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Keats Concordance
 
PLAC'D............6
And plac'd in midst of all that lovely lass To My Brother George (epistle), Line 86
Such thousands of shut eyes in order plac'd ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 738
The youth of Caria plac'd the lovely dame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 345
Of late two dainties were before me plac'd Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 1
Whether they merit death, or should be plac'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 243
Had plac'd you in some other custody! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 263
 
PLACE.............44
For sure so fair a place was never seen, Imitation of Spenser, Line 23
To find a place where I may greet the maid - To George Felton Mathew, Line 54
And make "a sun-shine in a shady place ": To George Felton Mathew, Line 75
Your hallowed names, in this unholy place , Sleep and Poetry, Line 210
Of friendly voices had just given place Sleep and Poetry, Line 351
Were I in such a place , I sure should pray I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 93
To keep the reader in so sweet a place , This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 3
In every place where infant Orpheus slept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 794
From place to place, and following at chance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 930
From place to place , and following at chance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 930
Young traveller, in such a mournful place ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 650
And after, straight in that inspired place Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 837
A resting place , thus much comes clear and plain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 848
One obscure hiding- place , one little spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 62
So in that crystal place , in silent rows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 735
In such a place as this. O do not curse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 939
O thou wouldst joy to live in such a place ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 675
There was a place untenanted in it: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 882
A mossy place , a Merlin's hall, a dream. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 34
And to examine it in secret place : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 474
To find a bard's low cradle place about the silent north. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 28
Of brother's eyes, of sister's brow, constant to every place ; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 34
All the magic of the place . Not Aladdin magian, Line 49
A very Eden that same place must be! Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 5
In short, sir, 'tis a very place for monks, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 16
One would meet in every place ? Fancy, Line 74
Saying, "Mercy, Porphyro! hie thee from this place ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 98
She took it in her head to see the place . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 56
It seem'd no force could wake him from his place ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 22
And all the gloom and sorrow of the place , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 91
Darken'd the place ; and neighing steeds were heard, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 184
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 3
I cannot square my conduct to time, place , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 3
What may it be? No trifle can take place Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
To set the place in flames. I pray, hast heard Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 7
Give me my woman's form, and place me where he is. Lamia, Part I, Line 120
A deep volcanian yellow took the place Lamia, Part I, Line 155
Of the wide doors disclos'd a place unknown Lamia, Part I, Line 388
All down the aisled place ; and beneath all Lamia, Part II, Line 130
By her glad Lycius sitting, in chief place , Lamia, Part II, Line 239
So old the place was, I remembered none The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 65
Or in that place the moth could not corrupt, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 75
It seem'd no force could wake him from his place ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 327
And all the gloom and sorrow of the place , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 402
 
PLACED............4
That in fairest lake had placed been, Imitation of Spenser, Line 20
Has placed a golden cuirass there; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 49
In white robes, and themselves in order placed Lamia, Part II, Line 196
Let once again these aching arms be placed , What can I do to drive away, Line 50
 
PLACES............8
Visions of all places : a bowery nook Sleep and Poetry, Line 63
Catch the white-handed nymphs in shady places , Sleep and Poetry, Line 105
In many places ;- some has been upstirr'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 224
" Places of nestling green for Poets made." Story of Rimini I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Epigraph
In desolate places , where dank moisture breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 240
Of those dusk places in times far aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 625
Spirit sole in deadly places ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 10
In echoing places ; when the winds respire, The Jealousies, Line 571
 
PLACID............7
Soothing with placid brow our late distress, On Peace, Line 3
The placid features of a human face: To George Felton Mathew, Line 89
And placid eye, young Calidore is burning Calidore: A Fragment, Line 142
Nought more ungentle than the placid look Sleep and Poetry, Line 261
And on their placid foreheads part the hair. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 230
The youth at once arose: a placid lake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1028
In placid sandals, and in white robes graced: Ode on Indolence, Line 4
 
PLAGUE............2
A master- plague in the midst of miseries. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 2
But we must plague him in the flank,- hey, friends? King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 18
 
PLAGUES...........2
Against these plagues he strove in vain; for Fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 96
That fellow's voice, which plagues me worse than any, The Jealousies, Line 159
 
PLAIN.............27
Great Liberty! how great in plain attire! To Hope, Line 38
You chang'd the footpath for the grassy plain . To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 126
The plain Doric column The Gothic looks solemn, Line 2
The archers too, upon a wider plain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 332
To follow it upon the open plain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 892
He caught her airy form, thus did he plain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 301
Soon were the white doves plain , with necks stretch'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 523
Like melodies upon a sandy plain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 683
A resting place, thus much comes clear and plain ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 848
I sue not for my phalanx on the plain ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 544
Turn to some level plain where haughty Mars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 728
"Come hither, Sister of the Island!" Plain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 14
What is there to plain of? By Titan's foe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 943
And yet I will, and tell my love all plain : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 38
There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 1
Is plain , and in the eye of all mankind Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 7
As to my poor deserts. Come, come, be plain . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 86
Upon the neighbour- plain Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 32b
Ah! too plain - Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 260b
I cannot, in plain terms, grossly assault Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 57
Between the tree-stems, marbled plain at first, Lamia, Part II, Line 138
Who on a wide plain gather in sad troops, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 43
Spoken to in clear, plain , and open terms, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 15
Then in plain terms, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 16b
The plain -dress'd sage and spangled blackamoor, The Jealousies, Line 321
What good would that do? And, to be more plain , The Jealousies, Line 466
Plain in our own original mood and tense, The Jealousies, Line 791
 
PLAINER...........3
Plainer and plainer shewing, till at last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 125
Plainer and plainer shewing, till at last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 125
He hears a whisper plainer than a rant: The Jealousies, Line 50
 
PLAINFUL..........1
Beset with plainful gusts, within ye hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 529
 
PLAINING..........4
He had begun a plaining of his woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 547
Plaining discrepant between sea and sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 342
The simple plaining of a minstrel's song! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 388
Were never miss'd." - Thus plaining , doth she bring The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 158
 
PLAININGS.........1
To Jove's high throne, and by her plainings drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 475
 
PLAINLY...........6
By this, friend Charles, you may full plainly see To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 21
So plainly character'd, no breeze would shiver Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 890
As plainly in his ear, as the faint charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 356
To look so plainly through them? to dispel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 328
Am I, that thou may'st plainly see how far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 450
There he says plainly that she loved a man! The Jealousies, Line 109
 
PLAINS............13
To see wide plains , fair trees and lawny slope: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 66
That freshly terminate in open plains , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 116
After dark vapours have oppressed our plains After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 1
Until it came to some unfooted plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 77
Night-swollen mushrooms? Are not our wide plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 215
And paces leisurely down amber plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 551
And make them happy in some happy plains ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1017
From rear to van they scour about the plains ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 252
Who on wide plains gather in panting troops, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 199
To scour the plains and search the cottages. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 39
Among his fallen captains on yon plains . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 92
And touch the stubble- plains with rosy hue; To Autumn, Line 26
Above the plains of Gobi,- desert, bleak; The Jealousies, Line 659
 
PLAINT............1
Nor sigh of his, nor plaint , nor passion'd moan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 201
 
PLAINTIVE.........4
Had touch'd her plaintive lute; and thou, being by, To Lord Byron, Line 4
Soft, plaintive , and melting, for ever will sigh; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 34
And craggy isles, and sea-mew's plaintive cry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 341
Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades Ode to a Nightingale, Line 75
 
PLAINTS...........1
With plaints for me, more tender than the voice Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 12
 
PLAIT.............2
And anxiously began to plait and twist Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 102
Buckled and tied with many a twist and plait ? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 88
 
PLAITED...........3
Was in his plaited brow: yet, his eyelids Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 762
She plaited mats o' rushes, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 22
Plaited upon his furnace-scorched brow: The Jealousies, Line 508
 
PLAITINGS.........1
About the fragrant plaitings of thy dress, The Jealousies, Line 170
 
PLAN..............2
When 'twas their plan to coax her by degrees Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 167
How? Where? The plan of your escape? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 179a
 
PLANET............8
When a new planet swims into his ken; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 10
Huge as a planet , and like that roll round, Sleep and Poetry, Line 176
Swart planet in the universe of deeds! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 15
Pardon me, airy planet , that I prize Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 185
Castor has tamed the planet Lion, see! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 591
The planet orb of fire, whereon he rode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 269
Where she doth breathe!" "Bright planet , thou hast said," Lamia, Part I, Line 87
"My silver planet , both of eve and morn! Lamia, Part II, Line 48
 
PLANET'S..........1
Who, when this planet's sphering time doth close, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 251
 
PLANETARY.........1
Her planetary eyes; and touch her voice The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 281
 
PLANETS...........4
Of planets all were in the blue again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 599
The old man may sleep, and the planets may wink; Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 20
Of influence benign on planets pale, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 108
Of influence benign on planets pale, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 414
 
PLANKS............1
Linger awhile upon some bending planks I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 61
 
PLANS.............1
Of the old bards to mighty deeds: his plans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 895
 
PLANT.............2
To tie for a moment thy plant round his brow, God of the golden bow, Line 32
Its sides I'll plant with dew-sweet eglantine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 697
 
PLANTAIN..........1
Of palm and plantain , met from either side, Lamia, Part II, Line 126
 
PLANTAINS.........1
Two palms and then two plantains , and so on, Lamia, Part II, Line 128
 
PLANTANE..........1
With plantane , and spice blossoms, made a screen; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 21
 
PLANTED...........1
And with calm- planted steps walk'd in austere; Lamia, Part II, Line 158
 
PLASHING..........1
And, plashing among bedded pebbles, stuck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 932
 
PLASHY............2
A serpent's plashy neck; its barbed tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 45
Are routed loose about the plashy meads, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 6
 
PLATE.............1
thereupon she, plate , Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
PLATES............1
Old rusted anchors, helmets, breast- plates large Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 123
 
PLATO.............1
A man may be 'twixt ape and Plato ; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 7
 
PLATO'S...........1
I should have Orphean lips, and Plato's fancy, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 23
 
PLATONIC..........1
In the calm'd twilight of Platonic shades. Lamia, Part I, Line 236
 
PLAUSIBLE.........1
My crooked deeds show good and plausible , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 109
 
PLAY..............22
When they have tired their gentle limbs with play , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 84
Small, busy flames play through the fresh laid coals, To My Brothers, Line 1
Play with their fingers, touch their shoulders white Sleep and Poetry, Line 107
The eyelids with the passing coolness play , After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 7
To laugh, and play , and sing, and loudly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 515
Wherever he may sport himself and play . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 172
For Dian play : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 585
Will you play once more, at nice cut-core, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 13
Here his mighty waters play Not Aladdin magian, Line 29
Or dance, or play , do any thing, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 86
Above tree tops and towers play , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 62
Give me the picklock, sirrah, and go play ." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 64
Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 12
The stage- play emperor to entrap applause, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 144
I play the prude: it is but venturing- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 130
Will you make Titan play the lackey-page Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 60
To play with! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 25a
he should hear her sing and play , and drink such wine as never any drank, and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
To play the Alexander with Darius. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 34
Or if it please him play an hour at chess- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 45
Any foul play , or awkward murdering, The Jealousies, Line 192
Comes from a play -thing of the Emperor's choice, The Jealousies, Line 332
 
PLAY'D............8
He had not with his tamed leopards play'd : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 794
Her silk had play'd in purple phantasies, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 370
If queens and soldiers have play'd high for hearts, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 12
He play'd an ancient ditty, long since mute, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 291
While play'd the organs loud and sweet. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 22
So play'd , so charm'd, so conquer'd, so bereft As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 4
Than the Emperor when he play'd on his Man-Tiger-Organ. The Jealousies, Line 342
"She cried for chess - I play'd a game with her- The Jealousies, Line 703
 
PLAYED............1
Had played upon my heels: I was light-hearted, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 25
 
PLAYFUL...........3
We must think rather, that in a playful mood, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 8
Who at each other tilt in playful quarrel, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 28
My love's far dwelling. Though the playful rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 179
 
PLAYING...........9
About the leaves, and flowers - about the playing Sleep and Poetry, Line 66
Playing in all her innocence of thought. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 100
If thou wast playing on my shady brink, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 977
To set my dull and sadden'd spirit playing ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 46
When he shall hear the wedding lutes a playing .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 601
Infant playing with a skull; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 12
When wedding fiddles are a playing , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 1
And Hazlitt playing with Miss Edgeworth's cat; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 10
More pleasantly by playing woman's part, Lamia, Part I, Line 337
 
PLAYMATE..........1
Her playmate , and her wooer in the shade." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 290
 
PLAYMATES.........3
Her playmates , with their needle broidery, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 434
Dolphins were still my playmates ; shapes unseen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 343
Young playmates of the rose and daffodil, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 572
 
PLAYS.............8
On the far depth where sheeted lightning plays ; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 6
To feel the air that plays about the hills, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 90
And plays about its fancy, till the stings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 621
There is a paly flame of hope that plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 984
Grew a new heart, which at this moment plays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 306
Of some gold tinge, and plays a roundelay Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 252
God's help! my lady fair the conjuror plays The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 124
Sweet in the air a mild-toned music plays , The Jealousies, Line 725
 
PLEA..............6
Soft voices had they, that with tender plea To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 13
He was content to let her amorous plea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 462
Known only to his troop, hath greater plea Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 28
Ludolph, you have no saving plea in store? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 104
No, I have no plea . Disobedience, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 106
Let us be calm, and hear the abbot's plea Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 100
 
PLEACH'D..........1
And plunder'd vines, teeming exhaustless, pleach'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 927
 
PLEAD.............1
Why will you plead yourself so sad forlorn, Lamia, Part II, Line 49
 
PLEADED...........1
'Tis me - my life that's pleaded for! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 59a
 
PLEADER...........1
Be pleader for you- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 88a
 
PLEADS............1
Hear, he pleads not guilty! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 29b
 
PLEAS'D...........8
Where Porphyro took covert, pleas'd amain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 188
Our gloom- pleas'd eyes, embower'd from the light, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 3
What pleas'd your Grace to say? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 141a
Could thy pleas'd star point down upon from heaven Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 8
With one of his well- pleas'd Olympian oaths, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 14
Of your own will? You pleas'd to send for me. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 29
He lives in Wapping, might live where he pleas'd ." Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 23
Somewhat in sadness, but pleas'd in the main, The Jealousies, Line 453
 
PLEASANT..........54
Fain would I echo back each pleasant note To George Felton Mathew, Line 13
And turns for calmness to the pleasant green Calidore: A Fragment, Line 9
These pleasant things, and heaven was bedewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 53
Soon in a pleasant chamber they are seated; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 134
Fatigued he sinks into some pleasant lair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 6
With him," said I, "will take a pleasant charm; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 129
Or of the distance from home's pleasant lair: Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 8
It is to hover round our pleasant hills! Sleep and Poetry, Line 207
All tenderest birds there find a pleasant screen, Sleep and Poetry, Line 252
The hearty grasp that sends a pleasant sonnet Sleep and Poetry, Line 319
And when they're come, the very pleasant rout: Sleep and Poetry, Line 322
Thus I remember all the pleasant flow Sleep and Poetry, Line 337
The pleasant day, upon a couch at ease. Sleep and Poetry, Line 353
O'er which it well might take a pleasant sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 109
The soul is lost in pleasant smotherings: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 132
Than e'er reflected in its pleasant cool I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 168
He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed. On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 8
This pleasant tale is like a little copse: This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 1
That in a time, when under pleasant trees To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 11
Into my being, and each pleasant scene Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 37
And, when the pleasant sun is getting low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 483
Away I wander'd - all the pleasant hues Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 691
My pleasant days, because I could not mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 746
An exil'd mortal, sounds its pleasant name! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 316
Increasing still in heart, and pleasant sense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 351
When on the pleasant grass such love, lovelorn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 466
Down, down, uncertain to what pleasant doom, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 661
The little flowers felt his pleasant sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 677
I roam in pleasant darkness, more unseen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 993
Some pleasant words:- but Love will have his day. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 915
Adieu to Ganges and their pleasant fields! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 33
All madly dancing through the pleasant valley, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 202
With an eye-guess towards some pleasant vale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 396
The pleasant sun-rise; green isles hast thou too, To the Nile, Line 13
A pleasant summer level For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 21
Had taken from the stars its pleasant veil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 82
Had taken from the stars its pleasant veil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 84
So on a pleasant morning, as he leant Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 177
By bards who died content in pleasant sward, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 7
When weary feet forget themselves upon a pleasant turf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 9
The pleasant valleys - have I not, mad brain'd, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 12
He pac'd away the pleasant hours of ease Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 194
I stood upon a shore, a pleasant shore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 262
Where branched thoughts, new grown with pleasant pain, Ode to Psyche, Line 52
Which, being pleasant , ease the heavy pulse, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
With pleasant weight, the amorous-aching earth, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
It gives me pleasant hopes. Please you, walk forth Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 59
About these thornless wilds; her pleasant days Lamia, Part I, Line 95
And fills the air with so much pleasant health The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 100
And ears act with that pleasant unison of sense The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 442
He paces through the pleasant hours of ease, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 38
Adorning bondage with the pleasant gloss King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 51
He said, smack'd his moist lips, and gave a pleasant frown. The Jealousies, Line 423
Seeing her pleasant , tried her with a pun- The Jealousies, Line 654
 
PLEASANTER........1
And his continual voice was pleasanter Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 13
 
PLEASANTLY........2
And ivy banks; all leading pleasantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 81
More pleasantly by playing woman's part, Lamia, Part I, Line 337
 
PLEASANTNESS......1
Full in the middle of this pleasantness Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 89
 
PLEASE............30
And little fit to please a classic ear; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 24
No, doubly no;- yet should these rhymings please , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 78
But thou to please wert nurtured so completely To G.A.W., Line 11
A leafy luxury, seeing I could please To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 13
Dost thou now please thy thirst with berry-juice? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 327
Buzz from their honied wings: and thou shouldst please Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 997
Dancing upon the waves, as if to please Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 84
When it shall please thee in our quiet home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 688
Some English that might strive thine ear to please . Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 4
That every other minute vex and please : Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 4
She liv'd as she did please . Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 12
She thought her pretty face would please the faeries. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 62
Like our Queen when she would please Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 37
O soothest Sleep! if so it please thee, close, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 5
Will't please your Highness enter, and accept Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 77
Then I retire, so generous Otho please , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 137
So please you let me unmolested pass Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 83
After that, say and do whate'er you please . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 111
Or, if't please you best- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 36c
After my health, intreating, if I please , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 37
Please you explain. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 56a
It gives me pleasant hopes. Please you, walk forth Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 59
Where I may all my many senses please , Lamia, Part I, Line 284
Let the mad poets say whate'er they please Lamia, Part I, Line 328
Of every guest; that each, as he did please , Lamia, Part II, Line 219
Benign, if so it please thee, my mind's film." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 146
So answer'd I, continuing, "If it please , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 186
Or if it please him play an hour at chess- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 45
Let us resume his subject if you please : The Jealousies, Line 122
Shall I put out the candles, please your Grace?" The Jealousies, Line 482
 
PLEASED...........2
Float along the pleased air, Ode to Apollo, Line 37
Borne upon wings,- and very pleased she feels The Jealousies, Line 593
 
PLEASING..........5
The enchanting tale - the tale of pleasing woe. To Lord Byron, Line 14
A fate more pleasing , a delight more true To George Felton Mathew, Line 4
Do they occasion; 'tis a pleasing chime. How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 8
Make pleasing music, and not wild uproar. How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 14
Why does his lady smile, pleasing her eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 798
 
PLEASURE..........42
Speaks pleasure from its circle bright, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 14
For, indeed, 'tis a sweet and peculiar pleasure , To Some Ladies, Line 25
Is my soul's pleasure ; and it sure must be O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 12
And always does my heart with pleasure dance, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 51
Through all that day I've felt a greater pleasure To My Brother George (epistle), Line 115
And choose each pleasure that my fancy sees; Sleep and Poetry, Line 104
With over pleasure - many, many more, Sleep and Poetry, Line 345
Though one moment's pleasure Hither, hither, love, Line 13
Pleasure is oft a visitant; but pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 906
'Tis scar'd away by slow returning pleasure . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 909
Ethereal for pleasure ; 'bove his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 672
For endless pleasure , by some coward blushes: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 788
In the very deeps of pleasure , my sole life?"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 824
Where pleasure may be sent: the nested wren Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 63
So it will pleasure thee, and force thee stop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 436
And garlanding grew wild; and pleasure reign'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 934
In search of pleasure throughout every clime: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 275
And lost in pleasure at her feet he sinks, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 418
There anguish does not sting; nor pleasure pall: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 526
Shall be my grief, or twinkle me to pleasure . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 719
All earthly pleasure , all imagin'd good, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 743
That those deceptions which for pleasure go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 851
And pleasure nobler pinions- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 15
Will for thine honor and his pleasure try. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 14
Than idle ears should pleasure in their woe. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 88
I thought some Fate with pleasure or with strife Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 331
There is a pleasure on the heath where Druids old have been, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 3
To taste of pleasure , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 76
Pleasure never is at home: Fancy, Line 2
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth, Fancy, Line 3
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth Fancy, Line 77
Pleasure never is at home. Fancy, Line 94
Listen'd in pain and pleasure at the birth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 66
Bidding adieu; and aching Pleasure nigh, Ode on Melancholy, Line 23
Almost with pleasure . Let them be set free Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 231
And love, and pleasure , and the ruddy strife Lamia, Part I, Line 40
To unperplex'd delight and pleasure known. Lamia, Part I, Line 327
With any pleasure on me, do not bid Lamia, Part II, Line 100
Had felt the cold full sponge to pleasure press'd, Lamia, Part II, Line 192
By faint degrees, voice, lute, and pleasure ceased; Lamia, Part II, Line 265
For pleasure ?)- the fair Princess in full view, The Jealousies, Line 592
With mad-cap pleasure , or hand-clasp'd amaze: The Jealousies, Line 724
 
PLEASURE'S........5
When pleasure's tree no longer bears, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 22
Rousing them from pleasure's lair:- Ode to Apollo, Line 39
Of pleasure's temple. Round about were hung Sleep and Poetry, Line 355
Drunken from pleasure's nipple; and his love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 869
Pain had no sting, and pleasure's wreath no flower. Ode on Indolence, Line 18
 
PLEASURED.........1
That warm, white, lucent, million- pleasured breast,- I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 8
 
PLEASURES.........15
On holy message sent. - What pleasures higher? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 13
Sweet are the pleasures that to verse belong, To George Felton Mathew, Line 1
These are the living pleasures of the bard: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 67
No sooner had I stepp'd into these pleasures To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 97
And many pleasures to my vision started; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 26
Like things of yesterday my youthful pleasures . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 337
'Mong men, are pleasures real as real may be: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 852
She weeps alone for pleasures not to be; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 233
Her from her own fair youth, and pleasures gay, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 463
They were my pleasures , they my sad life's end; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 11
She will mix these pleasures up Fancy, Line 37
And palpitations sweet, and pleasures soft, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 313
Beyond all pleasures past, and all to come: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
May in few hours make pleasures of them all. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 80
Their pleasures in a long immortal dream. Lamia, Part I, Line 128
 
PLEASURINGS.......1
And of three sweetest pleasurings the choice: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 716
 
PLEATED...........1
From pleated lawn-frill fine and thin The Eve of St. Mark, Line 53
 
PLEDGE............7
This ring as pledge of dearest amity; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 136
Ebb spouting to the lees;- if I pledge not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 50
Besides, I thirst to pledge my lovely bride Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 119
And pledge him. The bald-head philosopher Lamia, Part II, Line 245
The pledge of favour, that he not suspect The Jealousies, Line 191
"I pledge you, Hum! and pledge my dearest love, The Jealousies, Line 370
"I pledge you, Hum! and pledge my dearest love, The Jealousies, Line 370
 
PLEDGING..........3
And pledging with contented smack Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 21
My head is light with pledging a great soul, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 6
And, pledging all the mortals of the world, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 44
 
PLEIAD............1
Though a descended Pleiad , will not one Lamia, Part I, Line 265
 
PLEIADES..........1
The Pleiades were up, God of the golden bow, Line 25
 
PLENITUDE.........1
Filling with spiritual sweets to plenitude , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 39
 
PLENTEOUS.........2
Comparing, joyfully, their plenteous stores Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 389
There came upon my face, in plenteous showers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 899
 
PLENTEOUSLY.......1
So plenteously all weed-hidden roots Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 65
 
PLENTY............6
There are plenty of trees, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 13
And plenty of ease, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 14
And plenty of fat deer for parsons; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 15
Still was more plenty than the fabled horn The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 35
Plenty of posies, great stags, butterflies The Jealousies, Line 449
A plenty horn of jewels. And here I The Jealousies, Line 744
 
PLIED.............1
A toper this! he plied his glass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 25
 
PLIGHT............3
Sits in silver plight , For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 35
A whole long month of May in this sad plight Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 25
Your plight before, and, by her son, I swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 31
 
PLINTH............1
Or round white columns wreath'd from capital to plinth . The Jealousies, Line 729
 
PLODDING..........1
Quiet and plodding , thou dost bear no grudge The Jealousies, Line 250
 
PLOT..............6
In some melodious plot Ode to a Nightingale, Line 8
Was it a silent deep-disguised plot Ode on Indolence, Line 13
You - go to your sister there and plot again, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 65
A quick plot , swift as thought to save your heads; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 66
And therefore kept from me your demon's plot Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 138
And plot , in the same minute, how to chouse The Jealousies, Line 59
 
PLOTTED...........2
He meditated, plotted , and even now Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 69
Have I not labour'd, plotted -? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 111a
 
PLOTTING..........1
me, if I had not some hope that while it is dwindling I may be plotting , and Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
PLOUGH............1
Where furrows are new to the plough . Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 8
 
PLOUGHBOY'S.......1
From the ploughboy's heavy shoon; Fancy, Line 21
 
PLOUGHS...........1
Went arching up, and like two magic ploughs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 222
 
PLUCK.............9
So I straightway began to pluck a posey I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 27
Young Daniel, who did straightway pluck the beam Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 6
With my own steed from Araby; pluck down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 534
Daily, I pluck sweet flowerets from their bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 954
To pluck thee from me? And, of thine own will, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 750
O let me pluck it for thee.' Thus she link'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 443
And pluck the sorrow from our huntsmen's brows. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 840
It is as if the rose should pluck herself, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 5
Aye, Conrad, it will pluck out all grey hairs; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 7
 
PLUCK'D...........4
Beheld thee, pluck'd thee, cast thee in the stream To George Felton Mathew, Line 82
Of precious flowers pluck'd in Araby, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 410
Pluck'd witless the weak flowers, till thine arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 74
Beyond a flower pluck'd , white as itself? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
 
PLUCKS............2
He plucks it, dips its stalk in the water: how! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 58
She plucks the fruit unseen, she bathes unseen: Lamia, Part I, Line 99
 
PLUM..............3
Of candied apple, quince, and plum , and gourd; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 265
Or the ripe plum finger its misty bloom, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 6
And the ripe plum still wears its dim attire, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 11
 
PLUM'D............3
White- plum'd lilies, and the first Fancy, Line 49
Among the new- plum'd minions of the war. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 111
Thou superb, plum'd , and helmeted renown, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 10
 
PLUMAGE...........2
There the king-fisher saw his plumage bright Imitation of Spenser, Line 10
Will sear my plumage newly budded Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 25
 
PLUMAGED..........1
With the sweet Princess on her plumaged lair, The Jealousies, Line 40
 
PLUME.............3
Yes! patient plume thy little wing, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 7
With plume , tiara, and all rich array, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 38
Brushing the cobwebs with his lofty plume , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 110
 
PLUMED............1
Fair plumed syren, queen of far-away! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 2
 
PLUMES............6
O'er which bend four milky plumes Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 53
For large white plumes are dancing in mine eye. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 2
So that the waving of his plumes would be Calidore: A Fragment, Line 113
And now, from forth the gloom their plumes immense Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 286
With music wing'd instead of silent plumes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 287
Draw! but remember thou must cower thy plumes , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 109
 
PLUMMET...........1
Swift as a fathoming plummet down he fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 662
 
PLUMP.............5
His plump white arms, and shoulders, enough white Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 213
Plump infant laughers mimicking the coil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 247
Ere a lean bat could plump its wintery skin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 377
So she held her tongue and lay plump and fair Over the hill and over the dale, Line 15
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells To Autumn, Line 7
 
PLUMS.............1
By any touch, a bunch of blooming plums Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 450
 
PLUNDER...........1
His gear and plunder , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 52
 
PLUNDER'D.........2
And plunder'd of its load of blessedness. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 660
And plunder'd vines, teeming exhaustless, pleach'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 927
 
PLUNG'D...........2
I plung'd for life or death. To interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 380
And plung'd all noiseless into the deep night. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 357
 
PLUNGED...........1
I plunged into the crowd to find him or to die. The Jealousies, Line 783
 
PLUTO.............1
Thou madest Pluto bear thin element; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 99
 
PLUTO'S...........2
As Pluto's sceptre, that my words not burn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 474
Or where in Pluto's gardens palatine Lamia, Part I, Line 211
 
PLY...............1
Ply well the rowel with faint trembling heels, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 11
 
POACHES...........1
And then for supper, 'stead of soup and poaches , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 14
 
POCKET............3
Her pocket mirror and began to look When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 52
The picklock from the pocket in his jaw. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 68
From the left pocket of his threadbare hose, The Jealousies, Line 439
 
POCKETS...........1
About you,- feel your pockets , I command,- The Jealousies, Line 601
 
PODS..............1
Her currants pods o' broom, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 6
 
POEM..............1
Knowing within myself the manner in which this Poem has Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
 
POESIED...........1
And poesied with hers in dewy rhyme: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 70
 
POESIES...........2
Gone mad through olden songs and poesies . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 54
Referr'd to pious poesies The Eve of St. Mark, Line 95
 
POESY.............23
Past each horizon of fine poesy ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 12
Perhaps on the wing of poesy upsoar,- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 12
In water, earth, or air, but poesy . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 22
O Poesy ! for thee I hold my pen Sleep and Poetry, Line 47
O Poesy ! for thee I grasp my pen Sleep and Poetry, Line 53
Myself in poesy ; so I may do the deed Sleep and Poetry, Line 97
Of Poesy . Ill-fated, impious race! Sleep and Poetry, Line 201
Of light is poesy ; 'tis the supreme of power; Sleep and Poetry, Line 236
Of poesy , that it should be a friend Sleep and Poetry, Line 246
In the very fane, the light of Poesy : Sleep and Poetry, Line 276
The end and aim of Poesy . 'Tis clear Sleep and Poetry, Line 293
The face of Poesy : from off her throne Sleep and Poetry, Line 394
Until their tongues were loos'd in poesy . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 235
The passion poesy , glories infinite, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 29
Sweet poesy by moonlight: besides these, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 369
The path of love and poesy . But rest, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 38
Although the sun of poesy is set, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 729
Great love in me for thee and Poesy . Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 5
To fit the naked foot of Poesy ; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 6
But on the viewless wings of Poesy , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 33
I knew to be my demon Poesy . Ode on Indolence, Line 30
For Poesy !- no,- she has not a joy,- Ode on Indolence, Line 35
For Poesy alone can tell her dreams, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 8
 
POET..............22
That often must have seen a poet frantic; To George Felton Mathew, Line 38
That when a Poet is in such a trance, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 25
'Twould make the Poet quarrel with the rose. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 46
And they shall be accounted poet kings Sleep and Poetry, Line 267
For what has made the sage or poet write I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 125
So while the Poet stood in this sweet spot, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 177
He was a Poet , sure a lover too, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 193
The Poet wept at her so piteous fate, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 201
Was there a Poet born?- but now no more, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 241
I owe to the kind poet who has set On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 5
A poet caught as he was journeying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 834
As if thine eye, high Poet ! was not bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 48
Chief Poet ! and ye clouds of Albion, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 9
But Elfin- Poet , 'tis impossible Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 5
But a Poet evermore. 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 32
A Poet now or never! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 53
A Poet now or never! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 56
Where's the Poet ? Show him! show him! Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 1
"Thou art no poet ; may'st not tell thy dreams"? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 12
Are useless: sure a poet is a sage; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 189
The poet and the dreamer are distinct, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 199
"A poet , mounted on the court-clown's back, The Jealousies, Line 775
 
POET'S............6
Whose tones reach nought on earth but Poet's ear. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 32
The Poet's eye can reach those golden halls, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 35
It was a poet's house who keeps the keys Sleep and Poetry, Line 354
A woodland rivulet - a poet's death. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 14
The poet's harp - the voice of friends - the sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 165
Be poet's or fanatic's will be known The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 17
 
POETIC............2
Whose head is pregnant with poetic lore. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 54
Your eyes are fix'd, as in poetic sleep, To My Brothers, Line 6
 
POETICAL..........1
"Why, Hum, you're getting quite poetical ! The Jealousies, Line 559
 
POETRY............3
The poetry of earth is never dead: On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 1
The poetry of earth is ceasing never: On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 9
But scribble poetry - There was a naughty boy, Line 29
 
POETS.............9
Than that in which the brother Poets joy'd, To George Felton Mathew, Line 5
Are ugly clubs, the poets Polyphemes Sleep and Poetry, Line 234
"Places of nestling green for Poets made." Story of Rimini I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Epigraph
O Maker of sweet poets , dear delight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 116
Of mighty Poets is made up; the scroll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 724
To thee! But then I thought on poets gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 27
Souls of poets dead and gone, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 1
Souls of poets dead and gone, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 23
Let the mad poets say whate'er they please Lamia, Part I, Line 328
 
POINT.............15
Near to a little island's point they grew; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 24
And now he turns a jutting point of land, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 64
Before the point of his light shallop reaches Calidore: A Fragment, Line 67
Large wings upon my shoulders, and point out Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 178
Round every isle, and point , and promontory, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 405
Or tiny point of fairy scymetar; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 499
Moves round the point , and throws her anchor stiff. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 24
Goddess benign, point forth some unknown thing: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 95
And stars by thousands! Point me out the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 99
Could thy pleas'd star point down upon from heaven Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 8
The star may point oblique. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 11a
In such a searching point , were to give up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 29
That not in the smallest point should he be thwarted, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 30
Yield, Stephen, or my sword's point dip in King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 16
Their point , and bring the weeping bride away; The Jealousies, Line 33
 
POINTED...........6
The sharp, the rapier- pointed epigram? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 65
And pointed out the patriot's stern duty; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 69
Pointed its beak over the fringed bank; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 424
Moved on with pointed finger. In this guise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 606
Pointed each fringed lash; the smeared loam Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 405
The sable- pointed heads of firs and pines The Jealousies, Line 555
 
POINTEST..........1
Thou pointest out the way, and straight 'tis won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 96
 
POINTING..........3
Of knee from knee, nor ankles pointing light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 401
And last, pointing to Corinth, ask'd her sweet, Lamia, Part I, Line 342
Pointing some whither: whereat he too rose The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 456
 
POINTS............4
For while I muse, the lance points slantingly Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 12
Lie!- but begone all ceremonious points Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 89b
Their points of contact, and swift counterchange; Lamia, Part I, Line 194
Points level to the goal of victory. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 23
 
POISE.............3
Of harmony, to where it aye will poise Sleep and Poetry, Line 174
And poise about in cloudy thunder-tents Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 27
His eyes are on thee bent, as thou didst poise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 843
 
POISON............6
Know there is richest juice in poison -flowers. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 104
Its poison in the eyes of conquering Jove. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 48
A disanointing poison : so that Thea, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 98
Turning to poison while the bee-mouth sips: Ode on Melancholy, Line 24
No poison gender'd in close monkish cell The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 49
Poison , as every staunch true-born Imaian ought. The Jealousies, Line 81
 
POISONED..........1
And poisoned was my spirit: despair sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 602
 
POISONER..........1
Of light in light! delicious poisoner ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 987
 
POISONOUS.........6
Poisonous about my ears, and louder grew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 491
Savour of poisonous brass and metal sick: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 189
Wolf's-bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 2
Foul, poisonous , malignant whisperings; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 130
Not grey-brow'd like the poisonous Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
Savour of poisonous brass and metals sick. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 33
 
POISONS...........1
Not the discoloured poisons of a fen, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 22
 
POIZE.............1
As of some breathless racers whose hopes poize Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 924
 
POLAR.............2
And float my brittle limbs o'er polar seas? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 260
Or the polar ray to right you; Robin Hood, Line 22
 
POLES.............1
And while, for rhymes, I search around the poles , To My Brothers, Line 5
 
POLICY............1
By dexterous policy , from the rebel's axe; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 7
 
POLISH............1
So through the crystal polish , liquid fine, Lamia, Part I, Line 384
 
POLISH'D..........2
Black polish'd porticos of awful shade, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 596
Was sitting on a square edg'd polish'd stone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 51
 
POLITIC...........1
And make the politic smile; no, I have heard Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 146
 
POLL..............2
Seem'd like a poll of ivy in the teeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 160
Around the breathed boar: again I'll poll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 481
 
POLLARD...........1
To the knotty side of an old pollard tree When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 84
 
POLLUTE...........1
I dare not. 'Twould pollute so good a father! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 99
 
POLLUTED..........1
" Polluted jarvey! Ah, thou filthy hack! The Jealousies, Line 227
 
POLLUTION.........1
Hast brought pollution to our holy rites? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
 
POLLUX............1
And of the Bear has Pollux mastery: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 592
 
POLYPHEMES........1
Are ugly clubs, the poets Polyphemes Sleep and Poetry, Line 234
 
POMGRANATE........1
On this flush pomgranate bough. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 12
 
POMONA............1
Were high about Pomona : here is cream, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 446
 
POMP..............9
Ere he his unseen pomp would solemnize. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 214
And so the dawned light in pomp receive. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 94
As if she had not pomp subservient; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 47
Of the dome pomp , reflected in extremes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 886
This dusk religion, pomp of solitude, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 954
Insult, and blind, and stifle up my pomp .- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 245
With thunder, and with music, and with pomp : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 121
Of regal pomp and a vainglorious hour, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 3
'Tis not for worldly pomp I wish to see King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 19
 
POMPOUSNESS.......1
His foolish heart from its mad pompousness , Lamia, Part II, Line 114
 
PONDER............1
Endymion sat down, and 'gan to ponder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 886
 
PONDEREST.........1
Ponderest high and deep; and in thy face Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 164
 
PONDERING.........1
Of upcast eye, and tender pondering ! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 122
 
PONDEROUS.........6
All its more ponderous and bulky worth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 803
In ponderous stone, developing the mood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 132
Creus was one; his ponderous iron mace Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 41
The ponderous syllables, like sullen waves Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 305
Ponderous upon my senses a whole moon. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 392
A hedge-stake - or a ponderous stone to hurl King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 7
 
PONTIF............2
The sacrifice goes on; the pontif knife Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 20
I have been the pontif priest Not Aladdin magian, Line 39
 
POOL..............5
And in the midst of all, a clearer pool I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 167
The dashing fount pour'd on, and where its pool Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 133
Where through some sucking pool I will be hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 249
From off a crystal pool , to see its deep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 331
By a clear pool , wherein she passioned Lamia, Part I, Line 182
 
POOLS.............2
And all its vassal streams, pools numberless, Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 6
O lank-eared Phantoms of black-weeded pools ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 230
 
POOR..............91
Because my wine was of too poor a savour To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 25
From a tree's summit; a poor Indian's sleep Sleep and Poetry, Line 87
Holding a poor , decrepid standard out Sleep and Poetry, Line 204
Poor nymph,- poor Pan,- how he did weep to find I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 159
Poor nymph,- poor Pan,- how he did weep to find I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 159
With these poor offerings, a man like thee. To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 14
To save poor lambkins from the eagle's maw; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 267
Poor , lonely Niobe! when her lovely young Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 339
On this poor weakness! but, for all her strife, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 718
Seems all this poor endeavour after fame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 847
One sigh doth echo, one poor sob doth pine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 6
But, a poor Naiad, I guess not. Farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 129
But my poor mistress went distract and mad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 473
How he does love me! His poor temples beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 764
To the poor patient oyster, where it sleeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 67
Poor Cynthia greeted him, and sooth'd her light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 104
The poor folk of the sea-country I blest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 368
Why did poor Glaucus ever - ever dare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 400
From their poor breasts went sueing to her ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 519
I left poor Scylla in a niche and fled. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 635
The final gulphing; the poor struggling souls: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 659
Poor lovers lay at rest from joys and woes.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 736
For what poor mortals fragment up, as mere Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 845
For one so weak to venture his poor verse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 938
But thee to comfort a poor lonely maid; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 287
At last he said: " Poor lady, how thus long Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 298
Through the thick branches, poor ring-doves sleek forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 327
A fear in the poor herdsman who doth bring Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 63
Then one poor year a thousand years would be, To J.R., Line 3
Fair Isabel, poor simple Isabel! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 1
Of a poor three hours' absence? but we'll gain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 205
Poor Girl! put on thy stifling widow's weed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 229
From the poor girl by magic of their light, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 291
As this poor offering to you, sister mine. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 16
Alas! I could not choose. Ah! my poor heart, Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 13
Thus much I know, that, a poor witless elf, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 11
Poor alligators, poor things of one span, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 62
Poor alligators, poor things of one span, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 62
But ye, poor tongueless things, were meant O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 11
Poor skull, thy fingers set ablaze, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 43
Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 1
Poor Silver-wing! Ah! woe is me! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 5
Alas! poor queen! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 19
Flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 21
A poor , weak, palsy-stricken, churchyard thing, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 155
His poor guide hurried back with agues in her brain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 189
Down she sat, poor cheated soul, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 69
What your poor servants know but too, too well? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 23
The first, alas! poor Dwarf, I understand- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 25
Your poor Ape was a prince, and he, poor thing, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 36
Your poor Ape was a prince, and he, poor thing, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 36
"Saturn, look up!- though wherefore, poor old King? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 52
Unhinges the poor world;- not in that strife, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 147
And with poor skill let pass into the breeze Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 273
And for that poor Ambition - it springs Ode on Indolence, Line 33
A poor court-bankrupt, outwitted and lost, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
Of my poor secrets, and so hold a rod Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 117
Lady! O would to heaven your poor servant Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 132
But for poor Ludolph, he is food for sorrow; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 153
Of prisoners. Poor prince, forlorn he steps, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 87
Poor cancel for his kindness to my youth, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 41
My friend had held poor Ludolph's honour dear. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 63
Poor self-deceived wretches, who must think Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 76
As to my poor deserts. Come, come, be plain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 86
Alas, poor me! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 99b
That this poor face you deign to praise so much; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 110
Poor lady! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 117a
For a poor waiter? Why, man, how you stare! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 37
My eyes, too long poor exiles from thy face, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
O, poor deceived Prince, I pity thee! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 89
On my poor brain, such cruel - cruel sorrow, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 108
Alas! poor Prince, I would you knew my heart! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 28
Poor cheated Ludolph! Make the forest hiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
The next our poor Prince fills the arched rooms Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 15
O, my poor boy! My son! My son! My Ludolph! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 1
Console my poor boy, cheer him, heal his spirits? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 14
So perfect, so divine, that our poor eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 67
In human climes, and live: Alas! poor youth, Lamia, Part I, Line 281
Men, women, rich and poor , in the cool hours, Lamia, Part I, Line 355
Know'st thou that man?" Poor Lamia answer'd not. Lamia, Part II, Line 255
And more, like slaves to poor humanity, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 158
"Saturn! look up - and for what, poor lost King? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 354
With such a poor and sickly sounding pause, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 439
When, howe'er poor or particolour'd things, What can I do to drive away, Line 10
The poor , the fading, brief pride of an hour: To Fanny, Line 50
Set him before me. Not for the poor sake King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 2
Poor Elfinan is very ill at ease- The Jealousies, Line 121
Poor Elfinan! whose cruel fate was such, The Jealousies, Line 125
As many a poor felon does not live to tell. The Jealousies, Line 180
Honouring with royal tears the poor homespun; The Jealousies, Line 446
He bow'd at Bellanaine, and said- " Poor Bell! The Jealousies, Line 609
 
POOREST...........1
Or poorest of the beggar-clan, Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 5
 
POPLAR............2
Beneath the silence of a poplar shade; Sleep and Poetry, Line 278
Until the poplar tops, in journey dreary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 923
 
POPLAR'S..........1
Sudden a poplar's height, and 'gan to enclose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 607
 
POPLARS...........1
And poplars , and lawn-shading palms, and beech, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 25
 
POPPIED...........2
Their fairest blossom'd beans and poppied corn; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 255
Until the poppied warmth of sleep oppress'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 237
 
POPPIES...........5
Through which the poppies show their scarlet coats; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 128
Of sacred ditamy, and poppies red: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 555
Moreover, through the dancing poppies stole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 566
My clenched hands;- for lo! the poppies hung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 682
Drows'd with the fume of poppies , while thy hook To Autumn, Line 17
 
POPPY.............6
Wreather of poppy buds, and weeping willows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 14
Sleep, quiet with his poppy coronet: Sleep and Poetry, Line 348
Than when I wander'd from the poppy hill: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 914
By which he took his first soft poppy dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 786
Or wait the Amen ere thy poppy throws Sonnet to Sleep, Line 7
No Asian poppy , nor elixir fine The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 47
 
POPULOUS..........1
And all her populous streets and temples lewd, Lamia, Part I, Line 352
 
POR'D.............1
Por'd on its hazle cirque of shedded leaves. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 769
 
PORCH.............5
Like phantoms, to the iron porch , they glide; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 362
Each arched porch and entry low The Eve of St. Mark, Line 19
At Venus' temple porch , 'mid baskets heap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 317
A pillar'd porch , with lofty portal door, Lamia, Part I, Line 379
That royal porch , that high-built fair demesne; Lamia, Part II, Line 155
 
PORCHES...........2
They went till unobscur'd the porches shone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 724
Eager to sail their orb; the porches wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 297
 
PORE..............2
Enough! why need I further pore ? O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 91
And pore on Nature's universal scroll Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 151
 
PORPHYRION........1
Typhon, and Dolor, and Porphyrion , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 20
 
PORPHYRO..........14
Had come young Porphyro , with heart on fire The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 75
Saying, "Mercy, Porphyro ! hie thee from this place; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 98
To see thee, Porphyro !- St. Agnes' Eve! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 123
While Porphyro upon her face doth look, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 128
Quoth Porphyro : "O may I ne'er find grace The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 146
A gentler speech from burning Porphyro ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 159
Where Porphyro took covert, pleas'd amain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 188
Young Porphyro , for gazing on that bed; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 197
Save wings, for heaven:- Porphyro grew faint: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 224
Porphyro gazed upon her empty dress, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 245
While still her gaze on Porphyro would keep; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 304
"Ah, Porphyro !" said she, "but even now The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 307
Give me that voice again, my Porphyro , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 312
Porphyro will leave me here to fade and pine.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 329
 
PORT..............2
Hence burgundy, claret, and port , Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 1
In port Cenchreas, from Egina isle Lamia, Part I, Line 225
 
PORTAL............7
Is the swift opening of their wide portal , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 30
Gain'd its bright portal , enter'd, and behold! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 631
Through portal columns of a giant size, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 811
Hath pass'd beyond the rocky portal ; Not Aladdin magian, Line 46
For Madeline. Beside the portal doors, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 76
A pillar'd porch, with lofty portal door, Lamia, Part I, Line 379
Arriving at the portal , gaz'd amain, Lamia, Part II, Line 151
 
PORTALS...........4
As that of busy spirits when the portals Calidore: A Fragment, Line 159
When these enchanted portals open wide, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 33
He breath'd fierce breath against the sleepy portals , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 266
The portals of my state; and, for my own Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 163
 
PORTCULLIS........1
While from beneath the threat'ning portcullis Calidore: A Fragment, Line 79
 
PORTENT...........2
Not there, nor in sign, symbol, or portent Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 139
What portent - what strange prodigy is this? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 60
 
PORTENTOUS........1
'Tis as portentous as a meteor. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 65
 
PORTER............4
This was the porter !- he could sing, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 85
Where lay the Porter , in uneasy sprawl, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 363
Where, till the porter answer'd, might be seen, The Jealousies, Line 276
Return'd the porter - "off, and one shoe on, The Jealousies, Line 305
 
PORTERS...........1
The very porters , as I pass'd the doors, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 50
 
PORTFOLIO.........1
Of words at opening a portfolio . Sleep and Poetry, Line 338
 
PORTICO...........1
'Slant to a light Ionic portico , The Jealousies, Line 749
 
PORTICOS..........1
Black polish'd porticos of awful shade, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 596
 
PORTION...........2
But let a portion of ethereal dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 131
Were some most sensitive portion of thy life, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 93
 
PORTION'D.........3
Portion'd us - happy days, or else to die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 332
But horrors, portion'd to a giant nerve, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 175
But horrors portion'd to a giant nerve The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 23
 
PORTRAITURE.......3
But for the portraiture of clouds and sky: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 883
Filling the air, as on we move, with portraiture intense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 35
Of Titian's portraiture , and one, though new, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 68
 
PORTRAY'D.........1
Portray'd in many a fiery den Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 15
 
PORTS.............1
Part of himself. He hath his autumn ports Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 8


Published @ RC

March 2005