Res-Ri - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
RESERV'D..........1
Is, in this restless world, for me reserv'd . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 715
 
RESIDES...........1
And Anthony resides in Brunswick Square. And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 10
 
RESIGN............1
Doth her resign ; and where her tender hands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 945
 
RESIGN'D..........1
This sister's love with me?" Like one resign'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 872
 
RESIST............1
"Who could resist ? Who in this universe? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 453
 
RESISTANCE........1
Nay, linger not; make no resistance , sweet;- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 57
 
RESISTLESS........3
And when bleak storms resistless rove, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 17
O misery of hell! resistless , tame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 266
Of pains resistless ! make my being brief, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 540
 
RESOLV'D..........2
Resolv'd , she took with her an aged nurse, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 343
I hope, resolv'd between us. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50a
 
RESOLVE...........3
Stifled his voice, and puls'd resolve away- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 45
Can alter my resolve . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 130a
Those tears will wash away a just resolve , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 145
 
RESOLVED..........3
My soul to keep in its resolved course." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 488
For they resolved in some forest dim Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 175
In thy resolved looks! Yes, I could kneel Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 5
 
RESOLVING.........1
Resolving to begin that very day Sleep and Poetry, Line 402
 
RESORT............1
Amid the timbrels, and the throng'd resort The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 67
 
RESPECT...........1
stage, bowing with respect to LUDOLPH, he frowning on them. CONRAD follows. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
 
RESPECTFULLY......1
To half beg, and half demand, respectfully , The Jealousies, Line 30
 
RESPIRE...........3
Enraptured dwells, - not daring to respire , Ode to Apollo, Line 16
In echoing places; when the winds respire , The Jealousies, Line 571
Upon the laden wings that scantly could respire . The Jealousies, Line 666
 
RESPLENDENT.......1
Its sides are tinged with a resplendent glow, To Lord Byron, Line 10
 
RESPLENDENTLY.....1
And the west is resplendently cloathed in beams. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 4
 
RESPONSE..........1
No god, no demon of severe response , Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 2
 
RESPONSES.........1
From uttering soft responses to the love Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
 
RESPONSIVE........1
Responsive to sylphs, in the moon beamy air. To Some Ladies, Line 12
 
REST..............45
Are things on which the dazzled senses rest Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 17
Sometimes, when the good knight his rest would take, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 19
Him thou wilt hear; so I will rest in hope Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 65
Delighting much, to see it half at rest , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 15
And on the balmy zephyrs tranquil rest Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 3
Lured by the innocent dimples. To sweet rest To My Brother George (epistle), Line 101
And the broad winged sea-gull never at rest ; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 136
Nor to such downy rest can he allure them; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 12
Trips it before Apollo than the rest . To G.A.W., Line 14
might/ Rest I ne wist, for there n'as erthly wight/ [As I suppose] had more of Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
May fan the cool air gently o'er my rest ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 112
We rest in silence, like two gems upcurl'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 120
In breezy rest among the nodding stalks. Sleep and Poetry, Line 135
Of diverse moths, that aye their rest are quitting; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 112
Soon was he quieted to slumbrous rest : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 442
The path of love and poesy. But rest , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 38
What whisperer disturb'd his gloomy rest ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 97
My soul of any rest : yet must I hence: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 776
Nature's soft pillow in a wakeful rest . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 174
My nets would be spread out, and I at rest . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 367
Poor lovers lay at rest from joys and woes.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 736
Sprang to each other madly; and the rest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 794
Be gods of your own rest imperial. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 823
Long have I sought for rest , and, unaware, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 879
His hands against his face, and then did rest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 917
Rest for a space 'twixt Cairo and Decan? To the Nile, Line 8
But in her tone and look he read the rest . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 56
God rest her aged bones somewhere- Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 29
Where the waters never rest , Not Aladdin magian, Line 40
O Muses, weep the rest - Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 68b
When the hen-bird's wing doth rest Fancy, Line 61
Ah, silver shrine, here will I take my rest The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 337
Pair by pair had gone to rest , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 63
But where the dead leaf fell, there did it rest . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 10
For rest divine upon exalted couch Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 192
Am I to leave this haven of my rest , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 235
Felt faint, and would have sunk among the rest , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 106
Were Theodore and Gonfrid and the rest Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 72
For loveliness you may - and for the rest Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 98
Carve it on my tomb, that, when I rest beneath, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 132
Are misery, and will not let them rest . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 149
But where the dead leaf fell there did it rest : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 314
For rest divine upon exalted couch The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 36
O, let me once more rest What can I do to drive away, Line 48
O ease my heart of verse and let me rest ; To Fanny, Line 2
 
RESTED............7
Thy locks in a knightly casque are rested : Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 52
Towards the ground; but rested not, nor stopt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 334
And so he rested , on the lonely ground, Lamia, Part I, Line 32
And rested at the foot of those wild hills, Lamia, Part I, Line 175
Had rested , and there slept, how long a sleep! The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 321
Nor rested till they stood to cool, and fan, The Jealousies, Line 322
Rested amid the desert's dreariment, The Jealousies, Line 394
 
RESTING...........1
A resting place, thus much comes clear and plain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 848
 
RESTLESS..........4
His breast is dancing on the restless sea. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 138
Tossing about on Neptune's restless ways, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 348
My restless spirit never could endure Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 854
Is, in this restless world, for me reserv'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 715
 
RESTLESSNESS......1
In chafing restlessness , is yet more drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 39
 
RESTOR'D..........1
And when he is restor'd , thou, fairest dame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 816
 
RESTORATION.......2
the Anniversary of Charles's Restoration , on Hearing the Bells Lines Written on 29 May, Extended Title
The restoration of some captive maids, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 191
 
RESTORING.........1
How a restoring chance came down to quell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 644
 
RESTRAIN..........2
Not all the gaze upon us can restrain Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 6
Faded before him, cower'd, nor could restrain Lamia, Part I, Line 137
 
RESTRAINT.........1
Restraint ! imprisoned liberty! great key Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 456
 
RESTS.............6
With the young ashen boughs, 'gainst which it rests , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 21
And from the pillowy silkiness that rests I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 188
He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed. On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 8
Star'd, where upon their heads the cornice rests , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 35
Where it rests its mossy brim Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 33
But if, as now it seems, your vision rests Lamia, Part II, Line 99
 
RESULT............1
To this result : "O dreams of day and night! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 227
 
RESUM'D...........1
Had been resum'd in spite of hindering force- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 650
 
RESUME............1
Let us resume his subject if you please: The Jealousies, Line 122
 
RESUMING..........1
Resuming quickly thus; while ocean's tide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 312
 
RESURRECTION......1
Till the day of resurrection ; Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 4
 
RETAIL............1
But retail dealers, diligent, let loose The Jealousies, Line 210
 
RETAIN............1
O let me see our land retain her soul, To Hope, Line 33
 
RETARDS...........1
Though the dull brain perplexes and retards : Ode to a Nightingale, Line 34
 
RETIR'D...........3
And back retir'd , not cool'd by high disdain; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 61
Yet even in these days so far retir'd Ode to Psyche, Line 40
She dwelt but half retir'd , and there had led Lamia, Part I, Line 312
 
RETIRE............8
A lion into growling, loth retire - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 536
As, supperless to bed they must retire , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 51
So, purposing each moment to retire , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 73
Let me to my glooms retire ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 3
Dazzling bowers of soft retire , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 6
Then I retire , so generous Otho please, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 137
Retire , Gersa! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 55a
For by some freakful chance he made retire Lamia, Part I, Line 230
 
RETIRED...........5
Yet were these Florentines as self- retired Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 129
In the retired quiet of the night, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 274
There was no covert, no retired cave Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 39
Of love, retired , vex'd and murmuring The Jealousies, Line 131
As he retired , an hour ago I wis, The Jealousies, Line 286
 
RETIRES...........1
[ Retires to an inner apartment. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 184
 
RETIRING..........1
Who can forget her half retiring sweets? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 30
 
RETRACE...........1
To as sweet a silence, when I 'gan retrace Sleep and Poetry, Line 352
 
RETRACTION........1
Retraction follow close upon the heels Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 93
 
RETREAT...........4
Some precious book from out its snug retreat , Sleep and Poetry, Line 325
Content, O fool! to make a cold retreat , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 465
Of his great summoner, and made retreat Lamia, Part I, Line 11
From mortal tempters all to make retreat ,- The Jealousies, Line 25
 
RETREATED.........1
The slave retreated backwards, humble-eyed, The Jealousies, Line 203
 
RETREATING........1
Fade away where old time is retreating . Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 4
 
RETROGRADING......1
And retrograding careful as he can, The Jealousies, Line 309
 
RETURN............13
Peona, mayst return to me. I own Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 867
Would bar return and make a man forget his mortal way. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 32
Why thou art desolate, can e'er return . Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 40
Is shifted round, the first seen shades return ; Ode on Indolence, Line 8
Into the clouds, and never more return ! Ode on Indolence, Line 60
Will you return , Prince, to our banquetting? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 152
As to my father's board I will return . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 153
Return with what good speed you may; for soon Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 158
[They go in and return . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 68b
Return to me. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 73a
And the return Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 5b
He would return that way, as well she knew, Lamia, Part I, Line 221
Exclaim'd the Emperor; "When I return , The Jealousies, Line 528
 
RETURN'D..........17
Melted into a languor. He return'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 826
No word return'd : both lovelorn, silent, wan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 764
The dame return'd , and whisper'd in his ear The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 183
He has not yet return'd , my gracious liege. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 35
For the first glimpse of such a son return'd ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 18
Has just return'd . He bids me say, bright dame, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 10
Return'd the snake, "but seal with oaths, fair God!" Lamia, Part I, Line 88
"Why do you think?" return'd she tenderly: Lamia, Part II, Line 41
For Proserpine return'd to her own fields, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 37
When sense of life return'd , I started up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 58
"None can usurp this height," return'd that shade, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 147
Return'd the Princess, "my tongue shall not cease The Jealousies, Line 62
Quoth the dark page; "Oh no!" return'd the Swiss, The Jealousies, Line 281
Return'd the porter - "off, and one shoe on, The Jealousies, Line 305
"Don't beat him!" return'd Hum, and on the floor came pat. The Jealousies, Line 315
Return'd his Highness; "they are piping hot The Jealousies, Line 546
Th' Ambassador's return'd from Pigmio! The Jealousies, Line 551
 
RETURNETH.........2
No soft squeeze for squeeze returneth ; You say you love; but with a voice, Line 17
And back returneth , meagre, barefoot, wan, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 12
 
RETURNING.........4
Returning home at evening, with an ear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 9
'Tis scar'd away by slow returning pleasure. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 909
And soon, returning from love's banishment, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 525
Of one returning townwards late, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 59
 
REV'LING..........1
That e'er my rev'ling eyes beheld, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 11
 
REVEAL'D..........2
All that's reveal'd from that far seat of blisses, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 47
His slender wand officially reveal'd ; The Jealousies, Line 582
 
REVEL.............2
Do meet in the dusk to revel . For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 24
No! we must revel it, as 'tis in use Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 54
 
REVEL'D...........1
And revel'd in a chat that ceased not To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 117
 
REVELLER..........1
No reveller had ever dipp'd a chin Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 128
 
REVELLERS.........1
There came a noise of revellers : the rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 194
 
REVELRIES.........3
How sing the splendour of the revelries , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 35
The revelries , and mysteries of night: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 64
From these bright revelries ; go, show yourself, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 53
 
REVELRY...........4
With dancing and loud revelry ,- and went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 535
Meantime a glorious revelry began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 924
At length burst in the argent revelry , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 37
The many heard, and the loud revelry Lamia, Part II, Line 262
 
REVELS............4
And she her half-discover'd revels keeping. To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 12
And all the revels he had lorded there: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 891
Being gloomy-minded, haters of fair revels ,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 57
Complete and ready for the revels rude, Lamia, Part II, Line 144
 
REVENGE...........11
Hath no revenge in it: as it is whole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 471
Of rage, of fear, anxiety, revenge , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 94
Wide glaring for revenge !"- As this he said, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 324
Revenge is difficult. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 44a
For me! I take no personal revenge Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 232
My appetite sharp - for revenge ! I'll no sharer Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 135
And so is my revenge , my lawful chattels! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 137
Silent,- without revenge ,- pshaw!- bitter end,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 21
She's gone! I cannot clutch her! no revenge ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 25
Hid in the forest, safe from my revenge , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 32
Sparkling revenge with amorous fury blent. The Jealousies, Line 175
 
REVERE............1
Nor patriots revere ? Lines Written on 29 May, Line 3
 
REVERENCE.........10
With reverence would we speak of all the sages To George Felton Mathew, Line 59
That I will follow with due reverence , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 63
My boundly reverence , that I cannot trace Sleep and Poetry, Line 209
That whining boyhood should with reverence bow Sleep and Poetry, Line 273
Due reverence to your most sovereign eyes. To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 14
In reverence vailed - my crystalline dominion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 793
And each one's gentle wrists, with reverence , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 743
With reverence , though to one who knew it not. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 25
Some wept, some wail'd, all bow'd with reverence ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 112
With reverence , though to one who knew it not. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 330
 
REVEREND..........1
Of reverend brothers; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 94
 
REVERSELY.........1
To manage stairs reversely , like a peach The Jealousies, Line 628
 
REVIVE............3
Revive the dying tones of minstrelsy, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 32
Revive , dear youth, or I shall faint and die; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 766
Revive , or these soft hours will hurry by Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 767
 
REVIVES...........2
But he revives at once: for who beholds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 637
Anon his heart revives : her vespers done, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 226
 
REVOKES...........1
She wish'd a game at whist - made three revokes - The Jealousies, Line 700
 
REVOLT............2
Drawn off his nobles to revolt ,- and shown Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 39
You vext with bad revolt ? Was't opium, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 34
 
REVOLUTIONIST.....1
Since Knox, the revolutionist , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 14
 
REVOLVE...........1
Revolve these facts in your acutest mood, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 35
 
REWARD............1
Cry a reward , to him who shall first bring Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 40
 
REWARDS...........1
Glocester has fit rewards - nay, I believe King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 47
 
REYNOLDS..........2
Dear Reynolds , as last night I lay in bed, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 1
Dear Reynolds , I have a mysterious tale Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 86
 
RHADAMANTHUS'.....1
And by old Rhadamanthus' tongue of doom, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 953
 
RHENISH...........1
Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 349
 
RHEUM.............1
Rheum to kind eyes, a sting to humane thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 286
 
RHEUMED...........1
No rheumed eyes, no furrowing of age, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 82
 
RHOMB.............1
Triumphant in the enemy's shatter'd rhomb ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 55
 
RHONE.............1
The promise of fair sail beyond the Rhone , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
 
RHYME.............13
And sit, and rhyme and think on Chatterton; To George Felton Mathew, Line 56
Whene'er I venture on the stream of rhyme ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 16
And often, when I sit me down to rhyme , How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 5
Was never said in rhyme . In drear nighted December, Line 24
Has vanish'd from my rhyme , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 23
And poesied with hers in dewy rhyme : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 70
To make old prose in modern rhyme more sweet: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 156
Beneath the text; and thus the rhyme The Eve of St. Mark, Line 97
The Dwarf with piteous face began to rhyme . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 21
Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 53
A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme : Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 4
To rhyme and syllable his miseries; The Jealousies, Line 124
His woven periods into careless rhyme ; The Jealousies, Line 636
 
RHYMES............5
Than I began to think of rhymes and measures: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 98
And while, for rhymes , I search around the poles, To My Brothers, Line 5
The silence when some rhymes are coming out; Sleep and Poetry, Line 321
For what there may be worthy in these rhymes Sleep and Poetry, Line 349
If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 1
 
RHYMING...........1
And close into her face, with rhyming clack, The Jealousies, Line 777
 
RHYMINGS..........1
No, doubly no;- yet should these rhymings please, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 78
 
RIB...............1
Lay by him, and a shatter'd rib of rock Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 42
 
RIBB'D............1
Ribb'd and inlaid with coral, pebble, and pearl. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 629
 
RIBBALD...........1
To hear you condescend to ribbald -phrase. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 90
 
RIBBALDS..........1
Ne with lewd ribbalds sat he cheek by jowl, Character of C.B., Line 14
 
RIBBAND...........1
A guitar- ribband - and a lady's glove Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 36
 
RIBS..............1
And fists in the short ribs keep up the yell and pother. The Jealousies, Line 774
 
RICH..............35
Hast thou a trumpet rich melodies blowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 11
Beneath its rich shade did King Oberon languish, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 26
When steep'd in dew rich to intoxication. Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 11
Their rich brimm'd goblets, that incessant run To My Brother George (epistle), Line 39
Should it e'er be so, what a rich content! To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 83
And the rich notes to each sensation fitting; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 114
Through almond blossoms and rich cinnamon; Sleep and Poetry, Line 118
Rich benedictions o'er us; ye have wreathed Sleep and Poetry, Line 222
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 19
And the tann'd harvesters rich armfuls took. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 441
It feels Elysian, how rich to me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 315
Spangled, and rich with liquid broideries Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 619
The dew of her rich speech: ' Ah! Art awake? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 429
Rich opal domes were seen, on high upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 841
Hold like rich garners the full ripen'd grain; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 4
There's the barton rich For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 25
To land each Tuesday from the rich Levant, To J.R., Line 10
To take the rich -ored driftings of the flood. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 112
Rich in the simple worship of a day. Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 14
It should be rich and sombre, and the moon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 26
Rich dowry from the spirit of the spheres,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 18
With plume, tiara, and all rich array, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 38
Her rich attire creeps rustling to her knees: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 230
The arras, rich with horseman, hawk, and hound, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 358
Sidelong its rich antiquity, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 42
Now more than ever seems it rich to die, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 55
Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows, Ode on Melancholy, Line 18
And precious goblets that make rich the wine. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
'Tis a rich sobbing melody, with reliefs Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 82
Were strewn rich gifts, unknown to any Muse, Lamia, Part I, Line 19
Men, women, rich and poor, in the cool hours, Lamia, Part I, Line 355
To search its sullen entrails rich with ore, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 274
Rich from the fluttering crimson of his cloak, The Jealousies, Line 267
Where the close eye in deep rich fur might trace The Jealousies, Line 345
Came from the northern suburbs; rich attire The Jealousies, Line 574
 
RICHER............6
But richer far posterity's award. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 68
Richer entanglements, enthralments far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 798
And pulp, and ripen, richer every hour, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 9
Were richer than the songs of Grecian years?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 126
Each richer by his being a murderer. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 224
Of higher occupants, a richer zest, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 246
 
RICHES............2
And the riches of Flora are lavishly strown; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 2
All the bright riches of my crystal coffer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 108
 
RICHEST...........3
Thyself to choose the richest , where we might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 998
Distracted with the richest overflow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 805
Know there is richest juice in poison-flowers. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 104
 
RICHLY............4
Hast thou a steed with a mane richly flowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 9
I will tell thee my blisses, which richly abound On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 19
I too have my blisses, which richly abound On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 43
My lips to thine, that they may richly feast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 771
 
RICHNESS..........5
Peeps the richness of a pearl. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 18
Deepening to richness from a snowy gleam; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 447
Young Semele such richness never quaft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 536
To such a richness , that the cloudy kings Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 7
The roof of awful richness , nectarous cheer, Lamia, Part II, Line 207
 
RID...............1
Except his bridle - how get rid of that, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 87
 
RIDDLE............3
Who keepeth clos'd a wond'rous riddle -book, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 130
Whether the riddle puzzles her beyond Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 71
He will expound this riddle ; he will show Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 190
 
RIDE..............3
To-day will ride with me? Apollo to the Graces, Line 2
To-day will ride with me Apollo to the Graces, Line 5
"And all for nothing such a dreary ride , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 10
 
RIDGE.............5
Along a huge cloud's ridge ; and now with sprightly Sleep and Poetry, Line 130
Athwart a flood of crystal. On a ridge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 239
Battle to the swollen billow- ridge , and drave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 612
Couches of rugged stone, and slaty ridge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 16
And of that other ridge whose barren back Lamia, Part I, Line 177
 
RIDGED............1
Fledge the wild- ridged mountains steep by steep; Ode to Psyche, Line 55
 
RIDING............2
Riding the springy branches of an elm. Sleep and Poetry, Line 95
Came riding with her bridegroom soft Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 31
 
RIFE..............1
Pangs are in vain - until I grow high- rife Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 29
 
RIFLED............1
And rifled ,- stuff! the horses' hoofs have minced it! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 68
 
RIG...............1
I spied upon a misty rig Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 11
 
RIGHT.............27
That goblet right heavy, and massy, and gold? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 6
And 'tis right just, for well Apollo knows To My Brother George (epistle), Line 45
What swell'd with pathos, and what right divine: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 55
'Tis might half slumb'ring on its own right arm. Sleep and Poetry, Line 237
The ripples seem right glad to reach those cresses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 81
Takes as a long lost right the feel of May, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 6
From his right hand there swung a vase, milk-white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 153
My sight right upward: but it was quite dazed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 601
Right upward, through the bushes, to the sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 872
At his right hand stood winged Love, and on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 864
Or the polar ray to right you; Robin Hood, Line 22
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 18
I will advance a terrible right arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 248
In right thereof; for 'tis the eternal law Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 228
Which by just right should come of mighty Gods; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 258
His right hand, his brave Conrad! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 44a
For your right noble names, like favorite tunes, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 126
Have sworn divorcement 'twixt me and my right . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 116
To right you. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 52a
On the right shoulders; on that wretch's head Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 144
That I, by happy chance, hit the right man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 252
She's mine by right of marriage!- she is mine! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 74
Half mad - not right here - I forget my purpose. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 176
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 323
Death as a sovereign right unto a king King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 42
"Next door but one to us, upon the right , The Jealousies, Line 282
Then facing right about, he saw the page, The Jealousies, Line 316
 
RIGHTEOUS.........1
Turn them aside, wretch! or the righteous ban Lamia, Part II, Line 278
 
RIGHTFUL..........2
His heart leapt up as to its rightful throne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 445
This wayward brother to his rightful joys! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 842
 
RIGHTLY...........2
These things which happen. Rightly have they done: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 528
I am but rightly serv'd." So saying, he Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 944
 
RIGID.............1
And rigid ranks of iron - whence who dares Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 732
 
RIGOUR............1
And with a sullen rigour obstinate Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 49
 
RILL..............7
Silv'ring the untainted gushes of its rill ; Imitation of Spenser, Line 4
Than Leda's love, and cresses from the rill . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 158
Hour after hour, to each lush-leav'd rill . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 52
But 'twas not long; for, sweeter than the rill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 339
For yet the past doth prison me. The rill , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 691
I will entice this crystal rill to trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 699
To her, than noise of trees or hidden rill ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 14
 
RILLETS...........1
In amorous rillets down her shrinking form! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 945
 
RILLS.............8
And sips its freshness from the little rills ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 91
With the green world they live in; and clear rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 16
Were full of pestilent light; our taintless rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 694
There came a noise of revellers: the rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 194
And little rills of crimson wine imbrued Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 212
The mountains blue, and cold near neighbour rills - Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 36
Of primroses by shelter'd rills , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 11
The rugged founts of the Peraean rills , Lamia, Part I, Line 176
 
RIM...............1
Or by the moon lifting her silver rim I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 113
 
RIMINI............1
"Places of nestling green for Poets made." Story of Rimini I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Epigraph
 
RIMM'D............1
Before the daisies, vermeil rimm'd and white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 50
 
RINALDO...........1
Of Armida the fair, and Rinaldo the bold? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 8
 
RING..............22
And makes the gazers round about the ring Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 29
Round, vast, and spanning all like Saturn's ring ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 67
They will be found softer than ring -dove's cooings. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 64
By all the echoes that about thee ring , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 277
Might turn their steps towards the sober ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 356
What could it be but love? How a ring -dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 731
At Neptune's feet he sank. A sudden ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1013
To the silver cymbals' ring ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 260
Through the thick branches, poor ring -doves sleek forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 327
And a golden ring had she, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 14
I mean the finger for the ring - All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 43
Ring -doves may fly convuls'd across to some high cedar'd lair; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 20
She comes, she comes again, like ring -dove fray'd and fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 198
This ring as pledge of dearest amity; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 136
My ring ! now, on my life, it doth rejoice Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 17
Won by the syren-trumpets, and the ring Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 14
"Bring Hum to me! But stay - here take my ring , The Jealousies, Line 190
Mustachios, ear- ring , nose-ring, and his sabre keen. The Jealousies, Line 279
Mustachios, ear-ring, nose- ring , and his sabre keen. The Jealousies, Line 279
" Ring the repeater, gentle Hum!" "'Tis five," The Jealousies, Line 478
I want, this instant, an invisible ring ,- The Jealousies, Line 602
At six we heard Panthea's churches ring - The Jealousies, Line 718
 
RINGETH...........1
While the chime-bell ringeth - You say you love; but with a voice, Line 4
 
RINGING...........1
Ringing Lines Written on 29 May, Extended Title
 
RINGLETS..........4
Her ringlets round her fingers, saying: "Youth! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 103
All finish'd but some ringlets of her hair; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 39
If one of her soft ringlets I displace, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 148
Will thirst in drouthy ringlets there; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 57
 
RINGS.............4
To bind them all about with tiny rings . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 60
The steeple-bell rings , The Gothic looks solemn, Line 11
Upon my ear a noisy nothing rings - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 321
The fire is going out, and no one rings Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 6
 
RIOT..............1
Made purple riot : then doth he propose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 138
 
RIOTING...........1
Her dream, with feast and rioting to blend; Lamia, Part I, Line 214
 
RIPE..............24
O may these joys be ripe before I die. Sleep and Poetry, Line 269
Of buds into ripe flowers; or by the flitting I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 111
When the great deity, for earth too ripe , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 142
Who thus were ripe for high contemplating Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 355
Or ripe October's faded marigolds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 397
Ripe fruits, and lonely couch, contentment gave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 968
Our gold and ripe -ear'd hopes. With not one tinge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 8
Her lips were all my own, and - ah, ripe sheaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 272
He had in truth; and he was ripe for tears. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 288
Its hungry hugeness, seeming ready ripe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 347
If thou art ripe to taste a long love dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 440
Ripe from hue-golden swoons took all the blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 861
A bitter coolness; the ripe grape is sour: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 35
In its ripe warmth this gracious morning time." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 68
Acorns ripe down-pattering, Fancy, Line 65
Be of ripe progress - Saturn must be King. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 125
Was ripening in itself. The ripe hour came, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 194
Or the ripe plum finger its misty bloom, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 6
And the ripe plum still wears its dim attire, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 11
My idle days? Ripe was the drowsy hour; Ode on Indolence, Line 15
Slant on my sheeved harvest of ripe bliss. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 118
Just when your knighthood is grown ripe and full King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 37
Of a fit mould and beauty, ripe and rare, The Jealousies, Line 7
Too ripe , he fell, being puzzled in his head The Jealousies, Line 629
 
RIPEN.............1
And pulp, and ripen , richer every hour, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 9
 
RIPEN'D...........2
Their ripen'd fruitage; yellow girted bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 253
Hold like rich garners the full ripen'd grain; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 4
 
RIPENED...........1
Which done, and all these labours ripened , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 707
 
RIPENESS..........1
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To Autumn, Line 6
 
RIPENING..........4
Budding - fruit ripening in stillness - autumn suns After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 10
Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 10
Was ripening in itself. The ripe hour came, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 194
To ripening harvests. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 167a
 
RIPEST............2
In ripest quiet, shadows of sweet sounds; Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 9
And with the ripest claret crowned it, The Jealousies, Line 418
 
RIPLINGS..........1
Of morning roses - riplings tenderly To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 6
 
RIPPLE............3
Comes up with ripple , and with easy float, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 20
From silv'ry ripple , up to beauty's queen; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 39
No leaf doth tremble, no ripple is there Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 9
 
RIPPLED...........1
Rippled delighted up the flowery side; Imitation of Spenser, Line 31
 
RIPPLES...........1
The ripples seem right glad to reach those cresses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 81
 
RIPPLING..........2
Or a white Naiad in a rippling stream; To George Felton Mathew, Line 23
Were rippling round her dainty fairness now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 939
 
RIPPLY............1
Into a shady, fresh, and ripply cove, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 430
 
RISE..............13
Full, and round like globes that rise Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 21
And come like a clear sun- rise to my mind; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 50
That glance so brightly at the new sun- rise . Sleep and Poetry, Line 18
The dazzling sun- rise : two sisters sweet Sleep and Poetry, Line 367
To feel this sun- rise and its glories old. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 106
Rise , Cupids! or we'll give the blue-bell pinch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 505
Innumerable mountains rise , and rise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 59
Innumerable mountains rise, and rise , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 59
How they can dive in sight and unseen rise - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 342
The pleasant sun- rise ; green isles hast thou too, To the Nile, Line 13
To rise like Phoebus with a golden quell, Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 7
Into the sun- rise , o'er the balustrade Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 178
Our barber tells me too are on the rise ,- The Jealousies, Line 293
 
RISEN.............2
Which undone, these our latter days had risen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 19
And Vesper, risen star, began to throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 485
 
RISES.............2
She rises crescented!" He looks, 'tis she, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 430
[OTHO rises . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 217b
 
RISETH............1
Then takes his lamp, and riseth from his knees, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 11
 
RISING............4
And always, at the rising of the sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 254
Ever as if just rising from a sleep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 11
He lean'd; not rising , from supreme contempt. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 308
And long-tail'd pheasants, and a rising sun, The Jealousies, Line 448
 
RITE..............1
And I neglect the holy rite for thee. Lamia, Part II, Line 97
 
RITES.............1
Hast brought pollution to our holy rites ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
 
RIVAL.............2
Palm-shaded temples, and high rival fanes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 59
With rival clamours rang from every spire; The Jealousies, Line 569
 
RIVEN.............1
To hide the cankering venom, that had riven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 396
 
RIVER.............23
Into a river , clear, brimful, and flush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 421
"This river does not see the naked sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 540
The earth its dower of river , wood, and vale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 838
My charming rod, my potent river spells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 116
Of river sides, and woods, and heathy waste, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 303
Ourselves whole summers by a river glade; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 811
I shudder - gentle river , get thee hence. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 964
Thou wast the river - thou wast glory won; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 166
"Beneath my palm trees, by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 182
"Beneath my palm trees, by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 188
Beneath dark palm trees by a river side? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 192
Athwart the sallows of a river nook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 392
My river -lily bud! one human kiss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 664
See, through the trees, a little river go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 680
Tame on thy finger; to the River -gods, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 707
And, slowly as that very river flows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 925
Many all day in dazzling river stood, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 111
Comes from beyond the river to my bed: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 302
See, as they creep along the river side, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 345
On the river - all's still, and the night's sleepy eye Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 10
What little town by river or sea shore, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 35
And wound with many a river to its head, Lamia, Part I, Line 29
Among the river sallows, borne aloft To Autumn, Line 28
 
RIVER'S...........3
Its flowery slopes, its river's crystal swell, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 5
Nor breath of sleeping dove, nor river's flow,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 972
Had reach'd the river's brim. Then up he rose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 924
 
RIVERS............10
Spangler of clouds, halo of crystal rivers , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 118
For meadows where the little rivers run. On The Story of Rimini, Line 4
Of rivers , nor hill-flowers running wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 286
All mountain- rivers lost in the wide home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 949
Of flowers, rush of rivers , and the tombs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 642
Green rushes like our rivers , and dost taste To the Nile, Line 12
Of rivers new with springtide sedge, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 10
I to green-weed rivers bright! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 4
Stay! though a Naiad of the rivers , stay! Lamia, Part I, Line 261
That monstrous region, whose dull rivers pour What can I do to drive away, Line 34
 
RIVETS............1
Can manage those hard rivets to set free Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
 
RIVETTED..........1
He rivetted close There was a naughty boy, Line 20
 
RIVULET...........2
A woodland rivulet - a poet's death. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 14
Beside the osiers of a rivulet , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 34
 
RIVULETS..........1
Of unachievable tasks; small rivulets Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 126


Published @ RC

March 2005