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Keats Concordance
 
MOULD.............5
"What though I leave this dull, and earthly mould , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 71
She gaz'd into the fresh-thrown mould , as though Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 361
And cover'd it with mould , and o'er it set Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 415
Of even mould , felicitous and smooth; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 65
Of a fit mould and beauty, ripe and rare, The Jealousies, Line 7
 
MOULDER'D.........1
Some moulder'd steps lead into this cool cell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 869
 
MOULDERING........3
The mouldering arch, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 4
But those of Saturn's vintage; mouldering scrolls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 129
From the fast mouldering head there shut from view: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 430
 
MOULDY............1
And share his mouldy ratio in a siege. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 83
 
MOULTED...........2
Of moulted feathers, touchwood, alder chips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 882
Those moulted feathers, and so mount once more What can I do to drive away, Line 20
 
MOUND.............3
To smiles and frowns; they seem a lifted mound Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 39
Before its wreathed doorway, on a mound The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 28
The mossy mound and arbour were no more; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 60
 
MOUNT.............12
Mount his back! thy sword unsheath! Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 61
Swiftly I mount , upon wide spreading pinions, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 105
I mount for ever - not an atom less To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 3
Upon thy Mount Lycean!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 306
My pleasant days, because I could not mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 746
Thou shouldst mount up to with me. Now adieu! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 578
Save of blown self-applause, they proudly mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 13
And mount upon the snortings of a whale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 246
"To-day we purpose, ay, this hour we mount Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 185
And he put out an arm to bid me mount , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 42
Ere thou canst mount up these immortal steps." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 117
Those moulted feathers, and so mount once more What can I do to drive away, Line 20
 
MOUNTAIN..........21
Let the sweet mountain nymph thy favorite be, On Peace, Line 8
Yet over the steep, whence the mountain stream rushes, To Some Ladies, Line 5
Pure as the ice-drop that froze on the mountain ? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 2
Some mountain breeze had turned its chief delight, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 9
The mountain flowers, when his glad senses caught Calidore: A Fragment, Line 54
Fresher than berries of a mountain tree? Sleep and Poetry, Line 20
Upon some mountain -top until I feel Sleep and Poetry, Line 50
We see the waving of the mountain pine; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 128
Among his brothers of the mountain chase. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 192
The scrip, with needments, for the mountain air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 208
By every wind that nods the mountain pine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 261
My voice upon the mountain -heights; once more Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 478
A half-forgetfulness in mountain wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 980
Thou wast the mountain -top - the sage's pen- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 164
All mountain -rivers lost in the wide home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 949
With fairy fishes from the mountain tarn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 693
Blood-red the sun may set behind black mountain peaks; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 17
lips when she dashed it to the ground, for the mountain began to grumble; which Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
From the mountain soil they take, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 60
Or mountain -built with peaceful citadel, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 36
Of darkness, a great mountain (strange to speak), The Jealousies, Line 661
 
MOUNTAIN'D........2
Like old Deucalion mountain'd o'er the flood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 197
Which, when it ceases in this mountain'd world, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 123
 
MOUNTAIN'S........3
Huge dens and caverns in a mountain's side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 650
He reads it on the mountain's height, where chance he may sit down There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 43
A grain of gold upon a mountain's side, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 272
 
MOUNTAINEER.......3
Young mountaineer ! descend where alleys bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 203
Warm mountaineer ! for canst thou only bear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 54
The mountaineer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 721b
 
MOUNTAINS.........19
And light blue mountains : but no breathing man Calidore: A Fragment, Line 28
To the trees and mountains ; and there soon appear Sleep and Poetry, Line 137
Man's voice was on the mountains ; and the mass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 104
That overtop your mountains ; whether come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 199
Innumerable mountains rise, and rise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 59
In gulf or aerie, mountains or deep dells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 94
The stranger from the mountains , breathless, trac'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 737
O first-born on the mountains ! by the hues Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 2
"Over wide streams and mountains great we went, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 239
Son of the old moon- mountains African! To the Nile, Line 1
The mountains blue, and cold near neighbour rills- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 36
To the mountains There was a naughty boy, Line 39
Out owre the mountains , Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 2
That man may never lose his mind on mountains bleak and bare; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 46
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors; Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 8
Was hurling mountains in that second war, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 70
Underneath earth-quaked mountains ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 82
Fledge the wild-ridged mountains steep by steep; Ode to Psyche, Line 55
With the bright mists about the mountains hoar Lamia, Part I, Line 169
 
MOUNTED...........3
" Mounted on panthers' furs and lions' manes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 251
To pour in at the toes: I mounted up, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 134
"A poet, mounted on the court-clown's back, The Jealousies, Line 775
 
MOUNTS............2
Who now, ere Phoebus mounts the firmament, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 330
Why were they proud? Because fair orange- mounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 123
 
MOURN.............12
And mourn the fearful dearth of human kindness To George Felton Mathew, Line 62
Stands venerably proud; too proud to mourn Calidore: A Fragment, Line 39
The spreading blue bells: it may haply mourn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 43
Yet, as all things mourn awhile Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 17
With dangerous speed: and so he did not mourn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 550
It forces us in summer skies to mourn : Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 84
No heart was there in Florence but did mourn Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 499
The brethren's skulls mourn , dewy wet, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 5
Our conquerors to mourn as we do now. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 231
I still must mourn . The fair Auranthe mine! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 140
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn To Autumn, Line 27
To make rejoinder to Moneta's mourn . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 231
 
MOURN'D...........4
Mourn'd as if yet thou wert a forester;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 779
The Spirit mourn'd "Adieu!"- dissolv'd, and left Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 321
First the soft bag-pipe mourn'd with zealous haste; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 5
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 4
 
MOURNETH..........1
Spirit here that mourneth ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 4
 
MOURNFUL..........12
Delicious Avon, with a mournful sound, Sleep and Poetry, Line 214
Were heard of none beside the mournful robbins. This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 14
So mournful strange. Surely some influence rare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 497
Young traveller, in such a mournful place? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 650
Those towering horses and their mournful freight. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 359
The mournful wanderer dreams. Behold! he walks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 407
When it is nighing to the mournful house Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 103
Sighs, too, as mournful as that Memnon's harp Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 376
Your mournful Psyche, nor the downy owl Ode on Melancholy, Line 7
And there her women, in a mournful throng, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 2
In mournful syllables. Let but my words reach Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 15
There as he stood, he heard a mournful voice, Lamia, Part I, Line 35
 
MOURNFULLY........1
Sound mournfully upon the winds and low; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 445
 
MOURNING..........4
The mellow ditties from a mourning tongue?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 160
Some mourning words, which in our feeble tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 49
Bring me some mourning weeds, that I may 'tire Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 93
Some mourning words, which in our feeble tongue The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 351
 
MOURNS............2
He mourns that day so soon has glided by: To one who has been long in city pent, Line 12
O'er pale faces mourns The Gothic looks solemn, Line 8
 
MOUSE.............3
Thou shalt see the field- mouse peep Fancy, Line 55
With metaphysic swiftness, at the mouse ; The Jealousies, Line 56
The Imaian 'scutcheon bright,- one mouse in argent field. The Jealousies, Line 585
 
MOUSE'S...........1
"Show him a mouse's tail, and he will guess, The Jealousies, Line 55
 
MOUTH.............21
Some with upholden hand and mouth severe; Sleep and Poetry, Line 143
Sit ye near some old cavern's mouth and brood On the Sea, Line 13
Be rather in the trumpet's mouth ,- anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 737
That, near a cavern's mouth , for ever pour'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 85
By tenderest pressure, a faint damask mouth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 405
Convulsion to a mouth of many years? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 287
By the melancholy corners of that mouth . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 396
Of the salmon's mouth , For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 11
Two witch's eyes above a cherub's mouth , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 6
From mouth to mouth through all the country pass'd: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 502
From mouth to mouth through all the country pass'd: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 502
Each a mouth of pearls must strew. Not Aladdin magian, Line 34
What whining bit of tongue and mouth thus dares Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 21
He ground severe his skull, with open mouth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 51
And purple-stained mouth ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 18
Turning to poison while the bee- mouth sips: Ode on Melancholy, Line 24
The provinces about the Danube's mouth , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 19
Or the deep key of Jove's sonorous mouth , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 25
She had a woman's mouth with all its pearls complete: Lamia, Part I, Line 60
Her mouth foam'd, and the grass, therewith besprent, Lamia, Part I, Line 148
His mouth being held conveniently fit The Jealousies, Line 421
 
MOUTH'D...........2
Of pale- mouth'd prophet dreaming. Ode to Psyche, Line 35
Of pale- mouth'd prophet dreaming. Ode to Psyche, Line 49
 
MOUTHED...........2
And crimson mouthed shells with stubborn curls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 880
And sat me down, and took a mouthed shell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 270
 
MOUTHS............1
Silence! Gag up their mouths ! I cannot bear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 261
 
MOV'D.............8
Lay dormant, mov'd convuls'd and gradually Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 499
Death had come sudden; for no jot he mov'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 566
Have mov'd , even though Amphion's harp had woo'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 461
Mov'd on for many a league; and gain'd, and lost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 829
Mov'd in these vales invisible till now? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 52
Pour'd on his hair, they all mov'd to the feast Lamia, Part II, Line 195
Relented not, nor mov'd ; "from every ill Lamia, Part II, Line 296
Mov'd the thin linen folds that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 196
 
MOVE..............21
Nor move , till ends the lofty strain, Ode to Apollo, Line 21
Nor move till Milton's tuneful thunders cease, Ode to Apollo, Line 22
Then o'er the strings his fingers gently move , Ode to Apollo, Line 40
Light-footed damsels move with gentle paces Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 41
Like the bright spots that move about the sun; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 40
Deaf to light Zephyrus it would not move ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 175
A little cloud would move across the blue. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 88
What! dost thou move ? dost kiss? O bliss! O pain! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 773
Henceforth was dove-like.- Loth was he to move Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 870
"What is there in thee, Moon! that thou shouldst move Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 142
I move to the end in lowliness of heart.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 29
With the slow move of time,- sluggish and weary Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 922
Shall move on soberly, as it is meet; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 154
Filling the air, as on we move , with portraiture intense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 35
Fearing to move or speak, she look'd so dreamingly. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 306
As thou canst move about, an evident God; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 338
Alas! My lord, my lord! they cannot move her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 187
When move in a sweet body fit for life, Lamia, Part I, Line 39
Come, lead me to this Mars - and let us move King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 51
Zodiac will not move without a sly douceur! The Jealousies, Line 297
They dip, move on, and with them moves a glow The Jealousies, Line 556
 
MOVED.............6
Be moved for days from whence it sometime fell, On the Sea, Line 7
Through the cool depth.- It moved as if to flee- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 897
Moved on with pointed finger. In this guise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 606
Moved either host. On a wide sand they met, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 822
Moved 'twas with careful steps, and hush'd as death: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 4
wept, and desired Apollonius to be silent, but he would not be moved , and Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
MOVEMENT..........1
So that I felt a movement in my heart Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 267
 
MOVES.............4
On pinions that nought moves but pure delight; As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 3
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 12
Moves round the point, and throws her anchor stiff. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 24
They dip, move on, and with them moves a glow The Jealousies, Line 556
 
MOVEST............1
Besides the goods meanwhile thou movest east and west. The Jealousies, Line 243
 
MOVING............11
When it is moving on luxurious wings, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 131
A careful moving , caught my waking ears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 680
Moving more near the while. "O Haunter chaste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 302
Moving about as in a gentle wind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 616
Moving but with the mighty ebb and flow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 387
Smooth- moving came Oceanus the old, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 994
Like to a moving vintage down they came, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 200
And moving with demurest air The Eve of St. Mark, Line 17
The moving waters at their priestlike task Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 5
And threw their moving shadows on the walls, Lamia, Part I, Line 359
Freckled with red and gold the moving swarm; The Jealousies, Line 575
 
MOWN..............2
From hedge to hedge about the new- mown mead; On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 4
For the new mown hay For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 41
 
MOZART............1
Was warm'd luxuriously by divine Mozart ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 110
 
MR................7
Better than Mr . D--, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 30
Better than Mr . V--. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 32
My shoemaker was always Mr . Bates. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 18
And if not Mr . Bates, why I'm not old! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 19
Well done - for by what Mr . Dwarfy said, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 81
No, no, there Mr . Werter takes his spoon, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 10
" Mr . Nisby is of opinion that laced coffee is bad The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 365
 
MRS...............1
And two Mrs .- Two or three posies, Line 20
 
MUCH..............55
To say "joy not too much in all that's bloomy." To George Felton Mathew, Line 52
I marvel much that thou hast never told To George Felton Mathew, Line 84
Delighting much , to see it half at rest, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 15
Ah, yes! much more would start into his sight- To My Brother George (epistle), Line 63
Of late, too, I have had much calm enjoyment, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 119
Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold, On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 1
Spreads awfully before me. How much toil! Sleep and Poetry, Line 307
Or fed too much with cloying melody- On the Sea, Line 12
Who, who could tell how much Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 5
And press'd me by the hand: Ah! 'twas too much ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 636
As if, athirst with so much toil, 'twould sip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 88
With too much passion, will here stay and pity, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 828
As much as here is penn'd doth always find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 847
A resting place, thus much comes clear and plain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 848
No, he had felt too much for such harsh jars: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 865
Death felt it to his inwards: 'twas too much : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 787
And all my story that much passion slew me; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 114
And with them shall I die; nor much it grieves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 935
Sees not so much as I; Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 2
Too much of pity after they are dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 92
The little sweet doth kill much bitterness; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 98
And, furthermore, her brethren wonder'd much Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 457
O Lowther, how much better thou All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 21
Vaprous doth hide them; just so much I wist Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 4
And there is sullen mist; even so much Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 6
Thus much I know, that, a poor witless elf, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 11
Much charity, and ne'er neglect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 38
Too much gaz'd at? Where's the maid Fancy, Line 70
Not so much life as on a summer's day Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 8
And in the proof much comfort will I give, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 179
Much pain have I for more than loss of realms: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 334
Conrad, I owe thee much . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 179a
Indeed too much oppress'd. May I be bold Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
Your dukedom's privilege will grant so much . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 55
And much in the Emperor's favor. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 17a
This is too much ! Hearken, my lady pure,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
That this poor face you deign to praise so much ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 110
I think, nay I am sure, you will grieve much Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 113
I have too much . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 4a
This is a little painful; just too much . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 45
You do yourself much wrong. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 196a
Follow;- your presences will much avail Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 280
Not so much at your threats, as at your voice, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 131
Too much upon your thoughtful mood, I will Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 47
Much better he came not. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 139a
And fills the air with so much pleasant health The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 100
Then spake, so much more earnest, that the breath The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 195
Spake out, so much more earnest, that her breath The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 217
Was in this shrouded vale, not so much air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 311
In Council, dreams too much among his books. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 32
For it may comfort and console him much , The Jealousies, Line 123
Who, turning much his body, more his neck, The Jealousies, Line 255
Feel, feel my pulse, how much in love I am; The Jealousies, Line 400
It was too much . He shrunk back in his chair, The Jealousies, Line 456
( Much like our Boswell's), we will take a glance The Jealousies, Line 634
 
MUDDY.............4
And, like a muddy stream, would bear along Sleep and Poetry, Line 158
Once spiritual, are like muddy lees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 906
Should darken her pure grot with muddy gloom; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 8
Making our bright hours muddy , be a thing Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 116
 
MUFFLED...........6
Some with their faces muffled to the ear Sleep and Poetry, Line 144
When the soundless earth is muffled , Fancy, Line 19
All eyes be muffled , or a hundred swords The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 83
How came ye muffled in so hush a masque? Ode on Indolence, Line 12
Two muffled up,- one sighing heavily, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 122
A muffled death, ensnared in horrid silence! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26
 
MUFFLING..........5
Muffling to death the pathos with his wings; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 421
In muffling hands. So temper'd, out he stray'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 873
Nor muffling thicket interpos'd to dull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 966
Glow'd through, and wrought upon the muffling dark Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 275
Muffling his face, of greeting friends in fear, Lamia, Part I, Line 362
 
MULCIBER'S........1
Mulciber's columns gleam in far piazzian line. Lamia, Part I, Line 212
 
MULE..............4
Or how I pace my Otaheitan mule . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 14
But the Mule grasing on the herbage green. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 74
The Mule no sooner saw himself alone When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 75
O king of Otaheite - though a mule , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 79
 
MULES.............1
And pannier'd mules for ducats and old lies- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 134
 
MULLA'S...........1
Small good to one who had by Mulla's stream To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 33
 
MULTITUDE.........6
Up-followed by a multitude that rear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 164
A shout from the whole multitude arose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 308
Thus went that beautiful multitude , nor far, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 818
Another multitude . Whereat more quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 821
On all the multitude a nectarous dew. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 892
A skyey masque, a pinion'd multitude ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 558
 
MUMBLINGS.........1
Uttering the while some mumblings funeral. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 748
 
MUMCHANCE.........1
Mumchance art thou with both obliged to part. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 14
 
MUMMY.............1
Thank you, old mummy !- now securely I take wing." The Jealousies, Line 603
 
MURDER............3
Do gently murder half my soul, and I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 309
The guerdon of their murder they had got, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 477
Yet men will murder upon holy days: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 119
 
MURDER'D..........2
So the two brothers and their murder'd man Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 209
Was almost murder'd ; I am penitent, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 170
 
MURDERER..........1
Each richer by his being a murderer . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 224
 
MURDERING.........1
Any foul play, or awkward murdering , The Jealousies, Line 192
 
MURDEROUS.........2
Of the late darken'd time,- the murderous spite Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 293
Upon the murderous spot she seem'd to grow, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 365
 
MURKY.............2
Of murky buildings; climb with me the steep,- O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 3
This murky phantasm! thou contented seem'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 466
 
MURMUR............9
That the still murmur of the honey bee To My Brother George (epistle), Line 13
What does he murmur with his latest breath, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 69
Lo! how they murmur , laugh, and smile, and weep: Sleep and Poetry, Line 142
Wide sea, that one continuous murmur breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 16
And murmur about Indian streams?"- Then she, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 143
Before the tense string murmur .- To the earth! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 345
Instead of pines shall murmur in the wind: Ode to Psyche, Line 53
Still buds the tree, and still the sea-shores murmur . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 422
A metropolitan murmur , lifeful, warm, The Jealousies, Line 573
 
MURMUR'D..........1
And murmur'd into it, and made melody- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 271
 
MURMURED..........1
Rous'd by his whispering footsteps murmured faint: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 268
 
MURMURER..........1
Low murmurer of tender lullabies! Sleep and Poetry, Line 12
 
MURMURING.........6
But as the murmuring surge. Chilly and numb Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 243
For each their old love found. A murmuring rose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 824
And on her couch low murmuring "Where? O where?" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 240
Left murmuring , what deepest thought can tell? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 246
Swoon'd, murmuring of love, and pale with pain. Lamia, Part I, Line 289
Of love, retired, vex'd and murmuring The Jealousies, Line 131
 
MURMUROUS.........3
Unhaunted by the murmurous noise of waves, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 40
The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 50
He met within the murmurous vestibule Lamia, Part II, Line 163
 
MURMURS...........3
Melted in dying murmurs ! O how nigh Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 6
The surgy murmurs of the lonely sea. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 121
In murmurs , which his first-endeavouring tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 171
 
MUS'D.............1
So mus'd awhile, entoil'd in woofed phantasies. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 288
 
MUSCULAR..........1
Like a lithe serpent vast and muscular Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 261
 
MUSE..............21
With you, kindest friends, in idea I muse ; To Some Ladies, Line 6
To the coy muse , with me she would not live To George Felton Mathew, Line 32
How vain for me the niggard muse to tease: To George Felton Mathew, Line 73
For while I muse , the lance points slantingly Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 12
O kindly muse ! let not my weak tongue faulter Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 128
And, sitting down close by, began to muse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 558
Of these first minutes? The unchariest muse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 532
To muse for ever - Then a lucid wave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 997
Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1
Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1
On barren souls. Great Muse , thou know'st what prison, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 20
Muse of my native land, am I inspir'd? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 354
Glow with the muse , but they are never felt Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 12
Read me a lesson, Muse , and speak it loud Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 1
O leave them, Muse ! O leave them to their woes; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 3
Leave them, O Muse ! for thou anon wilt find Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 7
So, if we may not let the muse be free, If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 13
Were strewn rich gifts, unknown to any Muse , Lamia, Part I, Line 19
But first 'tis fit to tell how she could muse Lamia, Part I, Line 202
My muse had wings, What can I do to drive away, Line 11
Rejoin'd the mago, "but on Bertha muse ; The Jealousies, Line 434
 
MUSE'S............3
The classic page - the muse's lore. Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 20
Without one muse's smile, or kind behest, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 37
For when the Muse's wings are air-ward spread, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 82
 
MUSED.............2
Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 53
Because he mused beyond her, knowing well Lamia, Part II, Line 38
 
MUSES.............15
To raise a trophy to the drama's muses . To George Felton Mathew, Line 7
Now the Muses had been ten. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 36
Ay, in those days the Muses were nigh cloy'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 178
But strength alone though of the Muses born Sleep and Poetry, Line 241
Is folded by the muses ; the bright roll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 725
Towards her with the Muses in thine heart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 49
High Muses ! let him hurry to the ending. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 940
Muses bright and Muses pale; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 20
Muses bright and Muses pale; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 20
Muses bright and Muses pale, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 24
Muses bright and Muses pale, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 24
O Muses , weep the rest- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 68b
Muses nine, that I may know him! Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 2
He muses . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Lady, Line 99a
The soft, lute-finger'd Muses chaunting clear, Lamia, Part I, Line 73
 
MUSHROOM..........1
That camp- mushroom , dishonour of our house; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 80
 
MUSHROOMS.........2
Night-swollen mushrooms ? Are not our wide plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 215
And cold mushrooms ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 234
 
MUSIC.............58
Nor e'er will the music of Oberon die. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 36
That gave soft music from Armida's bowers, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 31
What time you were before the music sitting, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 113
Make pleasing music , and not wild uproar. How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 14
The while let music wander round my ears, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 9
Some ever-fleeting music on they sweep. Sleep and Poetry, Line 141
Fresh garlands: for sweet music has been heard Sleep and Poetry, Line 223
Than the light music of her nimble toes I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 97
The very music of the name has gone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 36
With a faint breath of music , which ev'n then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 115
In music , through the vales of Thessaly: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 144
Her lips with music for the welcoming. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 377
This sleepy music , forc'd him walk tiptoe: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 358
Who lov'd - and music slew not? 'Tis the pest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 365
Silence was music from the holy spheres; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 675
Their music came to my o'er-sweeten'd soul; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 445
Sweet music breath'd her soul away, and sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 767
Can mingle music fit for the soft ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 974
Let me have music dying, and I seek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 140
Truth the best music in a first-born song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 773
Beyond the reach of music : for the choir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 964
Dancing music , music sad, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 18
Dancing music, music sad, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 18
An echo of sweet music doth create Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 62
He tells of the sweet music and the spot Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 65
And Isabella on its music hung: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 284
And taste the music of that vision pale. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 392
O Music , Music, breathe despondingly! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 434
O Music, Music , breathe despondingly! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 434
O Music , Music, breathe despondingly! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 482
O Music, Music , breathe despondingly! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 482
The music , yearning like a god in pain, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 56
To music of the drowsy chimes. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 66
With thunder, and with music , and with pomp: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 121
With songs of misery, music of our woes; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 269
With music wing'd instead of silent plumes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 287
Fled is that music :- Do I wake or sleep? Ode to a Nightingale, Line 80
Martial music . Enter, from the outer gate, OTHO, Nobles, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
Her dazzling torches; nor the music breathe Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 47
Ho! let the music sound! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 202
[ Music . ETHELBERT raises his hands, as in benediction of Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
CONRAD, Nobles, Knights, Ladies, etc., etc., etc. Music . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
My Arab, no soft music should enrich Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 29
In one room music , in another sadness, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 278
Yes, yes! A hope! A music ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 31b
First I would hear what music is prepared Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 78
[A soft strain of music . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 81
A haunting music , sole perhaps and lone Lamia, Part II, Line 122
Soft went the music the soft air along, Lamia, Part II, Line 199
Grew hush; the stately music no more breathes; Lamia, Part II, Line 263
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,- To Autumn, Line 24
No music but a happy-noted voice- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 164
Save it for me, sweet love! though music breathe To Fanny, Line 25
The streets are full of music - King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 28a
Of feasts and music , and all idle shows King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 52
Sudden the music ceased, sudden the hand The Jealousies, Line 348
Cunningly-station'd music dies and swells The Jealousies, Line 570
Sweet in the air a mild-toned music plays, The Jealousies, Line 725
 
MUSIC'S...........2
Of music's kiss impregnates the free winds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 784
And scarce three steps, ere Music's golden tongue The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 20
 
MUSICAL...........1
He heard a laugh full musical aloft; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 198
 
MUSICIANS.........1
Bid the musicians soothe him tenderly. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 80
 
MUSING............3
While to the rugged north our musing turns To George Felton Mathew, Line 70
Musing on Milton's fate - on Sydney's bier- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 10
Which comes of thought and musing : give us help!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 166
 
MUSINGS...........2
Should sad Despondency my musings fright, To Hope, Line 9
Strange musings to the solitary Pan. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 411
 
MUSK..............6
A fresh-blown musk -rose; 'twas the first that threw To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 6
For there the lily, and the musk -rose, sighing, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 89
What is more tranquil than a musk -rose blowing Sleep and Poetry, Line 5
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk -rose blooms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 19
Close in a bower of hyacinth and musk , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 85
The coming musk -rose, full of dewy wine, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 49
 
MUSKROSE..........1
Sweet as a muskrose upon new-made hay; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 102
 
MUSSLEMAN.........1
His son to be that unknown Mussleman Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 12
 
MUSTACHIOS........1
Mustachios , ear-ring, nose-ring, and his sabre keen. The Jealousies, Line 279
 
MUSTER............4
Such as ay muster where grey time has scoop'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 649
To muster kites and eagles 'gainst my head? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 87
Than any drummer's in the muster -roll; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 268
Muster thy warlike thousands at a nod! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 155
 
MUSTY.............1
To musty laws lined out with wretched rule Sleep and Poetry, Line 195
 
MUTE..............9
The wondering spirits of heaven were mute , On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 31
Till the thunder was mute ? God of the golden bow, Line 22
If smiles, if dimples, tongues for ardour mute , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 441
His fingers went across it - All were mute Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1003
Shut up thine olden pages, and be mute . On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 4
He play'd an ancient ditty, long since mute , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 291
Mute thou remainest - mute! yet I can read Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 111
Mute thou remainest - mute ! yet I can read Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 111
I see in thy mute beauty beaming forth! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
 
MUTES.............2
And a few Persian mutes , who that same year Lamia, Part I, Line 390
In a finger conversation with my mutes ,- The Jealousies, Line 356
 
MUTTER'D..........5
Pigeons and doves: Adonis something mutter'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 497
Yet mutter'd wildly. I could hear he lov'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 567
Mutter'd : "What lonely death am I to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 258
And as she mutter'd "Well-a - well-a-day!" The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 111
Mutter'd , like tempest in the distance brew'd, Lamia, Part I, Line 353
 
MUTTERING.........2
Muttering to be unbound. God of the golden bow, Line 19
Dark clouds, and muttering of winds morose. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 652
 
MUTTERINGS........1
And die away in ardent mutterings . Sleep and Poetry, Line 40
 
MUTUAL............2
And friendliness, the nurse of mutual good; Sleep and Poetry, Line 318
Had died in mutual arms devout and true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 793
 
MYRIAD............2
The monstrous sea is thine - the myriad sea! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 69
Let me see the myriad shapes Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 13
 
MYRIADS...........5
To fret at myriads of earthly wrecks. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 776
Of mealy sweets, which myriads of bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 996
Glad was the hour, when, with thee, myriads bade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 32
Onward these myriads - with song and dance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 243
On the damp grass myriads of lingering leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 934
 
MYRRH.............1
A censer fed with myrrh and spiced wood, Lamia, Part II, Line 176
 
MYRTLE............7
Yet I rejoice: a myrtle fairer than Sleep and Poetry, Line 248
Soft breezes from the myrtle vale below; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 195
And flowers, and wreaths, and ready myrtle crowns Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 342
To where thick myrtle branches, 'gainst his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 378
A chamber, myrtle wall'd, embowered high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 389
The myrtle sicken'd in a thousand wreaths. Lamia, Part II, Line 264
Palm, myrtle , oak, and sycamore, and beech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 20
 
MYRTLES...........3
Passion their voices cooingly 'mong myrtles , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 248
Interwreath'd with myrtles new, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 31
And of thy spicy myrtles as they blow, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 147
 
MYSELF............24
Myself in poesy; so I may do the deed Sleep and Poetry, Line 97
If I do hide myself , it sure shall be Sleep and Poetry, Line 275
Knowing within myself the manner in which this Poem has Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
fitting myself Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Myself to thee. Ah, dearest, do not groan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 779
Myself to immortality: I prest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 173
Myself to things of light from infancy; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 958
I will bathe myself with thee, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 43
But why do I stand babbling to myself ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 14
Thou clod of yesterday - 'twas not myself ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 91
Can smother from myself the wrong I've done him,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 156
You rob me of myself ; my dignity Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 119
I will encounter his thwart spleen myself , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 91
In tender victory,- but for myself Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 139
Shall I go myself ? Monstrous wickedness! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 3
Prais'd be the heavens, I now dare own myself ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 94
Fie! Fie! But I will be her guard myself ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 127
I'll chain up myself . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 110b
Aye, I could almost curse him now myself . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 11
Myself , as fits one wailing her own death,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 94
Spite of myself , and with a Pythia's spleen, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 203
With half unravel'd web. I set myself The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 308
Of change, hour after hour I curs'd myself : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 399
Turn'd from myself , her partner, in a huff; The Jealousies, Line 701
 
MYSTERIES.........12
The revelries, and mysteries of night: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 64
Out the dark mysteries of human souls Sleep and Poetry, Line 289
The silent mysteries of earth, descend!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 214
Of heaven and its mysteries . Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 22
With its many mysteries , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 37
And sky-engendered, Son of Mysteries Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 310
A partner in your sorrow's mysteries ; Ode on Melancholy, Line 8
Of bridal- mysteries - a fine-spun vengeance! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 131
She stood: he pass'd, shut up in mysteries , Lamia, Part I, Line 241
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line, Lamia, Part II, Line 235
Hung pale, and curtain'd her in mysteries The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 253
Bigger than stags,- a moon,- with other mysteries . The Jealousies, Line 450
 
MYSTERIOUS........12
Mysterious , wild, the far heard trumpet's tone; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 156
Its voice mysterious , which whoso hears To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 7
Or by mysterious enticement draw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 268
Dread opener of the mysterious doors Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 288
That thou dost know of things mysterious , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 506
His quiver is mysterious , none can know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 539
I care not for this old mysterious man!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 280
Dear Reynolds, I have a mysterious tale Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 86
With a still, mysterious stealth: Fancy, Line 36
To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 32
And by mysterious sleights a hundred thirsts appease? Lamia, Part I, Line 285
And legend-leaved book, mysterious to behold. The Jealousies, Line 513
 
MYSTERY...........7
Shapes of delight, of mystery , and fear, Sleep and Poetry, Line 138
Himself with every mystery , and awe; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 270
He had left thinking of the mystery ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 930
And touch the strings into a mystery ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 444
Would come no mystery ? For me, dark, dark, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 86
This mystery demands an audience Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 104
He is the sole one in this mystery . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 254
 
MYSTIC............1
Great Brahma from his mystic heaven groans, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 265
 
MYTHOLOGY.........1
mythology of Greece, and dulled its brightness: for I wish to try once more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5


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Published @ RC

March 2005