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Keats Concordance
 
OH................28
Oh Peace! and dost thou with thy presence bless On Peace, Line 1
Oh Europe, let not sceptred tyrants see On Peace, Line 10
Oh brush not yet the pearl strung spray, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 3
Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 1
Oh ! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 1
Oh ! what a power has white simplicity! This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 9
Oh ! 'twas born to die. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 8
Of heaven! Oh Cynthia, ten-times bright and fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 170
The world has done its duty. Yet, oh yet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 728
Oh what a wild and harmonized tune Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 170
Oh , no - it shall not pine, and pine, and pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 578
A power overshadows thee! Oh , brave! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 759
Oh ! the sweetness of the pain! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 23
I dare not yet!- Oh never will the prize, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 74
Oh pain - for since the eagle's earliest scream Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 25
Oh , sweet Fancy! let her loose; Fancy, Line 67
Oh leave me not in this eternal woe, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 314
But oh ! how unlike marble was that face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 34
Of these new-form'd art thou, oh brightest child! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 319
Oh ! monstrous! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 61b
Aye, wife! Oh , impudence! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 75b
And all men! Vanish - Oh ! Oh! Oh! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 184
And all men! Vanish - Oh! Oh ! Oh! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 184
And all men! Vanish - Oh! Oh! Oh ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 184
Oh ! for enough life to support me on Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 1
Oh ! thou good man, against whose sacred head Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 140
Oh , my son! my son! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 179b
Quoth the dark page; " Oh no!" return'd the Swiss, The Jealousies, Line 281
 
OIL...............3
She whisk'd against their eyes the sooty oil . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 521
Had pour'd a mortal oil upon his head, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 97
Which to the oil -trade doth great scaith and harm, The Jealousies, Line 215
 
OILED.............1
Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 13
 
OILS..............1
And fragrant oils with ceremony meet Lamia, Part II, Line 194
 
OLD...............177
Hadst thou liv'd in days of old , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 1
From the worn top of some old battlement Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 15
Some tale of love and arms in time of old . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 18
Of Flora, and old Pan: sleep in the grass, Sleep and Poetry, Line 102
As she was wont of old ? prepare her steeds, Sleep and Poetry, Line 165
Affright you? Did our old lamenting Thames Sleep and Poetry, Line 212
As a large cross, some old cathedral's crest, Sleep and Poetry, Line 296
What first inspired a bard of old to sing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 163
Was at his old labor, God of the golden bow, Line 30
Wasting of old time - with a billowy main - On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 13
Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound. On the Sea, Line 4
Sit ye near some old cavern's mouth and brood On the Sea, Line 13
Your sceptre worth a straw, your cushions old door mats." Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 8
Supports an old bishop and crosier; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 3
Old Jonah went to C. O grant that like to Peter I, Line 4
Trees old , and young sprouting a shady boon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 14
About old forests; while the willow trails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 43
To feel this sun-rise and its glories old . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 106
Of their old piety, and of their glee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 130
To stammer where old Chaucer used to sing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 134
By the dim echoes of old Triton's horn: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 206
But in old marbles ever beautiful. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 319
Or the old eyes dissolving at his woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 400
Frozen in that old tale Arabian. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 406
Then old songs waken from enclouded tombs; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 787
Old ditties sigh above their father's grave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 788
Many old rotten-timber'd boats there be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 18
Though old Ulysses tortured from his slumbers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 26
Alas! 'tis his old grief. For many days, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 47
Like old Deucalion mountain'd o'er the flood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 197
Old darkness from his throne: 'twas like the sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 246
Down sidelong aisles, and into niches old . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 264
Feeling about for its old couch of space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 336
To its old channel, or a swollen tide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 340
Old ocean rolls a lengthened wave to the shore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 348
Old Atlas' children? Art a maid of the waters, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 690
O fountain'd hill! Old Homer's Helicon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 717
That there is no old power left to steep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 731
Half lost, and all old hymns made nullity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 794
By a cavern wind unto a forest old ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 831
Of the old bards to mighty deeds: his plans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 895
And set those old Chaldeans to their tasks.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 21
Aye, 'bove the withering of old -lipp'd Fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 29
O Moon! old boughs lisp forth a holier din Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 54
Old rusted anchors, helmets, breast-plates large Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 123
An old man sitting calm and peacefully. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 192
Upon a weeded rock this old man sat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 193
Beside this old man lay a pearly wand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 213
The old man rais'd his hoary head and saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 218
I bow full hearted to your old decree! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 252
I care not for this old mysterious man!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 280
But even now most miserable old , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 303
O such deformities! Old Charon's self, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 503
Old Eolus would stifle his mad spleen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 653
When at my feet emerg'd an old man's hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 669
For each their old love found. A murmuring rose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 824
Thou frownest, and old Eolus thy foe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 951
Smooth-moving came Oceanus the old , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 994
And thou, old forest, hold ye this for true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 77
Old Tartary the fierce! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 262
From the old womb of night, his cave forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 372
Or from old Skiddaw's top, when fog conceals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 394
Leaving old Sleep within his vapoury lair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 483
Forgetting the old tale. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 780a
Through the old garden-ground of boyish days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 784
For the soothsayers old saw yesternight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 829
And by old Rhadamanthus' tongue of doom, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 953
By old Saturnus' forelock, by his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 956
Old scholar of the spheres! Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 2
With old philosophy; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 30
When through the old oak forest I am gone, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 11
An astrologer's old quill Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 16
Underneath a new old sign Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 19
Away with old hock and madeira! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 2
And their hours are old and gray, Robin Hood, Line 2
Some old hunting ditty, while Robin Hood, Line 27
Honour to the old bow-string! Robin Hood, Line 50
Son of the old moon-mountains African! To the Nile, Line 1
Old Socrates a tying his cravat; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 9
From some old magic like Urganda's sword. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 29
And pannier'd mules for ducats and old lies- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 134
To make old prose in modern rhyme more sweet: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 156
That old nurse stood beside her wondering, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 377
O for the gentleness of old Romance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 387
Fair reader, at the old tale take a glance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 389
O give me their old vigour, and unheard, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 9
And may it taste to you like good old wine, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 19
When adieux have grown old and goodbyes Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 3
Fade away where old time is retreating. Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 4
Old Meg she was a gipsey, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 1
And with her fingers old and brown Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 21
Old Meg was brave as Margaret Queen Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 25
An old red blanket cloak she wore; Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 27
For old ones There was a naughty boy, Line 16
My pulse is warm with thine old barley-bree, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 5
Has any here an old grey mare All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 9
There is a pleasure on the heath where Druids old have been, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 3
There is a joy in every spot made known by times of old , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 5
When shapes of old come striding by and visages of old, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 37
When shapes of old come striding by and visages of old , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 37
To do an honor to your old bald pate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 3
And if not Mr. Bates, why I'm not old ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 19
It cannot be! My old eyes are not true! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 28
By my old night cap, night cap night and day, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 42
Old "Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin." Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 54
Than on the marble fairness of old Greece. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 61
That the jealous, the jealous old baldpate may hear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 3
The old man may sleep, and the planets may wink; Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 20
Like pious incense from a censer old , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 7
Of old romance. These let us wish away, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 41
As she had heard old dames full many times declare. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 45
Save one old beldame, weak in body and in soul. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 90
Then there's that old Lord Maurice, not a whit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 103
And Madeline asleep in lap of legends old . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 135
Old Angela was feeling for the stair, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 191
Were long be-nightmar'd. Angela the old The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 375
Dwelling in the old Minster Square; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 40
On ceiling beam and old oak chair, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 75
To the knotty side of an old pollard tree When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 84
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 18
"Saturn, look up!- though wherefore, poor old King? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 52
Until at length old Saturn lifted up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 89
Groan'd for the old allegiance once more, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 162
And bid old Saturn take his throne again."- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 250
Up to the zenith,- hieroglyphics old , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 277
Studied from that old spirit-leaved book Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 133
In glory that old Darkness: nor are we Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 215
And every gulf, and every chasm old , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 360
There those four shouted forth old Saturn's name; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 387
Many a fallen old Divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 8
Who hath forsaken old and sacred thrones Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 77
In the earth's wide entrails old Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 69
When old age shall this generation waste, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 46
Seem'd to say- "Sleep, old man, in safety sleep; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 61
An old lion sugar-cates of mild reprieve? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 172
From Gersa's tents. Farewell, old Ethelbert. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 199
Peace! peace, old man! I cannot think she is. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130
For old serge hangings,- me, your humble friend, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 36
The news is scarce a minute old with me. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 58
And old romances; but I'll break the spell. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 48
Ludolph, old Ethelbert, be sure, comes not Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 107
Old abbot, stand here forth. Lady Erminia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 111
But an old man's is narrow, tenantless Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 183
Here, Albert, this old phantom wants a proof! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 207
The lady weeping, the old abbot cowl'd. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 12
Or of old AEtna's pulpy wine-presses, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 123
Among the Gods, upon Olympus old , Lamia, Part I, Line 71
Not one hour old , yet of sciential brain Lamia, Part I, Line 191
From Pyrrha's pebbles or old Adam's seed. Lamia, Part I, Line 333
Is that old man? I cannot bring to mind Lamia, Part I, Line 372
Old Apollonius - from him keep me hid." Lamia, Part II, Line 101
The old man through the inner doors broad-spread; Lamia, Part II, Line 170
What for the sage, old Apollonius? Lamia, Part II, Line 222
From his old teacher's wrinkled countenance, Lamia, Part II, Line 244
To thin the scarlet conclave of old men, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 50
Of an old sanctuary with roof august, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 62
So old the place was, I remembered none The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 65
Against rebellion: this old image here, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 224
No farther than to where old Saturn's feet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 320
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 323
Until old Saturn rais'd his faded eyes, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 400
Methought I heard some old man of the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 440
Groan for the old allegiance once more, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 11
In my old liberty? What can I do to drive away, Line 6
As in old pictures tender cherubim The Jealousies, Line 37
Close at your back, that sly old Crafticant? The Jealousies, Line 49
And for the nephew of old Palfior, The Jealousies, Line 147
And to old Hum through street and alley hied; The Jealousies, Line 205
A thimble-full of old Jamaica rum." The Jealousies, Line 363
Live!- O! at Canterbury, with her old grand-dame." The Jealousies, Line 387
Charm'd into ever freezing, lay an old The Jealousies, Line 512
Like the old pageant of Aurora's train, The Jealousies, Line 578
I say, old hocus, have you such a thing The Jealousies, Line 600
Thank you, old mummy!- now securely I take wing." The Jealousies, Line 603
Old Crafticant will smoke me, by-the-bye! The Jealousies, Line 615
About this time,- a sad old figure of fun; The Jealousies, Line 656
I met, far gone in liquor, that old man, The Jealousies, Line 786
 
OLDEN.............4
Even for common bulk, those olden three, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 848
Shut up thine olden pages, and be mute. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 4
Gone mad through olden songs and poesies. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 54
He sipp'd no olden Tom, or ruin blue, Character of C.B., Line 21
 
OLDEST............2
O Moon! the oldest shades 'mong oldest trees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 52
O Moon! the oldest shades 'mong oldest trees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 52
 
OLIVE.............3
To some high noble and his olive -trees. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 168
Each like a dove leaving its olive perch, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 286
It was my chance to meet his olive brow, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 54
 
OLIVES............1
Rejoice, O Delos, with thine olives green, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 24
 
OLYMPIAN..........3
The Olympian eagle's vision, is dark, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 911
O were I one of the Olympian twelve, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 1
With one of his well-pleas'd Olympian oaths, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 14
 
OLYMPIANS.........1
Fluttering among the faint Olympians , Ode to Psyche, Line 42
 
OLYMPUS...........6
Who from Olympus watch our destinies! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 605
Olympus ! we are safe! Now, Carian, break Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 764
Of high Olympus utter'd slavish sighs. Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 8
Found way unto Olympus , and made quake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 146
From high Olympus had he stolen light, Lamia, Part I, Line 9
Among the Gods, upon Olympus old, Lamia, Part I, Line 71
 
OLYMPUS'..........2
Had waned from Olympus' solemn height, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 784
Of all Olympus' faded hierarchy! Ode to Psyche, Line 25
 
OMEGA.............1
The pale Omega of a wither'd race, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 288
 
OMEN..............1
Bad omen - this new match can't be a happy one. The Jealousies, Line 657
 
OMENS.............1
For as among us mortals omens drear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 169
 
OMINOUS...........1
Where these are new and strange, are ominous . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 911
 
OMIT..............1
a memorable instance in this kind, which I may not omit , of one Menippus Lycius, Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
OMNIPOTENT........1
Of the omnipotent Father, cleavest the air, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 12
 
ON'T..............6
And emptied on't a black dull-gurgling phial: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 515
And curb'd, think on't , O Latmian! did I sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 663
That bone, fie on't , bears just the shape O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 81
I have mine own particular comments on't ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 43
I ache to think on't . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 13b
Now I think on't , perhaps I could convince The Jealousies, Line 473
 
ONE'S.............7
One's thoughts from such a beauty; when I hear Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 37
And one's own image from the bottom peep? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 332
One's senses with so dense a breathing stuff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 381
And each one's gentle wrists, with reverence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 743
Moods of one's mind! You know I hate them well, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 106
To follow one's nose There was a naughty boy, Line 55
To follow one's nose to the north! There was a naughty boy, Line 58
 
ONENESS...........1
Into a sort of oneness , and our state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 796
 
ONES..............6
The mighty ones who have made eternal day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 253
Schooling its half-fledg'd little ones to brush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 130
But there are higher ones I may not see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 853
For old ones There was a naughty boy, Line 16
We fair ones show a preference, too blind! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 8
The mitred ones of Nice and Trent O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 7
 
ONLY..............28
But thy soft note - its only joy. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 20
That breast, earth's only paradise! Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 16
Gorgeous as I would have it - only I see On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 10
To a wide lawn, whence one could only see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 82
Only I pray, as fairest boon, to die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 550
Warm mountaineer! for canst thou only bear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 54
One moment from his home: only the sward Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 335
Bright signal that she only stoop'd to tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 500
"I would have thee my only friend, sweet maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 849
My only visitor! not ignorant though, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 850
For it only will last our youth out; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 14
O thou whose only book has been the light O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 5
Only to meet again more close, and share Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 75
Is mist and crag - not only on this height, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 13
A buried miser's only son, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 74
My heart began to burn - and only pains, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 10
And only blind from sheer supremacy, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 185
And yet she answer'd not, only complain'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 249
Known only to his troop, hath greater plea Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 28
Is not the only proud heart in his realm. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 57
Grey-growing. To thee only I appeal, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 177
The only sad one; for thou didst not hear Lamia, Part I, Line 72
Telling me only where my nymph is fled,- Lamia, Part I, Line 86
Only the dreamer venoms all his days, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 175
To what I erewhile heard: only his lips The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 450
No,- wine is only sweet to happy men; What can I do to drive away, Line 27
His speech, his only words were "yes" and "no," The Jealousies, Line 185
I've said it, sire; you only have to choose The Jealousies, Line 437
 
ONSET.............1
Escapes, makes fiercer onset , the anew King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 13
 
ONWARD............15
Flit onward - now a lovely wreath of girls Sleep and Poetry, Line 149
Easily onward , thorough flowers and weed. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 62
Onward it flies. From languor's sullen bands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 66
And onward to another city speeds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 152
Onward he goes - he stops - his bosom beats Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 355
He onward kept; wooing these thoughts to steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 140
And onward went upon his high employ, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 783
At every onward step proud domes arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 836
Still onward ; still the splendour gradual swell'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 840
Onward the tiger and the leopard pants, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 241
Onward these myriads - with song and dance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 243
A little onward ran the very stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 785
Onward I look'd beneath the gloomy boughs, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 297
Onward from the antichamber of this dream, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 465
" Onward we floated o'er the panting streets, The Jealousies, Line 730
 
ONWARDS...........1
First onwards in, among the fallen tribe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 100
 
OOZ'D.............2
Tawny and gold, ooz'd slowly from far lands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 114
Of happiness, from fairy-press ooz'd out. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 802
 
OOZE..............4
The ooze -born Goddess beckoned and drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 893
And warm with dew at ooze from living blood! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 667
And divine liquids come with odorous ooze Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 411
His Druid locks to shake and ooze with sweat, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 137
 
OOZINGS...........1
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours. To Autumn, Line 22
 
OOZY..............2
A new magnificence. On oozy throne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 993
Arose, with locks not oozy , and began, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 170
 
OPAL..............1
Rich opal domes were seen, on high upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 841
 
OPAQUE............1
Dungeon'd in opaque element, to keep Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 23
 
OPE...............8
And scarcely stays to ope the folding doors: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 70
Yet can I ope thy window-sash to find This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 10
Why should I ope thy melancholy eyes? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 70
Then, as was wont, his palace-door flew ope Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 205
A bright torch, and a casement ope at night, Ode to Psyche, Line 66
We are all weary - faint - set ope the doors- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 194
Why should I ope thy melancholy eyes? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 370
The little Bertha's eyes ope on the stars serene." The Jealousies, Line 396
 
OPED..............1
The doors all look as if they oped themselves, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 49
 
OPEN..............43
My ear is open like a greedy shark, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 27
Spenser! thy brows are arched, open , kind, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 49
And open face of heaven,- to breathe a prayer To one who has been long in city pent, Line 3
When these enchanted portals open wide, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 33
That freshly terminate in open plains, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 116
That stays one moment in an open flower, Sleep and Poetry, Line 3
Open afresh your round of starry folds, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 47
Of heaven appear'd to open for my flight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 582
To follow it upon the open plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 892
Queen Venus leaning downward open arm'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 526
These dreary caverns for the open sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 987
Ere it burst open swift as fairy thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 857
Open your ears and stay your trudge All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 3
Open wide the mind's cage-door, Fancy, Line 7
Open thine eyes, for meek St. Agnes' sake, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 278
Her blue affrayed eyes wide open shone: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 296
Her eyes were open , but she still beheld, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 298
Burst the door open , quick - or I declare When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 16
Open thine eyes eterne, and sphere them round Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 117
He ground severe his skull, with open mouth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 51
Came open -eyed to guess what we would speak:- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 338
Open eyes that never daze: Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 12
The open casement press'd a new-leaved vine, Ode on Indolence, Line 47
A few days since, I was an open rebel,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 37
Appear'd, a sudden host, in the open day. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
Nor judge my open purposes awry. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 141
Frank, open , generous; Albert I may trust. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 23
Our ear is open . First we here denounce Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 113
Nay open speech, rude mockery grown common, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
Here is the Duke, waiting with open arms Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 249
His eyes are fix'd still on the open doors, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 64
Through the dark ways they chose to the open air; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 125
Open the door; let's hear if all is quiet. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 35
Open it straight;- hush!- quiet!- my lost boy! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 37
[The doors open . Enter Page. Several women are seen Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
Saving a tythe which love still open kept, Lamia, Part II, Line 24
He answer'd, bending to her open eyes, Lamia, Part II, Line 46
Where even at the open doors awhile The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 466
Spoken to in clear, plain, and open terms, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 15
The Magazin des Modes now open is The Jealousies, Line 283
" Open the window, Hum; I'm ready now!" The Jealousies, Line 541
Or on the open turf their soothed eyelids closed. The Jealousies, Line 693
At the open doors, with wide saluting eyes, The Jealousies, Line 758
 
OPEN'D............2
Open'd upon the dusk demesnes of night; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 298
She felt the warmth, her eyelids open'd bland, Lamia, Part I, Line 141
 
OPENED............2
Opened again, and from without, in shone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 992
Opened - she enter'd with her servants three. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 72
 
OPENER............1
Dread opener of the mysterious doors Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 288
 
OPENEST...........1
Into mine own: for why? thou openest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 295
 
OPENING...........8
We will hasten, my fair, to the opening glades, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 5
Is the swift opening of their wide portal, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 30
Of words at opening a portfolio. Sleep and Poetry, Line 338
Fresh for the opening of the morning's eye. On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 8
Opening his eyelids with a healthier brain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 465
And lo! from opening clouds, I saw emerge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 591
Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Ode to a Nightingale, Line 69
A Cabinet, opening towards a Terrace. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Setting
 
OPENS.............1
[Goes to the door, listens, and opens it. Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 106
 
OPERATE...........1
Doth operate quietly when his breath is gone: Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 42
 
OPERATIONS........2
Have bared their operations to this globe- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 35
Therefore the operations of the dawn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 294
 
OPES..............1
Each opes delighted at thy lay. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 12
 
OPIATE............2
Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 3
And opiate for the conscience have I none! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 158
 
OPINION...........1
"Mr. Nisby is of opinion that laced coffee is bad The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 365
 
OPIUM.............1
You vext with bad revolt? Was't opium , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 34
 
OPPOSE............1
And canst oppose to each malignant hour Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 339
 
OPPOSITE..........5
Towards a bowery island opposite ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 428
And opposite the stedfast eye doth meet Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 51
Just opposite , an island of the sea, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 275
Full brimm'd, and opposite sent forth a look Lamia, Part II, Line 242
Diverse, sheer opposite , antipodes. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 200
 
OPPOSITION........2
A total opposition ? No one. So Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 693
I'll make the opposition -benches wince, The Jealousies, Line 138
 
OPPRESS...........1
A brace of toads, than league with them t' oppress Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 164
 
OPPRESS'D.........5
With the base purple of a court oppress'd , To Hope, Line 39
At that oppress'd I hurried in.- Ah! where Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 970
I am so oppress'd with joy! Why, I have shed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 431
Until the poppied warmth of sleep oppress'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 237
Indeed too much oppress'd . May I be bold Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
 
OPPRESSED.........2
After dark vapours have oppressed our plains After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 1
And he oppressed . Yet he shall not die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 695
 
OPPRESSIVE........1
Stifled beneath the thick oppressive shade Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 19
 
OPPREST...........1
The prison gates that have so long opprest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 296
 
OPPROBRIOUS.......1
My joys with such opprobrious surprise? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 80
 
OPS...............2
Of Ops the queen all clouded round from sight; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 78
And Ops , uplifting her black folded veil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 113
 
ORACLE............2
No shrine, no grove, no oracle , no heat Ode to Psyche, Line 34
Thy shrine, thy grove, thy oracle , thy heat Ode to Psyche, Line 48
 
ORACULAR..........1
Till this oracular couplet met his eye The Jealousies, Line 454
 
ORANGE............1
Why were they proud? Because fair orange -mounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 123
 
ORANGES...........1
My terrace is well bowered with oranges . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 34
 
ORAT'RIES.........2
Knights, ladies, praying in dumb orat'ries , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 16
Warm from their fireside orat'ries , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 16
 
ORATORY...........1
Your oratory ; your breath is not so hitch'd. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 47
 
ORB...............4
But, gentle Orb ! there came a nearer bliss- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 175
The planet orb of fire, whereon he rode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 269
Their wisdom long since fled.- Two wings this orb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 283
Eager to sail their orb ; the porches wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 297
 
ORBED.............7
Her pearl round ears, white neck, and orbed brow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 616
There hangs by unseen film, an orbed drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 806
Descried an orbed diamond, set to fray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 245
Orbed is the moon and bright, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 2
Blazing Hyperion on his orbed fire Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 166
My wrath against thee for the orbed world. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
Blazing Hyperion on his orbed fire The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 15
 
ORBING............1
Orbing along the serene firmament Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 79
 
ORBS..............3
To commune with those orbs , once more I rais'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 600
But meeting her blue orbs ! Who, who can write Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 531
There was no recognition in those orbs . Lamia, Part II, Line 260
 
ORBY..............1
Now I begin to feel thine orby power Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 180
 
ORDER.............3
Such thousands of shut eyes in order plac'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 738
Through bronzed lyre in tragic order go, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 443
In white robes, and themselves in order placed Lamia, Part II, Line 196
 
ORDER'D...........1
And order'd some death-warrants to be sent The Jealousies, Line 178
 
ORDERS............1
These orders given, the Prince, in half a pet, The Jealousies, Line 199
 
ORDINARY..........1
Trot round the quarto - ordinary time! The Jealousies, Line 638
 
ORE...............3
With quivering ore : 'twas even an awful shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 352
Through caves, and palaces of mottled ore , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 594
To search its sullen entrails rich with ore , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 274
 
OREAD.............2
An arch face peep'd,- an Oread as I guess'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 671
O Oread -Queen! would that thou hadst a pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 961
 
ORED..............1
To take the rich- ored driftings of the flood. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 112
 
ORGAN.............5
In solemn tenour and deep organ tone: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 48
Grew up like organ , that begins anew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 126
In solemn tenor and deep organ tune; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 350
From a Man-Tiger- Organ , prettiest of his toys." The Jealousies, Line 333
Than the Emperor when he play'd on his Man-Tiger- Organ . The Jealousies, Line 342
 
ORGANIC...........1
Chief of organic numbers! Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 1
 
ORGANS............2
Hollow organs all the day; Not Aladdin magian, Line 30
While play'd the organs loud and sweet. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 22
 
ORIENT............1
Now Morning from her orient chamber came, Imitation of Spenser, Line 1
 
ORIGINAL..........1
Plain in our own original mood and tense, The Jealousies, Line 791
 
ORION.............1
Or blind Orion hungry for the morn. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 198
 
ORPHEAN...........2
Alone? No, no; and by the Orphean lute, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 164
I should have Orphean lips, and Plato's fancy, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 23
 
ORPHEUS...........3
In every place where infant Orpheus slept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 794
Thou leddest Orpheus through the gleams of death; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 98
But Orpheus -like at an Eurydice; Lamia, Part I, Line 248
 
ORTHODOXY.........1
With orthodoxy ; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 10


About this Page

Published @ RC

March 2005