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Keats Concordance
 
P'RHAPS...........1
P'rhaps one or two, whose lives have patient wings, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 14
 
PAC'D.............3
While legion'd fairies pac'd the coverlet, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 168
He pac'd away the pleasant hours of ease Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 194
Towards the altar sober- pac'd I went, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 93
 
PACE..............7
See with what a stately pace Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 56
Or how I pace my Otaheitan mule. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 14
Let not her steeds with drowsy-footed pace Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 33
And will be sweeter, when ye see her pace Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 84
But lets it sometimes pace abroad majestical, Lamia, Part II, Line 59
Slow, heavy, deadly was my pace : the cold The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 129
And with slow pace approach our fallen King, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 334
 
PACED.............2
Of our dull, uninspired, snail- paced lives. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 25
Silently paced about, and as she went, Lamia, Part II, Line 134
 
PACES.............7
Light-footed damsels move with gentle paces Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 41
And staidly paces higher up, and higher, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 61
And paces leisurely down amber plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 551
His paces back into the temple's chief; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 298
'Twas with slow, languid paces , and face hid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 872
To a few paces ; not at all surmised Lamia, Part I, Line 346
He paces through the pleasant hours of ease, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 38
 
PACIFIC...........1
He star'd at the Pacific - and all his men On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 12
 
PACING............1
I set her on my pacing steed, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 21
 
PADDED............1
Though you've padded his night-cap, O sweet Isabel. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 4
 
PADDLES...........1
Paddles a little tune and sings 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 46
 
PADDLING..........1
Young Calidore is paddling o'er the lake; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 1
 
PAEAN.............1
Conjure thee to receive our humble paean , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 305
 
PAGAN.............1
On land, on seas, in pagan -chains, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 91
 
PAGAN'S...........1
Than that same quick-eyed pagan's . By the saints, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 45
 
PAGE..............28
The classic page - the muse's lore. Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 20
While Tasso's page was floating in a breeze To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 30
My soul page after page, till well-nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
My soul page after page , till well-nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
And cannot speak it. The first page I read Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 87
Except in such a page where Theseus' spouse Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 95
Go, pretty page , and in her ear Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 8
Go, pretty page , and soothly tell,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 12
Untir'd she read the legend page The Eve of St. Mark, Line 89
Page Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 12
Go, page his dusty heels upon a march, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 81
Will you make Titan play the lackey- page Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 60
Enter LUDOLPH and Page . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
[Exit Page . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D.a to Line 18b
[Enter Page . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 114
Enter LUDOLPH and Page . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D.b to Line 16
Enter LUDOLPH, followed by SIGIFRED and Page . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 22
Prick'd his own swollen veins! Where is my page ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 126
Youngster! Page ! go bid them drag her to me! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 178
[Exit Page . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 182
[The doors open. Enter Page . Several women are seen Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
Backbiting all the world in ev'ry page ; The Jealousies, Line 95
"At the same time, Eban,"- (this was his page , The Jealousies, Line 181
Quoth the dark page ; "Oh no!" return'd the Swiss, The Jealousies, Line 281
Then facing right about, he saw the page , The Jealousies, Line 316
Replied the page ; "that little buzzing noise, The Jealousies, Line 330
There's Bertha Watson,- and Miss Bertha Page ,- The Jealousies, Line 376
Kill'd a man-cook, a page , and broke a jar, The Jealousies, Line 669
 
PAGE'S............1
After the page's story of the death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 4
 
PAGEANT...........2
Hence, pageant history! hence, gilded cheat! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 14
Like the old pageant of Aurora's train, The Jealousies, Line 578
 
PAGEANTRY.........2
Few, who with gorgeous pageantry enrobe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 36
Of indoor pageantry ; while syren whispers, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 53
 
PAGEANTS..........1
With other pageants : but this fair unknown Lamia, Part II, Line 110
 
PAGES.............8
Amid the pages , and the torches' glare, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 109
necessarily taste in going over the following pages . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
These sorry pages ; then the verse would soar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 719
Shut up thine olden pages , and be mute. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 4
[Enter, from the Castle, AURANTHE, followed by Pages holding Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
His pages ,- so they tell me,- to enquire Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 36
In the silent pages of our chroniclers. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 5
Then pages three and three; and next, slave-held, The Jealousies, Line 584
 
PAH...............1
"Monstrous affair! Pshaw! pah ! what ugly minx The Jealousies, Line 163
 
PAID..............4
"Thy vows were on a time to Nais paid : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 899
Since Merlin paid his Demon all the monstrous debt. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 171
Lest she should vanish ere his lip had paid Lamia, Part I, Line 254
Eban then paid his fare, and tiptoe went The Jealousies, Line 262
 
PAIL..............1
When a milk- pail is upset, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 5
 
PAILS.............1
Its delicate amber; and the dairy pails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 44
 
PAIN..............65
Should e'er unhappy love my bosom pain , To Hope, Line 25
Of charming my mind from the trammels of pain . On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 24
The downcast eye, repentant of the pain Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 4
At times, 'tis true, I've felt relief from pain To My Brother George (epistle), Line 113
Full of sweet desolation - balmy pain . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 162
Two bending laurel sprigs - 'tis nearly pain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 7
So do these wonders a most dizzy pain , On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 11
Pleasure is oft a visitant; but pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 906
From every wasting sigh, from every pain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 126
What! dost thou move? dost kiss? O bliss! O pain ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 773
O Oread-Queen! would that thou hadst a pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 961
Yes, in my boyhood, every joy and pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 160
To tell thee briefly all my joy and pain . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 317
Might seem a work of pain ; so not enough Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 382
I knelt with pain - reached out my hand - had grasp'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 671
O what a load of misery and pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 684
Imagination gave a dizzier pain . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1009
Amongst them? Feelest not a kindred pain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 62
Thou surely canst not bear a mind in pain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 811
A Delphian pain - Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 10
Oh! the sweetness of the pain ! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 23
By every lull to cool her infant's pain : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 36
"Love, Isabel!" said he, "I was in pain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 201
And seldom felt she any hunger- pain ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 468
All is cold beauty; pain is never done On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 8
And put thee to a little pain All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 27
Oh pain - for since the eagle's earliest scream Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 25
The music, yearning like a god in pain , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 56
Blissfully haven'd both from joy and pain ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 240
Say, wherefore did I laugh? O mortal pain ! Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 6
Though an immortal, she felt cruel pain : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 44
And listen'd in sharp pain for Saturn's voice. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 163
O monstrous forms! O effigies of pain ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 228
Heaving in pain , and horribly convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 27
As though in pain ; for still upon the flint Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 50
Upon the precincts of this nest of pain , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 90
Now comes the pain of truth, to whom 'tis pain; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 202
Now comes the pain of truth, to whom 'tis pain ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 202
Much pain have I for more than loss of realms: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 334
Listen'd in pain and pleasure at the birth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 66
During the pain Mnemosyne upheld Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 133
Where branched thoughts, new grown with pleasant pain , Ode to Psyche, Line 52
To cease upon the midnight with no pain , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 56
Pain had no sting, and pleasure's wreath no flower. Ode on Indolence, Line 18
Off! And none pass this way on pain of death! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 72
And still remember, I repent in pain Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 116
Me the great pain of telling. You must know. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 121
All pain but pity: thus the lone voice spake: Lamia, Part I, Line 37
She writh'd about, convuls'd with scarlet pain : Lamia, Part I, Line 154
Nothing but pain and ugliness were left. Lamia, Part I, Line 164
To unperplex bliss from its neighbour pain ; Lamia, Part I, Line 192
And pain my steps upon these flowers too rough, Lamia, Part I, Line 273
Swoon'd, murmuring of love, and pale with pain . Lamia, Part I, Line 289
Saw this with pain , so arguing a want Lamia, Part II, Line 35
Of sorrows at his words; at last with pain Lamia, Part II, Line 67
Every sole man hath days of joy and pain , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 172
The pain alone; the joy alone; distinct: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 174
Free from all pain , if wonder pain thee not." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 248
Free from all pain, if wonder pain thee not." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 248
Though an immortal, she felt cruel pain ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 346
O, O, the pain , the pain of feebleness. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 429
O, O, the pain, the pain of feebleness. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 429
Where roof'd in by black rocks they waste in pain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 462
O, the sweetness of the pain ! What can I do to drive away, Line 54
Your pulse is shocking, but I'll ease your pain ." The Jealousies, Line 426
 
PAIN'D............1
Thee thus, and weep for fondness - I am pain'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 822
 
PAINED............4
Walk'd dizzily away. Pained and hot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 904
Flushing his brow, and in his pained heart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 137
Fetter'd, in spite of pained loveliness; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 3
Thy girdle some fine zealous- pained nerve Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 95
 
PAINEST...........1
Spirit here that painest ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 2
 
PAINFUL...........7
Whereat was heard a noise of painful toil, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 522
There was a painful change, that nigh expell'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 300
And painful vile oblivion seals my eyes: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 87
This is a little painful ; just too much. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 45
Painful , clogg'd up and stagnate. Weigh this matter Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 186
Pensive, and full of painful jealousies Lamia, Part I, Line 33
Of painful blindness; leaving thee forlorn, Lamia, Part II, Line 282
 
PAINFULLY.........2
Touch raptur'd!- See how painfully I flow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 948
Nearly, momentously,- aye, painfully ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 59
 
PAINING...........3
Sweet paining on his ear: he sickly guess'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 856
Paining me through: those sounds grow strange to me, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 311
Paining with eloquence her balmy side; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 205
 
PAINS.............13
That pains my wounded ear. Lines Written on 29 May, Line 6
The anxious month, relieving from its pains , After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 5
Of careless butterflies: amid his pains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 765
If thou art powerful, these lovers' pains ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1016
Of pains resistless! make my being brief, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 540
And air, and pains , and care, and suffering; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 432
My heart began to burn - and only pains , Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 10
Rejoicing for his many pains . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 92
Those pains of mine; O Saturn, hadst thou felt, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 297
My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 1
Than throbbing blood, and that the self-same pains Lamia, Part I, Line 308
Then sudden it grew hot, and all the pains Lamia, Part II, Line 252
Love, love alone, has pains severe and many; To Fanny, Line 46
 
PAINTER'S.........1
More warm than those heroic tints that fill a painter's sense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 36
 
PAIR..............8
Circling from three sweet pair of lips in mirth; To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 4
And sing above this gentle pair , like lark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 720
Why stand we here? Adieu, ye tender pair ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 902
May have crumpt up a pair of Dian's legs, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 9
Pair by pair had gone to rest, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 63
Pair by pair had gone to rest, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 63
Love, jealous grown of so complete a pair , Lamia, Part II, Line 12
Backwards and downwards from his own two pair : The Jealousies, Line 310
 
PAIRS.............1
Are fluttering round the room like doves in pairs ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 328
 
PALACE............20
"O thou, whose mighty palace roof doth hang Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 232
Of his white palace in wild forest nook, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 890
"Behold! behold, the palace of his pride! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 833
Of one fair palace , that far far surpass'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 847
This palace floor breath-air,- but for the amaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 884
Till Triton blew his horn. The palace rang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 888
For clamour, when the golden palace door Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 991
The palace whirls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1005b
Of Cynthia:- the wide palace of the sun; Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 2
Pedestal'd haply in a palace court, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 32
Oft made Hyperion ache. His palace bright, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 176
Then, as was wont, his palace -door flew ope Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 205
And of my ducal palace not one stone Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 8
This earth,- this palace ,- this room,- Auranthe! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 44
Love in a palace is perhaps at last Lamia, Part II, Line 3
That purple-lined palace of sweet sin, Lamia, Part II, Line 31
Make great Hyperion ache. His palace bright, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 24
(Of pastry he got store within the palace ,) The Jealousies, Line 218
Back to your palace , where I wait for guerdon fit." The Jealousies, Line 522
"Counts of the palace , and the state purveyor The Jealousies, Line 766
 
PALACES...........8
To golden palaces , strange minstrelsy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 457
With horses prancing o'er them, palaces Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 744
Through caves, and palaces of mottled ore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 594
But hollow rocks,- and they were palaces Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 323
God Neptune's palaces !" With noise increas'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 834
What nerveless minions of safe palaces ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
My essence? What serener palaces , Lamia, Part I, Line 283
Throughout her palaces imperial, Lamia, Part I, Line 351
 
PALANQUIN.........1
Into the jungles; and her palanquin , The Jealousies, Line 393
 
PALATABLE.........2
Full palatable ; and a colour grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 767
Eats wholesome, sweet, and palatable food King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 27
 
PALATE............8
Or thrice my palate moisten: but when I mark Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 25
For one whose palate gladdens in the flavour To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 26
O think how this dry palate would rejoice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 328
Instead of sweets, his ample palate took Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 188
Can burst Joy's grape against his palate fine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 28
The soul's fine palate . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26a
Instead of sweets, his ample palate takes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 32
Life's purposes,- the palate of my mind I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 13
 
PALATINE..........2
Or where in Pluto's gardens palatine Lamia, Part I, Line 211
And wept upon its purple palatine , The Jealousies, Line 411
 
PALE..............66
Can make their lying lips turn pale of hue, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 13
O'er pale faces mourns The Gothic looks solemn, Line 8
Still so pale ? - then, dearest, weep; Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 9
Stood, wan, and pale and with an awed face, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 191
And said, "Art thou so pale , who wast so bland Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 517
About her majesty, and front death- pale , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 642
For one as sorrowful: thy cheek is pale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 75
For one whose cheek is pale : thou dost bewail Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 76
At mere remembering her pale laugh, and curse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 569
By one and one, to pale oblivion; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 666
To give at evening pale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 161
Before young Bacchus' eye-wink turning pale .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 267
It seem'd as when around the pale new moon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 368
His rugged forehead in a mantle pale , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 395
Dark paradise! where pale becomes the bloom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 538
Pale unrelentor, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 600
And speak not one pale word, and sigh no more. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 808
Muses bright and Muses pale ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 20
Muses bright and Muses pale , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 24
He hath his winter too of pale misfeature, Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 13
She saw it waxing very pale and dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 53
She ask'd her brothers, with an eye all pale , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 258
Strange sound it was, when the pale shadow spake; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 281
Pale limbs at bottom of a crystal well; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 364
And taste the music of that vision pale . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 392
Pale Isabella kiss'd it, and low moan'd. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 399
And make a pale light in your cypress glooms, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 439
Into thy pale dominions! Spirit here that reignest, Line 10
Pale , lattic'd, chill, and silent as a tomb. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 113
And pale enchantment held her sleepy-eyed. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 169
Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth-sculptured stone. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 297
Their sorrows. Pale were the sweet lips I saw, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 12
Pale were the lips I kiss'd, and fair the form As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 13
Of influence benign on planets pale , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 108
So at Hyperion's words the Phantoms pale Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 255
Pale wox I, and in vapours hid my face. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 326
Show'd her pale cheeks, and all her forehead wan, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 114
Have bred forth, not pale solitary doves, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 225
In pale and silver silence they remain'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 356
Of pale immortal death, and with a pang Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 128
I saw pale kings, and princes too, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 37
Pale warriors, death pale were they all; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 38
Pale warriors, death pale were they all; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 38
Ever hides his brilliance pale , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 53
Of pale -mouth'd prophet dreaming. Ode to Psyche, Line 35
Of pale -mouth'd prophet dreaming. Ode to Psyche, Line 49
Where youth grows pale , and spectre-thin, and dies; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 26
Nor suffer thy pale forehead to be kiss'd Ode on Melancholy, Line 3
The second was Ambition, pale of cheek, Ode on Indolence, Line 26
Who vails its snowy wings and grows all pale - Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
But pale , as if you brought some heavy news. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 111
You know full well what makes me look so pale . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 112
Thee pale , my Albert. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 118a
Or pale Calabrian? or the Tuscan grape? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 122
Pale grew her immortality, for woe Lamia, Part I, Line 104
Nor grew they pale , as mortal lovers do. Lamia, Part I, Line 145
Swoon'd, murmuring of love, and pale with pain. Lamia, Part I, Line 289
Trembled; she nothing said, but, pale and meek, Lamia, Part II, Line 65
In pale contented sort of discontent, Lamia, Part II, Line 135
As pale it lay upon the rosy couch: Lamia, Part II, Line 250
Hung pale , and curtain'd her in mysteries The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 253
The pale Omega of a wither'd race, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 288
Of influence benign on planets pale , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 414
To grow pale from the waves at dull midnight. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 458
Grew pale as death, and fainted - very nigh! The Jealousies, Line 457
Pale was his face, he still look'd very ill: The Jealousies, Line 608
 
PALED.............2
Of virgin bloom paled gently for slight fear. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 189
Paled in and vineyarded from beggar-spies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 132
 
PALELY............2
Alone and palely loitering? La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 2
Alone and palely loitering, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 46
 
PALENESS..........2
That paleness warms my grave, as though I had Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 316
To be my spouse: thy paleness makes me glad; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 318
 
PALER.............3
Made their cheeks paler by the break of June: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 26
And of thy lilies, that do paler grow Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 149
She should be paler for my troublous days- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 114
 
PALFIOR...........1
And for the nephew of old Palfior , The Jealousies, Line 147
 
PALFREY...........1
Again on his fair palfrey . Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 16
 
PALFREYS..........2
Just as two noble steeds, and palfreys twain, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 77
From their low palfreys o'er his neck they bent: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 87
 
PALL..............6
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 12
There anguish does not sting; nor pleasure pall : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 526
Under the down-trodden pall Robin Hood, Line 4
Which saves a sick man from the feather'd pall Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 268
Belong'd to one whose early pall O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 57
These blossoms snow upon thy lady's pall ! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 7
 
PALLACES..........1
To my fragrant pallaces , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 49
 
PALLAS............3
That I am wise, that Pallas is a dunce- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 799
In chastity: yes, Pallas has been sighing, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 802
Like Pallas from the walls of Ilion, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 22
 
PALLAS'...........1
Upon his arm he braces Pallas' shield, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 413
 
PALLID............6
And when the moon her pallid face discloses, Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 13
To tint her pallid cheek with bloom, who cons Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 368
Against his pallid face: he felt the charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 105
Its little smoke, in pallid moonshine, died: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 200
How chang'd thou art! how pallid , chill, and drear! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 311
A pallid gleam across his features stern: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 349
 
PALM..............10
Away the palm ; yet shall it ever pay To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 13
"Beneath my palm trees, by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 182
"Beneath my palm trees, by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 188
Beneath dark palm trees by a river side? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 192
Among the dead: She withers, like a palm Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 447
O leave the palm to wither by itself; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 449
Palm -shaded temples, and high rival fanes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 59
Why does your tender palm dissolve in dew?"- Lamia, Part I, Line 370
Of palm and plantain, met from either side, Lamia, Part II, Line 126
Palm , myrtle, oak, and sycamore, and beech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 20
 
PALMER............1
Lorenzo, a young palmer in Love's eye! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 2
 
PALMER'S..........1
As palmer's that with weariness mid-desert shrine hath found. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 22
 
PALMERS...........1
Finny palmers great and small, Not Aladdin magian, Line 32
 
PALMISTRY.........1
Whate'er your palmistry may make of it, The Jealousies, Line 331
 
PALMS.............3
Or anxious calls, or close of trembling palms , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 401
And poplars, and lawn-shading palms , and beech, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 25
Two palms and then two plantains, and so on, Lamia, Part II, Line 128
 
PALMY.............1
Winding through palmy fern, and rushes fenny, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 80
 
PALPABLE..........5
Her form seems floating palpable , and near; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 39
Too palpable before me - the sad look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 790
The first-born of all shap'd and palpable Gods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 153
Here is proof palpable as the bright sun! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 5
By the dark roots, and leave her palpable , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 138
 
PALPITATING.......1
Until he found a palpitating snake, Lamia, Part I, Line 45
 
PALPITATIONS......2
Feel palpitations when thou lookest in: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 53
And palpitations sweet, and pleasures soft, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 313
 
PALSIED...........4
As in a palsied Druid's harp unstrung; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 286
And grasp'd his fingers in her palsied hand, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 97
As with a palsied tongue, and while his beard Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 93
Burning,- when suddenly a palsied chill The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 122
 
PALSY.............6
Met palsy half way: soon these limbs became Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 637
Shook with eternal palsy , I did wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 957
A poor, weak, palsy -stricken, churchyard thing, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 155
Died palsy -twitch'd, with meagre face deform; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 376
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 25
Have chang'd a God into a shaking palsy . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 426
 
PALY..............3
Lay a lost thing upon her paly lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 341
There is a paly flame of hope that plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 984
The short-lived, paly summer is but won On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 5
 
PAMPER............1
To pamper his slight wooing, warm yet staid: The Jealousies, Line 8
 
PAN...............12
Of Flora, and old Pan : sleep in the grass, Sleep and Poetry, Line 102
Arcadian Pan , with such a fearful dread. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 158
Poor nymph,- poor Pan ,- how he did weep to find I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 159
Pan is no longer sought, I feel a free, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 12
Where fed the herds of Pan : ay great his gains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 78
Our vows are wanting to our great god Pan . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 213
Hear us, great Pan ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 246
That wondrous night: the great Pan -festival: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 897
I see thy streaming hair! and now, by Pan , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 279
I on this spot will offer: Pan will bid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 634
And Pan made sing for thee his forest-hive; To Homer, Line 8
Strange musings to the solitary Pan . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 411
 
PAN'S.............1
Pan's holy priest for young Endymion calls; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 815
 
PANE..............1
With forehead 'gainst the window pane ; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 49
 
PANEL.............1
In the clear panel , more he could adore,- The Jealousies, Line 277
 
PANES.............4
And diamonded with panes of quaint device, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 211
Against the window- panes ; St. Agnes' moon hath set. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 324
And on the western window panes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 6
Comes through the panes with persecuting glare. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 25
 
PANG..............2
Would give a pang to jealous misery, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 176
Of pale immortal death, and with a pang Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 128
 
PANGS.............3
Sometimes these very pangs . Dear maiden, steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 985
Pangs are in vain - until I grow high-rife Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 29
Who cost her mother Tellus keener pangs , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 54
 
PANNEL............2
The parrot's cage and pannel square, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 76
Before each lucid pannel fuming stood Lamia, Part II, Line 175
 
PANNELS...........1
Came jasper pannels ; then, anon, there burst Lamia, Part II, Line 139
 
PANNIER'D.........1
And pannier'd mules for ducats and old lies- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 134
 
PANT..............3
She scuds with summer breezes, to pant through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 490
And keep our souls in one eternal pant ! To J.R., Line 12
And make its silvery splendour pant with bliss. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 102
 
PANTED............6
No man e'er panted for a mortal love. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 526
Till it has panted round, and stolen a share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 84
That I have so far panted , tugg'd, and reek'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 2
She clos'd the door, she panted , all akin The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 201
He ceased - she panted quick - and suddenly The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 295
Panted , and all his food was woodland air, Character of C.B., Line 17
 
PANTHEA...........1
In Scarab Street, Panthea , at the Jubal's Head. The Jealousies, Line 90
 
PANTHEA'S.........1
At six we heard Panthea's churches ring- The Jealousies, Line 718
 
PANTHERS'.........1
"Mounted on panthers' furs and lions' manes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 251
 
PANTING...........12
So saw he panting light, and towards it went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 383
In thy deceitful stream, a panting glow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 970
And panting bosoms bare! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 985
Behold her panting in the forest grass! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 59
With the tinge of love, panting in safe alarm.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 314
Too well awake, he feels the panting side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 440
Who on wide plains gather in panting troops, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 199
For ever panting , and for ever young; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 27
And panting fountains quivering with deep glows! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 47
While, like held breath, the stars drew in their panting fires. Lamia, Part I, Line 300
And hopes and joys and panting miseries,- To Fanny, Line 10
"Onward we floated o'er the panting streets, The Jealousies, Line 730
 
PANTINGLY.........1
Who whispers him so pantingly and close? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 407
 
PANTOMIME.........2
Visage sage at pantomime ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 10
Until their monkish pantomime O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 65
 
PANTS.............1
Onward the tiger and the leopard pants , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 241
 
PAPERS............1
and papers of yours I have become possessed of. His life is no Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 57
 
PAPHIAN...........2
A Paphian dove upon a message sent? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 510
Through which this Paphian army took its march, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 853
 
PAPHOS............1
E'er grew in Paphos , from the bitter weeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 249
 
PARADISE..........14
That breast, earth's only paradise ! Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 16
But the fair paradise of Nature's light? I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 126
With such a paradise of lips and eyes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 618
Dark paradise ! where pale becomes the bloom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 538
Or are the fruits of Paradise Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 7
Stol'n to this paradise , and so entranced, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 244
And legless birds of paradise , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 80
Sweet Dusketha! Paradise ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 86
For I was taught in Paradise Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 6
This is to wake in Paradise ! farewell, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 90
Where he was mirror'd small in paradise , Lamia, Part II, Line 47
A paradise for a sect; the savage too The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 2
Faded the voice, warmth, whiteness, paradise , The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 8
Goes off like lightning,- grains of paradise The Jealousies, Line 295
 
PARAGON...........3
E'en in this isle; and who could paragon Sleep and Poetry, Line 172
His left sat smiling Beauty's paragon . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 865
Am I not married to a paragon Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 21
 
PARAMOUR..........2
Ha! There! there!- He is the paramour !- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8b
When to the bridal he should lead his paramour . Lamia, Part II, Line 83
 
PARCEL'D..........1
Was parcel'd out from time to time: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 98
 
PARCELL'D.........1
Forc'd from their quiet cells, are parcell'd out Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 76
 
PARCH.............1
Will parch for lack of nutrient - thy bones The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 110
 
PARCH'D...........1
I saw parch'd Abyssinia rouse and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 259
 
PARCHES...........1
A homeward fever parches up my tongue- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 319
 
PARCHING..........2
More parching to the tongue than all, of more divine a smart, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 8
A burning forehead, and a parching tongue. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 30
 
PARCHINGS.........1
My fever'd parchings up, my scathing dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 636
 
PARD..............3
By angry wolf, or pard with prying head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 76
The gentle robin, like a pard or ounce, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 104
Striped like a zebra, freckled like a pard , Lamia, Part I, Line 49
 
PARDON............13
Pardon me, airy planet, that I prize Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 185
O pardon me, for I am full of grief- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 107
Grant thou a pardon here, and then the tale Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 153
Pray pardon me, I cannot help but smile- Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 8
And pardon that thy secrets should be sung Ode to Psyche, Line 3
The Emperor's pardon , Ludolph kept aloof, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 101
And pardon you will grant, that, at this hour, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 126
Not as a swordsman would I pardon claim, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 24
Then grant me loving pardon ,- but not else,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 110
As thus:- for, pardon me, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 56b
Farewell! For this heaven pardon you! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 10b
O pardon me - I'm absent now and then. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 20
Your pardon , brother, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 17b
 
PARDON'D..........1
I would not, I, be pardon'd in the heap, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 71
 
PARDS.............1
Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 32
 
PARENT............3
Should Disappointment, parent of Despair, To Hope, Line 13
O Heaven wide! O unseen parent dear! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 159
Drank. That full draught is parent of my theme. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 46
 
PARENT'S..........1
Could not see all his parent's love aright, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 101
 
PARENTAGE.........2
Dark as the parentage of chaos. Hark! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 912
Upon that very hour, our parentage , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 198
 
PARENTAL..........1
From Chaos and parental Darkness came Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 191
 
PARENTS...........1
From cruel parents , or relentless fair; To Hope, Line 26
 
PARENTS'..........1
My parents' bones are in their dusty urns Lamia, Part II, Line 94
 
PARLE.............2
And the parle of voices thund'rous; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 8
As hath the seeded thistle, when in parle Character of C.B., Line 3
 
PARLEY............6
Make my horn parley from their foreheads hoar: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 479
Of trumpets at clear parley from the east Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 553
Says I, 'tis the wind at a parley . Over the hill and over the dale, Line 10
And parley with him, as a son should do, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 95
You suffocate me! Stop this devil's parley , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
By such propitious parley medicin'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 183
 
PARLIAMENT........2
Is there a man in Parliament All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 17
Which seeing, his high court of parliament The Jealousies, Line 19
 
PARPAGLION........1
By Parpaglion and Co., (those sly compeers The Jealousies, Line 88
 
PARROT............1
My echo, my taught parrot ! but I fear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 40
 
PARROT'S..........1
The parrot's cage and pannel square, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 76
 
PARSLEY...........2
'Neath smothering parsley , and a hazy light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 230
Cool parsley , basil sweet, and sunny thyme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 577
 
PARSONS...........1
And plenty of fat deer for parsons ; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 15
 
PART..............22
Haply 'tis when thy ruby lips part sweetly, To G.A.W., Line 9
And on their placid foreheads part the hair. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 230
Mingle, and so become a part of it,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 811
How can we part ? Elysium! who art thou? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 753
Made fiercer by a fear lest any part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 845
And must we part ? Ah, yes, it must be so. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 585
"Ah, woe is me! that I should fondly part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 30
Part of himself. He hath his autumn ports Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 8
Part of the building was a chosen see Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 41
The other part two thousand years from him Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 43
Mumchance art thou with both obliged to part . Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 14
There is no part of it, to the very hilt, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 107
A part of the Forest. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Setting
Another part of the Forest. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Setting
Disjoin those hands - part - part - do not destroy Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 43
Disjoin those hands - part - part - do not destroy Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 43
whispering sadly, and ranging themselves; part entering and part discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
whispering sadly, and ranging themselves; part entering and part discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
More pleasantly by playing woman's part , Lamia, Part I, Line 337
Melancholy." Part 3. Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Another part of the Field. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Setting
With the third part - (yet that is drinking dear!)- The Jealousies, Line 368
 
PARTED............12
Light feet, dark violet eyes, and parted hair; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 15
'Mong the light skimming gondolas far parted , To George Felton Mathew, Line 15
A butterfly, with golden wings broad parted , Sleep and Poetry, Line 343
Parted its dripping leaves with eager care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 678
Leaning with parted lips, some words she spake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 47
For heaven is parted from thee, and the earth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 55
And know that we had parted from all hope. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 261
Of Nineveh new kiss'd the parted clouds! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 134
Parted the veils. Then saw I a wan face, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 256
Leaning, with parted lips, some words she spake The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 349
For heaven is parted from thee, and the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 357
Cinque- parted danced, some half asleep reposed The Jealousies, Line 690
 
PARTIAL...........2
Too partial friend! fain would I follow thee To George Felton Mathew, Line 11
And master is too partial , entre nous, The Jealousies, Line 299
 
PARTICOLOUR'D.....1
When, howe'er poor or particolour'd things, What can I do to drive away, Line 10
 
PARTICULAR........5
"Young man of Latmos! thus particular Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 449
His own particular fright, so these three felt: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 890
That gods might know my own particular taste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 4
To any one particular beauteous star, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 100
I have mine own particular comments on't; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 43
 
PARTING...........7
And after parting beds of simple flowers, Imitation of Spenser, Line 6
Parting luxuriant curls;- and the swift bound Sleep and Poetry, Line 334
Its own sweet grief at parting . Overhead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 939
That our heart-broken parting is so nigh. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 584
Felt parting and warm meeting every week; To J.R., Line 2
Parting they seem'd to tread upon the air, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 73
made at parting , and I will forget to send the Emperor letters Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
 
PARTLY............1
I partly owe to him: and thus, the chimes Sleep and Poetry, Line 350
 
PARTNER...........2
A partner in your sorrow's mysteries; Ode on Melancholy, Line 8
Turn'd from myself, her partner , in a huff; The Jealousies, Line 701
 
PARTNERSHIP.......1
The thought of this great partnership diffuses To George Felton Mathew, Line 8
 
PARTS.............1
A certain Arab haunting in these parts . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 120
 
PARTY.............1
Of dowdies, for some dance or party drest, The Jealousies, Line 242
 
PASS..............52
Nature's clear beauty, could pass lightly by Calidore: A Fragment, Line 30
May we together pass , and calmly try To My Brothers, Line 12
Then will I pass the countries that I see Sleep and Poetry, Line 99
Taste their pure fountains. First the realm I'll pass Sleep and Poetry, Line 101
Yes, I must pass them for a nobler life, Sleep and Poetry, Line 123
Slowly across the chequer'd shadows pass . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 68
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 3
That, any longer, I will pass my days Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 476
Had I been used to pass my weary eves; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 546
That one who through this middle earth should pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 723
And, from the turf, a lullaby doth pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 793
And like a new-born spirit did he pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 70
Said he, "will all this gush of feeling pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 681
Would pass the very hardest gazer's wish, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 208
So I will in my story straightway pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 397
I will forget them; I will pass these joys; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 548
I clung about her waist, nor ceas'd to pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 626
"Now let me pass a cruel, cruel space, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 639
That I may pass in patience still speak: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 139
Pelted with flowers as he on did pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 216
Their godships should pass this into a law; Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 2
Pass by unheeded as a threshold brook. Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 12
Honeyless days and days did he let pass ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 32
And glossy bees at noon do fieldward pass , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 309
Aye, if a madman could have leave to pass a healthful day, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 25
Dares to pass our sacred ways, Not Aladdin magian, Line 36
Letting her absolution pass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 29
In such like nonsense would I pass an hour Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 20
Pass by - she heeded not at all: in vain The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 59
All as ye pass swell out the monstrous truth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 65
Affrighted, kept her still, and let him pass Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 99
And fated to excel us, as we pass Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 214
And with poor skill let pass into the breeze Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 273
Be not so rash; wait till his wrath shall pass , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 105
As Jove fans off the clouds. Even now they pass . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 21
Off! And none pass this way on pain of death! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 72
So please you let me unmolested pass Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 83
In these rough times. Brave soldier, as you pass Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 19
I have news precious as we pass along. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 148
Let not the abbot pass . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Voice, Line 54b
Whose words once utter'd pass like current gold; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 210
And, thoughtless! suffer'd thee to pass alone Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 22
Pass the high stars, before sweet embassage Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Gentlemen, to pass on. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 44a
I saw the three pass slowly up the stairs, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 11
Real are the dreams of Gods, and smoothly pass Lamia, Part I, Line 127
She fled into that valley they pass o'er Lamia, Part I, Line 173
Into like gardens thou didst pass erewhile, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 179
As ye may read who can unwearied pass The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 464
Are envious which shall see your triumph pass . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 27
To Hum's hotel; and, as he on did pass The Jealousies, Line 263
"Besides, manners forbid that I should pass any The Jealousies, Line 469
 
PASS'D............36
Some weeks have pass'd since last I saw the spires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 84
Yet it has not pass'd - Hither, hither, love, Line 17
From the white flock, but pass'd unworried Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 75
Was pass'd in dreaming. Hearken, sweet Peona! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 861
He forthright pass'd , and lightly treading went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 431
To watch his slumber through. 'Tis well nigh pass'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 488
Had pass'd away: no longer did he wage Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 863
Pass'd like a dream before him. Then the spur Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 894
And, as he pass'd , each lifted up its head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 785
And while it died away a shade pass'd by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 325
Or the sweet name of love had pass'd away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 729
Into the hours that have pass'd us by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 825
And as he to the court-yard pass'd along, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 193
Lorenzo's flush with love.- They pass'd the water Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 215
From mouth to mouth through all the country pass'd : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 502
Hath pass'd beyond the rocky portal; Not Aladdin magian, Line 46
While others pass'd their idle days O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 47
The lover's endless minutes slowly pass'd ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 182
Has from thy sceptre pass'd ; and all the air Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 58
Lift up their heads, as still the whisper pass'd . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 58
They pass'd , like figures on a marble urn, Ode on Indolence, Line 5
A third time pass'd they by, and, passing, turn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 21
Auranthe! I had hoped this whim had pass'd . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 117
Her fame has pass'd into the grosser lips Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 150
Henry the Fowler pass'd the streets of Prague. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 16
The very porters, as I pass'd the doors, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 50
She stood: he pass'd , shut up in mysteries, Lamia, Part I, Line 241
Till she saw him, as once she pass'd him by, Lamia, Part I, Line 315
They pass'd the city gates, he knew not how, Lamia, Part I, Line 348
His spirit pass'd beyond its golden bourn Lamia, Part II, Line 32
To no death was that visage; it had pass'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 261
No sooner had this conjuration pass'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 291
Has from thy sceptre pass'd , and all the air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 360
He pass'd the hurdy-gurdies with disdain, The Jealousies, Line 222
Saluted, as we pass'd , an early rook- The Jealousies, Line 709
To watch our grand approach, and hail us as we pass'd . The Jealousies, Line 720
 
PASSAGE...........4
E'en like the passage of an angel's tear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 13
Through a dim passage , searching till he found Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 709
Stood in the passage whispering; if any Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 3
And down the passage cast a glow upon the floor. Lamia, Part II, Line 15
 
PASSAGES..........2
Through winding passages , where sameness breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 235
All courts and passages , where silence dead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 267
 
PASSED............5
Glory and loveliness have passed away; To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 1
And shadowy, through the mist of passed years: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 3
Writh'd not of passed joy? In drear nighted December, Line 20
Then save me or the passed day will shine Sonnet to Sleep, Line 9
As one I knew some passed weeks ago, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 41
 
PASSER............1
And ev'ry passer in he frowns upon, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 65
 
PASSES............1
That thus it passes smoothly, quietly. To My Brothers, Line 10
 
PASSETH...........2
And yet thy benediction passeth not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 61
He passeth by; and his weak spirit fails The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 17
 
PASSING...........21
But might I now each passing moment give To George Felton Mathew, Line 31
Passing along before a dusky space Sleep and Poetry, Line 139
The eyelids with the passing coolness play, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 7
feel sensible are not of such completion as to warrant their passing the press; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
In passing here, his owlet pinions shook; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 560
Into a marble gallery, passing through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 256
Went noiseless as a passing noontide rain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 380
To these founts Protean, passing gulph, and dell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 627
No melody was like a passing spright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 158
These minced leaves on me, and passing through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 769
Even in the passing of thine honey-moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 917
And silvery was its passing : voices sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 559
Whose passing -bell may ere the midnight toll; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 156
Upon the first toll of his passing -bell, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 173
The voice I hear this passing night was heard Ode to a Nightingale, Line 63
A third time pass'd they by, and, passing , turn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 21
The crime of passing an attaint upon Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 163
Close to her passing , in indifference drear, Lamia, Part I, Line 238
That but a moment's thought is passion's passing bell. Lamia, Part II, Line 39
Upon the first toll of his passing bell: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 22
Then passing by the Princess, singed her hoop: The Jealousies, Line 671
 
PASSION...........36
Would passion arm me for the enterprize: Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 4
While mine for passion burneth- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 19
The passion poesy, glories infinite, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 29
Passion their voices cooingly 'mong myrtles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 248
Vanish'd in elemental passion . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 375
Of diverse passion ; when her lips and eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 468
The passion " - "O dov'd Ida the divine! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 761
With too much passion , will here stay and pity, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 828
Has been an under- passion to this hour. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 179
Far as Egyptian Nile. My passion grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 407
Of passion from the heart!"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 85a
And all my story that much passion slew me; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 114
The lustrous passion from a falcon-eye?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 154
To that fair shadow'd passion puls'd its way- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 446
Have no self- passion or identity. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 477
Phoebe, his passion ! joyous she upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 987
Will I, grey-gone in passion , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 24
Alas! when passion is both meek and wild! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 48
Another night, and not my passion shrive. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 64
And as he thus over his passion hung, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 197
Came tragic; passion not to be subdued, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 247
In the passion of his toil, Not Aladdin magian, Line 6
Of carnal passion ; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 82
Of passion -flower;- just in time there sails Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 45
Bards of passion and of mirth, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 1
Bards of passion and of mirth, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 37
All passion struck, Spirit here that reignest, Line 9
Or look with ruffian passion in her face: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 149
This passion lifted him upon his feet, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 135
Actions of rage and passion ; even as Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 333
"O ye, whom wrath consumes! who, passion -stung, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 173
All breathing human passion far above, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 28
Breathing upon the flowers his passion new, Lamia, Part I, Line 28
His passion , cruel grown, took on a hue Lamia, Part II, Line 75
Misted the cheek; no passion to illume Lamia, Part II, Line 274
Of majesty, by dint of passion keen, The Jealousies, Line 349
 
PASSION'D.........2
Nor sigh of his, nor plaint, nor passion'd moan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 201
Now tiger- passion'd , lion-thoughted, wroth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 68
 
PASSION'S.........3
Though the passion's treasure Hither, hither, love, Line 15
An immortality of passion's thine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 808
That but a moment's thought is passion's passing bell. Lamia, Part II, Line 39
 
PASSIONATE........4
Mark the clear tumbling crystal, its passionate gushes, To Some Ladies, Line 7
Of kind and passionate looks; to count, and count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 657
The mere commingling of passionate breath, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 833
He is so full of grief and passionate wrath; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 18
 
PASSIONATELY......1
So passionately bright, my dazzled soul Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 594
 
PASSIONED.........1
By a clear pool, wherein she passioned Lamia, Part I, Line 182
 
PASSIONLESS.......1
See not her charms! Is Phoebe passionless ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 56
 
PASSIONS..........6
The Passions - a terrific band - Ode to Apollo, Line 26
Those eyes, those passions , those supreme pearl springs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 718
Locks shining black, hair scanty grey, and passions manifold. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 38
Fools! if some passions high have warm'd the world, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 11
Of their passions and their spites; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 32
passions , though not this of love, tarried with her a while to his great Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
PASSPORT..........1
Well! you shall have free passport through the gates. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 114
 
PAST..............49
So with the horrors past thou'lt win thy happier fate. On Peace, Line 14
But this is past . Thou art among the stars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 9
Past each horizon of fine poesy; To George Felton Mathew, Line 12
Full many a dreary hour have I past , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 1
But many days have past since last my heart To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 109
Into the widest alley they all past , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 126
In times long past ; to sit with them, and talk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 387
Past them, but he must brush on every side. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 868
What care, though striding Alexander past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 24
In other regions, past the scanty bar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 124
He saw not fiercer wonders - past the wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 249
For all those visions were o'ergone, and past , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 589
Leading afar past wild magnificence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 598
In wakeful ears, like uproar past and gone- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 19
How his own goddess was past all things fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 190
Now past the midway from mortality, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 315
Of wind and waters: 'tis past human wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 826
"Dear lady," said Endymion, "'tis past : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 137
'Tis well nigh past man's search their hearts to see; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 493
While past the vision went in bright array. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 562
My life from too thin breathing: gone and past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 650
For yet the past doth prison me. The rill, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 691
Cat! who hast past thy grand climacteric, To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 1
Past the heath and up the hill; Robin Hood, Line 14
All are gone away and past ! Robin Hood, Line 37
Rode past fair Florence, to where Arno's stream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 210
From his lorn voice, and past his loamed ears Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 279
Is past expressing. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 8
Past the eyesight's bearing- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 37
Past the sweet Virgin's picture, while his prayer he saith. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 9
Past the echoing minster gate. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 60
When, past all hindrance of my trembling hands, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 291
And ready still past kisses to outnumber Ode to Psyche, Line 19
One minute past , and Lethe-wards had sunk: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 4
Past the near meadows, over the still stream, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 76
And wander past him as through vacancy. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 75
Beyond all pleasures past , and all to come: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
Of times past , unremember'd! Better so Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 6
Of an aspiring life! My boyhood past Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 9
Past all reason. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Second Lady, Line 37c
Did I not send, sir, but a moment past , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 137
I fear me he is past my skill. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Physician, Line 174a
Lycius shrank closer, as they met and past , Lamia, Part I, Line 366
Into times past , yet to be echoed sure King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 4
See, past the skirts of yon white cloud they go, The Jealousies, Line 553
From twelve to half- past - wings not fit to fly The Jealousies, Line 646
"From two to half- past , dusky way we made, The Jealousies, Line 658
"At half- past three arose the cheerful moon- The Jealousies, Line 685
At half- past four the morn essay'd to beam- The Jealousies, Line 708
 
PASTORAL..........2
White hawthorn, and the pastoral eglantine; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 46
As doth eternity: Cold Pastoral ! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 45
 
PASTORELLA........1
Fair Pastorella in the bandit's den, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 32
 
PASTRY............2
Eban, untempted by the pastry -cooks, The Jealousies, Line 217
(Of pastry he got store within the palace,) The Jealousies, Line 218
 
PASTURE...........1
Down beside the pasture Trent; Robin Hood, Line 30
 
PASTURES..........1
From human pastures ; or, O torturing fact! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 5
 
PAT...............1
"Don't beat him!" return'd Hum, and on the floor came pat . The Jealousies, Line 315
 
PATCH'D...........1
A curious volume, patch'd and torn, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 25
 
PATE..............1
To do an honor to your old bald pate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 3
 
PATERNAL..........2
Those days paternal from my memory, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 45
Nor let these arms paternal hunger more Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 123
 
PATH..............17
Should madly follow that bright path of light Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 60
That smooth the path of honour; brotherhood, Sleep and Poetry, Line 317
By infant hands, left on the path to die. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 46
My uncertain path with green, that I may speed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 61
Bewildered shepherds to their path again; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 269
Along a path between two little streams,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 415
Let fall a sprig of yew tree in his path ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 732
The path of love and poesy. But rest, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 38
His diamond path with fretwork, streaming round Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 608
The diamond path ? And does it indeed end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 652
Towards it by a sandy path , and lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1020
Down a precipitous path , as if impell'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 489
The wanderer in his path . Thus warbled they, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 561
A path in hell, for ever would I bless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 617
His briar'd path to some tranquility. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 723
Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Ode to a Nightingale, Line 65
Lifted his eye-brows, spurn'd the path beneath, The Jealousies, Line 273
 
PATHETIC..........1
Nor be pathetic , my kind benefactor, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 112
 
PATHLESS..........2
In noisome alley, and in pathless wood: Addressed to Haydon, Line 4
Over the pathless waves towards him bows. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 96
 
PATHOS............2
What swell'd with pathos , and what right divine: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 55
Muffling to death the pathos with his wings; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 421
 
PATHS.............2
Who thus one lamb did lose. Paths there were many, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 79
Through buried paths , where sleepy twilight dreams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 73
 
PATIENCE..........9
Rock'd me to patience . Now, thank gentle heaven! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 706
But first a little patience ; first undo Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 755
A little patience , youth! 'twill not be long, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 908
That I may pass in patience still speak: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 139
Give me your patience , sister, while I frame Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 1
Wait here, my child, with patience ; kneel in prayer The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 178
Claim a brief while your patience . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 48a
Patience ! Not here; I would not spill thy blood Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 111
Patience , good people, in fit time I send Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 75
 
PATIENT...........23
Yes! patient plume thy little wing, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 7
The patient weeds, that now unshent by foam Sleep and Poetry, Line 379
Round the patient year- God of the golden bow, Line 6
A patient watch over the stream that creeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 447
Whose patient level peeps its crystal eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 871
Was now his lot. And must he patient stay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 293
But by a patient wing, a constant spell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 24
To the poor patient oyster, where it sleeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 67
Such ranges of white feet, and patient lips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 739
Yet wast thou patient . Then sang forth the Nine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 11
P'rhaps one or two, whose lives have patient wings, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 14
And, patient as a hen-bird, sat her there Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 471
His prayer he saith, this patient , holy man; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 10
Was fill'd with patient folk and slow, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 20
Like nature's patient , sleepless eremite, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 4
And still they were the same bright, patient stars. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 353
And the most patient brilliance of the moon! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 98
Your patient scholar. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 12a
By patient scrutiny, we may discover Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 242
His patient thought, had now begun to thaw, Lamia, Part II, Line 161
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look, To Autumn, Line 21
And marble balustrade, and patient travail The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 91
Round to the curb-stone patient dost thou trudge, The Jealousies, Line 247
 
PATIENTLY.........2
Sorrow the way to death; but patiently Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 973
Of smothering fancies, patiently sat down; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 139
 
PATMOS'...........1
Not St. John in Patmos' isle, Not Aladdin magian, Line 5
 
PATRIOT...........2
With after times.- The patriot shall feel To My Brother George (epistle), Line 73
Where patriot battle has been fought, when glory had the gain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 2
 
PATRIOT'S.........2
Let me not see the patriot's high bequest, To Hope, Line 37
And pointed out the patriot's stern duty; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 69
 
PATRIOTIC.........1
There warm my breast with patriotic lore, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 9
 
PATRIOTS..........1
Nor patriots revere? Lines Written on 29 May, Line 3
 
PATTERETH.........1
'Tis dark: quick pattereth the flaw-blown sleet: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 325
 
PATTERING.........2
Acorns ripe down- pattering , Fancy, Line 65
Like Love's alarum pattering the sharp sleet The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 323
 
PATTING...........2
There stood a knight, patting the flowing hair Calidore: A Fragment, Line 110
Patting against the sorrel as she goes. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 98


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Published @ RC

March 2005