIND..............32
"What wondrous beauty! From this moment I efface from my mind all Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
To banish Woman from my mind . Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 4
Of charming my mind from the trammels of pain. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 24
Yet the sweet converse of an innocent mind , O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 10
And come like a clear sun-rise to my mind ; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 50
Till their stern forms before my mind arise: Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 11
My brain bewilder'd, and my mind o'ercast To My Brother George (epistle), Line 2
So pert and useless, that they bring to mind To My Brother George (epistle), Line 129
These will in throngs before my mind intrude: How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 6
O'er which the mind may hover till it dozes; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 108
Surely the mind of man is closely bound Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 5
A young mind from its bodily tenement. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 325
That broodest o'er the troubled sea of the mind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 454
Thou surely canst not bear a mind in pain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 811
Four seasons are there in the mind of man. Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 2
Moods of one's mind ! You know I hate them well, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 106
For who has mind to relish, Minos-wise, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 9
That man may never lose his mind on mountains bleak and bare; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 46
With a mind self-overaw'd, Fancy, Line 26
Thee a mistress to thy mind : Fancy, Line 80
They saw her highness had made up her mind , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 45
In some untrodden region of my mind , Ode to Psyche, Line 51
No military swagger of my mind , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 155
Choak not the granary of thy noble mind Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 174
And, do ye mind , above all things, proclaim Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 70
Even on the moment; so his troubled mind Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 33
I pray you mind me not- 'tis sad, I say, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 92
His mind wrapp'd like his mantle, while her eyes Lamia, Part I, Line 242
Is that old man? I cannot bring to mind Lamia, Part I, Line 372
At those few words hung vast before my mind , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 307
Life's purposes,- the palate of my mind I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 13
Alter'd her mind , and thought it very nice: The Jealousies, Line 653
 
MIND'S............3
When no fair dreams before my " mind's eye" flit, To Hope, Line 3
Open wide the mind's cage-door, Fancy, Line 7
Benign, if so it please thee, my mind's film." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 146
 
MINDED............2
High- minded and unbending William Wallace. To George Felton Mathew, Line 69
Being gloomy- minded , haters of fair revels,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 57
 
MINDFUL...........1
And be ye mindful that Hyperion, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 343
 
MINDS.............3
In elegant, pure, and aerial minds . To Some Ladies, Line 28
Nor minds he the white swans that dream so sweetly: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 62
Our ready minds to fellowship divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 778
 
MINE..............51
For large white plumes are dancing in mine eye. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 2
And start with awe at mine own strange pretence. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 64
When some melodious sorrow spells mine eyes. Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 14
Would never make a lay of mine enchanting, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 16
Be lull'd with songs of mine . Fair world, adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 103
Of all the brightness that mine eyes have seen! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 206
While mine for passion burneth- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 19
Before mine eyes thick films and shadows float- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 323
Perhaps her love like mine is but unknown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 800
Such tenderness as mine ? Great Dian, why, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 937
Like this of mine , then would I fearless turn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 962
Of mine was once made perfect in these woods. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 966
Into mine own: for why? thou openest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 295
But such a love is mine , that here I chase Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 590
No hand to toy with mine ? No lips so sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 47
On me, and on this damsel fair of mine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 662
"Dear brother mine ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 804b
After a little sleep: or when in mine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 893
Than mine host's Canary wine? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 6
Mine host's sign-board flew away, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 14
As this poor offering to you, sister mine . Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 16
Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 308
"No dream, alas! alas! and woe is mine ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 328
Deserted, void, nor any haunt of mine . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 240
Those pains of mine ; O Saturn, hadst thou felt, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 297
Upon your skirts had fallen no tears of mine . Ode on Indolence, Line 50
But I have other greetings than mine own Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 134
When in the glorious scuffle they met mine , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 60
Both for his sake and mine , and to make glad Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 69
In mine it will. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 122b
Who sung far different notes into mine ears. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 42
I have mine own particular comments on't; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 43
I still must mourn. The fair Auranthe mine ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 140
All mine ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 12a
Wert thou not mine . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 14a
Not mine , and be more mannerly. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 65a
Mine is a cruel task: she is not dead, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 75
Your wrath, weak boy? Tremble at mine , unless Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
Thy father,- almost mine . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 113a
She's mine by right of marriage!- she is mine! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 74
She's mine by right of marriage!- she is mine ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 74
Join a loud voice to mine , and so denounce Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 150
So sweetly to these ravish'd ears of mine Lamia, Part I, Line 268
Your soul in mine , and labyrinth you there Lamia, Part II, Line 53
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine - Lamia, Part II, Line 236
Soft showering in mine ears, and, by the touch The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 23
Came brief upon mine ear,- "So Saturn sat The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 301
O, let me have thee whole,- all,- all - be mine ! I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 5
For the rose-water vase, magician mine ! The Jealousies, Line 431
See scraps of mine will make it worth your while, The Jealousies, Line 562
This room is full of jewels as a mine ,- The Jealousies, Line 616
 
MINE'S............1
"I know a many Berthas!" " Mine's above The Jealousies, Line 372
 
MINERVA...........1
I spring complete Minerva ! But the Prince- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 97
 
MINERVA'S.........1
Of Jove - Minerva's start - no bosom shook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 791
 
MINES.............1
In torched mines and noisy factories, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 108
 
MINGLE............4
The sage will mingle with each moral theme To My Brother George (epistle), Line 77
Mingle , and so become a part of it,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 811
Can mingle music fit for the soft ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 974
Will mingle kindly with the meadow air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 83
 
MINGLED...........7
Mingled with fragrance from her rarest flowers: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 32
Mingled indeed with what is sweet and strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 232
Of mingled wine, out-sparkling generous light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 154
With mingled bubblings and a gentle rush, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 420
But mingled up; a gleaming melancholy; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 223
Mingled with ceaseless bleatings of his sheep: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 360
All in a mingled heap confus'd there lay The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 78
 
MINGLER...........1
Mingler with leaves, and dew and tumbling streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 119
 
MINGLES...........1
That mingles Grecian grandeur with the rude On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
 
MINION............2
Minion of grandeur! think you he did wait? Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 5
Albert, thou art the minion ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 260a
 
MINIONS...........5
O sweetest essence! sweetest of all minions ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 983
His winged minions in close clusters stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 197
What nerveless minions of safe palaces! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
Among the new-plum'd minions of the war. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 111
His winged minions in close clusters stand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 41
 
MINISH............1
The Latmian saw them minish into nought; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 582
 
MINIST'RING.......3
Of man: though no great minist'ring reason sorts Sleep and Poetry, Line 288
By minist'ring slaves, upon his hands and feet, Lamia, Part II, Line 193
One minist'ring ; and there arose a flame. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 96
 
MINISTERS.........1
That ministers should join in it, I own, The Jealousies, Line 141
 
MINISTRANT........1
Strange ministrant of undescribed sounds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 285
 
MINISTRIES........1
Devoted to heaven's pious ministries , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 192
 
MINISTRING........3
Begirt with ministring looks: alway his eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 150
In ministring the potent rule of fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 366
As if the ministring stars kept not apart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 50
 
MINNOWS...........2
Where swarms of minnows show their little heads, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 72
Minnows small There was a naughty boy, Line 78
 
MINOR.............1
That shape, that fairness, that sweet minor zest I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 6
 
MINOS.............1
For who has mind to relish, Minos -wise, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 9
 
MINSTER...........3
Dwelling in the old Minster Square; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 40
Past the echoing minster gate. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 60
Above a pearl-built minster , hovering near; The Jealousies, Line 579
 
MINSTREL..........1
And minstrel memories of times gone by. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 435
 
MINSTREL'S........1
The simple plaining of a minstrel's song! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 388
 
MINSTRELSY........8
Revive the dying tones of minstrelsy , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 32
To golden palaces, strange minstrelsy , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 457
Full of light, incense, tender minstrelsy , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 390
And breathe thee whispers of its minstrelsy . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 813
To our wild minstrelsy !' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 227
To our mad minstrelsy !' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 238
"Fam'd in funeral minstrelsy . Not Aladdin magian, Line 26
Spread a green kirtle to the minstrelsy : Lamia, Part I, Line 188
 
MINT..............2
Savory, latter- mint , and columbines, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 576
'Mid water mint and cresses dim; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 34
 
MINUTE............9
That every other minute vex and please: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 4
Which when he heard, that minute did he bless, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 248
One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 4
The news is scarce a minute old with me. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 58
A minute first. It cannot be - but may Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 156
Besides, the foolish Prince sends, minute whiles, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 35
One minute before death, my iced foot touch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 132
And plot, in the same minute , how to chouse The Jealousies, Line 59
Sometime to-day I must contrive a minute , The Jealousies, Line 618
 
MINUTE'S..........4
On this delight; for, every minute's space, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 612
Ane minute's guessing- Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 6
So said, one minute's while his eyes remain'd The Jealousies, Line 172
Our minute's glance; a busy thunderous roar, The Jealousies, Line 735
 
MINUTES...........11
Minutes are flying swiftly; and as yet On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 1
Counting his woe-worn minutes , by the strokes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 50
Of these first minutes ? The unchariest muse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 532
Who in few minutes more thyself shalt see?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 634
Ye deaf and senseless minutes of the day, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 76
And their minutes buried all Robin Hood, Line 3
continued for a few minutes before he thus began,) Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
The lover's endless minutes slowly pass'd; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 182
"Five minutes before one - brought down a moth The Jealousies, Line 649
"Five minutes thirteen seconds after three, The Jealousies, Line 676
Bivouac'd for four minutes on a cloud- The Jealousies, Line 686
 
MINUTEST..........2
Not the minutest whisper does it send I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 66
To its huge self; and the minutest fish Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 207
 
MINX..............2
"Monstrous affair! Pshaw! pah! what ugly minx The Jealousies, Line 163
To be upon the wing! Now, now, that minx I spurn!" The Jealousies, Line 531
 
MIRACLE...........1
A famish'd pilgrim,- saved by miracle . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 339
 
MIRROR............4
And when thou first didst in that mirror trace To George Felton Mathew, Line 88
Of o'er-head clouds melting the mirror through. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 887
Her pocket mirror and began to look When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 52
Till flurried danger held the mirror up, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 80
 
MIRROR'D..........4
And from the mirror'd level where he stood Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 257
Where he was mirror'd small in paradise, Lamia, Part II, Line 47
Along the mirror'd walls by twin-clouds odorous. Lamia, Part II, Line 182
Upon the mirror'd walls, wherever he might look. The Jealousies, Line 270
 
MIRTH.............8
Circling from three sweet pair of lips in mirth ; To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 4
Great God of breathless cups and chirping mirth !- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 236
Fire-wing'd, and make a morning in his mirth : Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 8
Bards of passion and of mirth , Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 1
Bards of passion and of mirth , Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 37
Dance, and Provencal song, and sunburnt mirth ! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 14
To share our marriage feast and nuptial mirth ?" Lamia, Part II, Line 91
This famed for languid eyes, and that for mirth ,- The Jealousies, Line 377
 
MIRY..............1
Had made a miry channel for his tears. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 280
 
MISBAPTISED.......1
And misbaptised with a Christian name. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 33
 
MISCAL............1
We miscal grief, bale, sorrow, heartbreak, woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 942
 
MISCARRIES........1
So each Fair reasons - though it oft miscarries . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 61
 
MISCHIEF..........2
Thou bitter mischief ! Venemous bad priest! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 76
You would do me a mischief some odd day, The Jealousies, Line 467
 
MISCREED..........1
Spoil his salvation for a fierce miscreed ? On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 14
 
MISDEEDS..........1
All my misdeeds ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 117a
 
MISER.............2
Toil hard, ye slaves, and from the miser -earth Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 10
Even as a miser balances his coin; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
 
MISER'S...........1
A buried miser's only son, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 74
 
MISERABLE.........6
But off, Despondence! miserable bane! Sleep and Poetry, Line 281
Is miserable . 'Twas even so with this Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 372
Into his eyes. Ah, miserable strife, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 529
But even now most miserable old, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 303
My miserable child! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 38
Of hearts and lips! Ah, miserable me!" Lamia, Part I, Line 41
 
MISERIES..........6
A master-plague in the midst of miseries . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 2
Each other - forget her!- Our miseries Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 44
So rainbow-sided, touch'd with miseries , Lamia, Part I, Line 54
"But those to whom the miseries of the world The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 148
And hopes and joys and panting miseries ,- To Fanny, Line 10
To rhyme and syllable his miseries ; The Jealousies, Line 124
 
MISERS............2
To dig more fervently than misers can. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 368
Misers of sound and syllable, no less If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 10
 
MISERY............21
Dear child of sorrow! son of misery ! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 2
Would give a pang to jealous misery , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 176
What misery most drowningly doth sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 281
Thou know'st the deepness of his misery . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 551
O misery of hell! resistless, tame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 266
Long years of misery have told me so. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 325
Of all his kingdom. Long in misery Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 378
O what a load of misery and pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 684
Loving and hatred, misery and weal, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 112
Upon the bourne of bliss, but misery ?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 461
A dreary night of love and misery , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 50
And then, instead of love, O misery ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 235
I thought the worst was simple misery ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 330
With songs of misery , music of our woes; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 269
The misery his brilliance had betray'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 369
An ample store of misery thou hast, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 173
Tears, tears of misery . O, the heavy day! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 90
The misery in fit magnificence. Lamia, Part II, Line 116
Are misery , and will not let them rest. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 149
With an electral changing misery The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 246
Forget, in the mist of idle misery , I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 12
 
MISFEATURE........1
He hath his winter too of pale misfeature , Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 13
 
MISFORTUNE........1
Empty of all misfortune ? Do the brooks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 128
 
MISHAPS...........1
The generous Earl condoles in his mishaps , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 41
 
MISNOMERS.........1
A thing of soft misnomers , so divine And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 3
 
MISPLACED.........1
"Made racy - (sure my boldness is misplaced !)- The Jealousies, Line 367
 
MISS..............8
One felt heart-certain that he could not miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 374
After long toil and travelling, to miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 145
And Miss Chip has kiss'd the sawyer, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 19
And Hazlitt playing with Miss Edgeworth's cat; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 10
Lest I should miss to bid thee a good morrow: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 202
And next she wonder'd how his eyes could miss Lamia, Part I, Line 310
There's Bertha Watson,- and Miss Bertha Page,- The Jealousies, Line 376
On any terms, marry Miss Bellanaine; The Jealousies, Line 461
 
MISS'D............2
Were never miss'd ." - Thus plaining, doth she bring The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 158
Miss'd the way, boy? Say not that on your peril! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 16
 
MISS'S............1
Till Miss's comb is made a pearl tiara, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 7
 
MISSAL............5
The holy missal ; thou didst craze O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 45
Clasp'd like a missal where swart Paynims pray; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 241
And kiss the courtier's missal , its silk steps? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 65
Fetch me a missal , and a string of beads,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 97
But, as I've read Love's missal through to-day, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 13
 
MISSES............1
That mortal's a fool who such happiness misses ; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 18
 
MISSION...........1
It is an awful mission , God of the meridian, Line 5
 
MISSION'D.........2
Rose, like a mission'd spirit, unaware: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 193
Mission'd her viewless servants to enrich Lamia, Part II, Line 136
 
MISSIONARY........1
To some Kamschatkan missionary church, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 108
 
MISSIONED.........1
A disguis'd demon, missioned to knit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 701
 
MISSPENT..........1
Of my rough verses not an hour misspent ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 82
 
MIST..............18
And shadowy, through the mist of passed years: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 3
There curl'd a purple mist around them; soon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 367
His litter of smooth semilucent mist , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 385
Upon the spiritless mist have they outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 401
Whose eye has seen the snow clouds hung in mist , O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 2
Upon the top of Nevis, blind in mist ! Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 2
And there is sullen mist ; even so much Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 6
Mankind can tell of heaven: mist is spread Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 7
Is mist and crag - not only on this height, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 13
Blushing through the mist and dew, Fancy, Line 14
Through aged boughs, that yielded like the mist Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 156
A mist arose, as from a scummy marsh. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 258
Are shed through the rain and the milder mist , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 99
Or circumstance; to me 'tis all a mist ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 4
Slung from the spheres; gauzes of silver mist , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 37
Stretches, with all its mist and cloudy rack, Lamia, Part I, Line 178
Of columns north and south, ending in mist The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 84
Forget, in the mist of idle misery, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 12
 
MISTAKE...........2
Do not mistake me, Gersa. That you may not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 113
What, man, do you mistake the hollow sky Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 34
 
MISTED............1
Misted the cheek; no passion to illume Lamia, Part II, Line 274
 
MISTER............1
And charming Mister Lovels? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 40
 
MISTING...........1
When thy gold breath is misting in the west, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 44
 
MISTLETOE.........1
Anon she took a branch of mistletoe , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 514
 
MISTRESS..........8
But my poor mistress went distract and mad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 473
Where is my lovely mistress ? Well-away! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1011
Thee a mistress to thy mind: Fancy, Line 80
Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows, Ode on Melancholy, Line 18
Albert, you do insult my bride - your mistress - Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
Some demon's mistress , or the demon's self. Lamia, Part I, Line 56
Dear mistress , let him have no handle against you! The Jealousies, Line 54
"You hush!" replied the mistress , with a shine The Jealousies, Line 66
 
MISTRESS'.........3
Desist! or my offended mistress' nod Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 953
Its mistress' lips? Not thou?- 'Tis Dian's: lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 429
Peace! nor contrive thy mistress' ire to rouse," The Jealousies, Line 61
 
MISTS.............5
Through autumn mists , and took Peona's hand: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 991
Exhales in mists to heaven. Aye, the count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 723
On mists in idleness: to let fair things Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 11
With the bright mists about the mountains hoar Lamia, Part I, Line 169
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, To Autumn, Line 1
 
MISTY.............7
Upon a misty , jutting head of land- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 163
I'd rather stand upon this misty peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 166
On either side outgush'd, with misty spray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 918
Prone to the green head of a misty hill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 613
I spied upon a misty rig Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 11
Or the ripe plum finger its misty bloom, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 6
Where is thy misty pestilence to creep The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 205
 
MITHER............1
Young Peggy's mither , Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 22
 
MITIGATED.........3
Has not yet mitigated into milk. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 81
Fine was the mitigated fury, like Lamia, Part II, Line 78
Soft mitigated by divinest lids The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 266
 
MITIGATION........1
Of mitigation , or redeeming bubble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 641
 
MITRE.............1
Are bow'd before the mitre . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 61a
 
MITRED............1
The mitred ones of Nice and Trent O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 7
 
MIX...............1
She will mix these pleasures up Fancy, Line 37
 
MNEMOSYNE.........6
Mnemosyne was straying in the world; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 29
Throbb'd with the syllables.- " Mnemosyne ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 82
Trembling with light upon Mnemosyne . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 123
During the pain Mnemosyne upheld Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 133
Then came the griev'd voice of Mnemosyne , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 331
Reliev'd from the dusk vale. Mnemosyne The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 50
 
MO................2
I leave withouten wordes mo All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 55
He writith; and thinges many mo : The Eve of St. Mark, Line 109
 
MOAN..............32
Of Montmorenci. Why so sad a moan ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 89
Nor sigh of his, nor plaint, nor passion'd moan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 201
The earth clos'd - gave a solitary moan - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 586
A sound of moan , an agony of sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 485
Like one repenting in his latest moan ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 324
And to the silence made a gentle moan , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 238
Moan hither, all ye syllables of woe, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 441
Wherewith disturb'd, she utter'd a soft moan : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 294
And moan forth witless words with many a sigh; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 303
O darkness! darkness! ever must I moan , Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 7
And then upon the grass I sit, and moan , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 90
And made sweet moan . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 20
Nor virgin-choir to make delicious moan Ode to Psyche, Line 30
So let me be thy choir, and make a moan Ode to Psyche, Line 44
Ah! what a moan ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Second Lady, Line 96a
Deaf to his throbbing throat's long, long melodious moan . Lamia, Part I, Line 75
Of joys; and she began to moan and sigh Lamia, Part II, Line 37
Supportress of the faery-roof, made moan Lamia, Part II, Line 123
Gruff with contempt; which a death-nighing moan Lamia, Part II, Line 292
" Moan , brethren, moan; for we are swallow'd up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 412
"Moan, brethren, moan ; for we are swallow'd up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 412
Doth ease its heart of love in. Moan and wail. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 417
Moan , brethren, moan; for lo! the rebel spheres The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 418
Moan, brethren, moan ; for lo! the rebel spheres The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 418
No smell of death - there shall be death - Moan , moan, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 424
No smell of death - there shall be death - Moan, moan , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 424
Moan , Cybele, moan, for thy pernicious babes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 425
Moan, Cybele, moan , for thy pernicious babes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 425
Moan , brethren, moan; for I have no strength left, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 427
Moan, brethren, moan ; for I have no strength left, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 427
Moan , moan; for still I thaw - or give me help: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 430
Moan, moan ; for still I thaw - or give me help: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 430
 
MOAN'D............2
And through it moan'd a ghostly under-song, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 287
Pale Isabella kiss'd it, and low moan'd . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 399
 
MOANINGS..........2
Moanings had burst from him; but now that rage Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 862
My long captivity and moanings all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 334
 
MOANS.............2
And all his priesthood moans ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 266
Moans from my heart, and sighs not counterfeit. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 17
 
MOCK..............4
'Mong which it gurgled blythe adieus, to mock Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 938
Had come to mock behind her back, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 87
I pr'ythee mock me not with gentle speech, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 109
Of all mock lyrists, large self worshipers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 207
 
MOCK'D............1
"And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by." Shakspeare O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 2
 
MOCKERIES.........1
What abject things, what mockeries must ye be, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 101
 
MOCKERY...........1
Nay open speech, rude mockery grown common, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
 
MOCKING...........1
With crystal mocking of the trees and sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 422
 
MODERATE..........1
moderate his Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MODERN............2
To make old prose in modern rhyme more sweet: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 156
That 'tis of modern use to travel in a litter. The Jealousies, Line 234
 
MODES.............1
The Magazin des Modes now open is The Jealousies, Line 283
 
MODEST............2
Without that modest softening that enhances Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 3
That the sweet buds which with a modest pride I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 3
 
MODESTY...........1
In lovely modesty , and virtues rare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 22
 
MODRE.............1
Gif thate the modre (God her blesse) The Eve of St. Mark, Line 105
 
MOIST.............6
Moist , cool and green; and shade the violets, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 33
Those lips how moist - they speak, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 8
A mighty forest; for the moist earth fed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 64
With anguish moist and fever dew, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 10
As the moist scent of flowers, and grass, and leaves The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 404
He said, smack'd his moist lips, and gave a pleasant frown. The Jealousies, Line 423
 
MOISTEN...........1
Or thrice my palate moisten : but when I mark Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 25
 
MOISTEN'D.........1
And moisten'd it with tears unto the core. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 424
 
MOISTENED.........1
Warm and serene, but yet with moistened eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 922
 
MOISTURE..........7
And o'er my eyes the trembling moisture shake. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 42
He feels a moisture on his cheek, and blesses Calidore: A Fragment, Line 90
Dry up the moisture from your golden lids, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 49
And moisture , that the bowery green may live: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 84
In desolate places, where dank moisture breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 240
Were clos'd in sullen moisture , and quick sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 469
Clouds still with shadowy moisture haunt the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 420
 
MOLE..............2
And let his spirit, like a demon- mole , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 354
Its strength for darkness, burrowing like the mole ; Sonnet to Sleep, Line 12
 
MOLEST............1
molest him; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MOMENT............45
"What wondrous beauty! From this moment I efface from my mind all Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
But might I now each passing moment give To George Felton Mathew, Line 31
Which at this moment is in sunbeams drest: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 140
But not a moment can he there insure them, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 11
That stays one moment in an open flower, Sleep and Poetry, Line 3
Of over thinking had that moment gone Sleep and Poetry, Line 383
O let me for one moment touch her wrist; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 103
Let me one moment to her breathing list; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 104
But the soft numbers, in that moment spoken, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 237
Or "Go"? This very moment I would frown To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 11
To tie for a moment thy plant round his brow, God of the golden bow, Line 32
Could at this moment be content to lie This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 12
In one moment flies, Hither, hither, love, Line 14
In one moment dies; Hither, hither, love, Line 16
And, at that moment , felt my body dip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 663
Into a warmer air: a moment more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 664
Feel we these things?- that moment have we stept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 795
One moment in reflection: for he fled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 216
One moment with his hand among the sweets: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 354
Thus spake he, and that moment felt endued Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 707
More suddenly than doth a moment go, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1021
I'll swim to the syrens, and one moment listen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 241
Grew a new heart, which at this moment plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 306
A three days' journey in a moment done: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 253
One moment from his home: only the sward Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 335
And scarcely for one moment could be caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 388
Even then, that moment , at the thought of this, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 745
In one swift moment , would what then he saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 907
Yet at the moment , temperate was my blood- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 40
Three rows of oars are lightening moment -whiles Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 57
The moment then - for then will Red-Crag rub Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 65
And, in the same moment - hark! Fancy, Line 43
So, purposing each moment to retire, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 73
But for one moment in the tedious hours, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 79
Each one the face a moment whiles to me; Ode on Indolence, Line 22
I saw my moment . The Hungarians, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 47
I, for a moment -whiles, was prisoner ta'en Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67
Not till this moment did I ever feel Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 92
He doth this moment wish himself asleep Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 91
Pause but one moment , mighty conqueror, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
Of little moment . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 117a
Even on the moment ; so his troubled mind Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 33
Did I not send, sir, but a moment past, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 137
One warm, flush'd moment , hovering, it might seem Lamia, Part I, Line 129
Of deep sleep in a moment was betray'd. Lamia, Part II, Line 105
 
MOMENT'S..........5
Though one moment's pleasure Hither, hither, love, Line 13
Even to a moment's filling up, and fast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 489
And so left Florence in a moment's space, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 478
Or I will, even in a moment's space, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 151
That but a moment's thought is passion's passing bell. Lamia, Part II, Line 39
 
MOMENTOUSLY.......1
Nearly, momentously ,- aye, painfully! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 59
 
MOMENTS...........11
In those still moments I have wish'd you joys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 127
In what diviner moments of the day To G.A.W., Line 2
For many moments , ere their ears were sated Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 114
The moments , by some greedy help that seem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 658
And a whole age of lingering moments crept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 915
Are those swift moments ? Whither are they fled? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 971
For moments few, a temperament as stern Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 473
For some few gasping moments ; like a lance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 269
O aching time! O moments big as years! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 64
His most uneasy moments , when cold death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 14
So that, in moments few, she was undrest Lamia, Part I, Line 161
 
MOMUS.............2
Sombre Saturn, Momus hale, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 21
While nudging the elbow of Momus ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 17


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Published @ RC

March 2005