Os-Oz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
OSIER'D...........1
In baskets of bright osier'd gold were brought Lamia, Part II, Line 217
 
OSIERS............1
Beside the osiers of a rivulet, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 34
 
OSIRIAN...........1
"I saw Osirian Egypt kneel adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 257
 
OTAHEITAN.........1
Or how I pace my Otaheitan mule. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 14
 
OTAHEITE..........1
O king of Otaheite - though a mule, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 79
 
OTHELLO'S.........1
Anthropophagi in Othello's mood, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 10
 
OTHER.............81
Be jealous that the foot of other wight Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 59
That each at other look'd half staringly; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 149
To see no other verdure that its own; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 2
To feel no other breezes than are blown Happy is England! I could be content, Line 3
Who at each other tilt in playful quarrel, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 28
And on the other side, outspread, is seen To My Brother George (epistle), Line 131
Look'd at each other with a wild surmise- On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 13
And other spirits there are standing apart Addressed to the Same, Line 9
And other pulses. Hear ye not the hum Addressed to the Same, Line 12
With honors; nor had any other care Sleep and Poetry, Line 179
In other ages - cold and sacred busts Sleep and Poetry, Line 357
Smiled at each other . Happy he who trusts Sleep and Poetry, Line 358
Thee must I praise above all other glories I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 123
Young men, and maidens at each other gaz'd I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 231
Calling the people to some other prayers, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 2
Some other gloominess, more dreadful cares, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 3
The while they pelt each other on the crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 275
A world of other unguess'd offices. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 370
In other regions, past the scanty bar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 124
They trembled to each other .- Helicon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 716
All other depths are shallow: essences, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 905
Into the bloom of heaven: other light, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 909
Ever pursued, the other strove to shun- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 928
With rapture to the other side of the world! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 250
Sprang to each other madly; and the rest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 794
Speechless they eyed each other , and about Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 803
In harmless tendril they each other chain'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 935
Didst thou not after other climates call, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 142
Shall feel the other half so utterly!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 310
And this is sure thine other softling - this Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 316
Leant to each other trembling, and sat so Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 329
Let us ay love each other ; let us fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 626
Nor at each other gaz'd, but heavily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 768
That every other minute vex and please: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 4
The other part two thousand years from him Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 43
And many other juts of aged stone Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 47
It soothed each to be the other by; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 6
But to each other dream, and nightly weep. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 8
There is no other crime, no mad assail Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 155
His bitter thoughts to other , well nigh mad Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 164
Clearly she saw, as other eyes would know Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 363
O Echo, Echo, on some other day, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 483
In the other There was a naughty boy, Line 35
Hadst figur'd t' other day, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 22
Or any other wondrous thing Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 6
Where your other souls are joying, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 27
The other upon Saturn's bended neck Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 45
Meanwhile in other realms big tears were shed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 158
Where other hearts are sick of the same bruise; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 104
No other sound succeeds; but ceasing here, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 124
Its strain, when other harmonies, stopt short, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 127
Each several one against the other three, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 143
And thousand other signs of purer life; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 211
Are there not other regions than this isle? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 96
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 24
Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 47
And one behind the other stepp'd serene, Ode on Indolence, Line 3
When shifted round to see the other side; Ode on Indolence, Line 6
But I have other greetings than mine own Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 134
Father and son each other repossess. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 36
To thank thee; here congratulate each other ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 250
Had plac'd you in some other custody! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 263
The other cursing low, whose voice I knew Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 123
Each other - forget her!- Our miseries Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 44
There are no other means. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 34b
We did not tilt each other ,- that's a blessing,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 53
And of that other ridge whose barren back Lamia, Part I, Line 177
Use other speech than looks; bidding him raise Lamia, Part I, Line 304
That they might see each other while they almost slept; Lamia, Part II, Line 25
What mortal hath a prize, that other men Lamia, Part II, Line 57
With other pageants: but this fair unknown Lamia, Part II, Line 110
her, to whose wedding, amongst other guests, came Apollonius; who, by some Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Other men here: but I am here alone." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 160
The other vexes it." Then shouted I The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 202
Of other crisped spice-wood - then again The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 236
The other upon Saturn's bended neck The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 347
Let me hear other groans, and trumpets blown The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 432
Bigger than stags,- a moon,- with other mysteries. The Jealousies, Line 450
The other he could wave about at will; The Jealousies, Line 607
Marching a-row, each other slipshod treads; The Jealousies, Line 769
Of cinder wenches meet and soil each other ; The Jealousies, Line 771
 
OTHER'S...........6
They gave each other's cheeks; with all their sighs, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 145
And how they kist each other's tremulous eyes: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 146
To see the brightness in each other's eyes; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 233
The other's fierceness. Through the air they flew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 347
The inward fragrance of each other's heart. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 76
The one he struck stone blind, the other's eyes wox dim. In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 9
 
OTHERS............8
With solemn sound,- and thousand others more, How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 12
For others , good or bad, hatred and tears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 4
With others of the sisterhood. Hard by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 418
When others were all blind; and were I given Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 913
While others pass'd their idle days O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 47
They're like the others ! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 96
[Exeunt GERSA and ALBERT, with others . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 160
Sprinkled with golden crescents, others bright Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 88
 
OTHERWHERE........1
But she saw not: her heart was otherwhere : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 62
 
OTHERWISE.........1
to behold. The young man, a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet, able to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
OTHO..............36
OTHO THE GREAT, Emperor of Germany Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 1
ALBERT, a Knight, favoured by Otho Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 4
ERMINIA, Niece of Otho Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 14
Otho ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 20
To most believing Otho ; and so help'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
From no less man than Otho , who has sent Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 135
Martial music. Enter, from the outer gate, OTHO , Nobles, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
God save illustrious Otho ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 6b
None, mighty Otho . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 37a
Most mighty Otho ? Will not my great host Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
Thank you, fair lady - Otho !- Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 118
Then I retire, so generous Otho please, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 137
'Twill not be Gersa's fault. Otho , farewell! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
Imperial Otho ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 186a
OTHO . Exeunt severally. The scene closes on them. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
If Otho knew Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 11b
I know the clear truth; so would Otho see, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 86
He's very close to Otho , a tight leach! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 56
Enter OTHO and CONRAD. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 60
You needs must be. Carry it swift to Otho ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 73
The eagle Otho to beat off assault. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
Enter, as from the Marriage, OTHO , LUDOLPH, AURANTHE, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Otho ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 56a
Who calls on Otho ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 56b
You again, Duke? Justice, most noble Otho ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 64
Great Otho , I claim justice- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 90a
Of a just judge, and that will Otho be. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 105
Otho ! thou father of the people call'd, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 118
Illustrious Otho , stay! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 172b
[ OTHO rises. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 217b
[Exeunt OTHO and Nobles; ALBERT following. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 245a
Otho calls me his lion,- should I blush Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 42
Your generous father, most illustrious Otho , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 61
Here, underneath this roof where Otho breathes,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 112
OTHO , ERMINIA, ETHELBERT, and a Physician, discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
[Enter OTHO , ERMINIA, ETHELBERT, SIGIFRED, and Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 140
 
OTHO'S............3
Now I am Otho's favorite, his dear friend, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 43
Kept danger all aloof from Otho's head, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 22
To Otho's feet! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 2a
 
OTTOMAN...........1
"Fetch me that ottoman , and prithee keep The Jealousies, Line 427
 
OUGHT.............6
Where never yet was ought more earthly seen Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 53
It cannot be that ought will work him harm." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 130
That ought to frighten into hooded shame Addressed to Haydon, Line 7
Her eye-lashes may be, for ought I know, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 4
More than a brother of a sister ought , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 146
Poison, as every staunch true-born Imaian ought . The Jealousies, Line 81
 
OUNCE.............2
The gentle robin, like a pard or ounce , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 104
No ounce of man in thy mortality? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 85
 
OURS..............1
Than ours , a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 48
 
OURSELF...........1
When the whole kingdom, centred in ourself , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 65
 
OURSELVES.........4
Ourselves whole summers by a river glade; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 811
Ourselves at once to vengeance; we might die; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 758
Found ourselves ruling new and beauteous realms. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 201
And used, as we ourselves have just now said, The Jealousies, Line 627
 
OUTBLACKENS.......1
Outblackens Erebus, and the full-cavern'd earth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 121
 
OUTBURNT..........1
That they are dying like an outburnt lamp; Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 11
 
OUTBURST..........1
The storm, and through chill aguish gloom outburst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 675
 
OUTCAST...........1
While I, least guilty, am an outcast still, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 84
 
OUTER.............2
Into the outer courts of Neptune's state: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 854
Martial music. Enter, from the outer gate, OTHO, Nobles, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
 
OUTFACES..........1
What stare outfaces now my silver moon! To Fanny, Line 18
 
OUTGUSH'D.........1
On either side outgush'd , with misty spray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 918
 
OUTLAW............1
Gone, the tough-belted outlaw Robin Hood, Line 35
 
OUTLET............1
Of a wide outlet , fathomless and dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 272
 
OUTNUMBER.........1
And ready still past kisses to outnumber Ode to Psyche, Line 19
 
OUTRAUGHT.........1
And meet so nearly, that with wings outraught , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 866
 
OUTREACH'D........1
In courteous fountains to all cups outreach'd ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 926
 
OUTRIGHT..........1
If men, in court and camp, lie not outright , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 35
 
OUTSKIRT..........1
Through sunny meadows, that outskirt the side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 250
 
OUTSPRANG.........1
So from the turf outsprang two steeds jet-black, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 343
 
OUTSPREAD.........6
And on the other side, outspread , is seen To My Brother George (epistle), Line 131
With outspread wings the Naiad Zephyr courts, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 6
Upon the sides of Latmos was outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 63
Of lucid depth the floor, and far outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 879
Upon the spiritless mist have they outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 401
Just where her falling hair might be outspread , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 81
 
OUTSPREADED.......1
Rose, one by one, till all outspreaded were; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 287
 
OUTSPRINGS........1
Whence ever and anon the jay outsprings , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 36
 
OUTSTEPPING.......1
Petrarch, outstepping from the shady green, Sleep and Poetry, Line 389
 
OUTSTRETCH........1
Doom'd with enfeebled carcase to outstretch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 690
 
OUTSTRETCH'D......1
Or, on the wavy grass outstretch'd supinely, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 7
 
OUTSTRIP..........1
You far outstrip my spleen in this affair. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 99
 
OUTSTRIPT.........1
Full leav'd, the forest had outstript , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 45
 
OUTVIEING.........1
Outvieing all the buds in Flora's diadem. Imitation of Spenser, Line 36
 
OUTWARD...........1
Of things as nimbly as the outward eye The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 305
 
OUTWEAR...........1
And with sick longing all the night outwear , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 23
 
OUTWITTED.........1
A poor court-bankrupt, outwitted and lost, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
 
OUTWORN...........1
The lonely turret, shatter'd, and outworn , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 38
 
OUZEL.............1
Dew-dabbled on their stalks, the ouzel sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 683
 
OVEN..............1
Of these dull boughs,- this oven of dark thickets,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 20
 
OVER..............68
Yet over the steep, whence the mountain stream rushes, To Some Ladies, Line 5
Over the genius loving heart, a feeling To George Felton Mathew, Line 9
Over which thine eyebrows, leaning, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 7
Until his heart is well nigh over wound, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 8
Now over them he goes with hasty trip, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 69
Over a knightly brow; while they went by Calidore: A Fragment, Line 131
Over their beauties, earthly, or sublime: How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 4
And over me the grass shall be smooth shaven; Sleep and Poetry, Line 279
Over some precipice; let the hot sun Sleep and Poetry, Line 302
With over pleasure - many, many more, Sleep and Poetry, Line 345
Over the trippings of a little child: Sleep and Poetry, Line 369
Of over thinking had that moment gone Sleep and Poetry, Line 383
For over them was seen a free display Sleep and Poetry, Line 392
necessarily taste in going over the following pages. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Over the hills at every nightfall went. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 72
Each having a white wicker over brimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 137
Green'd over April's lap? No howling sad Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 217
That come a swooning over hollow grounds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 286
From stumbling over stumps and hillocks small; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 418
Pointed its beak over the fringed bank; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 424
A patient watch over the stream that creeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 447
'Tis blue, and over -spangled with a million Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 629
Over the darkest, lushest blue-bell bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 631
When last the wintry gusts gave over strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 920
No more will I count over , link by link, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 978
Over a bower, where little space he stood; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 381
Over his waned corse, the tremulous shower Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 482
And doubling over head their little fists Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 509
Over his sullen eyes: I saw him throw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 564
Over his nested young: but all is dark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 721
Over eclipsing eyes: and at the last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 877
Over the vanish'd bliss. Ah! what is it sings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 932
And over it a sighing voice expire. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 422
And then she hover'd over me, and stole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 446
As over them a gnarled staff she shook. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 508
Let me sob over thee my last adieus, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 587
And over Glaucus held his blessing hands.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 902
Slants over blue dominion. Thy bright team Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 955
"And as I sat, over the light blue hills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 193
" Over wide streams and mountains great we went, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 239
Over the hill and over the dale, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 1
Over the hill and over the dale, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 1
And over the bourn to Dawlish- Over the hill and over the dale, Line 2
Over the pathless waves towards him bows. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 96
And as he thus over his passion hung, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 197
Hung over her sweet basil evermore, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 423
And kingdom over all the realms of verse Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 7
When we meet over sea and o'er land Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 7
Not over fat There was a naughty boy, Line 77
And over the hush'd carpet, silent, stept, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 251
Over the fiery frontier of my realms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 247
From over -strained might. Releas'd, he fled Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 263
Forward he stoop'd over the airy shore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 356
"Or shall we listen to the over -wise, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 309
Or to the over -foolish, Giant-Gods? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 310
"How cam'st thou over the unfooted sea? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 50
Past the near meadows, over the still stream, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 76
Over head - look over head, Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 9
Over head - look over head, Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 9
Over my life? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 118a
I would I were so over -fortunate, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 68
For you, whose wings so shadow over me Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 138
Over the solitary hills he fared, Lamia, Part I, Line 233
Over these hills and vales, where no joy is,- Lamia, Part I, Line 277
Over heads and ears, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 15b
For giving way, so over fashionably, The Jealousies, Line 106
She's very delicate,- not over tall,- The Jealousies, Line 476
Over her woman's weakness. ' Where,' cried I, The Jealousies, Line 780
 
OVERACT...........1
I pr'ythee, Conrad, do not overact Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 30
 
OVERAW'D..........1
With a mind self- overaw'd , Fancy, Line 26
 
OVERBEAR..........1
To overbear and crumble this to nought? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 144
 
OVERBRIMS.........1
My wine overbrims a whole summer; Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 6
 
OVERCAME..........1
Of joy and grief at once. Grief overcame , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 289
 
OVERCAST..........2
All death-shadows, and glooms that overcast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 981
In pity of her love, so overcast . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 500
 
OVERFLOW..........1
Distracted with the richest overflow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 805
 
OVERGONE..........1
After a thousand mazes overgone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 387
 
OVERGROWN.........1
Find a fresh sward beneath it, overgrown Sleep and Poetry, Line 258
 
OVERGROWTH........1
The pipy hemlock to strange overgrowth ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 241
 
OVERHEAD..........2
Its own sweet grief at parting. Overhead , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 939
Blackening on every side, and overhead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 630
 
OVERJOY'D.........1
"Then," cried the young Endymion, overjoy'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 712
 
OVERLOOK'D........1
She overlook'd things that I scarce could tell. Sleep and Poetry, Line 395
 
OVERLOOKING.......1
Clear streams, smooth lakes, and overlooking towers. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 68
 
OVERMEEK..........1
And think that I would not be overmeek To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 5
 
OVERPAST..........1
And there, ere many days be overpast , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 594
 
OVERROASTED.......1
When the pig is overroasted , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 13
 
OVERSHADOWETH.....1
From jagged trunks, and overshadoweth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 233
 
OVERSHADOWS.......1
A power overshadows thee! Oh, brave! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 759
 
OVERSMITTEN.......1
Though with their grace I was not oversmitten , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 102
 
OVERSTEPT.........1
And faery Zendervester overstept ; The Jealousies, Line 14
 
OVERSTRAINS.......1
How Glocester overstrains his courtesy King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 37
 
OVERSWEEP.........1
And let a lush laburnum oversweep them, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 31
 
OVERTEEM..........1
That never tongue, although it overteem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 575
 
OVERTOASTED.......1
And the cheese is overtoasted , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 15
 
OVERTOP...........1
That overtop your mountains; whether come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 199
 
OVERTWINED........1
A filbert hedge with wild briar overtwined , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 35
 
OVERWHELM.........3
O for ten years, that I may overwhelm Sleep and Poetry, Line 96
Or more complete to overwhelm surmise? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 522
You may not, sire; 'twould overwhelm him quite, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 17
 
OVERWHELMING......2
And in the savage overwhelming lost, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 704
And shudder'd; for the overwhelming voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 303
 
OVERWING..........1
My happy love will overwing all bounds! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 814
 
OVERWOVE..........1
Where nested was an arbour, overwove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 431
 
OVERWROUGHT.......2
And my slain spirit, overwrought with fright, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 559
Of marble men and maidens overwrought , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 42
 
OWE...............4
I partly owe to him: and thus, the chimes Sleep and Poetry, Line 350
I owe to the kind poet who has set On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 5
All gentle folks who owe a grudge All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 1
Conrad, I owe thee much. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 179a
 
OWL...............4
But wherefore this? What care, though owl did fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 22
The owl , for all his feathers, was a-cold; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 2
Your mournful Psyche, nor the downy owl Ode on Melancholy, Line 7
She frown'd; a monstrous owl across us flies The Jealousies, Line 655
 
OWL'S.............1
Able to face an owl's , they still are dight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 10
 
OWLET.............1
In passing here, his owlet pinions shook; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 560
 
OWLET'S...........1
And think of yellow leaves, of owlet's cry, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 182
 
OWLS..............1
Before he went to live with owls and bats, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 1
 
OWN...............96
To regions of his own his genius true Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 12
With its own drooping buds, but very white; To George Felton Mathew, Line 44
Of our own Alfred, of Helvetian Tell; To George Felton Mathew, Line 67
In the midst of their own brightness; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 5
And from her own pure self no joy dissembling, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 17
And start with awe at mine own strange pretence. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 64
To see no other verdure that its own ; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 2
And with proud breast his own white shadow crowning; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 2
And echo back the voice of thine own tongue? Sleep and Poetry, Line 52
That my own soul has to itself decreed. Sleep and Poetry, Line 98
'Tis might half slumb'ring on its own right arm. Sleep and Poetry, Line 237
With their own sweet delight, and ever nestle I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 76
To woo its own sad image into nearness: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 174
The incense went to her own starry dwelling. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 198
My will from its own purpose? who say, "Stand," To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 10
Will find at once a region of his own , On The Story of Rimini, Line 11
Of our own vallies: so I will begin Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 39
Each one his own anticipated bliss. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 373
On her own couch, new made of flower leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 438
With my own steed from Araby; pluck down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 534
Its own sweet grief at parting. Overhead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 939
Stood stupefied with my own empty folly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 961
Itself, and strives its own delights to hide- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 344
To pluck thee from me? And, of thine own will, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 750
Uplift thee; nor for very shame can own Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 778
My own dear will, 'twould be a deadly bane. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 960
Shakes hand with our own Ceres; every sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 38
How his own goddess was past all things fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 190
Her lips were all my own , and - ah, ripe sheaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 272
Into mine own : for why? thou openest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 295
And one's own image from the bottom peep? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 332
No, nor the Eolian twang of Love's own bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 973
To what my own full thoughts had made too tender, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 74
Like an own babe I nurse thee on my breast: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 281
Thine own fair bosom, and I am so near! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 317
Search my most hidden breast! By truth's own tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 458
Came it? It does not seem my own , and I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 476
And horror! kiss'd his own - he was alone. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 510
Its own existence, of remotest glooms. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 515
In thine own depth. Hail, gentle Carian! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 545
For my own sullen conquering: to him Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 619
Has my own soul conspired: so my story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 644
With my own fancies garlands of sweet life, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 750
Be gods of your own rest imperial. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 823
Peona, mayst return to me. I own Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 867
Tender soever, but is Jove's own care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 878
So after my own heart! I knew, I knew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 881
His own particular fright, so these three felt: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 890
Of my own breast thou shalt, beloved youth!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 981
Rather than shadow our own soul's daytime Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 70
Her from her own fair youth, and pleasures gay, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 463
Now fills, O Burns, a space in thine own room, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 2
That gods might know my own particular taste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 4
With a silken thread of my own hand's weaving: I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 4
Her own lute thou wilt see: no time to spare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 175
She smil'd at her own beauteous face again. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 54
Away from my own bosom: I have left Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 113
Jarr'd his own golden region; and before Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 224
Could glimmer on their tears; where their own groans Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 6
Thus grew it up - "Not in my own sad breast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 129
Which is its own great judge and searcher out, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 130
Upon its own producer, forthwith touch'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 196
In midst of his own brightness, like the bulk Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 373
Even into thine own soft-conched ear: Ode to Psyche, Line 4
I see, and sing, by my own eyes inspired. Ode to Psyche, Line 43
She will be bound with garlands of her own . If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 14
But I have other greetings than mine own Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 134
By your own healing presence, and that too, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 132
The portals of my state; and, for my own Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 163
I have mine own particular comments on't; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 43
You have your own perhaps. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 44a
My sword to my own throat, rather than held Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
Of your own will? You pleas'd to send for me. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 29
"He, for his own Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 59b
Prais'd be the heavens, I now dare own myself! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 94
Ask your own soldiers. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 97a
And you dare own your name. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 97b
Have his own say; read me some silly creed Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 42
So keep your wits at work, for your own sake, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 64
Myself, as fits one wailing her own death,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 94
But make your own heart monitor, and save Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 120
In my feast; my injury is all my own , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 136
Though my own knell they be! This cannot last! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 43
They know their own thoughts best. As for the third, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 58
Prick'd his own swollen veins! Where is my page? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 126
For Proserpine return'd to her own fields, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 37
Stung my own ears - I strove hard to escape The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 127
Is thy own safety; thou hast dated on The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 144
Of their own power. A long awful time The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 384
But my own weak mortality, I bore The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 389
That thou would wish thine own heart dry of blood, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 5
That ministers should join in it, I own , The Jealousies, Line 141
Backwards and downwards from his own two pair: The Jealousies, Line 310
(I own it,)- have made too free with his wine; The Jealousies, Line 614
And progresses through its own labyrinth; The Jealousies, Line 726
Plain in our own original mood and tense, The Jealousies, Line 791
 
OWN'D.............2
And then they own'd themselves without a blush, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 81
Own'd they the lovelorn piteous appeal: Lamia, Part II, Line 257
 
OWNER.............1
The owner out of it; show him a-" "Peace! The Jealousies, Line 60
 
OWNS..............1
But his sagacious eye an inmate owns : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 366
 
OWRE..............1
Out owre the mountains, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 2
 
OX................2
As grazing ox unworried in the meads; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 67
Make lean and lank the starv'd ox while he feeds; What can I do to drive away, Line 41
 
OXUS..............1
By Oxus or in Ganges' sacred isles. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 60
 
OYSTER............1
To the poor patient oyster , where it sleeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 67


Published @ RC

March 2005