Pri-Pz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

Printer-friendly versionSend by email
Keats Concordance
 
PRICE.............5
Can I prize thee, fair maid, all price above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 473
At a very great price - Two or three posies, Line 16
And almost put a price upon my head? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 53
Come not near me, De Kaims, for by the price King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 22
For chalk, I hear, stands at a pretty price ; The Jealousies, Line 290
 
PRICK.............1
With those bright languid segments green and prick To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 4
 
PRICK'D...........2
Than he prick'd up his ears and said, "Well done; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 76
Prick'd his own swollen veins! Where is my page? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 126
 
PRICKETS..........1
And startle the dappled prickets ? For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 42
 
PRICKLY...........2
Blue hare-bells lightly, and where prickly furze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 202
Their leaves and prickly nuts; a sheep-fold bleat Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 301
 
PRIDE.............23
Haply it was the workings of its pride , Imitation of Spenser, Line 34
Her pride , her freedom; and not freedom's shade. To Hope, Line 34
That the sweet buds which with a modest pride I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 3
A meek and forlorn flower, with naught of pride , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 172
And in that nook, the very pride of June, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 545
To goodly vessels; many a sail of pride , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 20
Nor in one spot alone; the floral pride Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 345
For on a silken couch of rosy pride , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 392
"Behold! behold, the palace of his pride ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 833
All fancy, pride , and fickle maidenhood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 742
But flowers bursting out with lusty pride , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 17
Gush'd with more pride than do a wretch's tears?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 122
In hungry pride and gainful cowardice, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 130
Of pride and avarice,- the dark pine roof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 294
Sickly imagination and sick pride On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 11
The level chambers, ready with their pride , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 32
Sole,- in a stiff, fool-hardy, sulky pride ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 102
When in the morning he doth yawn with pride , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 14
Down, down, proud temper! down, Auranthe's pride ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 74
Brow-beating her fair form, and troubling her sweet pride . Lamia, Part II, Line 248
The poor, the fading, brief pride of an hour: To Fanny, Line 50
Yonder my chivalry, my pride of war, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 4
The city's delicacy, and the pride The Jealousies, Line 750
 
PRIDED............1
My love of fame, my prided honesty Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 23
 
PRIEST............11
A venerable priest full soberly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 149
In midst of all, the venerable priest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 193
Where sat Endymion and the aged priest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 357
Pan's holy priest for young Endymion calls; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 815
I have been the pontif priest Not Aladdin magian, Line 39
Yes, I will be thy priest , and build a fane Ode to Psyche, Line 50
To what green altar, O mysterious priest , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 32
Thou bitter mischief! Venemous bad priest ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 76
Prevail against my fury. Damned priest ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 170
Peace, rebel- priest ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 219a
The priest of justice, will immolate her Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 156
 
PRIESTESS.........2
Sole priestess of his desolation."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 227
Her priestess -garments. My quick eyes ran on The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 53
 
PRIESTHOOD........2
And all his priesthood moans; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 266
And all the priesthood of his city wept, The Jealousies, Line 11
 
PRIESTLIKE........1
The moving waters at their priestlike task Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 5
 
PRIME.............5
To lose in grieving all my maiden prime . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 278
He felt aloof the day and morning's prime - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 374
From budding at the prime . In drear nighted December, Line 8
And we have the prime of the kissing time, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 15
To kiss a mortal's lips, when such were in their prime . The Jealousies, Line 99
 
PRIMEVAL..........1
He might not:- No, though a primeval God: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 292
 
PRIMROSE..........3
Save of the quiet primrose , and the span Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 10
Hedge-grown primrose that hath burst; Fancy, Line 50
They scatter'd,- daisy, primrose , hyacinth,- The Jealousies, Line 728
 
PRIMROSES.........5
What next? A tuft of evening primroses , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 107
Like vestal primroses , but dark velvet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 874
Wan as primroses gather'd at midnight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 970
And the primroses are waken'd, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 33
Of primroses by shelter'd rills, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 11
 
PRINCE............42
Brain-sick shepherd prince , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 43b
Along whose track the prince quick footsteps told, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 227
I was a prince - a baby prince - my doom When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 30
I was a prince - a baby prince - my doom When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 30
He was a prince , the Fool, a grown up prince, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 33
He was a prince, the Fool, a grown up prince , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 33
Your poor Ape was a prince , and he, poor thing, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 36
At least, unhappy Prince , I may be free- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 77
GERSA, Prince of Hungary Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 9
I spring complete Minerva! But the Prince - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 97
It is young Gersa, the Hungarian prince , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 85
Of prisoners. Poor prince , forlorn he steps, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 87
So brave a prince and soldier. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 116a
Will you return, Prince , to our banquetting? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 152
The Prince a regal escort to his camp; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 155
In chains, as just now stood that noble prince : Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 168
Still give me leave to wonder that the Prince Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 2
My Prince , you think too harshly- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 47a
Do not wrong me, Prince . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 12b
Great honour to the Prince ! The Emperor, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 18
My gracious Prince , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 44b
Or with one word fever'd you, gentle Prince , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
Gentle Prince , 'tis false indeed. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 117b
Me - the Prince Ludolph, in this presence here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 78
O, poor deceived Prince , I pity thee! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 89
Besides, the foolish Prince sends, minute whiles, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 35
Condoling with Prince Ludolph. In fit time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 72
My good Prince , with me Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 4b
Alas! poor Prince , I would you knew my heart! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 28
Prince Gersa's freeing Abbot Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 7
The next our poor Prince fills the arched rooms Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 15
Say, how fares the Prince ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 46b
The Prince from A to Z, though it should be Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 6
Say you so, Prince ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 52a
Men shall confess,- this prince was gull'd and cheated, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 133
Good Prince ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 183b
From Stephen, my good Prince - Stephen - Stephen- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 29
If impious prince no bound or limit kept, The Jealousies, Line 13
"I'll trounce some of the members," cried the Prince , The Jealousies, Line 136
These orders given, the Prince , in half a pet, The Jealousies, Line 199
"Ah! good my Prince , weep not!" And then again The Jealousies, Line 424
Vile strictures on the conduct of a prince The Jealousies, Line 470
 
PRINCE'S..........1
What 'tis to smother up a prince's flames; The Jealousies, Line 140
 
PRINCELY..........3
No welcome to a princely visitor, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 94
Princely Ludolph, hail! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 26b
Stay there! No - guess? More princely you must be Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 68
 
PRINCES...........3
To startle princes from their easy slumbers. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 76
I saw pale kings, and princes too, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 37
O kings and princes of this fevrous world, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 100
 
PRINCES'..........1
To fallen princes' necks, as to his stirrup, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
 
PRINCESS..........22
"No one at home!" the fretful Princess cry'd, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 9
The Princess grasp'd her switch, but just in time When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 20
"O mighty Princess , did you ne'er hear tell When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 22
While the Dwarf spake the Princess all for spite When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 41
The Princess took it and, dismounting straight, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 69
No more a princess shall side saddle me. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 78
The Princess faints! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 73a
Of the Princess Erminia, your niece. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 133
Of Ludolph with the Princess . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 6a
Where the most wicked Princess is? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 8a
With the sweet Princess on her plumaged lair, The Jealousies, Line 40
"Dear Princess , do not whisper me so loud," The Jealousies, Line 46
Return'd the Princess , "my tongue shall not cease The Jealousies, Line 62
Against this highland princess , rating her The Jealousies, Line 105
For pleasure?)- the fair Princess in full view, The Jealousies, Line 592
For a thick fog - the Princess sulky quite- The Jealousies, Line 647
Princess turn'd dainty, to our great surprise, The Jealousies, Line 652
Then passing by the Princess , singed her hoop: The Jealousies, Line 671
Till he sheer'd off - the Princess very scared- The Jealousies, Line 683
The Princess fell asleep, and, in her dream, The Jealousies, Line 710
While that fair Princess , from her winged chair, The Jealousies, Line 740
Rode to the Princess swift with spurring heels, The Jealousies, Line 776
 
PRINTLESS.........1
Then, lighting on the printless verdure, turn'd Lamia, Part I, Line 131
 
PRINTS............1
Took silently their foot- prints . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 314a
 
PRISON............13
Kind Hunt was shut in prison , yet has he, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 2
Think you he nought but prison walls did see, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 6
The prison gates that have so long opprest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 296
Or let me from this heavy prison fly: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 541
On barren souls. Great Muse, thou know'st what prison , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 20
From his green prison , and here kneeling down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 69
For yet the past doth prison me. The rill, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 691
Quickly break her prison -string Fancy, Line 91
The Titans fierce, self-hid, or prison -bound, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 161
Though, at my words, the hollow prison -vaults Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 257
From prison . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 9a
And dream, when in the serpent prison -house, Lamia, Part I, Line 203
The Titans fierce, self-hid, or prison -bound, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 10
 
PRISON'D..........1
Who would not be so prison'd ? but, fond elf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 461
 
PRISONER..........7
I, for a moment-whiles, was prisoner ta'en Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67
Fair prisoner , you hear these joyous shouts? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 7
Lady Erminia! are you a prisoner Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 27
Tell him, moreover, I am prisoner Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 74
Stephen - me - prisoner . Certes, De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 32
What, you are vulnerable! my prisoner ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 40
Of Stephen of Boulogne, our prisoner , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 25
 
PRISONERS.........1
Of prisoners . Poor prince, forlorn he steps, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 87
 
PRITHEE...........3
But, prithee , do not turn To Fanny, Line 21
"Fetch me that ottoman, and prithee keep The Jealousies, Line 427
And prithee , Hum, behind the screen do peep The Jealousies, Line 430
 
PRIVACY...........3
Kept with such sweet privacy , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 27
That same Adonis, safe in the privacy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 479
Him in a closet, of such privacy The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 165
 
PRIVATE...........2
Conrad, we would be private ! Sigifred! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 71
And question them in private ; for perhaps, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 241
 
PRIVILEGE.........3
The utmost privilege that ocean's sire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 376
Taking on me a woman's privilege , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 29
Your dukedom's privilege will grant so much. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 55
 
PRIZE.............11
Ambition is no sluggard: 'tis no prize , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 523
Would seem a feather to the mighty prize . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 592
Pardon me, airy planet, that I prize Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 185
Can I prize thee, fair maid, all price above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 473
I dare not yet!- Oh never will the prize , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 74
And then the prize was all for Isabel: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 402
Of northern whale; then for the tender prize - Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 64
And you will prize it, lady, I doubt not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 138
What mortal hath a prize , that other men Lamia, Part II, Line 57
Ah! if you prize my subdued soul above To Fanny, Line 49
If you hold Bertha as a worthy prize . The Jealousies, Line 499
 
PRIZED............1
How she might find the clay, so dearly prized , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 339
 
PRIZES............1
A trampling down of what the world most prizes , On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 11
 
PROBABLE..........1
probable Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
PROBE.............1
No, no, you never could my feelings probe The Jealousies, Line 409
 
PROBLEM...........1
As though some knotty problem , that had daft Lamia, Part II, Line 160
 
PROCEED...........2
Ethelbert, proceed . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 148a
And therefore duly shall proceed to tell, The Jealousies, Line 790
 
PROCEEDS..........1
proceeds mawkishness, and all the thousand bitters which those men I speak of Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
 
PROCESSIONS.......1
When bright processions took their airy march To George Felton Mathew, Line 29
 
PROCLAIM..........5
With England's happiness proclaim Europa's liberty. On Peace, Line 9
Infatuate Britons, will you still proclaim Lines Written on 29 May, Line 1
Voices of soft proclaim , and silver stir Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 130
And, do ye mind, above all things, proclaim Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 70
Voices of soft proclaim , and silver stir The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 435
 
PRODIGIES.........1
For as upon the earth dire prodigies The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 18
 
PRODIGIOUS........2
As these prodigious sycophants disgust Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 25
Prodigious seem'd the toil; the leaves were yet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 121
 
PRODIGY...........2
What portent - what strange prodigy is this? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 60
Fanatic obstinacy! Prodigy ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 201
 
PRODUCE...........1
Produce more than our searching witnesseth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 834
 
PRODUCED..........1
produced , it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
 
PRODUCER..........1
Upon its own producer , forthwith touch'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 196
 
PROFANE...........1
Let none profane my Holy See of Love, To Fanny, Line 51
 
PROFOUND..........1
Their marble being: now, as deep profound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 210
 
PROFUSELY.........1
Which fell profusely from the rose-tree stem! Imitation of Spenser, Line 33
 
PROGENY...........2
With down from Leda's cygnet progeny : Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 66
Not mortal, but of heavenly progeny , Lamia, Part II, Line 87
 
PROGRESS..........2
Till it begins to progress silverly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 541
Be of ripe progress - Saturn must be King. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 125
 
PROGRESSES........1
And progresses through its own labyrinth; The Jealousies, Line 726
 
PROGRESSING.......1
Can put no end to; deathwards progressing The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 260
 
PROLOGUE..........2
The little prologue to a line of kings. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
Of such deliberate prologue , serious 'haviour. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51
 
PROMENADE.........1
A promenade for cooks and ancient ladies; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 13
 
PROMENER..........1
She chose to " promener a l'aile," or take The Jealousies, Line 44
 
PROMETHEAN........1
And the Promethean clay by thief endued, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 955
 
PROMISE...........6
What promise hast thou faithful guarded since Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 44
For thou hast brought their promise to an end. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 688
Did last eve ask my promise to refine Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 3
That Angela gives promise she will do The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 161
The promise of fair sail beyond the Rhone, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
The amorous promise of her lone complain, Lamia, Part I, Line 288
 
PROMISED..........1
Whereat, to calm their fears, he promised soon The Jealousies, Line 24
 
PROMISES..........1
Soon as (according to his promises ) The Jealousies, Line 127
 
PROMONTORY........2
A hand that from the world's bleak promontory Calidore: A Fragment, Line 107
Round every isle, and point, and promontory , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 405
 
PRONE.............5
He who knows these delights, and, too, is prone On The Story of Rimini, Line 9
And I was gazing on the surges prone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 667
Prone to the green head of a misty hill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 613
Next Cottus: prone he lay, chin uppermost, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 49
Not far hence Atlas; and beside him prone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 73
 
PRONOUNC'D........2
As if it were some demon's name pronounc'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 82
Language pronounc'd . "If thou canst not ascend The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 107
 
PRONOUNCE.........1
I shall as soon pronounce which Grace more neatly To G.A.W., Line 13
 
PROOF.............17
Yet listen, ye who will, whilst I bring proof Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 177
And in the proof much comfort will I give, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 179
And how intriguing secresy is proof Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 177
To my appalling, I saw too good proof Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 146
Here is proof palpable as the bright sun! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 5
O proof ! proof! proof! Albert's an honest man; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 24
O proof! proof ! proof! Albert's an honest man; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 24
O proof! proof! proof ! Albert's an honest man; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 24
Without proof could you think me innocent? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 42
Your knights, found war- proof in the bloody field, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 34
A noon-day proof of bad Auranthe's guilt. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 191
Wilt thou infuriate me? Proof ! Thou fool! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 198
Here, Albert, this old phantom wants a proof ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 207
Give him his proof ! A camel's load of proofs! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 208
Of any proof against the honourableness Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 213
My liege, what proof should I have 'gainst a fame Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 216
Delicate, put to the proof the lythe Caducean charm. Lamia, Part I, Line 133
 
PROOFS............2
Give him his proof! A camel's load of proofs ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 208
Ludolph! Erminia! Proofs ! O heavy day! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 92
 
PROP..............3
To prop my empire's dome. Conrad, in thee Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 161
Moneta silent. Without stay or prop The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 388
His elbow for a prop , and snuff'd his mignionette. The Jealousies, Line 567
 
PROPER............4
Life's self is nourish'd by its proper pith, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 814
At random flies; they are the proper home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 521
Of heroes gone! Against his proper glory Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 643
Beyond its proper bound, yet still confined,- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 79
 
PROPERTY..........1
And, warrior, it nurtures the property rare On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 23
 
PROPHECIES........1
For prophecies of thee, and for the sake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 78
 
PROPHECYINGS......1
Ghosts of melodious prophecyings rave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 789
 
PROPHESIED........2
Her arms as one who prophesied .- At length Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 134
"I thought you guess'd, foretold, or prophesied , The Jealousies, Line 325
 
PROPHESYING.......1
For she was prophesying of her glory; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 57
 
PROPHESYINGS......1
Or prophesyings of the midnight lamp; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 174
 
PROPHET...........2
Of pale-mouth'd prophet dreaming. Ode to Psyche, Line 35
Of pale-mouth'd prophet dreaming. Ode to Psyche, Line 49
 
PROPHETESS........1
Thy doom."- "High Prophetess ," said I, "purge off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 145
 
PROPHETIC.........1
Rapt in a deep prophetic solitude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 9
 
PROPITIOUS........2
O be propitious , nor severely deem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 183
By such propitious parley medicin'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 183
 
PROPITIOUSLY......2
Since under my glad roof, propitiously , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 35
If Mercury propitiously incline, The Jealousies, Line 619
 
PROPORTIONING.....1
Are dazzled with the sweet proportioning , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 68
 
PROPOSE...........1
Made purple riot: then doth he propose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 138
 
PROPOSED..........1
Of that fierce threat, and the hard task proposed . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 120
 
PROPP'D...........1
Those men I mean, who on my shoulders propp'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 73
 
PROPPING..........1
Let o'er the silk his propping elbow slide, The Jealousies, Line 200
 
PROSE.............4
Is sure enough - and so "here follows prose ." Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 113
To make old prose in modern rhyme more sweet: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 156
Pray do not prose , good Ethelbert, but speak Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 189
At his sweet prose , and, if we can, make dance The Jealousies, Line 635
 
PROSERPINE........4
Of Proserpine , when Hell, obscure and hot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 944
By nightshade, ruby grape of Proserpine ; Ode on Melancholy, Line 4
As Proserpine still weeps for her Sicilian air. Lamia, Part I, Line 63
For Proserpine return'd to her own fields, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 37
 
PROSPECT..........1
In prospect ,- diamond gleams, and golden glows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 837
 
PROSPER...........1
Through me the shepherd realm shall prosper well; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 863
 
PROSPERITY........1
In our prosperity . We thank you, sir. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 131
 
PROSPEROUS........1
Drove Nymph and Satyr from the prosperous woods, Lamia, Part I, Line 2
 
PROSTRATE.........2
Upon his elbow rais'd, all prostrate else, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 65
Both, prostrate on the carpet, ear by ear, The Jealousies, Line 336
 
PROTEAN...........1
To these founts Protean , passing gulph, and dell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 627
 
PROTECTION........1
For man's protection . Surely the All-seeing, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 32
 
PROTEUS...........1
Proteus is my sacristan. Not Aladdin magian, Line 44
 
PROTHALAMION......1
Began a prothalamion ;- she reels, The Jealousies, Line 778
 
PROUD.............29
Inconstant, childish, proud , and full of fancies; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 2
Stands venerably proud ; too proud to mourn Calidore: A Fragment, Line 39
Stands venerably proud; too proud to mourn Calidore: A Fragment, Line 39
Of his proud horse's mane: he was withal Calidore: A Fragment, Line 111
While his proud eye looks through the film of death? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 70
And with proud breast his own white shadow crowning; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 2
Proud to behold him in his country's eye. Addressed to Haydon, Line 14
Than the proud laurel shall content my bier. To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 4
At every onward step proud domes arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 836
Juno's proud birds are pecking pearly grain: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 410
And the moon, all silver proud , Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 3
And many once proud -quiver'd loins did melt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 109
Why were they proud ? Because their marble founts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 121
Why were they proud ? Because fair orange-mounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 123
Why were they proud ? Because red-lin'd accounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 125
Why were they proud ? again we ask aloud, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 127
Why in the name of Glory were they proud ? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 128
Quarrel with the proud forests it hath fed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 218
For this, and be you ever proud of it; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 94
Is in the heady, proud , ambitious vein; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 149
Slow, and demure, and proud in his despair. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 88
When here, a monarch, whose proud foot is used Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
How this proud temper with clear reason squares. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 31
Is not the only proud heart in his realm. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 57
You know his temper, hot, proud , obstinate; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 89
Down, down, proud temper! down, Auranthe's pride! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 74
One while these proud towers are hush'd as death. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 14
For all thine impious proud -heart sophistries, Lamia, Part II, Line 285
And careless hectorers in proud bad verse. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 208
 
PROUDEST..........1
A word to fright the proudest spirit here!- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 68
 
PROUDLY...........8
Or wherefore comes that steed so proudly by? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 46
Wherefore more proudly does the gentle knight Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 47
That crowns a lofty clift, which proudly towers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 124
Up to its climax and then dying proudly ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 61
Till at its shoulders it should proudly see Sleep and Poetry, Line 83
To some lone spirits who could proudly sing Sleep and Poetry, Line 218
And grin and look proudly , God of the golden bow, Line 33
Save of blown self-applause, they proudly mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 13
 
PROV'ST...........1
Who prov'st , with jolting arguments and bitter, The Jealousies, Line 233
 
PROVE.............2
Taste the high joy none but the bless'd can prove . As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 8
Keep it, my brightest daughter; it may prove Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 19
 
PROVED............1
For we have proved the mago never fell The Jealousies, Line 788
 
PROVENCAL.........1
Dance, and Provencal song, and sunburnt mirth! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 14
 
PROVENCE..........2
In Provence call'd, "La belle dame sans mercy": The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 292
White Provence rose-leaves with her faery tears, The Jealousies, Line 83
 
PROVERB...........1
"You cannot eat your cake and have it too." Proverb On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Epigraph
 
PROVINCE..........2
When late this province was a lawless spoil, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 195
The province to invite your Highness back Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 126
 
PROVINCES.........3
The provinces about the Danube's mouth, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 19
When they should span the provinces ! A snake, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 14
One who could say,- here, rule these provinces ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 152
 
PROVING...........1
Proving upon this element, dismay'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 617
 
PROW..............4
Mark the bright silver curling round her prow . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 134
Too keen in beauty, for thy silver prow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 181
When the prow sweeps into a midnight cove. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 355
Grated the quaystones with her brazen prow Lamia, Part I, Line 224
 
PROWESS...........1
I never saw such prowess . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 57a
 
PROXY.............2
To speak by proxy . O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 12
Thy spheres, and as thy silver proxy shine? Lamia, Part I, Line 267
 
PRUDE.............1
I play the prude : it is but venturing- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 130
 
PRUDENCE'.........1
Aye, clutch your scabbard; but, for prudence' sake, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 168
 
PRUDISH...........1
And the moon, whether prudish or complaisant, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 13
 
PRY...............5
In leafy quiet: where to pry , aloof, To George Felton Mathew, Line 47
Round about with eager pry . Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 30
Pry 'mong the stars, to strive to think divinely: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 8
Who gathering round the altar, seemed to pry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 111
Not even I, for one whole month, will pry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 824
 
PRYING............2
So that we look around with prying stare, Sleep and Poetry, Line 32
By angry wolf, or pard with prying head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 76
 
PRYTHEE...........2
Those velvet ears - but prythee do not stick To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 5
Prythee , fair lady, what chance brought you here? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
 
PSALTERIAN........1
Warm, tremulous, devout, psalterian . Lamia, Part I, Line 114
 
PSHAW.............2
Silent,- without revenge,- pshaw !- bitter end,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 21
"Monstrous affair! Pshaw ! pah! what ugly minx The Jealousies, Line 163
 
PSYCHE............6
So felt he, who first told, how Psyche went I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 141
What Psyche felt, and Love, when their full lips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 143
The winged Psyche with awaken'd eyes? Ode to Psyche, Line 6
His Psyche true! Ode to Psyche, Line 23
Your mournful Psyche , nor the downy owl Ode on Melancholy, Line 7
Of Psyche given by Love, there was a buzz Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 29
 
PUBLIC............1
produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
 
PUBLISHED.........1
Written by Crafticant, and published The Jealousies, Line 87
 
PUFF..............1
And puff from the tail's end to stifled throat: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 526
 
PUG...............1
Her Highness' pug -dog - got a sharp rebuff- The Jealousies, Line 699
 
PULING............1
His glories: with a puling infant's force Sleep and Poetry, Line 185
 
PULL..............5
Pull droopingly, in slanting curve aside, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 4
Be happy both of you! for I will pull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 813
Man feels the gentle anchor pull and gladdens in its strength. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 40
Waiting but for your sign to pull them up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 137
"I'll pull the string," said he, and further said, The Jealousies, Line 226
 
PULL'D............3
So did he feel, who pull'd the boughs aside, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 151
Pull'd down fresh foliage and coverture Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 930
Philosophising thus, he pull'd the check, The Jealousies, Line 253
 
PULLED............1
So pulled the clouds again about his head Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 70
 
PULP..............2
To melting pulp , that fish would have bright mail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 837
And pulp , and ripen, richer every hour, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 9
 
PULPED............1
But my Isabel's eyes and her lips pulped with bloom. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 16
 
PULPIT............2
Thine arms from forth a pulpit of hot fire Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 91
In vain the pulpit thunder'd at the throne, The Jealousies, Line 17
 
PULPY.............1
Or of old AEtna's pulpy wine-presses, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 123
 
PULS'D............3
Of nature's lives and wonders puls'd tenfold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 105
To that fair shadow'd passion puls'd its way- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 446
Stifled his voice, and puls'd resolve away- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 45
 
PULSE.............12
Two liquid pulse streams 'stead of feather'd wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 583
His eyes from the dead leaves, or one small pulse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 781
My pulse is warm with thine old barley-bree, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 5
With sanguine feverous boiling gurge of pulse . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 28
Touch the very pulse of fire Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 84
Benumb'd my eyes; my pulse grew less and less; Ode on Indolence, Line 17
Which, being pleasant, ease the heavy pulse , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
Supported him - no pulse , or breath they found, Lamia, Part II, Line 310
Upon those streams that pulse beside the throat: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 125
The quickest pulse for me. To Fanny, Line 24
Feel, feel my pulse , how much in love I am; The Jealousies, Line 400
Your pulse is shocking, but I'll ease your pain." The Jealousies, Line 426
 
PULSES............6
His warm arms, thrilling now with pulses new, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 102
And other pulses . Hear ye not the hum Addressed to the Same, Line 12
Gave mighty pulses : in this tottering case Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 305
A noise of harmony, pulses and throes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 791
God of warm pulses , and dishevell'd hair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 984
I must be there, while her young pulses beat Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 110
 
PULSING...........2
And took a lute, from which there pulsing came Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 491
Above some giant, pulsing underground. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 40
 
PUN...............1
Seeing her pleasant, tried her with a pun - The Jealousies, Line 654
 
PUNISH............1
Punish me not with favour. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 103a
 
PUNISH'D..........1
Now to be punish'd ,- do not look so sad! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 143
 
PUNISHMENT........2
punishment : but no feeling man will be forward to inflict it: he will leave me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Till we determine some fit punishment . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 239
 
PUNKS.............1
For it containeth twenty thousand punks , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 17
 
PUNY..............1
Stifling that puny essence in its tent. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 331
 
PUPPET............1
Erminia's fresh puppet ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 102a
 
PURBLIND..........1
And purblind amid foggy, midnight wolds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 636
 
PURE..............28
Which, pure from mossy beds, did down distill, Imitation of Spenser, Line 5
On pinions that nought moves but pure delight; As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 3
In elegant, pure , and aerial minds. To Some Ladies, Line 28
Pure as the ice-drop that froze on the mountain? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 2
Close to the source, bright, pure , and undefil'd, To George Felton Mathew, Line 77
And from her own pure self no joy dissembling, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 17
Than the pure freshness of thy laurels green. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 54
Yet did I never breathe its pure serene On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 7
Taste their pure fountains. First the realm I'll pass Sleep and Poetry, Line 101
The clouds were pure and white as flocks new shorn, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 8
That aye refreshing, pure deliciousness, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 183
The breezes were ethereal, and pure , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 221
Shut her pure sorrow drops with glad exclaim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 490
The two deliverers tasted a pure wine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 801
When we shall meet in pure elysium. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 658
Sweet, holy, pure , sacred, and innocent, Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 2
She knelt, so pure a thing, so free from mortal taint. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 225
The blisses of her dream so pure and deep: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 301
Not to pure Ida with its snow-cold skies, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 7
Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 6
These crystalline pavilions, and pure fanes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 238
Should darken her pure grot with muddy gloom; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 8
This is too much! Hearken, my lady pure ,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
Sweet smelling, whose pure kinds I could not know. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 34
That in its lucid depth reflected pure The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 52
Off Glocester's golden dishes - drinks pure wine, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 28
Tinder's a lighter article,- nitre pure The Jealousies, Line 294
He lifted a bright casket of pure gold, The Jealousies, Line 510
 
PURER.............2
And thousand other signs of purer life; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 211
What taste of purer air hast thou to soothe Lamia, Part I, Line 282
 
PUREST............2
A full-heaped helmet of the purest gold. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 42
A virgin purest lipp'd, yet in the lore Lamia, Part I, Line 189
 
PURGATORIAL.......1
Emprison'd in black, purgatorial rails: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 15
 
PURGATORY.........2
Lost in a sort of purgatory blind, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 80
And make a heaven of his purgatory , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 50
 
PURGE.............2
And purge the ether of our enemies; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 328
Thy doom."- "High Prophetess," said I, " purge off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 145
 
PURGING...........1
His ignominy up in purging fires! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 136
 
PURITY............3
With awe of purity - no Cupid pinion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 792
Dissolve the frozen purity of air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 586
A blushing fair-eyed purity ? A sylph, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 23
 
PURLIEUS..........1
Nor in obscured purlieus would he seek Character of C.B., Line 25
 
PURPLE............21
With the base purple of a court oppress'd, To Hope, Line 39
And seems from purple clouds to wing its flight. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 45
To show their purple stars, and bells of amber. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 137
The purple west, and, two bright streaks between, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 11
Crowned with flowers purple , white, and red: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 88
Ocean's blue mantle streak'd with purple , and green. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 132
For the sun's purple couch; to emulate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 365
In pink and purple chequer, nor, up-pil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 287
So cool a purple : taste these juicy pears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 444
Into the wide stream came of purple hue- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 195
There curl'd a purple mist around them; soon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 367
Her silk had play'd in purple phantasies, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 370
Ink'd purple with a song concerning dying; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 43
Made purple riot: then doth he propose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 138
And purple -stained mouth; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 18
Hangings of heaven's clouds, purple and gold, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 36
The purple slaughter-house, where Bacchus' self Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 125
I dreamt I saw thee, robed in purple flakes, Lamia, Part I, Line 76
That purple -lined palace of sweet sin, Lamia, Part II, Line 31
His purple vest, that ever peeping was The Jealousies, Line 266
And wept upon its purple palatine, The Jealousies, Line 411
 
PURPLISH..........1
Golden, or rainbow-sided, or purplish , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 110
 
PURPORT...........1
And there was purport in her looks for him, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 47
 
PURPOS'D..........1
Their cradling arms, and purpos'd to convey Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1017
 
PURPOSE...........13
My will from its own purpose ? who say, "Stand," To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 10
written with the least atom of purpose to forestall criticisms of course, but Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
"To-day we purpose , ay, this hour we mount Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 185
His lady's purpose ; and he scarce could brook The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 133
What is your purpose . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 190
Your purpose touching her. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 143a
Aye, so we purpose . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 141a
What more to the purpose , abbot? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 127b
I guess his purpose ! Indeed he must not have Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 100
Half mad - not right here - I forget my purpose . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 176
To change his purpose . He thereat was stung, Lamia, Part II, Line 69
Or else forget the purpose of the night, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 3
Her work-box, and 'twill help your purpose dearly; The Jealousies, Line 525
 
PURPOSED..........1
Whether the dream now purposed to rehearse The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 16
 
PURPOSES..........2
Nor judge my open purposes awry. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 141
Life's purposes ,- the palate of my mind I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 13
 
PURPOSING.........2
So, purposing each moment to retire, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 73
That Fate, cross- purposing , should let her be The Jealousies, Line 76
 
PURSE.............1
Nigh swooning, he doth purse his weary lips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 10
 
PURSES............1
Two or three purses Two or three posies, Line 7
 
PURSUE............2
At which I sigh'd that I could not pursue , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 589
He must pursue this task of joy and grief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 702
 
PURSUED...........1
Ever pursued , the other strove to shun- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 928
 
PURSUES...........1
Thus Crafticant pursues his diary:- The Jealousies, Line 641
 
PURSUING..........1
A mad- pursuing of the fog-born elf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 277
 
PURSUIT...........1
What mad pursuit ? What struggle to escape? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 9
 
PURVEYOR..........1
"Counts of the palace, and the state purveyor The Jealousies, Line 766
 
PUSH'D............1
Push'd through a screen of roses. Starry Jove! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 425
 
PUSHES............1
So pushes off his boat most eagerly, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 59
 
PUT...............43
But put therein some drug design'd Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 3
Where we may soft humanity put on, To George Felton Mathew, Line 55
When like a blank ideot I put on thy wreath- God of the golden bow, Line 8
Will put choice honey for a favoured youth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 211
That toiling years would put within my grasp, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 524
To put on such a look as would say, Shame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 717
Put sleekly on one side with nicest care; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 742
Put cross-wise to its heart. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 744a
Have I put forth to serve thee. What, not yet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 906
The moon put forth a little diamond peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 497
Before it can put forth its blossoming. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 12
I'll put your basket all safe in a nook Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 13
Poor Girl! put on thy stifling widow's weed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 229
Lustre into the sun, and put cold doom Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 277
We put our eyes into a pillowy cleft, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 325
And put it in her bosom, where it dries Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 372
And put her lean hands to the horrid thing: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 381
O put it to her buttocks bare All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 11
Take lawyer's nose and put it to't All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 15
And put one in his breech. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 20
And put thee to a little pain All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 27
O put a gadfly to that thing All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 41
With hair blown back, and wings put cross-wise on their breasts. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 36
And almost put a price upon my head? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 53
Had put a sudden stop to my hot breath, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 4
Put to the torture for confessional? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 24
And he put out an arm to bid me mount, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 42
I will from her turn off, and put the load Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 143
I ask, great judge, if you to-day have put Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 157
And therefore fit to calmly put a close Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 211
When simplest things put on a sombre cast; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 123
Put on your brightest looks; smile if you can; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 14
Put on a judge's brow, and use a tongue Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 147
Delicate, put to the proof the lythe Caducean charm. Lamia, Part I, Line 133
Put her new lips to his, and gave afresh Lamia, Part I, Line 294
And was ascending quick to put cold grasp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 124
Can put no end to; deathwards progressing The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 260
Put your soft hand upon your snowy side, To Fanny, Line 34
"I'll put a mark against some rebel names, The Jealousies, Line 137
So brightly, they put all our fays to shame!- The Jealousies, Line 386
Shall I put out the candles, please your Grace?" The Jealousies, Line 482
"Do put them out, and, without more ado, The Jealousies, Line 483
There, put it underneath your royal arm; The Jealousies, Line 515
 
PUTTING...........1
(Here the lady took some more whiskey and was putting even more to Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
 
PUZZLE............1
You puzzle me,- you haunt me,- when I dream Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 203
 
PUZZLED...........3
Puzzled those eyes that for the centre sought; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 387
Like puzzled urchin on an aged crone The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 129
Too ripe, he fell, being puzzled in his head The Jealousies, Line 629
 
PUZZLES...........1
Whether the riddle puzzles her beyond Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 71
 
PYLOS.............1
To rule in Pylos with a Nestor's beard. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 12
 
PYRAMID...........2
Chief of the pyramid and crocodile! To the Nile, Line 2
Hearken, thou craggy ocean pyramid , To Ailsa Rock, Line 1
 
PYRAMIDS..........2
Bastion'd with pyramids of glowing gold, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 177
Bastion'd with pyramids of glowing gold, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 25
 
PYRE..............3
The while he tells of grief, around a funeral pyre . Ode to Apollo, Line 17
Made every eastern cloud a silvery pyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 96
Solid and black from that eternal pyre , The Jealousies, Line 665
 
PYRRHA'S..........1
From Pyrrha's pebbles or old Adam's seed. Lamia, Part I, Line 333
 
PYTHIA'S..........1
Spite of myself, and with a Pythia's spleen, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 203
 
PYTHON............1
Went through the dismal air like one huge Python Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 530


Published @ RC

March 2005