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Keats Concordance
LIKE (verbal form)....2
Truly I should not like to be convey'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C—, Line 35
You do not like cold pig with Latin phrases, The Jealousies, Line 539
 
MAY (month).....17
Gay villagers, upon a morn of May , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 83
A bush of May flowers with the bees about them; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 29
Takes as a long lost right the feel of May , After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 6
The silvery tears of April? — Youth of May ? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 10
The shrine of Flora in her early May . To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 8
Such morning incense from the fields of May , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 470
Heart's lightness from the merriment of May ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 166
Not longer than the May —fly's small fan-horns; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 5
A whole long month of May in this sad plight Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 25
All the buds and bells of May , Fancy, Line 33
Sapphire queen of the mid- May ; Fancy, Line 52
On the May —grown asphodel. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 28
Far in the west where the May -cloud lowers, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 97
Though in her lids hung the sweet tears of May ; Ode on Indolence, Line 46
From the first shoot till the unripe mid- May , Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 134
When in mid- May the sickening east wind The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 97
 
STILL...184
Infatuate Britons, will you still proclaim Lines Written on 29 May, Line 1
Attuning still the soul to tenderness, To Lord Byron, Line 2
Still warble, dying swan, — still tell the tale, To Lord Byron, Line 13
Still warble, dying swan, — still tell the tale, To Lord Byron, Line 13
'Tis still ! — Wild warblings from the AEolian lyre Ode to Apollo, Line 34
That the still murmur of the honey bee To My Brother George (epistle), Line 13
I feel delighted, still , that you should read them. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 118
Still scooping up the water with my fingers, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 19
Slowly, or rapidly — unwilling still To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 50
Still sounded in my ears, when I no more To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 123
In those still moments I have wish'd you joys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 127
Unnumber'd souls breathe out a still applause, Addressed to Haydon, Line 13
And still will dance with ever varied ease, Sleep and Poetry, Line 115
Still downward with capacious whirl they glide; Sleep and Poetry, Line 133
Of summer nights collected still to make Sleep and Poetry, Line 191
And still she governs with the mildest sway: Sleep and Poetry, Line 240
The air was cooling, and so very still , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 2
But still would seem to droop, to pine, to love. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 176
Still , still they toll, and I should feel a damp, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 9
Still, still they toll, and I should feel a damp, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 9
Still time is fleeting, and no dream arises On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 9
Still so pale? — then, dearest, weep; Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 9
Are tenderer still . Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 16
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 3
Wild thyme, and valley-lilies whiter still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 157
"Be still the unimaginable lodge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 293
Then leave the naked brain: be still the leaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 296
Be still a symbol of immensity; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 299
Aye, even as dead— still as a marble man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 405
And still , a sleeping, held her finger-tips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 445
For still , with Delphic emphasis, she spann'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 499
I, who still saw the horizontal sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 529
Like sorrow came upon me, heavier still , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 913
Of the lone woodcutter; and listening still , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 51
To cheer itself to Delphi. Still his feet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 82
Quick waterflies and gnats were sporting still , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 135
That they are still the air, the subtle food, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 157
Into the deadening ether that still charms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 209
Increasing still in heart, and pleasant sense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 351
Of which the throbs were born. This still alarm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 357
Still brooding o'er the cadence of his lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 456
Of this still region all his winter-sleep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 480
On soft Adonis' shoulders, made him still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 521
So still obey the guiding hand that fends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 574
And, when all were clear vanish'd, still he caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 583
Yet still I feel immortal! O my love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 686
Full well I feel thou wouldst not leave me. Still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 751
Able to face an owl's, they still are dight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 10
And as I grew in years, still didst thou blend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 162
Dolphins were still my playmates; shapes unseen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 343
Unheard of yet; and it shall still its cries Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 576
But live and wither, cripple and still breathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 597
Still onward; still the splendour gradual swell'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 840
Still onward; still the splendour gradual swell'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 840
"Endymion! Ah! still wandering in the bands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 903
But still he slept. At last they interwove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1016
A higher summons:— still didst thou betake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 16
That I may pass in patience still speak: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 139
Join dance with shadowy Hours; while still the blast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 424
In swells unmitigated, still doth last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 425
Yet all is still within and desolate. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 528
Still fed by melting ice, he takes a draught— Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 535
My love is still for thee. The hour may come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 657
To listen and think of love. Still let me speak; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 689
Still let me dive into the joy I seek,— Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 690
Still is that fur as soft as when the lists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 13
Beyond its proper bound, yet still confined,— Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 79
Still am I sick of it: and though to-day Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 99
Still do I that most fierce destruction see, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 102
With every eve deeper and tenderer still ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 10
For power to speak; but still the ruddy tide Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 44
Gurgles through straiten'd banks, and still doth fan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 211
Its eyes, though wild, were still all dewy bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 289
Those dainties made to still an infant's cries: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 374
She drench'd away:— and still she comb'd, and kept Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 407
Sighing all day — and still she kiss'd, and wept. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 408
Still is the burthen sung — "O cruelty, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 503
Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia! Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 1
But the forgotten eye is still fast wedded to the ground— There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 21
Still dumb, ungrateful Nevis — still so cold! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C—, Line 20
Still dumb, ungrateful Nevis — still so cold! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C—, Line 20
Its cradle still are in the lake; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 19
Through the thought still spread beyond her: Fancy, Line 6
With a still , mysterious stealth: Fancy, Line 36
Here, your earth-born souls still speak Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 29
On the river — all's still , and the night's sleepy eye Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 10
She linger'd still . Meantime, across the moors, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 74
And still she slept an azure-lidded sleep, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 262
Her eyes were open, but she still beheld, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 298
While still her gaze on Porphyro would keep; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 304
'Tis dark: the iced gusts still rave and beat: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 327
Save now and then the still footfall The Eve of St. Mark, Line 58
Untired she read; her shadow still The Eve of St. Mark, Line 83
No — yet still stedfast, still unchangeable, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 9
No — yet still stedfast, still unchangeable, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 9
Still , still to hear her tender-taken breath, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 13
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 13
Still as the silence round about his lair; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 5
A stream went voiceless by, still deadened more Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 11
And still these two were postured motionless, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 85
The frozen God still couchant on the earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 87
But one of the whole mammoth-brood still kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 164
Still sat, still snuff'd the incense, teeming up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 167
Still sat, still snuff'd the incense, teeming up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 167
While still the dazzling globe maintain'd eclipse, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 288
Until it ceas'd; and still he kept them wide: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 352
And still they were the same bright, patient stars. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 353
Their clenched teeth still clench'd, and all their limbs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 24
As though in pain; for still upon the flint Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 50
More horrid still . Above a sombre cliff Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 86
Affrighted, kept her still , and let him pass Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 99
Low-ebb'd still hid it up in shallow gloom;— Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 136
And feedeth still , more comely than itself? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 219
And still it cried, ' Apollo! young Apollo! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 293
Came booming thus, while still upon his arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 307
Still without intermission speaking thus: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 326
Our brightest brother, still is undisgraced— Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 344
And they beheld, while still Hyperion's name Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 347
Lift up their heads, as still the whisper pass'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 58
Or liker still to one who should take leave Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 127
Like a bat's, still wandering, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 8
And the beams of still Vesper, when winds are all whist, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 98
O soft embalmer of the still midnight, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 1
Save me from curious conscience, that still hoards Sonnet to Sleep, Line 11
And ready still past kisses to outnumber Ode to Psyche, Line 19
Fame, like a wayward girl, will still be coy On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 1
And the ripe plum still wears its dim attire, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 11
Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— Ode to a Nightingale, Line 59
Past the near meadows, over the still stream, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 76
Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 1
For ever warm and still to be enjoy'd, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 26
Still understand me, King of Hungary, Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 140
Still weep amid the wild Hungarian camp, Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 196
Still give me leave to wonder that the Prince Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 2
Still to rejoice that 'twas a German arm Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 4
Still it must not be known, good Sigifred; Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 10
While I, least guilty, am an outcast still , Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 84
And still remember, I repent in pain Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 116
I still must mourn. The fair Auranthe mine! Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 140
The King — aye, now our King,— but still your slave, Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 8
Still with the dews of piety, this meek lady Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
Still in extremes! No, they must not be loose. Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 235
No! Do I? Surely I am still to learn Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 113
Against Erminia. Silent? Be so still ; Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
Still very sick, my lord; but now I went, Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 1
His eyes are fix'd still on the open doors, Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 64
Still whole. I have surviv'd. My arm is strong,— Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 134
As Proserpine still weeps for her Sicilian air. Lamia, PART I, Line 63
Still shone her crown; that vanish'd, also she Lamia, PART I, Line 165
Sweet days a lovely graduate, still unshent, Lamia, PART I, Line 198
And still the cup was full,— while he, afraid Lamia, PART I, Line 253
To see her still , and singing so sweet lays; Lamia, PART I, Line 323
That, while it smote, still guaranteed to save. Lamia, PART I, Line 339
Saving a tythe which love still open kept, Lamia, PART II, Line 24
As still I do. Hast any mortal name, Lamia, PART II, Line 88
And shut the chamber up, close, hush'd and still , Lamia, PART II, Line 143
To the high roof, still mimick'd as they rose Lamia, PART II, Line 181
"Fool! Fool!" repeated he, while his eyes still Lamia, PART II, Line 295
And still more, later flowers for the bees, To Autumn, Line 9
Still was more plenty than the fabled horn The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 35
My power, which to me is still a curse, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 243
Still swooning vivid through my globed brain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 245
A stream went voiceless by, still deaden'd more The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 315
With such remorseless speed still come new woes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 366
I look'd upon them; still they were the same; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 385
The frozen God still bending to the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 386
Clouds still with shadowy moisture haunt the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 420
Still suck their fill of light from sun and moon, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 421
Still buds the tree, and still the sea-shores murmur. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 422
Still buds the tree, and still the sea-shores murmur. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 422
Moan, moan; for still I thaw — or give me help: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 430
Still fix'd he sat beneath the sable trees, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 446
But one of our whole eagle-brood still keeps The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 13
Still sits, still snuffs the incense teeming up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 16
Still sits, still snuffs the incense teeming up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 16
A mighty soldier. Does he still hold out? King Stephen ACT I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 34
He shames our victory. His valour still King Stephen ACT I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 35
They wept, he sinn'd, and still he would sin on, The Jealousies, Line 15
In husband's company, but still employ'd The Jealousies, Line 113
Pale was his face, he still look'd very ill: The Jealousies, Line 608
Farewell! farewell! and if for ever! still The Jealousies, Line 610
Turban'd with smoke, which still away did reek, The Jealousies, Line 664
Still emptied, at meet distance, here and there, The Jealousies, Line 743
" Still ' Bellanaine!' they shouted, while we glide The Jealousies, Line 748
 
WELL....104
We well might drop a tear for him, and Burns. To George Felton Mathew, Line 71
Thine ear, and find thy gentle heart; so well Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 3
Until his heart is well nigh over wound, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 8
And 'tis right just, for well Apollo knows To My Brother George (epistle), Line 45
That well you know to honour:— "Life's very toys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 128
'Tis perhaps as well that it should be to borrow Sleep and Poetry, Line 324
The very sense of where I was might well Sleep and Poetry, Line 396
O'er which it well might take a pleasant sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 109
A melancholy spirit well might win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 98
Gave temperate sweets to that well —wooing sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 101
With April's tender younglings: next, well trimm'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 138
Of logs piled solemnly.— Ah, well —a-day, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 183
At which I wondered greatly, knowing well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 556
To answer; feeling well that breathed words Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 712
Far as the slabbed margin of a well , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 870
Smiling in the clear well . My heart did leap Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 896
In sacred custom, that he well nigh fear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 258
To watch his slumber through. 'Tis well nigh pass'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 488
With love — he — but alas! too well I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 550
A well -known voice sigh'd, "Sweetest, here am I!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 714
Full well I feel thou wouldst not leave me. Still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 751
Follow'd their languid mazes, till well nigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 929
My soul page after page, till well -nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
Cupid well -natured, my Adonis kind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 919
Where is my lovely mistress? Well -away! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1011
Too well awake, he feels the panting side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 440
Ah, what perplexity! Ah, well a day! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 447
'Tis well nigh past man's search their hearts to see; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 493
But few have ever felt how calm and well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 524
Through me the shepherd realm shall prosper well ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 863
Well then, I see there is no little bird, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 877
But I behold thine eyes' well -memoried light; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 6
Might as well be in a cloud. Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 4
And Junius Brutus pretty well so so, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 11
You know it well enough, where it doth seem Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 33
Moods of one's mind! You know I hate them well , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 106
They could not sit at meals but feel how well Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 5
His bitter thoughts to other, well nigh mad Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 164
"I know what was, I feel full well what is, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 313
Pale limbs at bottom of a crystal well ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 364
For here, in truth, it doth not well belong Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 390
But one, whose gentleness did well accord Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 395
With tears, as chilly as a dripping well , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 406
Spirits of grief, sing not your " Well -a-way!" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 485
O horrible! to lose the sight of well remember'd face, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 33
On his neck his well -grown locks, Not Aladdin magian, Line 16
A cave of young earth dragons — well , my boy, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 55
Well ! I'm a craniologist, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 17
My terrace is well bowered with oranges. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 34
All the house is asleep, but we know very well Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 2
Hath fled to her bower, well knowing I want Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 14
Well done — now those lips and a flowery seat: Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 19
And as she mutter'd " Well -a — well-a-day!" The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 111
And as she mutter'd "Well-a - well -a-day!" The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 111
Saving of thy sweet self; if thou think'st well The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 341
The silent streets were crowded well The Eve of St. Mark, Line 14
What your poor servants know but too, too well ? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 23
Than he prick'd up his ears and said, " Well done; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 76
Well done — for by what Mr. Dwarfy said, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 81
Hast sifted well the atom-universe; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 183
That is the top of sovereignty. Mark well ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 205
Cold as a bubbling well ; let faint-lipp'd shells, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 19
Why should I tell thee what thou so well seest? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 84
Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well Ode to a Nightingale, Line 73
Well ! hast told Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 1b
Unto thine anger I might well have spoken, Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 28
Well said, Sir Albert. Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 93a
With one of his well -pleas'd Olympian oaths, Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 14
Well , sir! What! Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 17b
Let me look well : your features are the same, Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 39
Well ! you shall have free passport through the gates. Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 114
I have. Well ? Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 34a
Believe me, I am well nigh sure— Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 146a
You well may laugh and banter. What a fool Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 40
Well , Ludolph, what say you? Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 35b
Well , I give up, and save my prayers for heaven! Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 255
Well , well I know what ugly jeopardy Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 1
Well, well I know what ugly jeopardy Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 1
Well , suppose this Albert here; Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 38b
That I should claim your pity! Art not well ? Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
Yes, lady, well . Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 110a
You know full well what makes me look so pale. Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 112
Well ? What ails thee, child? Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 115a
He dies! 'Tis well she do not advertise Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 14
Full and majestic; it is well enough, Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 83
That's not well done.— Where is she? Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 186
He would return that way, as well she knew, Lamia, PART I, Line 221
To hear her whisper woman's lore so well ; Lamia, PART I, Line 325
Because he mused beyond her, knowing well Lamia, PART II, Line 38
Keen, cruel, perceant, stinging: she, as well Lamia, PART II, Line 301
"Alas, my friend! your coat sits very well : Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 18
And been well nurtured in his mother tongue. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 15
Ply well the rowel with faint trembling heels, King Stephen ACT I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 11
We are well breathed,— follow! King Stephen ACT I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 19a
A meaner summoner might do as well King Stephen ACT I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 23
It may read well , but sure 'tis out of date King Stephen ACT I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 33
For ruin and dismay they well foresaw, The Jealousies, Line 12
And mention ('tis as well ) the torture of the wasp." The Jealousies, Line 198
It goes against your conscience — good! Well , don't. The Jealousies, Line 462
Tit-bits for Phoebus!- yes, you well may smile. The Jealousies, Line 563
For ever fare thee well !"— and then he fell The Jealousies, Line 611
For of superfluous diamonds I as well may thin it. The Jealousies, Line 621
Well , let us see,— tenth book and chapter nine,— The Jealousies, Line 640
So far so well ,— The Jealousies, Line 787b
 
WILL (noun form)....10
Methinks it now is at my will to start Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 695
To pluck thee from me? And, of thine own will , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 750
My own dear will , 'twould be a deadly bane. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 960
I tried in fear the pinions of my will . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 390
Be my award. Things cannot to the will Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 76
In will , in action free, companionship, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 210
Approving all, she faded at self— will , Lamia, PART II, Line 142
Be poet's or fanatic's will be known The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 17
Will I be kind to thee for thy good will . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 242
The other he could wave about at will ; The Jealousies, Line 607

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Published @ RC

March 2005