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Keats Concordance
 
NEREIDS...........3
The Nereids danc'd; the Syrens faintly sang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 889
Of Nereids were about him, in kind strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1014
Down through tress-lifting waves the Nereids fair Lamia, Part I, Line 207
 
NERVE.............5
He tries the nerve of Phoebus' golden bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 411
Warm the nerve of a welcoming hand, Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 5
But horrors, portion'd to a giant nerve , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 175
Thy girdle some fine zealous-pained nerve Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 95
But horrors portion'd to a giant nerve The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 23
 
NERVELESS.........3
His old right hand lay nerveless , listless, dead, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 18
What nerveless minions of safe palaces! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
His old right hand lay nerveless , listless, dead, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 323
 
NERVES............2
O Stranger, thou my nerves from pipe didst charm; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 10
My china closet too - with wretched nerves Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 14
 
NERVES'...........1
For your convenience, and her dear nerves' sake; The Jealousies, Line 491
 
NERVOUS...........2
There Homer with his nervous arms Ode to Apollo, Line 7
While Fate seem'd strangled in my nervous grasp? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 105
 
NERVY.............2
His nervy knees there lay a boat-spear keen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 174
Uplifted drowsily, and nervy tails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 646
 
NEST..............19
I see the lark down-dropping to his nest , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 135
In milky nest , and sip them off at leisure. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 10
More secret than a nest of nightingales? Sleep and Poetry, Line 8
Of secret grief, here in this bowery nest . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 539
And once, above the edges of our nest , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 670
Of a swallow's nest -door, could delay a trace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 753
How happy once again in grassy nest ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1032
Warm as a dove's nest among summer trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 666
Fair Isabella in her downy nest ? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 138
Fire them and ram them in the dragon's nest ; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 59
Freckled nest -eggs thou shalt see Fancy, Line 59
Quiet on her mossy nest ; Fancy, Line 62
Soon, trembling in her soft and chilly nest , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 235
Though I have found, I will not rob thy nest The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 340
Each in its ancient belfry nest , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 64
Which eagles cleave upmounting from their nest . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 157
Made a fit roofing to this nest of woe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 14
Upon the precincts of this nest of pain, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 90
Fresh hatch'd in my ambition's eagle- nest ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 41
 
NESTED............7
Like sunbeams in a cloudlet nested Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 51
Nested and quiet in a valley mild, Sleep and Poetry, Line 227
Where nested was an arbour, overwove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 431
Full soothingly to every nested finch: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 504
Over his nested young: but all is dark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 721
Where pleasure may be sent: the nested wren Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 63
Nested in trees, which all do seem to shake Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 28
 
NESTLE............3
With their own sweet delight, and ever nestle I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 76
Nestle and turn uneasily about. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 522
No wrinkles, where all vices nestle in Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 83
 
NESTLED...........1
That nestled in his arms. A dimpled hand, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 93
 
NESTLING..........4
Would be to find where violet beds were nestling , To George Felton Mathew, Line 49
Nestling a rose, convuls'd as though it smarted Sleep and Poetry, Line 344
"Places of nestling green for Poets made." Story of Rimini I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Epigraph
Ah! through their nestling touch, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 4
 
NESTOR'S..........1
To rule in Pylos with a Nestor's beard. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 12
 
NESTS.............3
And th' half seen mossiness of linnets' nests . Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 22
From out the middle air, from flowery nests , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 187
Nor knew that nests were built. Now a soft kiss- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 806
 
NET...............2
A net whose thraldom was more bliss than all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 427
Escap'd from dull mortality's harsh net ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 907
 
NETHER............2
A lurking trouble in his nether lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 179
The nether sides of mossy stones and rock,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 937
 
NETS..............2
That they may bind the moss in leafy nets . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 34
My nets would be spread out, and I at rest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 367
 
NETTLE............1
Whose flitting lantern, through rude nettle -briar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 278
 
NETTLES...........1
Where mantles grey have rustled by and swept the nettles green: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 4
 
NEVER.............125
And, in its middle space, a sky that never lowers. Imitation of Spenser, Line 9
For sure so fair a place was never seen, Imitation of Spenser, Line 23
My sight will never more be blest, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 17
Will never give him pinions, who intreats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 34
I marvel much that thou hast never told To George Felton Mathew, Line 84
That thou hast never told thy travels strange, To George Felton Mathew, Line 90
Alas! thou this wilt never do: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 65
And wilt surely never spill Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 67
Where never yet was ought more earthly seen Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 53
Thank'd heaven that his joy was never ending; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 104
That I should never hear Apollo's song, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 9
Would never teach a rural song to me: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 14
Would never make a lay of mine enchanting, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 16
Between her breasts, that never yet felt trouble, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 91
And the broad winged sea-gull never at rest; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 136
In which a trembling diamond never lingers. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 20
Why I have never penn'd a line to thee: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 22
Because my thoughts were never free, and clear, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 23
With many else which I have never known. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 48
Upon a tyrant's head. Ah! had I never seen, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 72
"Write! thou wilt never have a better day." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 100
Verses from which the soul would never wean: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 108
Yet did I never breathe its pure serene On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 7
And lo! - whose stedfastness would never take Addressed to the Same, Line 7
That I can never tell what mood is best. To G.A.W., Line 12
Delight you? Did ye never cluster round Sleep and Poetry, Line 213
Of a fresh woodland alley, never ending; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 20
Made silken ties, that never may be broken. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 238
The poetry of earth is never dead: On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 1
In summer luxury,- he has never done On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 6
The poetry of earth is ceasing never : On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 9
They never pout for kisses- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 14
Its loveliness increases; it will never Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 2
Never again saw he the happy pens Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 70
From vallies where the pipe is never dumb; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 200
Like one who on the earth had never stept- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 404
That never tongue, although it overteem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 575
If human souls did never kiss and greet? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 842
And never can be born of atomies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 851
My restless spirit never could endure Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 854
Where there was never sound of mortal men, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 78
Alive with sparkles - never , I aver, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 442
But never may be garner'd. I must stoop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 274
Aye, hadst thou never lov'd an unknown power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 301
And never was a day of summer shine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 361
This furrow'd visage thou hadst never seen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 448
O vulture-witch, hast never heard of mercy? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 620
Sure never since king Neptune held his state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 726
Like what was never heard in all the throes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 825
I love thee! and my days can never last. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 138
Say, beautifullest, shall I never think? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 305
Young Semele such richness never quaft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 536
For, never since thy griefs and woes began, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 546
On forest-fruits, and never , never go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 627
On forest-fruits, and never, never go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 627
There never liv'd a mortal man, who bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 646
Of visionary seas! No, never more Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 653
Fly in the air where his had never been- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 796
Free-voic'd as one who never was away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 821
Never , never petting In drear nighted December, Line 15
Never, never petting In drear nighted December, Line 15
Was never said in rhyme. In drear nighted December, Line 24
And thy lyre shall never have a slacken'd string; Apollo to the Graces, Line 12
Thy spirit never slumbers, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 3
And think that I may never live to trace When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 7
That I shall never look upon thee more, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 10
Never have relish in the fairy power When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 11
But you never may behold Robin Hood, Line 23
Never one, of all the clan, Robin Hood, Line 25
And yet I never look on midnight sky, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 5
May rage, and foam, and fret, but never can Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 7
I dare not yet!- Oh never will the prize, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 74
"O may I never see another night, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 29
Love never dies, but lives, immortal Lord: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 397
Never to turn again.- Away they went, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 479
Glow with the muse, but they are never felt Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 12
Though saphire warm, their stars do never beam; On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 7
All is cold beauty; pain is never done On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 8
That man may never lose his mind on mountains bleak and bare; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 46
Where the waters never rest, Not Aladdin magian, Line 40
Boasting he never knew excess, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 32
A Poet now or never ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 53
A Poet now or never ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 56
Pleasure never is at home: Fancy, Line 2
Pleasure never is at home. Fancy, Line 94
Never slumber'd, never cloying. Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 28
Never slumber'd, never cloying. Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 28
Were never miss'd." - Thus plaining, doth she bring The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 158
Never on such a night have lovers met, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 170
Or may I never leave my grave among the dead." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 180
It seem'd he never , never could redeem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 286
It seem'd he never, never could redeem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 286
The bloated wassaillers will never heed:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 346
But he has never been a king's son since When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 34
Beauty before the wide world never knew- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 60
Open eyes that never daze: Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 12
Who breeding flowers, will never breed the same: Ode to Psyche, Line 63
A jilt, whose ear was never whisper'd close, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 7
What thou among the leaves hast never known, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 22
Bold lover, never , never canst thou kiss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 17
Bold lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 17
That I may never know how change the moons, Ode on Indolence, Line 39
Into the clouds, and never more return! Ode on Indolence, Line 60
Yet, for all this, I never saw a father Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 103
I never saw such prowess. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 57a
Cowards, who never knew their little hearts, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 79
Fine wording, Duke! but words could never yet Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 37
And, though it never come, be on my head Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 162
Who never shook before. There's moody death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 4
Whose snowy timid hand has never sinn'd Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 24
Set her before me - never fear I can strike. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 182
So noiseless, and he never thought to know. Lamia, Part I, Line 349
And knowing surely she could never win Lamia, Part II, Line 113
he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Until they think warm days will never cease, To Autumn, Line 10
One-thoughted, never wand'ring, guileless love, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 3
For I will never by mean hands be led King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 46
That after marriage too, she never joy'd The Jealousies, Line 112
His son shall never touch that bishopric; The Jealousies, Line 146
Whose glass once up can never be got back, The Jealousies, Line 232
No, no, you never could my feelings probe The Jealousies, Line 409
And wept as if he never would have done, The Jealousies, Line 445
Look in the Almanack - Moore never lies- The Jealousies, Line 500
Which never should be used but in alarming cases." The Jealousies, Line 540
For we have proved the mago never fell The Jealousies, Line 788
 
NEVIS.............5
Upon the top of Nevis , blind in mist! Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 2
Upon my life, Sir Nevis , I am piqu'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 1
Still dumb, ungrateful Nevis - still so cold! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 20
Sweet Nevis , do not quake, for though I love Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 33
To see Ben Nevis and to touch his nose? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 46
 
NEW...............100
His warm arms, thrilling now with pulses new , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 102
In which a spirit new come from the skies Calidore: A Fragment, Line 120
When a new planet swims into his ken; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 10
That glance so brightly at the new sun-rise. Sleep and Poetry, Line 18
Breath of new buds unfolding? From the meaning Sleep and Poetry, Line 169
The clouds were pure and white as flocks new shorn, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 8
That sweetest of all songs, that ever new , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 182
From hedge to hedge about the new -mown mead; On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 4
Now while the early budders are just new , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 41
Gives it a touch ethereal - a new birth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 298
On her own couch, new made of flower leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 438
Fountains grotesque, new trees, bespangled caves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 458
Bathing my spirit in a new delight. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 902
The day of sacrifice? Or, have new sorrows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 45
And like a new -born spirit did he pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 70
There, when new wonders ceas'd to float before, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 274
A tumult to his heart, and a new life Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 528
The endless sleep of this new -born Adon', Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 554
New sudden thoughts, nor casts his mental slough? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 638
Have seen a new tinge in the western skies: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 727
So stedfastly, that the new denizen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 215
With new -born life! What shall I do? Where go, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 239
Grew a new heart, which at this moment plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 306
Then, like a new fledg'd bird that first doth shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 388
A new appareling for western skies; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 464
To me new born delights! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 472a
Shouted the new born god; "Follow, and pay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 807
Where these are new and strange, are ominous. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 911
New growth about each shell and pendent lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 928
A new magnificence. On oozy throne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 993
Sweet as a muskrose upon new -made hay; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 102
It seem'd as when around the pale new moon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 368
Of new -born woe it feels more inly smart: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 519
New singing for our maids shalt thou devise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 839
And said, in a new voice, but sweet as love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 978
Giving delight new joys, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 14
Give me new phoenix wings to fly at my desire. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 14
Underneath a new old sign Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 19
Interwreath'd with myrtles new , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 31
For the new mown hay For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 41
And from detested moods in new romance Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 111
And the new morn she saw not: but in peace Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 422
Where furrows are new to the plough. Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 8
I dreamed long ago. Now new begun, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 4
New stockings There was a naughty boy, Line 15
New to the feet, although the tale a hundred times be told: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 6
Of Titian's portraiture, and one, though new , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 68
Whose lip mature is ever new ? Fancy, Line 71
Double-lived in regions new ? Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 4
Double-lived in regions new ! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 40
The brain, new stuff'd, in youth, with triumphs gay The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 40
Of rivers new with springtide sedge, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 10
And all for nothing my new diamond cross, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 11
But new he was and bright as scarf from Persian loom. Character of C.B., Line 9
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 7
Thy thunder, conscious of the new command, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 60
Beautiful things made new , for the surprise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 132
To see and to behold these horrors new ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 233
And the bright Titan, phrenzied with new woes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 299
Of these new -form'd art thou, oh brightest child! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 319
Found ourselves ruling new and beauteous realms. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 201
With that new blissful golden melody. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 280
Of such new tuneful wonder. Is't not strange Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 67
Of loveliness new born."- Apollo then, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 79
Where branched thoughts, new grown with pleasant pain, Ode to Psyche, Line 52
Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 30
For ever piping songs for ever new ; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 24
The open casement press'd a new -leaved vine, Ode on Indolence, Line 47
Among the new -plum'd minions of the war. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 111
Of Nineveh new kiss'd the parted clouds! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 134
To these fair children, stars of a new age? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 22
A wide world, where a thousand new -born hopes Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 181
Of Lady Auranthe, our new -spoused daughter? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 214
Forgets in the new dawn. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 234
For though so new your presence is to me, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 54
Breathing upon the flowers his passion new , Lamia, Part I, Line 28
And, like new flowers at morning song of bees, Lamia, Part I, Line 142
And in the air, her new voice luting soft, Lamia, Part I, Line 167
A full-born beauty new and exquisite? Lamia, Part I, Line 172
Put her new lips to his, and gave afresh Lamia, Part I, Line 294
Mild as a star in water; for so new , Lamia, Part I, Line 382
Luxurious in her sorrows, soft and new . Lamia, Part II, Line 74
Thy thunder, captious at the new command, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 362
With such remorseless speed still come new woes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 366
Beautiful things made new for the surprize The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 437
Say they are gone,- with the new dawning light What can I do to drive away, Line 46
Where the heart beats: confess - 'tis nothing new - To Fanny, Line 35
Let none else touch the just new -budded flower; To Fanny, Line 54
Aye, even on the first of the new moon, The Jealousies, Line 26
To this new -fangled vice, which seems a burr The Jealousies, Line 107
As backwards as he can,- is't something new ? The Jealousies, Line 302
A sampler hoarded slyly, good as new , The Jealousies, Line 440
Now breathing its new bloom upon the skies, The Jealousies, Line 502
Ask what you will,- I'll give you my new bride! The Jealousies, Line 529
The monster's always after something new ," The Jealousies, Line 545
And next a chaplain in a cassock new ; The Jealousies, Line 590
With my new double-barrel - stew'd the thighs, The Jealousies, Line 650
Bad omen - this new match can't be a happy one. The Jealousies, Line 657
Their new -blown loyalty with guerdon fair, The Jealousies, Line 742
Now Hum, new fledg'd with high authority, The Jealousies, Line 793
 
NEWEST............1
Of newest joys upon that alp. Sometimes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 666
 
NEWLY.............8
Of flowers budded newly ; and the dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 91
As newly come of heaven, dost thou sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 962
Danae's Son, before Jove newly bow'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 606
She seem'd a splendid angel, newly drest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 223
Will sear my plumage newly budded Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 25
Here sitting like an angel newly -shent, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 125
For the sake of my fair newly wedded wife, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 142
Of amorous herbs and flowers, newly reap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 318
 
NEWS..............10
Where is Auranthe? I have news for her Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 15
News of that vanished Arabian, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 41
And no news ! No news! 'Faith! 'tis very strange Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 74
And no news! No news ! 'Faith! 'tis very strange Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 74
I have good news to tell you, Ethelbert. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 143
I have news precious as we pass along. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 148
The news is scarce a minute old with me. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 58
But pale, as if you brought some heavy news . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 111
Your last news ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 3b
Ward him from harm,- and bring me better news ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 51
 
NEWTON............1
There is Newton Marsh For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 19
 
NEXT..............31
Next , thy Tasso's ardent numbers Ode to Apollo, Line 36
Thrown by the pitiless world. We next could tell To George Felton Mathew, Line 65
Apollo chang'd thee; how thou next didst seem To George Felton Mathew, Line 86
To cluster round it when we next shall meet. Sleep and Poetry, Line 326
What next ? A tuft of evening primroses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 107
Stands next door to Wilson the Hosier. The Gothic looks solemn, Line 6
With April's tender younglings: next , well trimm'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 138
Thy brain to loss of reason: and next tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 643
Next , on a dolphin, clad in laurel boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1001
To meet us many a time." Next Cynthia bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 996
And the next day will be a day of sorrow. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 232
The Stranger next with head on bosom bent Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 6
But in the very next he reads his soul's memorial: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 42
By her affrighted servants. Next day, hous'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 72
The next is snoring in their company; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 27
The next , the last, the direst of the three, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 28
Next Cottus: prone he lay, chin uppermost, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 49
In the next valley-glades: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 78
The next hour stamps with credit. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 3a
What next ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 13a
The next our poor Prince fills the arched rooms Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 15
In the next room; have you remark'd those two Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 9
And next she wonder'd how his eyes could miss Lamia, Part I, Line 310
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers: To Autumn, Line 18
One hour, the next shall see him in my grasp, The Jealousies, Line 195
And the next after that shall see him neck'd, The Jealousies, Line 196
" Next door but one to us, upon the right, The Jealousies, Line 282
To-morrow, or the next day, as time suits, The Jealousies, Line 355
Then pages three and three; and next , slave-held, The Jealousies, Line 584
Gentlemen pensioners next ; and after them, The Jealousies, Line 586
And next a chaplain in a cassock new; The Jealousies, Line 590
 
NIBBLE............3
Nibble the little cupped flowers and sing. Sleep and Poetry, Line 254
Nibble their fill at ocean's very marge, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 204
Nibble their toasts, and cool their tea with sighs, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 2
 
NICE..............9
I am too flinty-hard for thy nice touch: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 573
Will you play once more, at nice cut-core, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 13
Of a nice There was a naughty boy, Line 83
The mitred ones of Nice and Trent O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 7
And a nice judge in the age and smack of wine. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 11
To dull the nice remembrance of my home? Lamia, Part I, Line 275
Some lady's fingers nice in Candy wine; The Jealousies, Line 429
Nice way would be to bring her in a swoon; The Jealousies, Line 492
Alter'd her mind, and thought it very nice : The Jealousies, Line 653
 
NICEST............2
For 'tis the nicest touch of human honour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 436
Put sleekly on one side with nicest care; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 742
 
NICHE.............2
I left poor Scylla in a niche and fled. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 635
The fretted splendour of each nook and niche . Lamia, Part II, Line 137
 
NICHES............1
Down sidelong aisles, and into niches old. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 264
 
NICKED............1
Thy tail's tip is nicked off - and though the fists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 11
 
NIECE.............5
ERMINIA, Niece of Otho Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 14
Any compassion for that Emperor's niece , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 46
Erminia! I am she,- the Emperor's niece ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 93
I this, your gentle niece - the simplest flower Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
Of the Princess Erminia, your niece . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 133
 
NIGGARD...........1
How vain for me the niggard muse to tease: To George Felton Mathew, Line 73
 
NIGH..............27
Melted in dying murmurs! O how nigh Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 6
Thou wilt think that some amorous zephyr is nigh ; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 14
Call on thy gentle spirit to hover nigh Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 56
Until his heart is well nigh over wound, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 8
Ay, in those days the Muses were nigh cloy'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 178
Of their dear friends, nigh foolish with delight; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 228
Nigh swooning, he doth purse his weary lips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 10
Imagination's struggles, far and nigh , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 155
In sacred custom, that he well nigh fear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 258
To watch his slumber through. 'Tis well nigh pass'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 488
Follow'd their languid mazes, till well nigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 929
That our heart-broken parting is so nigh . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 584
My soul page after page, till well- nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
For the first time, since he came nigh dead born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 371
'Tis well nigh past man's search their hearts to see; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 493
His first touch of the earth went nigh to kill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 614
Endymion! unhappy! it nigh grieves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 770
Our friends will all be there from nigh and far. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 835
And when the night is nigh , Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 11
His bitter thoughts to other, well nigh mad Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 164
And thy mother sweet is nigh thee! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 30
There was a painful change, that nigh expell'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 300
Bidding adieu; and aching Pleasure nigh , Ode on Melancholy, Line 23
Believe me, I am well nigh sure- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 146a
Despair, or eat thy words! Why, thou wast nigh Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 96
And on the paved floor, where nigh were pil'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 234
Grew pale as death, and fainted - very nigh ! The Jealousies, Line 457
 
NIGHING...........2
When it is nighing to the mournful house Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 103
Gruff with contempt; which a death- nighing moan Lamia, Part II, Line 292
 
NIGHT.............113
Was night to thy fair morning! Thou didst die Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 7
Whene'er I wander, at the fall of night , To Hope, Line 7
And fright him as the morning frightens night ! To Hope, Line 18
After a night of some quaint jubilee To George Felton Mathew, Line 27
So scantly, that it seems her bridal night , To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 11
The revelries, and mysteries of night : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 64
That maids will sing them on their bridal night . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 82
When Cynthia smiles upon a summer's night , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 93
When at night -fall among your books we got: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 118
Again I shake your hand,- friend Charles, good night . To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 132
That aye at fall of night our care condoles. To My Brothers, Line 8
Surprised me even from a sleepless night ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 400
Tell but one wonder of thy bridal night ! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 210
Sinking away to his young spirit's night , On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 7
These numbers to the night and starlight meek, On The Story of Rimini, Line 7
Night -swollen mushrooms? Are not our wide plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 215
That but one night had wrought this flowery spell; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 557
Or, it may be, ere matron Night uptook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 561
How tiptoe Night holds back her dark-grey hood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 831
Has made me scruple whether that same night Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 860
By a fore-knowledge of unslumbrous night ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 912
Had zoned her through the night . There is no trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 569
That wondrous night : the great Pan-festival: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 897
Be incense-pillow'd every summer night . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 999
And mesh my dewy flowers all the night . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 157
Rough billows were my home by night and day,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 320
For I would watch all night to see unfold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 363
Fainted away in that dark lair of night . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 560
Will slime the rose to night . Though if thou wilt, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 133
Or, on a moonless night , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 156
From the old womb of night , his cave forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 372
The good- night blush of eve was waning slow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 484
The Star-Queen's crescent on her marriage night : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 589
That I may see thy beauty through the night ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 705
O Hermes! on this very night will be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 827
Night after night, and day by day, until Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 856
Night after night , and day by day, until Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 856
With thy good help, this very night shall see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 887
To her for the last time. Night will strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 933
Peona kiss'd, and bless'd with fair good night : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 997
Night -shade with the woodbine kissing; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 14
Of the day, and of the night , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 27
Night after night, when Phoebus was away, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 7
Night after night , when Phoebus was away, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 7
And when the night is nigh, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 11
Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 1
And Alexander with his night -cap on- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 8
As from the westward of a summer's night ; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 52
In the dark void of night . For in the world Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 71
And with sick longing all the night outwear, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 23
"O may I never see another night , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 29
A dreary night of love and misery, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 50
Another night , and not my passion shrive. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 64
Sorely she wept until the night came on, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 234
And every night in dreams they groan'd aloud, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 263
Like hoarse night -gusts sepulchral briars among. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 288
And every night the dark glen yew Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 19
For night cap- There was a naughty boy, Line 12
By my old night cap, night cap night and day, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 42
By my old night cap, night cap night and day, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 42
By my old night cap, night cap night and day, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 42
To- night I'll have my friar,- let me think Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 24
While the night breeze doth softly let us know Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 33
'Tis the "witching time of night "- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 1
Spirit of a winter's night ; Fancy, Line 18
When the Night doth meet the Noon Fancy, Line 22
Though you've padded his night -cap, O sweet Isabel. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 4
And all night kept awake, for sinners' sake to grieve. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 27
Upon the honey'd middle of the night , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 49
They are all here to- night , the whole blood-thirsty race! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 99
This very night : good angels her deceive! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 125
And win perhaps that night a peerless bride, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 167
Never on such a night have lovers met, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 170
Quickly on this feast- night : by the tambour frame The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 174
In the retired quiet of the night , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 274
That night the Baron dreamt of many a woe, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 372
Not in lone splendor hung aloft the night , Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 2
As when, upon a tranced summer- night , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 72
Dream, and so dream all night without a stir, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 75
Her silver seasons four upon the night , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 84
To this result: "O dreams of day and night ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 227
Open'd upon the dusk demesnes of night ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 298
Upon the boundaries of day and night , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 303
And plung'd all noiseless into the deep night . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 357
The heaven itself, is blinded throughout night . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 38
Thick night confounds the pine-tops with the clouds: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 80
A bright torch, and a casement ope at night , Ode to Psyche, Line 66
Already with thee! tender is the night , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 35
The voice I hear this passing night was heard Ode to a Nightingale, Line 63
Farewell! I yet have visions for the night , Ode on Indolence, Line 57
This coming night of banquets must not light Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 46
More than against a night -mare, which a man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 233
Methinks, if't now were night , I could intrigue Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 26
To- night , upon the skirts of the blind wood Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 147
To talk of horrors on our wedding- night ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 27
Howling in vain along the hollow night ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 49
No! What? Upon our marriage- night ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51b
She's gone! I am content - nobles, good night ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 192
I had a splendid dream of thee last night : Lamia, Part I, Line 69
Late on that eve, as 'twas the night before Lamia, Part I, Line 319
If 'twas too far that night for her soft feet. Lamia, Part I, Line 343
To the wide-spreaded night above her towers. Lamia, Part I, Line 354
And good instructor; but to- night he seems Lamia, Part I, Line 376
As were his limbs of life, from that same night . Lamia, Part II, Line 308
Or else forget the purpose of the night , Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 3
As when, upon a tranced summer night , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 372
Dream, and so dream all night , without a noise, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 374
Her silver seasons shedded on the night , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 394
To- night , if I may guess, thy beauty wears To Fanny, Line 11
For press of coaches, that to- night here meet, The Jealousies, Line 259
"Does not your master give a rout to- night ?" The Jealousies, Line 280
"'Twas twelve o'clock at night , the weather fine, The Jealousies, Line 642
Tow'rds Thibet. Mem.:- birds fly in the night ; The Jealousies, Line 645
 
NIGHT'S...........3
When I behold, upon the night's starr'd face, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 5
On the river - all's still, and the night's sleepy eye Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 10
So wearily, as if night's chariot-wheels Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
 
NIGHTED...........2
In drear nighted December, In drear nighted December, Line 1
In drear nighted December, In drear nighted December, Line 9
 
NIGHTFALL.........2
Over the hills at every nightfall went. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 72
You would not hear the end of. At nightfall Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 170
 
NIGHTINGALE.......7
As does the nightingale , upperched high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 828
Unto the nightingale , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 162
To Flora, and a nightingale shall light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 706
It spoils the singing of the nightingale . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 85
Where the nightingale doth sing Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 17
As though a tongueless nightingale should swell The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 206
The nightingale had ceas'd, and a few stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 36
 
NIGHTINGALE'S.....3
Ah! you list to the nightingale's tender condoling, To Some Ladies, Line 11
Deaf to the nightingale's first under-song; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 61
Perhaps her voice is not a nightingale's , Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 2
 
NIGHTINGALES......3
Wild strains to which, spell-bound, the nightingales listened; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 30
'Mong which the nightingales have always sung To George Felton Mathew, Line 46
More secret than a nest of nightingales ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 8
 
NIGHTLY...........4
And what our duties there: to nightly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 362
And monitor me nightly to lone slumber. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 884
But to each other dream, and nightly weep. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 8
Besides, there, nightly , with terrific glare, Lamia, Part II, Line 11
 
NIGHTMAR'D........1
Were long be- nightmar'd . Angela the old The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 375
 
NIGHTMARE.........3
A horrid nightmare , similar somewhat, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 9
A nightmare sure - What, madam, was it you? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 27
A dose of senna-tea, or nightmare Gorgon, The Jealousies, Line 341
 
NIGHTS............5
When summer nights the dews bestow, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 9
Of summer nights collected still to make Sleep and Poetry, Line 191
So once more days and nights aid me along, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 42
So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 4
Said gentle Hum; "the nights draw in apace; The Jealousies, Line 479
 
NIGHTSHADE........1
By nightshade , ruby grape of Proserpine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 4
 
NILE..............1
Far as Egyptian Nile . My passion grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 407
 
NILUS.............1
A very gipsey is she, Nilus born, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 9


Published @ RC

March 2005