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Keats Concordance
 
PAUNCH'D..........1
It paunch'd the Earl of Chester's horse, who then King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 42
 
PAUSE.............4
From a sick dove. At length, to break the pause , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 720
Each third step did he pause , and listen'd oft Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 194
Pause but one moment, mighty conqueror, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
With such a poor and sickly sounding pause , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 439
 
PAUSING...........1
Pausing upon their yellow flutterings. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 92
 
PAVED.............6
And diamond- paved lustrous long arcades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 220
Struck from the paved level up my limbs, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 123
And on the paved floor, where nigh were pil'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 234
And diamond paved lustrous long arcades. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 56
Show'd in the pearl- paved street, as in a glass; The Jealousies, Line 265
That seem'd throughout with upheld faces paved ; The Jealousies, Line 731
 
PAVEMENT..........5
On heaven's pavement ; brotherly he talks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 408
Of shields upon the pavement , when bright mail'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 15
Shuffled their sandals o'er the pavement white, Lamia, Part I, Line 356
Of what thou now art on that pavement cold. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 113
Rot on the pavement where thou rotted'st half."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 153
 
PAVILION..........1
Her scarf into a fluttering pavilion ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 628
 
PAVILIONS.........2
Pavilions him in bloom, and he doth see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 56
These crystalline pavilions , and pure fanes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 238
 
PAVILLION'D.......1
'Mongst boughs pavillion'd , where the deer's swift leap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 7
 
PAW...............2
In air he sees white coursers paw , and prance, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 26
Paw up against the light, and do strange deeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 166
 
PAWING............2
My steeds are all pawing on the thresholds of morn: Apollo to the Graces, Line 3
March, little Pegasus, with pawing hoof sublime! The Jealousies, Line 639
 
PAWS..............3
Their surly eyes brow-hidden, heavy paws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 645
Quick cat's- paws on the generous stray-away,- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 135
On libbard's paws , upheld the heavy gold Lamia, Part II, Line 185
 
PAY...............7
Catch an immortal thought to pay the debt On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 4
Away the palm; yet shall it ever pay To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 13
The many that are come to pay their vows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 291
Shouted the new born god; "Follow, and pay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 807
Come to pay devotion due- Not Aladdin magian, Line 33
Left it to pay the piper - a good sum- The Jealousies, Line 696
Bow'd low with high demeanour, and, to pay The Jealousies, Line 741
 
PAYING............1
Without your paying me one compliment. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 5
 
PAYNIMS...........1
Clasp'd like a missal where swart Paynims pray; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 241
 
PEACE.............27
Oh Peace ! and dost thou with thy presence bless On Peace, Line 1
Regions of peace and everlasting love; As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 5
And leave once more the ravish'd heavens in peace . Ode to Apollo, Line 23
Whisper'd of peace , and truth, and friendliness unquell'd. To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 14
Held her in peace : so that a whispering blade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 449
In peace upon my watery pillow: now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 235
Us live in peace , in love and peace among Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 635
Us live in peace, in love and peace among Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 635
It aches in loneliness - is ill at peace Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 220
And the new morn she saw not: but in peace Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 422
At war, at peace , or inter-quarreling Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 141
The days of peace and slumberous calm are fled; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 335
Thus in alternate uproar and sad peace , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 1
Smooth, without clashing cymbal, tones of peace Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 48
We must consult upon our terms of peace . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 159
With silver index, bidding thee make peace ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 9
This marriage be the bond of endless peace ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 153
Peace ! peace, old man! I cannot think she is. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130
Peace! peace , old man! I cannot think she is. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130
Peace , my son; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 98b
Ludolph, be calm. Ethelbert, peace awhile. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 103
Peace , rebel-priest! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 219a
To nations drows'd in peace ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 164a
Good Ethelbert, shall I die in peace with you? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 172
Where shall I learn to get my peace again? What can I do to drive away, Line 30
The owner out of it; show him a-" " Peace ! The Jealousies, Line 60
Peace ! nor contrive thy mistress' ire to rouse," The Jealousies, Line 61
 
PEACEFUL..........4
To trains of peaceful images: the stirs Sleep and Poetry, Line 340
Of peaceful sway above man's harvesting, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 110
Or mountain-built with peaceful citadel, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 36
And peaceful sway above man's harvesting, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 415
 
PEACEFULLY........1
An old man sitting calm and peacefully . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 192
 
PEACEFULNESS......1
Of unseen flowers in heavy peacefulness ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 235
 
PEACH.............2
And coverlids gold-tinted like the peach , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 396
To manage stairs reversely, like a peach The Jealousies, Line 628
 
PEACHES...........1
Nor will a bee buzz round two swelling peaches , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 66
 
PEACOCK...........1
Eyed like a peacock , and all crimson barr'd; Lamia, Part I, Line 50
 
PEACOCKS..........1
Of flowers, peacocks , swans, and naiads fair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 620
 
PEAK..............6
Silent, upon a peak in Darien. On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 14
I'd rather stand upon this misty peak , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 166
The moon put forth a little diamond peak , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 497
It was Hyperion:- a granite peak Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 367
Hyperion from the peak loud answered, "Saturn!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 388
Spitting, from forth its sulphur-baken peak , The Jealousies, Line 662
 
PEAKS.............2
Blood-red the sun may set behind black mountain peaks ; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 17
From the gold peaks of heaven's high piled clouds; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 434
 
PEALING...........1
It comes upon us like the glorious pealing To Kosciusko, Line 3
 
PEALS.............1
She falls, she faints! while laughter peals The Jealousies, Line 779
 
PEARL.............16
Oh brush not yet the pearl strung spray, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 3
Peeps the richness of a pearl . Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 18
Her pearl round ears, white neck, and orbed brow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 616
Ribb'd and inlaid with coral, pebble, and pearl . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 629
Those eyes, those passions, those supreme pearl springs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 718
Thou seest it for my happiness, no pearl Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 869
Perhaps her teeth are not the fairest pearl ; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 3
Asleep! O sleep a little while, white pearl , Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 1
Till Miss's comb is made a pearl tiara, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 7
Fools! make me whole again that weighty pearl And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 15
Like pearl beads dropping sudden from their string: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 284
Like to a jealous casket, hold my pearl - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 103
Show'd in the pearl -paved street, as in a glass; The Jealousies, Line 265
Without a little conjuring." "'Tis Pearl , The Jealousies, Line 382
'Tis Bertha Pearl ! What makes my brain so whirl? The Jealousies, Line 383
Above a pearl -built minster, hovering near; The Jealousies, Line 579
 
PEARL'D...........1
Or that the evening dew had pearl'd their tresses, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 89
 
PEARL'S...........1
"Sire, this is Bertha Pearl's neat handy-work, The Jealousies, Line 442
 
PEARLED...........3
And from their treasures scatter pearled hail; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 264
Pearled with the self-same shower. Fancy, Line 54
By duchesses and pearled margravines! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 90
 
PEARLIEST.........1
About me; and the pearliest dew not brings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 469
 
PEARLS............7
The pearls , that on each glist'ning circlet sleep, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 99
O'er studded with a thousand, thousand pearls , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 879
To gaze on Amphitrite, queen of pearls , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1004
Each a mouth of pearls must strew. Not Aladdin magian, Line 34
Of all its wreathed pearls her hair she frees; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 227
Pearls , while on land they wither'd and adored. Lamia, Part I, Line 16
She had a woman's mouth with all its pearls complete: Lamia, Part I, Line 60
 
PEARLY............12
Kissing thy daily food from Naiad's pearly hands. To George Felton Mathew, Line 93
And let there glide by many a pearly car, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 6
In the recesses of a pearly shell. Sleep and Poetry, Line 121
Yes, every thing, even to the pearly cup Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 117
Within its pearly house.- The mighty deeps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 68
Beside this old man lay a pearly wand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 213
Here is a shell; 'tis pearly blank to me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 761
And Thetis pearly too.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1005a
For Venus' pearly bite: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 214
Juno's proud birds are pecking pearly grain: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 410
Like to a diver in the pearly seas, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 355
Wind into Thetis' bower by many a pearly stair; Lamia, Part I, Line 208
 
PEARS.............1
So cool a purple: taste these juicy pears , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 444
 
PEAS..............2
Here are sweet peas , on tip-toe for a flight: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 57
Hum about globes of clover and sweet peas , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 52
 
PEASE.............1
I kiss'd you oft, and gave you white pease ; I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 9
 
PEBBLE............5
The meadows runnels, runnels pebble -stones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 839
Yea, or my veined pebble -floor, that draws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 112
Free from the smallest pebble -bead of doubt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 149
Ribb'd and inlaid with coral, pebble , and pearl. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 629
Which calls them Highland pebble -stones not worth a fly. The Jealousies, Line 747
 
PEBBLED...........2
Along the pebbled shore of memory! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 17
That, lingering along a pebbled coast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 301
 
PEBBLES...........4
And, plashing among bedded pebbles , stuck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 932
With lily shells, and pebbles milky white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 103
And pebbles blue from deep enchanted wells. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 696
From Pyrrha's pebbles or old Adam's seed. Lamia, Part I, Line 333
 
PEBBLY............5
O'er pebbly crystal, and o'er golden sands; To George Felton Mathew, Line 92
Across the lawny fields, and pebbly water; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 88
A natural sermon o'er their pebbly beds; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 71
Their silver bellies on the pebbly sand. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 77
In the fountain's pebbly margin, and she stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 99
 
PECCADILLOES......1
From peccadilloes . But, sire, as I say, The Jealousies, Line 465
 
PECKING...........1
Juno's proud birds are pecking pearly grain: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 410
 
PECULIAR..........2
For, indeed, 'tis a sweet and peculiar pleasure, To Some Ladies, Line 25
Of a peculiar sort,- a consummation;- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 106
 
PEDESTAL..........3
Or young Apollo on the pedestal : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 218
This wand against yon lyre on the pedestal ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 765
To keep thy strength upon its pedestal . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 165
 
PEDESTAL'D........2
Pedestal'd haply in a palace court, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 32
Like to the image pedestal'd so high The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 299
 
PEEL..............1
That set sharp racks at work, to pinch and peel . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 120
 
PEEL'D............1
Peel'd the brown hazel twig to lilly white, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 42
 
PEEP..............6
Peep with the moon-beams through the leafy roof, To Hope, Line 11
To see the sun o'er peep the eastern dimness, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 86
And one's own image from the bottom peep ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 332
Though he should dance from eve till peep of day- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 169
Thou shalt see the field-mouse peep Fancy, Line 55
And prithee, Hum, behind the screen do peep The Jealousies, Line 430
 
PEEP'D............2
An arch face peep'd ,- an Oread as I guess'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 671
And 'tween the curtains peep'd , where, lo!- how fast she slept. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 252
 
PEEPING...........4
Cynthia is from her silken curtains peeping To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 10
The blue sky here, and there, serenely peeping I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 169
And, being hidden, laugh at their out- peeping ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 273
His purple vest, that ever peeping was The Jealousies, Line 266
 
PEEPS.............5
Peeps the richness of a pearl. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 18
Whose patient level peeps its crystal eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 871
For, as the sunset peeps into a wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 382
Ah! surely that light peeps from Vesper's eye, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 78
And through whose curtains peeps no hellish nose, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 15
 
PEER..............6
To peer about upon variety; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 16
Who loves to peer up at the morning sun, On The Story of Rimini, Line 1
Endymion too, without a forest peer , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 190
Alone, without a peer : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 271
Who 'sdains to yield to any but his peer , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 43
Full soldier as he is, and without peer King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 31
 
PEERING...........2
Embroidered with many a spring peering flower? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 14
Mantling the east, by Aurora's peering hand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 113
 
PEERLESS..........4
"O Arethusa, peerless nymph! why fear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 936
And win perhaps that night a peerless bride, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 167
Or bright elixir peerless I had drunk, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 119
And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes. Ode on Melancholy, Line 20
 
PEERS.............9
Breathless the laurel'd peers ; Ode to Apollo, Line 20
That fill'd the eyes of morn;- the laurel'd peers To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 3
And peers among the cloudlet's jet and white, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 94
While ever and anon to his shorn peers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 280
So that it smelt more balmy than its peers Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 427
And shaped and tinted her above all peers . Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 4
Peers like the front of Saturn. Who had power Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 102
Stood bright, amid the sorrow of his peers ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 30
Peers with disrelish, grey, barren, and cold! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
 
PEEVISHNESS.......1
I should not quarrel with his peevishness . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 147
 
PEG...............1
"Venus won't stir a peg without a fee, The Jealousies, Line 298
 
PEGASUS...........3
And thought it Pegasus . Ah dismal soul'd! Sleep and Poetry, Line 187
O, little faery Pegasus ! rear - prance- The Jealousies, Line 637
March, little Pegasus , with pawing hoof sublime! The Jealousies, Line 639
 
PEGGY.............1
And Peggy too - adown the glen Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 23
 
PEGGY'S...........1
Young Peggy's mither, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 22
 
PEGS..............1
Two or three pegs Two or three posies, Line 25
 
PELF..............2
Should he give up awhile his penny pelf , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 504
It may not be - those Baalites of pelf , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 451
 
PELICAN...........1
And we are nurtured like a pelican brood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 815
 
PELT..............1
The while they pelt each other on the crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 275
 
PELTED............1
Pelted with flowers as he on did pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 216
 
PELTETH...........2
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth ; Fancy, Line 4
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth . Fancy, Line 78
 
PEN...............8
Give me a golden pen , and let me lean On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 1
O Poesy! for thee I hold my pen Sleep and Poetry, Line 47
O Poesy! for thee I grasp my pen Sleep and Poetry, Line 53
Thou wast the mountain-top - the sage's pen - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 164
Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 2
And a pen There was a naughty boy, Line 33
Too huge for mortal tongue or pen of scribe: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 160
Too huge for mortal tongue, or pen of scribe. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 9
 
PENALTIES.........1
Hard penalties against thee, if't be found Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
 
PENANC'D..........1
Penanc'd , and taunted on a scaffolding! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 146
 
PENANCE...........2
His was harsh penance on St. Agnes' Eve: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 24
That he, as a fit penance for his crimes, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 26
 
PENANCED..........1
She seem'd, at once, some penanced lady elf, Lamia, Part I, Line 55
 
PENDENT...........5
The lamps that from the high-roof'd hall were pendent , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 132
New growth about each shell and pendent lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 928
These pendent lamps and chandeliers are bright Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 40
Pendent .- "Art thou not of the dreamer tribe? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 198
Pendent ; and by her voice I knew she shed The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 220
 
PENETRANT.........1
The lady, ever watchful, penetrant , Lamia, Part II, Line 34
 
PENITENT..........4
Of Zephyr slew him,- Zephyr penitent , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 329
The penitent shower fell, as down he knelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 289
Who, penitent ere he'd begun O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 75
Was almost murder'd; I am penitent , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 170
 
PENN'D............2
Why I have never penn'd a line to thee: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 22
As much as here is penn'd doth always find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 847
 
PENNY.............1
Should he give up awhile his penny pelf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 504
 
PENS..............1
Never again saw he the happy pens Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 70
 
PENSIONERS........1
Gentlemen pensioners next; and after them, The Jealousies, Line 586
 
PENSIVE...........3
Pensive awhile she dreams awake, and sees, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 232
Pensive , and full of painful jealousies Lamia, Part I, Line 33
Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 1
 
PENT..............3
To one who has been long in city pent , To one who has been long in city pent, Line 1
Their summer coolness: pent up butterflies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 258
Were pent in regions of laborious breath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 22
 
PEONA.............14
Peona , his sweet sister: of all those, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 408
Peona guiding, through the water straight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 427
Hereat Peona , in their silver source, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 489
Mark me, Peona ! that sometimes it brought Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 689
" Peona ! ever have I long'd to slake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 769
Was pass'd in dreaming. Hearken, sweet Peona ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 861
I'll smile no more, Peona ; nor will wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 972
Peona of the woods!- Can she endure- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 801
Peona , mayst return to me. I own Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 867
Peona , ye should hand in hand repair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 912
Endymion!" said Peona , "we are here! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 972
Be spiritualiz'd. Peona , we shall range Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 993
Peona kiss'd, and bless'd with fair good night: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 997
They vanish'd far away!- Peona went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1002
 
PEONA'S...........2
Peona's busy hand against his lips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 444
Through autumn mists, and took Peona's hand: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 991
 
PEONIES...........1
Or on the wealth of globed peonies ; Ode on Melancholy, Line 17
 
PEOPLE............8
Dwells here and there with people of no name, Addressed to Haydon, Line 3
Calling the people to some other prayers, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 2
The people for to see- There was a naughty boy, Line 95
Forgive me pray, good people all, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 33
'Twas with some people out of common reach; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 43
Otho! thou father of the people call'd, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 118
Patience, good people , in fit time I send Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 75
Of yonder hill, what crowds of people !" "Whew! The Jealousies, Line 544
 
PEOPLE'S..........1
(I've got a conscience, maugre people's jokes:) The Jealousies, Line 697
 
PERAEAN...........1
The rugged founts of the Peraean rills, Lamia, Part I, Line 176
 
PERCEANT..........1
Keen, cruel, perceant , stinging: she, as well Lamia, Part II, Line 301
 
PERCEIVE..........2
soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
"O Isabella, I can half perceive Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 57
 
PERCH.............3
To their spirit's perch , their being's high account, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 14
After some warm delight, that seems to perch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 64
Each like a dove leaving its olive perch , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 286
 
PERCHANCE.........4
Until that grove appear'd, as if perchance , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 949
As one who sits ashore and longs perchance To Homer, Line 3
Perchance speak, kneel, touch, kiss - in sooth such things have been. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 81
Unless perchance I might rejoice to win Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 23
 
PERCHING..........1
A vulture from his towery perching ; frown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 535
 
PERFECT...........4
Of mine was once made perfect in these woods. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 966
Say, is not bliss within our perfect seisure? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 720
Spreading her perfect arms upon the air, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 239
So perfect , so divine, that our poor eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 67
 
PERFECTION........2
Whence came that high perfection of all sweetness? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 607
So on our heels a fresh perfection treads, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 212
 
PERFIDY...........1
Urging the perfidy of broken faith,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 148
 
PERFORCE..........3
Far wandering, they were perforce content Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 766
How ye, perforce , must be content to stoop: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 178
Perforce . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 182a
 
PERFUME...........3
Perfume which on earth is not; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 16
Filling the chilly room with perfume light.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 275
Fill'd with pervading brilliance and perfume : Lamia, Part II, Line 174
 
PERFUMED..........1
Came forth, and in perfumed leafits spread. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 432
 
PERHAPS...........28
Perhaps on the wing of poesy upsoar,- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 12
Perhaps to see shapes of light, aerial lymning, Sleep and Poetry, Line 33
'Tis perhaps as well that it should be to borrow Sleep and Poetry, Line 324
Or perhaps , to show their black, and golden wings, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 91
Those who would watch. Perhaps , the trembling knee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 337
What it might mean. Perhaps , thought I, Morpheus, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 559
Saving, perhaps , some snow-light cadences Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 79
Perhaps her love like mine is but unknown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 800
Perhaps ye are too happy to be glad: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 819
Perhaps her voice is not a nightingale's, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 2
Perhaps her teeth are not the fairest pearl; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 3
Or discontent, perhaps from both; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 20
And win perhaps that night a peerless bride, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 167
At glaring watch, perhaps , with ready spears- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 354
Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Ode to a Nightingale, Line 65
Yet stay,- perhaps a charm may call you back, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 84
To some securest lodging - cold perhaps ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 98
You have your own perhaps . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 44a
And question them in private; for perhaps , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 241
When I had heard e'en of thy death perhaps , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 21
For two of them, they stay away perhaps , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 56
Perhaps 'twould be Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 138c
Perhaps grown wearied of their Corinth talk: Lamia, Part I, Line 232
Love in a palace is perhaps at last Lamia, Part II, Line 3
A haunting music, sole perhaps and lone Lamia, Part II, Line 122
Of her high phrase: perhaps no further dare. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 468
Or living on perhaps , your wretched thrall, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 11
Now I think on't, perhaps I could convince The Jealousies, Line 473
 
PERIL.............2
On your peril , sirs, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 53b
Miss'd the way, boy? Say not that on your peril ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 16
 
PERILOUS..........3
A fragile dew-drop on its perilous way Sleep and Poetry, Line 86
In perilous bustle; while upon the deck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 657
Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 70
 
PERILS............1
The little struggler, sav'd from perils dark, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 12
 
PERIODS...........2
With lofty periods when my verses fire him, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 79
His woven periods into careless rhyme; The Jealousies, Line 636
 
PERIS.............1
Of the sweets of Fairies, Peris , Goddesses, Lamia, Part I, Line 329
 
PERISH............1
Though my name perish from the book of honour, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 265
 
PERISH'D..........2
Had we both perish'd ?"- "Look!" the sage replied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 717
I should have perish'd in our empire's wreck; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50
 
PERIWINKLE........1
Of periwinkle and wild strawberry, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 101
 
PERJUR'D..........1
A perjur'd slave! King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 46a
 
PERJURED..........2
I'll not be perjured . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 76a
You'll not be perjured ! Go to Albert then, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 79
 
PERJURY...........1
And for his perjury King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 46b
 
PERMITTED.........1
Write on my tablets all that was permitted , Sleep and Poetry, Line 79
 
PERNICIOUS........3
At one pernicious charge of the enemy, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 66
Too cheerful for these foul pernicious days. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 121
Moan, Cybele, moan, for thy pernicious babes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 425
 
PERPETUAL.........1
As say these sages, health perpetual Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 831
 
PERPLEX...........2
Fright and perplex , so also shuddered he- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 170
Fright and perplex , so also shudders he: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 19
 
PERPLEX'D.........4
In sort of wakeful swoon, perplex'd she lay, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 236
Perplex'd her with a thousand things- The Eve of St. Mark, Line 29
Perplex'd , the while melodiously he said: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 49
Lycius, perplex'd at words so blind and blank, Lamia, Part II, Line 102
 
PERPLEXES.........1
Though the dull brain perplexes and retards: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 34
 
PERPLEXING........4
Something more high perplexing in thy face!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 515
O state perplexing ! On the pinion bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 439
You are a most perplexing noble boy. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 112
You not less a perplexing noble father. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 113
 
PERPLEXITY........3
Ah, what perplexity ! Ah, well a day! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 447
Had no perplexity to hide his head! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 2
Perplexity every where! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 279a
 
PERSEAN...........1
With duller steel than the Persean sword Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 393
 
PERSECUTED........1
Is persecuted more, and fever'd more, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 102
 
PERSECUTING.......2
Severe before me: persecuting fate! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1006
Comes through the panes with persecuting glare. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 25
 
PERSEVER'D........1
The Latmian persever'd along, and thus Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 789
 
PERSEVERING.......1
With such a thick skull'd persevering suit? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 200
 
PERSIAN...........3
No one to see my Persian feathers toss, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 12
But new he was and bright as scarf from Persian loom. Character of C.B., Line 9
And a few Persian mutes, who that same year Lamia, Part I, Line 390
 
PERSIST...........1
Persist and you may be an ape tomorrow." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 40
 
PERSON............3
That when his person meets again your eye, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 73
Your person unaffronted by vile odds, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 25
' Where is his Majesty?' No person feels The Jealousies, Line 781
 
PERSON'D..........1
The tender- person'd Lamia melt into a shade. Lamia, Part II, Line 238
 
PERSONAE..........1
Dramatis Personae King Stephen
 
PERSONAL..........3
For me! I take no personal revenge Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 232
"Of personal beauty and untainted soul"? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 22
Not trenching on our actions personal . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 13
 
PERSONATE.........1
For your self's sake, I do not personate Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 143
 
PERSONIFIED.......1
And young AEolian harps personified , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 18
 
PERSPECTIVE.......1
In long perspective , and continually Sleep and Poetry, Line 100
 
PERSUADE..........4
And breath'd a sister's sorrow to persuade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 410
And pray persuade with thee - Ah, I have done, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 920
Persuade her sacred tongue All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 50
Persuade your honour's Highness to refrain The Jealousies, Line 464
 
PERT..............2
So pert and useless, that they bring to mind To My Brother George (epistle), Line 129
She keeps so white and pert - All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 42
 
PERTH.............1
There's Bertha Blount of York,- and Bertha Knox of Perth ." The Jealousies, Line 378
 
PERVADE...........1
Can size and shape pervade . The lofty theme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 306
 
PERVADED..........1
Pervaded all the beetling gloomy steeps, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 358
 
PERVADING.........3
Are but a slime, a thin pervading scum, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 335
Fill'd with pervading brilliance and perfume: Lamia, Part II, Line 174
Fills forest dells with a pervading air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 405
 
PERVERSE..........2
In trammels of perverse deliciousness. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 761
Perverse , with stronger fancy to reclaim Lamia, Part II, Line 70
 
PEST..............2
Who lov'd - and music slew not? 'Tis the pest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 365
A straying from his toil? Hot Egypt's pest Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 140
 
PESTER............2
The scarlet coats that pester human-kind. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 130
We are cag'd in; you need not pester that Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 2
 
PESTILENCE........2
That pestilence brought in,- that cannot be, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 101
Where is thy misty pestilence to creep The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 205
 
PESTILENT.........1
Were full of pestilent light; our taintless rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 694
 
PET...............2
A pet -lamb in a sentimental farce! Ode on Indolence, Line 54
These orders given, the Prince, in half a pet , The Jealousies, Line 199
 
PETARDS...........1
Is bruised by the Hungarian petards . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 9
 
PETER.............2
O grant that like to Peter I O grant that like to Peter I, Line 1
May like to Peter B. O grant that like to Peter I, Line 2
 
PETER'S...........1
By Peter's chair! I have upon my tongue Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 67
 
PETRARCH..........2
And faithful Petrarch gloriously crown'd. Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 14
Petrarch , outstepping from the shady green, Sleep and Poetry, Line 389
 
PETTICOATS........2
And kick'd up her petticoats fairly. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 6
To cravats and to petticoats . Not Aladdin magian, Line 52
 
PETTING...........1
Never, never petting In drear nighted December, Line 15
 
PETTISH...........2
Came vex'd and pettish through her nostrils small. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 470
Define their pettish limits, and estrange Lamia, Part I, Line 193
 
PETTY.............2
Of their petty ocean. Oftener, heavily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 884
petty fancies I was crossed." Wordsworth O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 1
 
PHAETONS..........1
To whisking tilburies, or phaetons rare, The Jealousies, Line 251
 
PHALANX...........1
I sue not for my phalanx on the plain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 544
 
PHALARIC..........1
And give the colonelcy to Phalaric ; The Jealousies, Line 149
 
PHANTASIED........1
It could not be so phantasied . Fierce, wan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 506
 
PHANTASIES........4
Had taken fairy phantasies to strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 92
Her silk had play'd in purple phantasies , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 370
So mus'd awhile, entoil'd in woofed phantasies . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 288
And thus in thousand hugest phantasies Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 13
 
PHANTASM..........3
No merely slumberous phantasm , could unlace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 771
This murky phantasm ! thou contented seem'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 466
phantasm in the Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
PHANTASMS.........1
Are cloudy phantasms . Caverns lone, farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 651
 
PHANTASY..........3
Of colour'd phantasy ; for I fear 'twould trouble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 642
And see what more my phantasy can win. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 47
His phantasy was lost, where reason fades, Lamia, Part I, Line 235
 
PHANTOM...........2
With love, and kept all phantom fear aloof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 290
Here, Albert, this old phantom wants a proof! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 207
 
PHANTOMS..........7
These phantoms with a nod. Lo! from the dark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 533
Or be by phantoms duped. O destiny! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 629
They glide, like phantoms , into the wide hall; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 361
Like phantoms , to the iron porch, they glide; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 362
O lank-eared Phantoms of black-weeded pools! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 230
So at Hyperion's words the Phantoms pale Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 255
Vanish, ye phantoms , from my idle spright, Ode on Indolence, Line 59
 
PHEASANTS.........1
And long-tail'd pheasants , and a rising sun, The Jealousies, Line 448
 
PHIAL.............2
And emptied on't a black dull-gurgling phial : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 515
Pour'd out a phial of wrath upon my faults? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 50
 
PHIDIAN...........1
With vases, to one deep in Phidian lore. Ode on Indolence, Line 10
 
PHILOMEL..........1
Catching the notes of Philomel ,- an eye To one who has been long in city pent, Line 10
 
PHILOMEL'S........1
Clear was the song from Philomel's far bower; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 154
 
PHILOSOPHER.......3
And pledge him. The bald-head philosopher Lamia, Part II, Line 245
to behold. The young man, a philosopher , otherwise staid and discreet, able to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Is a philosopher the while he goes What can I do to drive away, Line 16
 
PHILOSOPHIC.......2
Philosophic numbers smooth; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 20
Slow-stepp'd, and robed in philosophic gown: Lamia, Part I, Line 365
 
PHILOSOPHISING....1
Philosophising thus, he pull'd the check, The Jealousies, Line 253
 
PHILOSOPHIZE......1
On the admiral staff - and to philosophize Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 73
 
PHILOSOPHY........4
With old philosophy ; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 30
The staid philosophy . God of the meridian, Line 22
At the mere touch of cold philosophy ? Lamia, Part II, Line 230
Philosophy will clip an Angel's wings, Lamia, Part II, Line 234
 
PHILOSTRATUS......1
" Philostratus , in his fourth book de Vita Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
PHILTRES..........1
Ask you for her receipt for love philtres . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 15
 
PHLEGM............1
With browless idiotism - o'erweening phlegm - To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
 
PHO...............2
" Pho ! nonsense!" exclaim'd Hum, "now don't despair: The Jealousies, Line 458
For thine imperial absence? Pho ! I can The Jealousies, Line 534
 
PHOEBE............6
See not her charms! Is Phoebe passionless? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 56
Phoebe is fairer far - O gaze no more:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 57
Alas, I must not think - by Phoebe , no! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 303
And Phoebe bends towards him crescented. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 438
Phoebe , his passion! joyous she upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 987
Far from her moon had Phoebe wandered; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 30
 
PHOEBE'S..........2
Young Phoebe's , golden hair'd; and so 'gan crave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 451
Fairer than Phoebe's sapphire-region'd star, Ode to Psyche, Line 26
 
PHOEBEAN..........1
And, swiftly as a bright Phoebean dart, Lamia, Part I, Line 78
 
PHOEBUS...........8
I shall again see Phoebus in the morning: To George Felton Mathew, Line 21
Phoebus awhile delayed his mighty wheels, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 212
Who now, ere Phoebus mounts the firmament, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 330
And to god Phoebus , for a golden lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 702
To rise like Phoebus with a golden quell, Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 7
Night after night, when Phoebus was away, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 7
O Phoebus , that I had thy sacred word Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 30
Tit-bits for Phoebus !- yes, you well may smile. The Jealousies, Line 563
 
PHOEBUS'..........5
To Phoebus' shrine; and in it he did fling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 835
"Arise, good youth, for sacred Phoebus' sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 292
I rear'd my head, and look'd for Phoebus' daughter. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 414
Exhal'd to Phoebus' lips, away they are gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 349
He tries the nerve of Phoebus' golden bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 411
 
PHOENICIAN........1
suburbs of Corinth, and told him she was a Phoenician by birth, and if he would Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
PHOENIX...........1
Give me new phoenix wings to fly at my desire. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 14
 
PHORCUS...........2
Phorcus , the sire of Gorgons. Neighbour'd close Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 74
And Phorcus , sea-born, and together strode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 385
 
PHOSPHOR..........3
And where the sun on fiercest phosphor shines Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 58
Flash'd phosphor and sharp sparks, without one cooling tear. Lamia, Part I, Line 152
Where hung a silver lamp, whose phosphor glow Lamia, Part I, Line 380
 
PHRASE............2
To hear you condescend to ribbald- phrase . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 90
Of her high phrase : perhaps no further dare. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 468
 
PHRASES...........1
You do not like cold pig with Latin phrases , The Jealousies, Line 539
 
PHRENZIED.........1
And the bright Titan, phrenzied with new woes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 299
 
PHYSICIAN.........7
Physician Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 11
It is the best physician for the spleen; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 8
OTHO, ERMINIA, ETHELBERT, and a Physician , discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
Physician . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 140
Physician ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 173c
A humanist, physician to all men. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 190
Physician Nature! let my spirit blood! To Fanny, Line 1
 
PHYSICIANS........3
In care of the physicians . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 244
Have ye no comfort for me, ye physicians Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 2
Then twelve physicians fluttering two and two; The Jealousies, Line 589
 
PIAZZIAN..........1
Mulciber's columns gleam in far piazzian line. Lamia, Part I, Line 212
 
PICK..............1
To pick up the keep-sake intended for me. To Some Ladies, Line 16
 
PICK'D............2
And here is manna pick'd from Syrian trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 452
Pick'd like a red stag from the fallow herd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 86
 
PICKAXE...........1
Will not yield to the pickaxe and the spade,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 46
 
PICKLES...........1
Deserted all my pickles and preserves, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 13
 
PICKLOCK..........2
Give me the picklock , sirrah, and go play." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 64
The picklock from the pocket in his jaw. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 68
 
PICKLOCK'D........1
Picklock'd a faery's boudoir - now no king, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 37
 
PICTUR'D..........2
Pictur'd in western cloudiness, that takes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 741
Then there was pictur'd the regality Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 210
 
PICTURE...........6
Picture out each lovely meaning: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 8
See, in another picture , nymphs are wiping Sleep and Poetry, Line 372
To picture out the quaint, and curious bending I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 19
So dear a picture of his sovereign power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 548
Past the sweet Virgin's picture , while his prayer he saith. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 9
Twin picture to your face. Erminia! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
 
PICTURES..........3
From such fine pictures , heavens! I cannot dare Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 19
My pictures all Salvator's, save a few Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 67
As in old pictures tender cherubim The Jealousies, Line 37
 
PIECE.............3
Our piece of heaven - whose benevolence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 37
Or tear me piece -meal with a bony saw, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 263
Against that ugly piece of calumny, The Jealousies, Line 746
 
PIECES............3
Began to tear his scroll in pieces small, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 747
He tore it into pieces small as snow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 749
I'll switch you soundly and in pieces tear." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 17
 
PIERC'D...........2
Or by the song of Erin pierc'd and sadden'd: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 112
O shell-borne Neptune, I am pierc'd and stung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 238
 
PIERCE............6
Why pierce high-fronted honour to the quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 759
I saw the whelming vintage hotly pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 261
One hour doth linger weeping, for the pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 518
The Centaur's arrow ready seems to pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 597
With cruel pierce , and bringing him again Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 271
May pierce them on the sudden with the thorn Lamia, Part II, Line 281
 
PIERCING..........2
Stiff-holden shields, far- piercing spears, keen blades, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 9
Groan'd one and all, as if some piercing trial Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 516
 
PIES..............1
Sweeter than those dainty pies Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 8
 
PIETIES...........1
From happy pieties , thy lucent fans, Ode to Psyche, Line 41
 
PIETY.............3
Of their old piety , and of their glee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 130
Our piety to Neptunus supreme!"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 808
Still with the dews of piety , this meek lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
 
PIG...............2
When the pig is overroasted, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 13
You do not like cold pig with Latin phrases, The Jealousies, Line 539
 
PIGEON............1
A pigeon tumbling in clear summer air; Sleep and Poetry, Line 93
 
PIGEON'S..........1
A pigeon's somerset, for sport or change's sake. The Jealousies, Line 45
 
PIGEONS...........1
Pigeons and doves: Adonis something mutter'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 497
 
PIGHT.............2
And, in the middle, there is softly pight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 60
When I have finish'd it! Now,- now, I'm pight , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 166
 
PIGMIES...........1
To chattering pigmies ? I would have you know Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 61
 
PIGMIO............2
To Pigmio , of Imaus sovereign, The Jealousies, Line 29
Th' Ambassador's return'd from Pigmio ! The Jealousies, Line 551
 
PIGMY'S...........1
Had stood a pigmy's height: she would have ta'en Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 28
 
PIGSNEY...........1
To see my pigsney Bellanaine. Hum! do The Jealousies, Line 547
 
PIL'D.............2
In pink and purple chequer, nor, up- pil'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 287
And on the paved floor, where nigh were pil'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 234
 
PILE..............2
Bay leaves were crackling in the fragrant pile , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 228
So shelter'd by the mighty pile . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 47
 
PILED.............4
Of logs piled solemnly.- Ah, well-a-day, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 183
Before high piled books, in charactry, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 3
Not world on world upon these shoulders piled , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 313
From the gold peaks of heaven's high piled clouds; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 434
 
PILGRIM...........2
After the pilgrim in his wanderings, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 493
A famish'd pilgrim ,- saved by miracle. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 339
 
PILGRIM'S.........1
But after water-brooks this pilgrim's soul Character of C.B., Line 16
 
PILGRIMAGE........3
My pilgrimage for the world's dusky brink. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 977
Thee, gentle Goddess of my pilgrimage , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1014
Shrieks, yells, and groans of torture- pilgrimage ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 524
 
PILLAR............1
Behind a broad hall- pillar , far beyond The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 94
 
PILLAR'D..........2
Through a long pillar'd vista, a fair shrine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 260
A pillar'd porch, with lofty portal door, Lamia, Part I, Line 379
 
PILLARS...........4
Atween the pillars of the sylvan roof, To George Felton Mathew, Line 48
Pillars , and frieze, and high fantastic roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 624
By jasper pillars , letting through their shafts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 842
Through the dark pillars of those sylvan aisles. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 968
 
PILLOW............9
I pillow my head on the sweets of the rose, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 38
Of mosses, and flowers, to pillow thy head; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 10
Pillow my chin for ever? ever press Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 742
Nature's soft pillow in a wakeful rest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 174
In peace upon my watery pillow : now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 235
'Twas Sleep slow journeying with head on pillow . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 370
And kiss on a grass green pillow . Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 16
Sank in her pillow . Shaded was her dream The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 281
Upon my pillow , breeding many woes: Sonnet to Sleep, Line 10
 
PILLOW'D..........6
E'en now I'm pillow'd on a bed of flowers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 123
Be incense- pillow'd every summer night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 999
Pillow'd in lovely idleness, nor dream'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 467
Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 10
Comes from the pillow'd beauty of that fair Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 35
Might fancy-fit his brows, silk- pillow'd at his ease. Lamia, Part II, Line 220
 
PILLOWING.........1
Afloat, and pillowing up the majesty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 999
 
PILLOWS...........3
Light hoverer around our happy pillows ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 13
Our pillows ; and the fresh to-morrow morn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 23
So spake they to their pillows ; but, alas, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 31
 
PILLOWY...........2
And from the pillowy silkiness that rests I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 188
We put our eyes into a pillowy cleft, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 325
 
PIMPLES...........1
With two or three pimples - Two or three posies, Line 4
 
PIN'D.............2
By telling how the sea-born goddess pin'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 458
Not pin'd by human sorrows, but bright blanch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 257
 
PINCH.............3
Rise, Cupids! or we'll give the blue-bell pinch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 505
That set sharp racks at work, to pinch and peel. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 120
Not liking in her heart an hour-long pinch , The Jealousies, Line 71
 
PINE..............20
We see the waving of the mountain pine ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 128
But still would seem to droop, to pine , to love. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 176
Why should our young Endymion pine away! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 184
By every wind that nods the mountain pine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 261
One sigh doth echo, one poor sob doth pine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 6
Such utmost beauty? Alas, thou dost pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 74
For I no more shall wither, droop, and pine . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 254
Wandering about in pine and cedar gloom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 483
Oh, no - it shall not pine , and pine, and pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 578
Oh, no - it shall not pine, and pine , and pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 578
Oh, no - it shall not pine, and pine, and pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 578
Endymion, weep not so! Why shouldst thou pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 805
To Lucifer or Baal, when he'd pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 892
Of pride and avarice,- the dark pine roof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 294
Porphyro will leave me here to fade and pine .- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 329
Thick night confounds the pine -tops with the clouds: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 80
Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 30
Stretch'd out, at ease, beneath a glutinous pine ; Lamia, Part I, Line 210
(Like a stunt bramble by a solemn pine ) The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 293
And sponge my forehead,- so my love doth make me pine ." The Jealousies, Line 432
 
PINED.............2
And so she pined , and so she died forlorn, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 497
Told of his rage, ere he thus sank and pined . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 43
 
PINES.............7
With fennel green, and balm, and golden pines , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 575
Pines , and lime-trees full in bloom, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 32
Take you a bundle of the largest pines , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 57
There is a roaring in the bleak-grown pines Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 116
Such noise is like the roar of bleak-grown pines ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 122
Instead of pines shall murmur in the wind: Ode to Psyche, Line 53
The sable-pointed heads of firs and pines The Jealousies, Line 555
 
PINING............2
Narcissus pining o'er the untainted spring? I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 164
He is a fool who stands at pining gaze! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 152
 
PINION............2
With awe of purity - no Cupid pinion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 792
O state perplexing! On the pinion bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 439
 
PINION'D..........1
A skyey masque, a pinion'd multitude,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 558
 
PINIONS...........24
On pinions that nought moves but pure delight; As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 3
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head. To Hope, Line 6
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head! To Hope, Line 24
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head! To Hope, Line 30
Beneath thy pinions canopy my head! To Hope, Line 36
Waving thy silver pinions o'er my head. To Hope, Line 48
If a cherub, on pinions of silver descending, To Some Ladies, Line 17
Will never give him pinions , who intreats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 34
Swiftly I mount, upon wide spreading pinions , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 105
In passing here, his owlet pinions shook; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 560
Spreading imaginary pinions wide. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 586
Far off, the shadows of his pinions dark, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 674
Cupids a slumbering on their pinions fair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 386
I tried in fear the pinions of my will. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 390
Then Love took wing, and from his pinions shed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 891
Our spirits, fann'd away by thy light pinions . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 982
Wide pinions to keep here; nor do I dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 356
And on those pinions , level in mid air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 403
Shew cold through watery pinions ; make more bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 588
And pleasure nobler pinions - Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 15
Enshaded with thy pinions ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 7
Their arms embraced, and their pinions too; Ode to Psyche, Line 16
And thus; while Hermes on his pinions lay, Lamia, Part I, Line 66
Balanced upon his grey-grown pinions twain, The Jealousies, Line 581
 
PINK..............3
Pink robes, and wavy hair, and diamond jar, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 7
In pink and purple chequer, nor, up-pil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 287
About my room,- I'll have it in the pink ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 25
 
PINKS.............1
Roses, and pinks , and violets, to adorn To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 7
 
PINNACLE..........1
And each imagined pinnacle and steep On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 3
 
PINNACLES.........1
Of icy pinnacles , and dipp'dst thine arms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 208
 
PIONEEREST........1
Or through the air thou pioneerest me, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 27
 
PIOUS.............9
Had swollen and green'd the pious charactery, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 790
Has any here a pious spouse All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 45
Like pious incense from a censer old, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 7
With silver taper's light, and pious care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 194
With staid and pious companies, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 15
Referr'd to pious poesies The Eve of St. Mark, Line 95
Is emptied of this folk, this pious morn? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 37
Devoted to heaven's pious ministries, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 192
The saints will bless you for this pious care. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 200
 
PIOUSLY...........4
Most piously ;- all lovers tempest-tost, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 703
And where I have enshrined piously Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 721
When they St. Agnes' wool are weaving piously ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 117
Meantime touch piously the Delphic harp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 10
 
PIPE..............15
Bubbles a pipe ; fine sounds are floating wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 228
Such as sat listening round Apollo's pipe , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 141
From vallies where the pipe is never dumb; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 200
To the swift treble pipe , and humming string. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 314
Than Hermes' pipe , when anxious he did lean Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 876
The shepherd's pipe come clear from airy steep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 359
Through the cold serpent- pipe refreshfully,- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 412
First the soft bag- pipe mourn'd with zealous haste; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 5
Sigh'd; rueful again the piteous bag- pipe went; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 7
O bag- pipe , thou didst steal my heart away; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 9
O Stranger, thou my nerves from pipe didst charm; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 10
O bag- pipe , thou didst reassert thy sway; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 11
No voice, no lute, no pipe , no incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 32
Thy voice, thy lute, thy pipe , thy incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 46
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone: Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 14
 
PIPER.............1
Left it to pay the piper - a good sum- The Jealousies, Line 696
 
PIPES.............6
Pipes will I fashion of the syrinx flag, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 686
The pipes go shrilly, the libation flows: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 22
What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 10
Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes , play on; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 12
Convey'd in little solder'd pipes by stealth, The Jealousies, Line 212
Of tambourines and pipes , serene and loud, The Jealousies, Line 688
 
PIPING............3
Thrilling liquidity of dewy piping . Sleep and Poetry, Line 371
For ever piping songs for ever new; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 24
Return'd his Highness; "they are piping hot The Jealousies, Line 546
 
PIPPIN............1
For it sounds of Eve's sweet pippin ; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 10
 
PIPS..............1
By those loosen'd hips, you have tasted the pips , O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 11
 
PIPY..............1
The pipy hemlock to strange overgrowth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 241
 
PIQU'D............1
Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 1
 
PITCHERS..........1
Or they might watch the quoit- pitchers , intent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 326
 
PITEOUS...........11
The Poet wept at her so piteous fate, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 201
The seal on the cold ice with piteous bark Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 116
The quiet glooms of such a piteous theme. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 152
For there was striving, in its piteous tongue, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 282
Piteous she look'd on dead and senseless things, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 489
Sigh'd; rueful again the piteous bag-pipe went; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 7
Who knelt, with joined hands and piteous eye, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 305
The Dwarf with piteous face began to rhyme. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 21
Most piteous indeed! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 96b
Own'd they the lovelorn piteous appeal: Lamia, Part II, Line 257
Half lidded, piteous , languid, innocent; The Jealousies, Line 173
 
PITH..............1
Life's self is nourish'd by its proper pith , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 814
 
PITIABLE..........2
A money mong'ring, pitiable brood. Addressed to Haydon, Line 8
Was sharpening for their pitiable bones. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 517
 
PITIED............1
This stranger ay I pitied . For upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 555
 
PITIFUL...........3
Why was I not crush'd - such a pitiful germ? God of the golden bow, Line 23
Fair maid, be pitiful to my great woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 949
Instead of a pitiful rummer, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 5
 
PITILESS..........1
Thrown by the pitiless world. We next could tell To George Felton Mathew, Line 65
 
PITS..............1
Edges them round, and they have golden pits : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 875
 
PITY..............33
As if soft Pity with unusual stress To Lord Byron, Line 3
And melt the soul to pity and to love. Ode to Apollo, Line 41
And tearful ladies made for love, and pity : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 47
O why didst thou pity and beg for a worm? God of the golden bow, Line 20
In pity of the shatter'd infant buds,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 923
Is, that I pity thee; that on this day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 122
With too much passion, will here stay and pity , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 828
With pity , for the grey-hair'd creature wept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 283
And then 'twere pity , but fate's gentle shears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 580
Writhing with pity , and a cursing fit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 664
"Fair damsel, pity me! forgive that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 105
For pity sang this roundelay- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 145
Too much of pity after they are dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 92
Until her heart felt pity to the core Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 378
In pity of her love, so overcast. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 500
Look'd down on him with pity , and the voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 306
Pity he's not here. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 62b
And my son too, pity he is not here. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 63
By Venus, 'tis a pity I knew not Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 30
If you have any pity for a maid, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 44
O, poor deceived Prince, I pity thee! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 89
I know not whether to pity , curse, or laugh. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 206
Would groan for pity . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 258a
'Bout shame and pity . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 43a
That I should claim your pity ! Art not well? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
Begone! I pity thee; thou art a gull, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 101
All pain but pity : thus the lone voice spake: Lamia, Part I, Line 37
Lycius, look back! and be some pity shown." Lamia, Part I, Line 246
For pity do not this sad heart belie- Lamia, Part I, Line 259
For pity do not melt!"- "If I should stay," Lamia, Part I, Line 271
Guesses at heaven: pity these have not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 4
I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 1
Yourself - your soul - in pity give me all, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 9
 
PITY'S............1
Canst thou read aught? O read for pity's sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 763
 
PITYING...........7
Great Alfred's too, with anxious, pitying eyes, Sleep and Poetry, Line 385
On either side; pitying the sad death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 327
May sigh my love unto her pitying ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 957
Some friendly monster, pitying my sad state, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 350
Lo! while slow carried through the pitying crowd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1019
Pitying each form that hungry death hath marr'd, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 357
And pitying forsooth my many wrongs; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 75


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Published @ RC

March 2005