O-Of - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
O'................12
O' the sudden, and receive thy spiriting:- Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 10
To the sheep on the lea o' the down, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 15
Her currants pods o' broom, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 6
Her wine was dew o' the wild white rose, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 7
She plaited mats o' rushes, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 22
A troup o' horses- Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 12
O' the western wild, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 50
O' the western wild, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 55
Lest our rent banners, too o' the sudden shown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
To set the silly sort o' the world agape, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 145
Driven me to the very edge o' the world, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 52
A long life in the foulest sink o' the world! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
 
O'CLOCK...........4
From morning, four o'clock , to twelve at noon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 10
"Sire you must be in Kent by twelve o'clock at noon." The Jealousies, Line 495
"'Twas twelve o'clock at night, the weather fine, The Jealousies, Line 642
"Just upon three o'clock , a falling star The Jealousies, Line 667
 
O'ERCAST..........2
My brain bewilder'd, and my mind o'ercast To My Brother George (epistle), Line 2
That, whether there be shine, or gloom o'ercast , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 32
 
O'ERGONE..........1
For all those visions were o'ergone , and past, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 589
 
O'ERHANGING.......2
To the o'erhanging sallows: blades of grass I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 67
Into o'erhanging boughs, and precious fruits. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 66
 
O'ERHEAD..........2
Towards her, and awakes - and, strange, o'erhead , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 434
Mankind do know of hell: I look o'erhead , Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 5
 
O'ERLEAP..........1
Thus ending loudly, as he would o'erleap Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 333
 
O'ERPOWERED.......1
O'erpowered me - it sank. Then 'gan abate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 674
 
O'ERSHADING.......1
O'ershading sorrow doth not make thee less To Lord Byron, Line 6
 
O'ERSPREAD........1
Or a green hill o'erspread with chequered dress Sleep and Poetry, Line 77
 
O'ERTAKING........1
Through copse-clad vallies,- ere their death, o'ertaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 120
 
O'ERWEENING.......1
With browless idiotism - o'erweening phlegm- To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
 
O'ERWHELM'D.......1
O'erwhelm'd , and spurn'd, and batter'd, ye are here! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 156
 
O'ERWHELMING......2
The o'erwhelming sweets, 'twill bring to me the fair Sleep and Poetry, Line 62
O'erwhelming water-courses; scaring out Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 88
 
O'ERWROUGHT.......1
O'erwrought with symbols by the deepest groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 198
 
OAK...............5
With silvery oak apples, and fir cones brown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 276
Your nuts in oak -tree cleft?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 231
When through the old oak forest I am gone, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 11
On ceiling beam and old oak chair, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 75
Palm, myrtle, oak , and sycamore, and beech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 20
 
OAKEN.............2
Anon he leaps along the oaken floors Calidore: A Fragment, Line 71
Collecting, mimick'd the wrought oaken beams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 623
 
OAKS..............7
Where oaks , that erst the Druid knew, are growing, To George Felton Mathew, Line 39
Made by some mighty oaks : as they would chase Sleep and Poetry, Line 140
Through wilderness, and woods of mossed oaks ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 49
About the crisped oaks full drearily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 295
He would swear, for all his oaks , Robin Hood, Line 43
Tall oaks , branch-charmed by the earnest stars, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 74
Even to the hollows of time-eaten oaks , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 408
 
OAR...............1
With shatter'd boat, oar snapt, and canvass rent, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 17
 
OAR'D.............1
And oar'd himself along with majesty; Imitation of Spenser, Line 15
 
OARS..............2
With toying oars and silken sails they glide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 249
Three rows of oars are lightening moment-whiles Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 57
 
OAT...............1
Not oat -sheaves drooping in the western sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 610
 
OATH..............5
To a young Delian oath - aye, by thy soul, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 18
And yet one day, against his oath , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 21
He is! but here make oath Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 69b
You heard what oath I sware, as the sun rose, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 27
An oath , and through the serpent's ears it ran Lamia, Part I, Line 113
 
OATHS.............3
Eternal oaths and vows they interchange, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 489
With one of his well-pleas'd Olympian oaths , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 14
Return'd the snake, "but seal with oaths , fair God!" Lamia, Part I, Line 88
 
OATS..............1
On one side is a field of drooping oats , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 127
 
OBEISANCE.........1
Submissive of knee-bent obeisance , The Jealousies, Line 753
 
OBELISKS..........2
And touch'd with shade of bronzed obelisks , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 178
And touch'd with shade of bronzed obelisks , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 26
 
OBERON............3
Beneath its rich shade did King Oberon languish, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 26
Nor e'er will the music of Oberon die. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 36
To sleep and Oberon will tease. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 38
 
OBERON'S..........1
Before King Oberon's bright diadem, Lamia, Part I, Line 3
 
OBEY..............8
A thousand willing agents to obey , Sleep and Poetry, Line 239
So still obey the guiding hand that fends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 574
Kindest Alpheus, for should I obey Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 959
I am no seer; you know we must obey Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 5
A summoner,- she will obey my call, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 76
Be ready to obey me; anon thou shalt Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 128
Obey ! This shall finish it! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 179a
To thy far wishes will thy streams obey : Lamia, Part I, Line 262
 
OBEY'D............2
Nods, becks, and hints, should be obey'd with care, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 32
Am I obey'd ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 180b
 
OBEYING...........1
Swallows obeying the south summer's call, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 816
 
OBJECT............1
object . This is not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
 
OBJECTED..........1
The gas ( objected to on score of health), The Jealousies, Line 211
 
OBJECTION.........1
You may do so sans objection Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 3
 
OBJECTS...........2
Objects that look'd out so invitingly Calidore: A Fragment, Line 31
Wrapping all objects from my smothered sight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 901
 
OBLIGED...........2
Mumchance art thou with both obliged to part. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 14
"Gad! he's obliged to stick to business! The Jealousies, Line 289
 
OBLIQUE...........1
The star may point oblique . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 11a
 
OBLIVION..........7
Into oblivion ;- that fresh flowers will grow, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 13
Oblivion , and melt out his essence fine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 99
Echo into oblivion , he said:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 233
By one and one, to pale oblivion ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 666
To meet oblivion ."- As her heart would burst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 124
All the sad spaces of oblivion , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 359
And painful vile oblivion seals my eyes: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 87
 
OBLIVIOUS.........1
So a day's journey, in oblivious haze To J.R., Line 7
 
OBSCUR'D..........1
How soon the film of death obscur'd that eye, Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 3
 
OBSCURE...........2
Of Proserpine, when Hell, obscure and hot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 944
One obscure hiding-place, one little spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 62
 
OBSCURED..........2
My sayings will the less obscured seem, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 858
Nor in obscured purlieus would he seek Character of C.B., Line 25
 
OBSERVATORY.......1
Nature's observatory - whence the dell, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 4
 
OBSERVE...........2
As I am; let me observe you, face to face: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 80
Observe what I have said,- show no surprise. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 21
 
OBSTINACY.........2
Rebellion, obstinacy , blasphemy,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 107
Fanatic obstinacy ! Prodigy! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 201
 
OBSTINATE.........4
Obstinate silence came heavily again, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 335
And with a sullen rigour obstinate Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 49
You know his temper, hot, proud, obstinate ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 89
No, obstinate boy, you shall be kept cag'd up, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 88
 
OCCASION..........2
Do they occasion ; 'tis a pleasing chime. How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 8
Have been content to let occasion die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 822
 
OCCUPANTS.........1
Of higher occupants , a richer zest, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 246
 
OCCUPY............1
To occupy me wholly, and to fashion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 976
 
OCEAN.............19
Than the shell, from the bright golden sands of the ocean To Some Ladies, Line 23
The ocean with its vastness, its blue green, To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 5
Above the ocean -waves. The stalks, and blades, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 125
The winds of heaven blew, the ocean roll'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 188
An ocean dim, sprinkled with many an isle, Sleep and Poetry, Line 306
With the subsiding crystal: as when ocean Sleep and Poetry, Line 376
The ocean , its neighbour, God of the golden bow, Line 29
Of their petty ocean . Oftener, heavily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 884
Of ocean fades upon him; then, anew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 76
Towers like an ocean -cliff, and whence he seeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 241
Old ocean rolls a lengthened wave to the shore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 348
O Moon! far-spooming Ocean bows to thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 70
Of ambitious magic: every ocean -form Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 199
The ceaseless wonders of this ocean -bed. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 392
One million times ocean must ebb and flow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 694
Blue!- 'Tis the life of waters - Ocean , Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 5
Hearken, thou craggy ocean pyramid, To Ailsa Rock, Line 1
And ocean too, with all its solemn noise, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 57
And ocean too, with all its solemn noise, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 359
 
OCEAN'S...........6
Ocean's blue mantle streak'd with purple, and green. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 132
Nibble their fill at ocean's very marge, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 204
Resuming quickly thus; while ocean's tide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 312
The utmost privilege that ocean's sire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 376
Enforced, at the last by ocean's foam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 607
Suddenly on the ocean's chilly streams. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 268
 
OCEANUS...........5
Smooth-moving came Oceanus the old, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 994
By the great Oceanus ; Not Aladdin magian, Line 28
Oceanus , and Tethys, in whose lap Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 75
Is all a-hunger'd. Thou, Oceanus , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 163
They guarded silence, when Oceanus Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 245
 
OCEANUS'S.........1
For though I scorn Oceanus's lore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 333
 
OCH...............1
Och the charm There was a naughty boy, Line 53
 
OCTOBER'S.........1
Or ripe October's faded marigolds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 397
 
ODD...............1
You would do me a mischief some odd day, The Jealousies, Line 467
 
ODDS..............1
Your person unaffronted by vile odds , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 25
 
ODE...............1
Who found for me the grandeur of the ode , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 62
 
ODOROUS...........5
A willow-bough, distilling odorous dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 424
Odorous and enlivening; making all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 514
There is a sleepy dusk, an odorous shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 362
And divine liquids come with odorous ooze Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 411
Along the mirror'd walls by twin-clouds odorous . Lamia, Part II, Line 182
 
ODOUR.............1
Blendeth its odour with the violet,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 321
 
ODOURS............1
Teeming with odours . Lamia, regal drest, Lamia, Part II, Line 133
 
OFF...............53
No, no! this is far off :- then how shall I Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 31
When butts of wine are drunk off to the lees? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 36
Went off in gentle windings to the hoar Calidore: A Fragment, Line 27
So pushes off his boat most eagerly, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 59
Kept off dismay, and terror, and alarm Calidore: A Fragment, Line 145
Yet further off , are dimly seen their bowers, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 43
In milky nest, and sip them off at leisure. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 10
But off , Despondence! miserable bane! Sleep and Poetry, Line 281
From off her brow, and left her all alone. Sleep and Poetry, Line 384
The face of Poesy: from off her throne Sleep and Poetry, Line 394
Then off at once, as in a wanton freak: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 90
Of mailed heroes should tear off my crown:- To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 13
To keep off mildews, and all weather harms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 284
His senses had swoon'd off : he did not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 398
Far off , the shadows of his pinions dark, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 674
Holding his forehead, to keep off the burr Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 138
To search it inwards; whence far off appear'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 259
Spun off a drizzling dew,- which falling chill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 520
To scud like a wild bird, and take thee off Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 698
Of love-spangles, just off yon cape of trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 83
From off a crystal pool, to see its deep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 331
Each Atlas-line bore off !- a shine of hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 685
Thy tail's tip is nicked off - and though the fists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 11
And a kiss from the stranger as off he went Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 15
And at the least 'twill startle off her cares." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 40
Could keep him off so long? They spake a tale Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 260
So saying, she hobbled off with busy fear. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 181
And off he went, run, trot, or any how. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 96
Which comes upon the silence, and dies off , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 77
So weak a creature could turn off the help Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 257
Off , ye icy spirits, fly, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 87
Drawn off his nobles to revolt,- and shown Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 39
As Jove fans off the clouds. Even now they pass. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 21
Yet be that hour far off ; and may he live, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 32
Off ! And none pass this way on pain of death! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 72
The eagle Otho to beat off assault. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
The cool wine, kiss'd off with a soldier's smack: Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 30
[Attendants bear off AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 74a
I will from her turn off , and put the load Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 143
Cut off these curls, and brand this lily hand, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 95
So threw the goddess off , and won his heart Lamia, Part I, Line 336
Then to the west I look'd, and saw far off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 87
Thy doom."- "High Prophetess," said I, "purge off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 145
Swelling upon the silence; dying off ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 376
My sword met his and snapp'd off at the hilts. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 50
Off Glocester's golden dishes - drinks pure wine, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 28
Talks off the mighty frowning from his brow, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 43
Goes off like lightning,- grains of paradise The Jealousies, Line 295
Return'd the porter - " off , and one shoe on, The Jealousies, Line 305
Cut off my ears and hands, or head too, by my fay! The Jealousies, Line 468
Adieu! adieu! I'm off for Angle-land! The Jealousies, Line 599
Beheld afar off , in the hooded shade The Jealousies, Line 660
Till he sheer'd off - the Princess very scared- The Jealousies, Line 683
 
OFFENCE...........1
In no deed did you give me more offence Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 144
 
OFFEND............1
Yes, yes, yes, I offend . You must forgive me; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
 
OFFENDED..........2
Desist! or my offended mistress' nod Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 953
Of conscience, for their long offended might, Lamia, Part II, Line 284
 
OFFENSIVE.........1
Offensive to the heavenly powers? Caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 509
 
OFFER.............4
Thy soul of care, by heavens, I would offer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 107
I on this spot will offer : Pan will bid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 634
Doves will offer up, and sweetest store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 660
Would offer a burnt sacrifice of verse Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 9
 
OFFERING..........2
Was offering up a hecatomb of vows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 39
As this poor offering to you, sister mine. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 16
 
OFFERINGS.........4
With these poor offerings , a man like thee. To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 14
Such cool and sorrowful offerings , thou art fond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 438
For many years my offerings must be hush'd. Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 32
And then upon the offerings again; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 239
 
OFFICE............2
Of a curs'd torturer's office ? Why shouldst join,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 87
And do its ruddy office . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 24a
 
OFFICER...........1
SIGIFRED, an Officer , friend of Ludolph Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 5
 
OFFICERS..........1
THEODORE, GONFRID, Officers Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 6,7
 
OFFICES...........1
A world of other unguess'd offices . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 370
 
OFFICIALLY........1
His slender wand officially reveal'd; The Jealousies, Line 582
 
OFFICIOUSLY.......1
Officiously . Sideway his face repos'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 403
 
OFT...............29
Through the dark robe oft amber rays prevail, To Lord Byron, Line 11
There, oft would he bring from his soft sighing lute On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 29
And tears 'mong the dewdrops of morning oft glistened. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 32
A dewy flower, oft would that hand appear, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 41
That I am oft in doubt whether at all To George Felton Mathew, Line 20
Oft have you seen a swan superbly frowning, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 1
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 5
Oft may be found a "singleness of aim," Addressed to Haydon, Line 6
Oft have I brought thee flowers, on their stalks set Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 873
Pleasure is oft a visitant; but pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 906
For with wide eye he wonders, and smiles oft . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 63
Oft hast thou seen bolts of the thunder hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 205
The youth approach'd; oft turning his veil'd eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 263
He wander'd through, oft wondering at such swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 679
I oft have dried my tears when thou hast smil'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 144
Nor be my desolation; and, full oft , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 345
Oft -times upon the sudden she laugh'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 509
Flutter'd and laugh'd, and oft -times through the throng Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 932
Each third step did he pause, and listen'd oft Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 194
I have oft honoured thee. Great shadow, hide On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 13
She turn'd her dazed head full oft , Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 29
One would hear so very oft ? Fancy, Line 76
I kiss'd you oft , and gave you white pease; I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 9
So each Fair reasons - though it oft miscarries. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 61
Oft made Hyperion ache. His palace bright, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 176
The same that oft -times hath Ode to a Nightingale, Line 68
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store? To Autumn, Line 12
Such things as thou art are admitted oft The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 178
Love thwarted in bad temper oft has vent: The Jealousies, Line 176
 
OFTEN.............13
That often must have seen a poet frantic; To George Felton Mathew, Line 38
Those smiling ladies, often turned his head Calidore: A Fragment, Line 129
Full often dropping a delicious tear, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 13
Yet do I often warmly burn to see Happy is England! I could be content, Line 12
And often , when I sit me down to rhyme, How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 5
And as she leaves me may she often turn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 105
Let him with this sweet tale full often seek On The Story of Rimini, Line 3
Often 'tis in such gentle temper found On the Sea, Line 5
Would often beat its wings, and often too Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 87
Would often beat its wings, and often too Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 87
Often with more than tortured lion's groan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 861
Yet often have I, on the brink of tears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 778
He often would There was a naughty boy, Line 68
 
OFTENER...........1
Of their petty ocean. Oftener , heavily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 884
 
OFTENTIMES........5
And oftentimes he feels the dewy drops This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 5
And see that oftentimes the reins would slip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 180
Because Lorenzo came not, Oftentimes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 257
Of her lorn voice, she oftentimes would cry Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 492
More gaunt and ghostly. Oftentimes I pray'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 396
 
OFTTIMES..........1
Though he would ofttimes feed on gillyflowers rare. Character of C.B., Line 18


Published @ RC

March 2005