R-Rea - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
RAB...............1
Then came his brother Rab and then Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 21
 
RACE..............10
Of Poesy. Ill-fated, impious race ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 201
I, who, for very sport of heart, would race Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 533
Immortal, for thou art of heavenly race : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 589
A third is in the race ! who is the third, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 593
They are all here to-night, the whole blood-thirsty race ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 99
Then thou first-born, and we the giant- race , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 200
Yea, by that law, another race may drive Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 230
Charioting foremost in the envious race , Lamia, Part I, Line 217
Seeing all their luckless race are dead, save me, Lamia, Part II, Line 96
The pale Omega of a wither'd race , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 288
 
RACERS............1
As of some breathless racers whose hopes poize Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 924
 
RACK..............4
The cloudy rack slow journeying in the west; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 288
Dismay'd; and, like a wretch from whom the rack Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 256
And all along a dismal rack of clouds, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 302
Stretches, with all its mist and cloudy rack , Lamia, Part I, Line 178
 
RACKS.............1
That set sharp racks at work, to pinch and peel. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 120
 
RACY..............1
"Made racy - (sure my boldness is misplaced!)- The Jealousies, Line 367
 
RADIANCE..........4
Thy heaven-born radiance around me shed, To Hope, Line 23
Melting into its radiance , we blend, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 810
He stretch'd himself in grief and radiance faint. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 304
Hyperion, lo! his radiance is here!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 345
 
RADIANT...........1
Whose cords are solid rays, and twinkle radiant fires. Ode to Apollo, Line 6
 
RAFT..............1
And the dull twanging bowstring, and the raft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 334
 
RAGE..............10
Moanings had burst from him; but now that rage Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 862
Increasing gradual to a tempest rage , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 523
And, with a blind voluptuous rage , I gave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 611
May rage , and foam, and fret, but never can Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 7
And I should rage , if spirits could go mad; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 314
Actions of rage and passion; even as Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 333
Told of his rage , ere he thus sank and pined. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 43
Of rage , of fear, anxiety, revenge, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 94
What vice in this or that year was the rage , The Jealousies, Line 94
The Emperor is now in a huge rage ,- The Jealousies, Line 318
 
RAGGED............2
Or upward ragged precipices flit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 266
Lies a deep hollow, from whose ragged brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 864
 
RAILS.............1
Emprison'd in black, purgatorial rails : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 15
 
RAIN..............20
Into the winds: rain -scented eglantine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 100
Fondles the flower amid the sobbing rain . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 331
Went noiseless as a passing noontide rain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 380
Not flowers budding in an April rain , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 971
Ye tender bibbers of the rain and dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 571
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth; Fancy, Line 4
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth. Fancy, Line 78
Blinded alike from sunshine and from rain , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 242
As crying cup biddy to drops of rain . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 66
Of rain and hail-stones, lovers need not tell As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 11
When the chill rain begins at shut of eve, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 36
As fire with air loud warring when rain -floods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 144
Of chilly rain , and shivering air. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 22
Are shed through the rain and the milder mist, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 99
Who waits for thee, as the chapp'd earth for rain . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 33
Alone they can drink up the morning rain : Lamia, Part I, Line 264
Arose and knelt before him, wept a rain Lamia, Part II, Line 66
Shifts sudden to the south, the small warm rain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 98
Just as he made his vow, it 'gan to rain , The Jealousies, Line 224
Then black gnomes scattering sixpences like rain ; The Jealousies, Line 583
 
RAIN'D............1
Rain'd violets upon his sleeping eyes. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 427
 
RAINBOW...........7
Is of too wide, too rainbow -large a scope, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 775
Golden, or rainbow -sided, or purplish, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 110
Like Vulcan's rainbow , with some monstrous roof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 231
Or on the rainbow of the salt sand-wave, Ode on Melancholy, Line 16
So rainbow -sided, touch'd with miseries, Lamia, Part I, Line 54
There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: Lamia, Part II, Line 231
Unweave a rainbow , as it erewhile made Lamia, Part II, Line 237
 
RAINING...........1
Fra wind and raining - Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 26
 
RAINS.............4
Like rose-leaves with the drip of summer rains . After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 8
Speckled with countless fleeces? Have not rains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 216
From wholesome drench of April rains , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 5
Clouds of stored summer rains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 58
 
RAIS'D............5
To commune with those orbs, once more I rais'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 600
The old man rais'd his hoary head and saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 218
Upon his elbow rais'd , all prostrate else, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 65
Turning from these with awe, once more I rais'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 81
Until old Saturn rais'd his faded eyes, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 400
 
RAISE.............4
To raise a trophy to the drama's muses. To George Felton Mathew, Line 7
Alone and sad. No, I will once more raise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 477
So, ye three ghosts, adieu! Ye cannot raise Ode on Indolence, Line 51
Use other speech than looks; bidding him raise Lamia, Part I, Line 304
 
RAISES............1
[Music. ETHELBERT raises his hands, as in benediction of Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
 
RAKE..............1
With random friar, or rake upon his tour, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 21
 
RAKED.............1
Who raked up ev'ry fact against the dead,) The Jealousies, Line 89
 
RAM...............2
A ram goes bleating: Winder of the horn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 281
Fire them and ram them in the dragon's nest; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 59
 
RAMBLE............3
Should he upon an evening ramble fare To My Brother George (epistle), Line 55
In some delicious ramble , he had found I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 165
In the middle of a brook,- whose silver ramble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 933
 
RAMBLED...........1
As late I rambled in the happy fields, To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 1
 
RAMPING...........1
The ramping Centaur! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 595
 
RAN...............20
By all the trembling mazes that she ran , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 245
Whence it ran brightly forth, and white did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 936
To mellow into words, and then there ran Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 737
That out I ran and search'd the forest o'er. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 482
Before the Water-Monarch. Nectar ran Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 925
A little onward ran the very stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 785
Rantipole Betty she ran down a hill, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 5
He ran There was a naughty boy, Line 38
He ran away to Scotland There was a naughty boy, Line 94
It smack'd of power!- and here he ran O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 71
Of leaves and trembled blossoms, where there ran Ode to Psyche, Line 11
An oath, and through the serpent's ears it ran Lamia, Part I, Line 113
To change; her elfin blood in madness ran , Lamia, Part I, Line 147
Ran the dark veins, that none but feet divine Lamia, Part I, Line 385
There ran a stream of lamps straight on from wall to wall. Lamia, Part II, Line 131
'Twas icy, and the cold ran through his veins; Lamia, Part II, Line 251
Ran imageries from a sombre loom. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 77
Her priestess-garments. My quick eyes ran on The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 53
Let us away!" Away together ran The Jealousies, Line 320
"Jostling my way I gain'd the stairs, and ran The Jealousies, Line 784
 
RANDOM............2
At random flies; they are the proper home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 521
With random friar, or rake upon his tour, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 21
 
RANG..............4
Till Triton blew his horn. The palace rang ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 888
They rang - no one at home - all gone to sport When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 2
He rose, he stampt his foot, he rang the bell, The Jealousies, Line 177
With rival clamours rang from every spire; The Jealousies, Line 569
 
RANG'D............1
Soon the assembly, in a circle rang'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 185
 
RANGE.............7
And all the wonders of the mazy range To George Felton Mathew, Line 91
Is there so small a range Sleep and Poetry, Line 162b
Dream within dream!" - "She took an airy range , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 633
Whether to silver grots, or giant range Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 237
The range of flower'd Elysium. Thus did fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 428
Be spiritualiz'd. Peona, we shall range Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 993
The embossed roof, the silent massy range The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 83
 
RANGED............1
That even the homage of his ranged chiefs Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 11
 
RANGER............1
I've been a ranger Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 274
 
RANGES............1
Such ranges of white feet, and patient lips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 739
 
RANGING...........1
whispering sadly, and ranging themselves; part entering and part discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
RANK..............1
Whose rank -grown forests, frosted, black, and blind, What can I do to drive away, Line 39
 
RANKS.............1
And rigid ranks of iron - whence who dares Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 732
 
RANT..............1
He hears a whisper plainer than a rant : The Jealousies, Line 50
 
RANTIPOLE.........1
Rantipole Betty she ran down a hill, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 5
 
RAPACIOUS.........1
Deliver me from this rapacious deep!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 332
 
RAPE..............1
Ah! he was one for theft and rape , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 83
 
RAPHAEL'S.........1
A meaner sound than Raphael's whispering. Addressed to the Same, Line 8
 
RAPIDLY...........2
Slowly, or rapidly - unwilling still To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 50
A flight of starlings making rapidly The Jealousies, Line 644
 
RAPIER............1
The sharp, the rapier -pointed epigram? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 65
 
RAPINE............1
Swifter than centaurs after rapine bent.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 536
 
RAPS..............1
Two or three raps Two or three posies, Line 9
 
RAPT..............5
Or a rapt seraph in a moonlight beam; To George Felton Mathew, Line 24
And was now rapt in tender hoverings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 931
Rapt in a deep prophetic solitude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 9
Her dawning love-look rapt Endymion blesses Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 463
Could so have rapt unwilling life away. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 51
 
RAPTUR'D..........1
Touch raptur'd !- See how painfully I flow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 948
 
RAPTURE...........2
With rapture to the other side of the world! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 250
To spread a rapture in my very hair,- What can I do to drive away, Line 53
 
RAPTUROUS.........1
Each family of rapturous hurried notes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 282
 
RARE..............9
And, warrior, it nurtures the property rare On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 23
In lovely modesty, and virtues rare . Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 22
So mournful strange. Surely some influence rare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 497
Swifter than lightning went these wonders rare ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 621
Though he would ofttimes feed on gillyflowers rare . Character of C.B., Line 18
A splendid company! rare beauties here! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 22
Waits with high marble doors for blood and incense rare . Lamia, Part I, Line 228
Of a fit mould and beauty, ripe and rare , The Jealousies, Line 7
To whisking tilburies, or phaetons rare , The Jealousies, Line 251
 
RAREST............1
Mingled with fragrance from her rarest flowers: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 32
 
RASH..............1
Be not so rash ; wait till his wrath shall pass, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 105
 
RATHER............19
We must think rather , that in a playful mood, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 8
Of thy wide heaven - Should I rather kneel Sleep and Poetry, Line 49
Ah! rather let me like a madman run Sleep and Poetry, Line 301
attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
The rather for the sun unwilling leaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 547
Be rather in the trumpet's mouth,- anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 737
And, truly, I would rather be struck dumb, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 824
I'd rather stand upon this misty peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 166
Worse than the torment's self: but rather tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 177
But rather , giving them to the filled sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 402
Rather than shadow our own soul's daytime Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 70
That I should rather love a Gothic waste Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 59
There is no face I rather would behold Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 44
I rather would grieve with you than upbraid. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 36
By heavens, I'd rather kiss Duke Conrad's slipper, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 13
My sword to my own throat, rather than held Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
Rather suffer me Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 114b
But rather , if her eyes could brighter be, Lamia, Part I, Line 292
But rather on your journey keep you warm: The Jealousies, Line 517
 
RATING............1
Against this highland princess, rating her The Jealousies, Line 105
 
RATIO.............1
And share his mouldy ratio in a siege. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 83
 
RATS..............3
Made a naumachia for mice and rats : Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 4
How many mice and rats hast in thy days To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 2
Of fish and mice and rats and tender chick. To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 8
 
RATTAN............1
'Tis nine to one he'll give you the rattan ! The Jealousies, Line 319
 
RAUGHT............2
In lone Endymion's ear, now he has raught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 282
To which the leaders sped; but not half raught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 856
 
RAV'D.............1
Took to the cowl,- then rav'd and swore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 53
 
RAVE..............7
Ghosts of melodious prophecyings rave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 789
He did not rave , he did not stare aghast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 588
And Isabella did not stamp and rave . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 384
'Tis dark: the iced gusts still rave and beat: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 327
Tell me why thus I rave , about these groves! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 110
Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave , Ode on Melancholy, Line 19
He is about to rave again. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 103
 
RAVED.............1
From square to square, among the buildings raved , The Jealousies, Line 736
 
RAVEN.............3
These raven horses, though they foster'd are Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 398
In letters raven -sombre, you may trace Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 53
The bird-lim'd raven ? She shall croak to death! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 107
 
RAVEN'D...........1
Clusters of grapes, the which they raven'd quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 511
 
RAVENING..........1
Ravening a worm.- Away ye horrid moods, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 105
 
RAVING............1
That 's Majesty was in a raving fit." The Jealousies, Line 326
 
RAVINGS...........2
Or tears, or ravings , or self-threatened death, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 129
With ghastly ravings . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 16a
 
RAVISH'D..........4
And leave once more the ravish'd heavens in peace. Ode to Apollo, Line 23
Ravish'd , she lifted her Circean head, Lamia, Part I, Line 115
So sweetly to these ravish'd ears of mine Lamia, Part I, Line 268
Ravish'd away far from her dear countree; The Jealousies, Line 77
 
RAVISHED..........1
As when with ravished , aching, vassal eyes, To Fanny, Line 14
 
RAVISHES..........1
And, as the lava ravishes the mead, Lamia, Part I, Line 157
 
RAVISHING.........1
Of flutes and viols, ravishing his heart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 772
 
RAVISHMENT........4
The silver lamp,- the ravishment ,- the wonder- I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 147
Tones ravishment , or ravishment its sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 841
Tones ravishment, or ravishment its sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 841
At which soft ravishment , with doating cry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 715
 
RAVISHMENTS.......1
Alecto's serpents; ravishments more keen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 875
 
RAY...............3
Where woven boughs shut out the moon's bright ray , To Hope, Line 8
With careless robe, to meet the morning ray , To G.A.W., Line 7
Or the polar ray to right you; Robin Hood, Line 22
 
RAYS..............4
Through the dark robe oft amber rays prevail, To Lord Byron, Line 11
Whose cords are solid rays , and twinkle radiant fires. Ode to Apollo, Line 6
With silver saint in golden rays , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 44
Azure saints mid silver rays , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 32
 
RAZOR.............1
No brush had touch'd his chin or razor sheer; Character of C.B., Line 7
 
RE................1
All were re -animated. There arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 790
 
REACH.............19
Whose tones reach nought on earth but Poet's ear. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 32
The Poet's eye can reach those golden halls, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 35
Of which no mortal eye can reach the flowers; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 44
Sounds which will reach the Framer of all things, Sleep and Poetry, Line 39
Ere the dread thunderbolt could reach ? How! Sleep and Poetry, Line 274
Why, you might read two sonnets, ere they reach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 69
The ripples seem right glad to reach those cresses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 81
Than sighs could fathom, or contentment reach : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 395
Where will the splendour be content to reach ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 91
"Why was I not contented? Wherefore reach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 372
Beyond the reach of music: for the choir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 964
O for a voice to reach the Emperor's ears! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 6
'Twas with some people out of common reach ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 43
The trumpets reach us. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 53a
In mournful syllables. Let but my words reach Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 15
The reach of fluttering Love, What can I do to drive away, Line 22
Could reach your dastard ears and fright you more! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 8
Reach the hill top, and now throughout the valley shines." The Jealousies, Line 558
The corridor, and scarce upright could reach The Jealousies, Line 625
 
REACH'D...........4
And when they reach'd the throned eminence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 895
When these words reach'd him. Whereupon he bows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 40
Had reach'd the river's brim. Then up he rose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 924
Until he reach'd the great main cupola; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 221
 
REACHED...........2
Until it reached a splashing fountain's side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 84
I knelt with pain - reached out my hand - had grasp'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 671
 
REACHES...........2
Before the point of his light shallop reaches Calidore: A Fragment, Line 67
And as it reaches each delicious ending, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 10
 
REACHING..........2
And reaching fingers, 'mid a luscious heap Sleep and Poetry, Line 362
So reaching back to boy-hood: make me ships Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 881
 
READ..............31
For she's to read a tale of hopes, and fears; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 97
I feel delighted, still, that you should read them. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 118
Who read for me the sonnet swelling loudly To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 60
A lovely tale of human life we'll read . Sleep and Poetry, Line 110
Why, you might read two sonnets, ere they reach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 69
All lovely tales that we have heard or read : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 22
As may be read of in Arcadian books; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 140
I read these words, and read again, and tried Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 682
I read these words, and read again, and tried Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 682
My eyes against the heavens, and read again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 683
Canst thou read aught? O read for pity's sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 763
Canst thou read aught? O read for pity's sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 763
In Dian's face they read the gentle lore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 833
And cannot speak it. The first page I read Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 87
But in her tone and look he read the rest. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 56
Whose matter in bright gold were best be read ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 94
Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 1
Bertha arose and read awhile, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 48
Untired she read ; her shadow still The Eve of St. Mark, Line 83
Untir'd she read the legend page The Eve of St. Mark, Line 89
Wherefrom I take strange lore, and read it deep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 148
Which he with eager guess began to read Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 48
Mute thou remainest - mute! yet I can read Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 111
This letter's not so soil'd but you may read it;- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 53
Possible! There - that letter! Read - read it! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 54
Possible! There - that letter! Read - read it! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 54
Have his own say; read me some silly creed Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 42
As ye may read who can unwearied pass The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 464
But, as I've read Love's missal through to-day, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 13
It may read well, but sure 'tis out of date King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 33
And made him read in many a learned book, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 4
 
READER............3
To keep the reader in so sweet a place, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 3
What manner I mean, will be quite clear to the reader , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Fair reader , at the old tale take a glance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 389
 
READINESS.........1
And went in haste, to get in readiness , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 191
 
READING...........3
With hopes that you would one day think the reading To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 81
The reading of an ever-changing tale; Sleep and Poetry, Line 91
Too fond of reading novels, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 38
 
READS.............5
Of wavy grass, and reads a debonair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 7
But in the very next he reads his soul's memorial: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 42
He reads it on the mountain's height, where chance he may sit down There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 43
( reads it). Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.b to Line 55
( Reads .) Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 59b
 
READY.............17
Bowing her head, and ready to expire: To Hope, Line 40
And mailed hand held out, ready to greet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 126
Our ready minds to fellowship divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 778
And flowers, and wreaths, and ready myrtle crowns Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 342
Ready to melt between an infant's gums: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 451
Ready to snort their streams. In this cool wonder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 885
Its hungry hugeness, seeming ready ripe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 347
Her ready eggs, before I'll kissing snatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1026
The Centaur's arrow ready seems to pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 597
The level chambers, ready with their pride, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 32
At glaring watch, perhaps, with ready spears- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 354
And ready still past kisses to outnumber Ode to Psyche, Line 19
Be ready to obey me; anon thou shalt Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 128
Complete and ready for the revels rude, Lamia, Part II, Line 144
And ever ready was to take her course What can I do to drive away, Line 12
His smelling-bottle ready for the allies; The Jealousies, Line 221
"Open the window, Hum; I'm ready now!" The Jealousies, Line 541
 
REAL..............12
A sense of real things comes doubly strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 157
How specious heaven was changed to real hell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 476
One sigh of real breath - one gentle squeeze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 665
'Mong men, are pleasures real as real may be: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 852
'Mong men, are pleasures real as real may be: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 852
Some, Titian colours touch'd into real life. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 19
Take you to real happiness and give Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 20
The real of beauty, free from that dead hue On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 10
My strong identity, my real self, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 114
Real are the dreams of Gods, and smoothly pass Lamia, Part I, Line 127
As a real woman, lineal indeed Lamia, Part I, Line 332
So, through a real heaven, on they swim The Jealousies, Line 39
 
REALLY............3
With syren words - Ah, have I really got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 955
" Really you must not talk of him, indeed." The Jealousies, Line 65
She does not mean it really . Cheer up, hearty - there! The Jealousies, Line 459
 
REALM.............9
Taste their pure fountains. First the realm I'll pass Sleep and Poetry, Line 101
In water, fiery realm , and airy bourne; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 31
If impiously an earthly realm I take. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 854
Through me the shepherd realm shall prosper well; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 863
Is not the only proud heart in his realm . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 57
Welcome, thou young scepter to the realm ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
To any but the second man of the realm , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 25
For by thy valour have I won this realm , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 8
Of all the realm , admiring of his deeds. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 56
 
REALMLESS.........2
Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were closed; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 19
Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were clos'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 324
 
REALMS............13
So fled thy soul into the realms above, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 4
Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold, On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 1
On the smooth wind to realms of wonderment; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 142
Of thine enmossed realms : O thou, to whom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 251
And kingdom over all the realms of verse Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 7
Meanwhile in other realms big tears were shed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 158
Over the fiery frontier of my realms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 247
Found ourselves ruling new and beauteous realms . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 201
Much pain have I for more than loss of realms : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 334
More than my love, and these wide realms in fee? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
The superannuations of sunk realms , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 68
When he had lost his realms ."- Whereon there grew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 302
In melancholy realms big tears are shed, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 7
 
REAP..............1
Is a full harvest whence to reap high feeling; To Kosciusko, Line 2
 
REAP'D............2
Of amorous herbs and flowers, newly reap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 318
Or on a half- reap'd furrow sound asleep, To Autumn, Line 16
 
REAPED............1
Rustle of the reaped corn; Fancy, Line 41
 
REAPPEARED........1
Hearing that his brave son had reappeared , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 19
 
REAR..............8
And from the rear diminishing away,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 831
From rear to van they scour about the plains; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 252
Had spent their malice, and the sullen rear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 40
Hyperion, leaving twilight in the rear , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 203
Had spent their malice, and the sullen rear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 342
Hyperion, leaving twilight in the rear , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 47
Bears his flaunt standard close upon their rear . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, First Knight, Line 13
O, little faery Pegasus! rear - prance- The Jealousies, Line 637
 
REAR'D............5
Up-followed by a multitude that rear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 164
Whereon, it was decreed he should be rear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 477
When a dread waterspout had rear'd aloft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 346
I rear'd my head, and look'd for Phoebus' daughter. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 414
High as the level of a man's breast rear'd Lamia, Part II, Line 184
 
REASON............13
Of man: though no great minist'ring reason sorts Sleep and Poetry, Line 288
Thy brain to loss of reason : and next tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 643
High reason , and the lore of good and ill, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 75
It is no reason why such agonies And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 13
By reason of his fallen divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 12
Can I find reason why ye should be thus: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 131
Can I find reason why ye should be thus: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 149
But for this reason , that thou art the King, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 184
How this proud temper with clear reason squares. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 31
Past all reason . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Second Lady, Line 37c
Whimpering away my reason ! Hark 'e, sir,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 97
His phantasy was lost, where reason fades, Lamia, Part I, Line 235
By reason of the fallen divinity The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 316
 
REASONS...........2
So each Fair reasons - though it oft miscarries. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 61
Bad reasons for her sorrow, as appears The Jealousies, Line 85
 
REASSERT..........1
O bag-pipe, thou didst reassert thy sway; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 11


Published @ RC

March 2005