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Keats Concordance
 
ROAD..............1
Upon hot sand, or flinty road , or sea shore iron scurf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 10
 
ROAM..............8
' Ah! impious mortal, whither do I roam ?' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 942
I roam in pleasant darkness, more unseen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 993
That thou mayst always know whither I roam , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 687
Ever let the Fancy roam , Fancy, Line 1
Let the winged Fancy roam , Fancy, Line 93
And many else were free to roam abroad, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 31
Thou canst not ask me with thee here to roam Lamia, Part I, Line 276
Nor when away you roam , To Fanny, Line 44
 
ROAM'D............1
Far had he roam'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 119b
 
ROAR..............10
Enormous chasms, where, all foam and roar , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 601
And calm, and whispering, and hideous roar , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 201
And gave a roar , as if of earthly fire, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 215
They felt, but heard not, for the solid roar Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 7
Such noise is like the roar of bleak-grown pines; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 122
Speak! roar ! shout! yell! ye sleepy Titans all. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 316
In unhaunted roar and blaze, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 11
Hover'd and buzz'd his wings, with fearful roar , Lamia, Part II, Line 13
And gave a roar , as if of earthly fire, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 59
Our minute's glance; a busy thunderous roar , The Jealousies, Line 735
 
ROAR'D............1
And roar'd for more; with many a hungry lick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 512
 
ROARING...........2
The lion's roaring , and can tell Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 11
There is a roaring in the bleak-grown pines Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 116
 
ROARS.............1
My sports were lonely, 'mid continuous roars , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 340
 
ROB...............4
Or rob from aged Lear his bitter teen: Imitation of Spenser, Line 22
Though I have found, I will not rob thy nest The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 340
You rob me of myself; my dignity Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 119
Or, for such trifles, rob th' adorned world Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 88
 
ROB'D.............1
Those green- rob'd senators of mighty woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 73
 
ROBBER'S..........1
A robber's mark,- and near the nape O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 80
 
ROBBINS...........1
Were heard of none beside the mournful robbins . This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 14
 
ROBE..............6
Through the dark robe oft amber rays prevail, To Lord Byron, Line 11
Wraps round her ample robe with happy trembling. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 18
With careless robe , to meet the morning ray, To G.A.W., Line 7
Will set a green robe floating round her head, Sleep and Poetry, Line 114
And, in its marriage robe , the heavy body wound. Lamia, Part II, Line 311
To such a depth!" The Emperor took his robe , The Jealousies, Line 410
 
ROBED.............3
Or hath that antique mien and robed form Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 51
I dreamt I saw thee, robed in purple flakes, Lamia, Part I, Line 76
Slow-stepp'd, and robed in philosophic gown: Lamia, Part I, Line 365
 
ROBERT............1
Robert of Glocester. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 26a
 
ROBES.............11
Pink robes , and wavy hair, and diamond jar, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 7
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 214
Fall!- No, by Tellus and her briny robes ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 246
In placid sandals, and in white robes graced: Ode on Indolence, Line 4
her robes , and a train of Women. She kneels. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
By ladies, habited in robes of lawn Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 87
While her robes flaunted with the daffodils. Lamia, Part I, Line 184
In white robes , and themselves in order placed Lamia, Part II, Line 196
Robes , golden tongs, censer, and chafing dish, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 79
But yet I had a terror of her robes , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 251
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 58
 
ROBIN.............7
TUNE - "Julia to the Wood Robin " Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Keats's note to Line 1
Drest as though bold Robin Hood Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 10
Little John, or Robin bold; Robin Hood, Line 24
And if Robin should be cast Robin Hood, Line 38
Honour to bold Robin Hood, Robin Hood, Line 57
The gentle robin , like a pard or ounce, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 104
Where even the robin feels himself exil'd, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 6
 
ROBINS............1
Where robins hop, and fallen leaves are sere. On The Story of Rimini, Line 14
 
ROBS..............3
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 9
And robs his fair name of its maidenhood; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 4
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 313
 
ROCK..............7
The nether sides of mossy stones and rock ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 937
Upon a weeded rock this old man sat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 193
Sitting upon a rock above the spray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 646
Thee the waves awful bow. Fast, stubborn rock , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 946
Upon a rock on the border of a lake Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 27
Upon a lampit rock of green sea weed Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 88
Lay by him, and a shatter'd rib of rock Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 42
 
ROCK'D............1
Rock'd me to patience. Now, thank gentle heaven! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 706
 
ROCKING...........1
They sway'd about upon a rocking horse, Sleep and Poetry, Line 186
 
ROCKS.............14
Its ships, its rocks , its caves, its hopes, its fears,- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 6
Whether descended from beneath the rocks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 198
The semblance of gold rocks and bright gold sands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 742
Swift, mad, fantastic round the rocks , and lash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 920
Through mossy rocks ; where, 'mid exuberant green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 992
But hollow rocks ,- and they were palaces Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 323
Ere from among some rocks of glittering spar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 819
The rocks were silent - the wide sea did weave Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 90
Drench'd about the sombre rocks ; Not Aladdin magian, Line 15
Crag jutting forth to crag, and rocks that seem'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 10
In the half-glutted hollows of reef- rocks , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 306
Flew from his lips up to the vaulted rocks , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 348
Or nature's rocks toil'd hard in waves and winds, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 69
Where roof'd in by black rocks they waste in pain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 462
 
ROCKY.............4
Its rocky marge, and balances once more Sleep and Poetry, Line 378
Which kept as fixedly as rocky marge, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 224
As I stood where a rocky brig Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 9
Hath pass'd beyond the rocky portal; Not Aladdin magian, Line 46
 
ROD...............4
Had dipt his rod in it: such garland wealth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 563
My charming rod , my potent river spells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 116
Of my poor secrets, and so hold a rod Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 117
"I swear," said Hermes, "by my serpent rod , Lamia, Part I, Line 89
 
RODE..............5
And near him rode Silenus on his ass, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 215
And the horse he rode upon! Robin Hood, Line 56
Rode past fair Florence, to where Arno's stream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 210
The planet orb of fire, whereon he rode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 269
Rode to the Princess swift with spurring heels, The Jealousies, Line 776
 
RODS..............2
And they shall bring thee taper fishing- rods Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 708
Whose winds, all zephyrless, hold scourging rods , What can I do to drive away, Line 37
 
ROLL..............8
In the long vista of the years to roll , To Hope, Line 31
I shall roll on the grass with two-fold ease: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 79
Huge as a planet, and like that roll round, Sleep and Poetry, Line 176
Commingling with her argent spheres did roll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 595
Is folded by the muses; the bright roll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 725
By all that from thy mortal lips did roll ; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 19
Than any drummer's in the muster- roll ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 268
Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 1
 
ROLL'D............1
The winds of heaven blew, the ocean roll'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 188
 
ROLLING...........3
Of highest heaven; to the rolling spheres Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 10
In rolling out upfollow'd thunderings, To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 6
Easily rolling so as scarce to mar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 166
 
ROLLS.............5
To clear conceiving: yet there ever rolls Sleep and Poetry, Line 290
That lingered in the air like dying rolls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 309
Old ocean rolls a lengthened wave to the shore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 348
I heard their cries amid loud thunder- rolls . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 660
But rolls about our ears Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 4
 
ROMANCE...........7
More full of visions than a high romance ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 10
No tumbling water ever spake romance , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 149
O golden-tongued Romance , with serene lute! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 1
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance , When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 6
And from detested moods in new romance Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 111
O for the gentleness of old Romance , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 387
Of old romance . These let us wish away, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 41
 
ROMANCES..........2
Through its tall woods with high romances blent: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 4
And old romances ; but I'll break the spell. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 48
 
ROMANTIC..........2
Of all that ever charm'd romantic eye: Imitation of Spenser, Line 24
Some flowery spot, sequester'd, wild, romantic , To George Felton Mathew, Line 37
 
ROMEO.............2
And common Wellingtons turn Romeo boots; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 8
Romeo ! Arise! take snuffers by the handle; Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 14
 
ROOF..............21
Peep with the moon-beams through the leafy roof , To Hope, Line 11
Atween the pillars of the sylvan roof , To George Felton Mathew, Line 48
"O thou, whose mighty palace roof doth hang Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 232
Like Vulcan's rainbow, with some monstrous roof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 231
In through the woven roof , and fluttering-wise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 426
So from the arbour roof down swell'd an air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 513
Pillars, and frieze, and high fantastic roof , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 624
Lashed from the crystal roof by fishes' tails. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 111
Up in the winds, beneath a starry roof , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 491
They could not, sure, beneath the same roof sleep Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 7
Of pride and avarice,- the dark pine roof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 294
On the deep intenser roof , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 17
In deepest grass, beneath the whisp'ring roof Ode to Psyche, Line 10
Since under my glad roof , propitiously, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 35
Here, underneath this roof where Otho breathes,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 112
Supportress of the faery- roof , made moan Lamia, Part II, Line 123
To the high roof , still mimick'd as they rose Lamia, Part II, Line 181
The roof of awful richness, nectarous cheer, Lamia, Part II, Line 207
I saw an arbour with a drooping roof The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 25
Of an old sanctuary with roof august, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 62
The embossed roof , the silent massy range The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 83
 
ROOF'D............2
The lamps that from the high- roof'd hall were pendent, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 132
Where roof'd in by black rocks they waste in pain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 462
 
ROOFED............1
Useless, could find about its roofed home The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 229
 
ROOFING...........2
As I stood its roofing under, Not Aladdin magian, Line 10
Made a fit roofing to this nest of woe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 14
 
ROOFLESS..........1
Within these roofless walls, where yet O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 2
 
ROOK..............1
Saluted, as we pass'd, an early rook - The Jealousies, Line 709
 
ROOKS.............1
Or the rooks , with busy caw, Fancy, Line 45
 
ROOM..............24
Are fluttering round the room like doves in pairs; Sleep and Poetry, Line 328
Now fills, O Burns, a space in thine own room , This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 2
Yet be the anchor e'er so fast, room is there for a prayer There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 45
About my room ,- I'll have it in the pink; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 25
It is a gorgeous room , but somewhat sad; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 48
He found him in a little moonlight room , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 112
Filling the chilly room with perfume light.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 275
Abroad and in the homely room ; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 68
The room with wildest forms and shades, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 85
Enter GONFRID, from the Council- room . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 17b
[Exit. Enter the Nobles from the Council- room . They cross Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
This earth,- this palace,- this room ,- Auranthe! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 44
Chiefly by shifting to this lady's room Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 146
In one room music, in another sadness, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 278
Sits in the banquet- room among his chiefs; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 62
In the next room ; have you remark'd those two Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 9
about. AURANTHE in the inner- room . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
Floated into the room , and let appear Lamia, Part II, Line 20
The glowing banquet- room shone with wide-arched grace. Lamia, Part II, Line 121
Of wealthy lustre was the banquet- room , Lamia, Part II, Line 173
Scarce saw in all the room another face, Lamia, Part II, Line 240
Keeps elbow room amid our eager swords, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 36
To waiting-maids, and bed- room coteries, The Jealousies, Line 119
This room is full of jewels as a mine,- The Jealousies, Line 616
 
ROOMS.............1
The next our poor Prince fills the arched rooms Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 15
 
ROOT..............2
Meant but to fertilize my earthly root , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 907
Seated upon an uptorn forest root ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 499
 
ROOT'S............1
Young buds sleep in the root's white core. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 4
 
ROOTED............2
'Mid hush'd, cool- rooted flowers, fragrant-eyed, Ode to Psyche, Line 13
Wolf's-bane, tight- rooted , for its poisonous wine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 2
 
ROOTS.............8
And let long grass grow round the roots to keep them I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 32
From the quaint mossiness of aged roots : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 40
The seeds and roots in earth God of the golden bow, Line 27
So plenteously all weed-hidden roots Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 65
That writhes about the roots of Sicily: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 244
She found me roots of relish sweet, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 25
Will make thy bold tongue quiver to the roots , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 87
By the dark roots , and leave her palpable, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 138
 
ROOTY.............1
And not a tree, beneath whose rooty shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 793
 
ROPE..............1
A rope -ladder for false witness. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 147a
 
ROSARY............3
His dewy rosary on the eglantine." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 188
His rosary , and while his frosted breath, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 6
Make not your rosary of yew-berries, Ode on Melancholy, Line 5
 
ROSE..............63
Which fell profusely from the rose -tree stem! Imitation of Spenser, Line 33
I pillow my head on the sweets of the rose , On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 38
O come, dearest Emma! the rose is full blown, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 1
A fresh-blown musk- rose ; 'twas the first that threw To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 6
I thought the garden- rose it far excell'd: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 10
'Twould make the Poet quarrel with the rose . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 46
For there the lily, and the musk- rose , sighing, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 89
He of the rose , the violet, the spring, Addressed to the Same, Line 5
What is more tranquil than a musk- rose blowing Sleep and Poetry, Line 5
Nestling a rose , convuls'd as though it smarted Sleep and Poetry, Line 344
Of vine leaves. Then there rose to view a fane Sleep and Poetry, Line 363
And up I rose refresh'd, and glad, and gay, Sleep and Poetry, Line 401
Like rose -leaves with the drip of summer rains. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 8
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk- rose blooms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 19
And soon it lightly dipt, and rose , and sank, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 425
Than those of sea-born Venus, when she rose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 626
Of dying fish; the vermeil rose had blown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 696
A rose leaf round thy finger's taperness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 782
This said, he rose , faint-smiling like a star Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 990
Stems the upbursting cold: a wild rose tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 55
Disparts a dew-lipp'd rose . Above his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 407
The impatient doves, up rose the floating car, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 580
Done heedlessly, those spouting columns rose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 606
And rose , with spicy fannings interbreath'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 664
He rose in silence, and once more 'gan fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 118
Then up he rose , like one whose tedious toil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 226
Even to the trees. He rose : he grasp'd his stole, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 230
Made of rose leaves and thistledown, express, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 571
For each their old love found. A murmuring rose , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 824
Will slime the rose to night. Though if thou wilt, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 133
To the white rose bushes? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 150
Diversely ting'd with rose and amethyst, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 386
Slowly she rose , as though she would have fled, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 503
Young playmates of the rose and daffodil, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 572
Had reach'd the river's brim. Then up he rose , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 924
Her wine was dew o' the wild white rose , Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 7
Where the daisies are rose -scented, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 14
And the rose herself has got Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 15
The shut rose shall dream of our loves and awake Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 21
Sudden a thought came like a full-blown rose , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 136
Rose , like a mission'd spirit, unaware: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 193
Rose -bloom fell on her hands, together prest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 220
As though a rose should shut, and be a bud again. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 243
Into her dream he melted, as the rose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 320
And the long carpets rose along the gusty floor. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 360
The wakeful bloodhound rose , and shook his hide, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 365
And like a rose in vermeil tint and shape, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 209
Rose , one by one, till all outspreaded were; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 287
Let the rose glow intense and warm the air, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 15
And on thy cheeks a fading rose La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 11
It is as if the rose should pluck herself, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 5
But the rose leaves herself upon the briar, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 9
The coming musk- rose , full of dewy wine, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 49
Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose , Ode on Melancholy, Line 15
You heard what oath I sware, as the sun rose , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 27
But from the ashes of disgrace he rose Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 134
It cannot be - adieu!" So said, she rose Lamia, Part I, Line 286
Like the hid scent in an unbudded rose ? Lamia, Part II, Line 54
To the high roof, still mimick'd as they rose Lamia, Part II, Line 181
Pointing some whither: whereat he too rose The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 456
White Provence rose -leaves with her faery tears, The Jealousies, Line 83
He rose , he stampt his foot, he rang the bell, The Jealousies, Line 177
For the rose -water vase, magician mine! The Jealousies, Line 431
 
ROSE'S............3
Life is the rose's hope while yet unblown; Sleep and Poetry, Line 90
I cannot look upon the rose's dye, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 7
Fell sick within the rose's just domain, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 34
 
ROSEATE...........1
Or flush'd Aurora in the roseate dawning! To George Felton Mathew, Line 22
 
ROSES.............16
Sweeter by far than Hybla's honied roses Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 10
But when, O Wells! thy roses came to me To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 11
Fair dewy roses brush against our faces, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 133
Of morning roses - riplings tenderly To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 6
Roses , and pinks, and violets, to adorn To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 7
The gentle heart, as northern blasts do roses ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 734
Push'd through a screen of roses . Starry Jove! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 425
And cradled me in roses . Thus condemn'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 457
Groves, meadows, melodies, and arbour roses ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 939
Serpents in red roses hissing; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 15
Where my lord's roses blow. Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 12
Twin roses by the zephyr blown apart Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 74
And of thy roses amorous of the moon, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 148
A skull upon a mat of roses lying, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 42
Blush'd into roses 'mid his golden hair, Lamia, Part I, Line 25
Of scent, not far from roses . Turning round, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 24
 
ROSY..............11
Of luxuries bright, milky, soft and rosy . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 28
To meet his rosy child, with feathery sails, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 379
For on a silken couch of rosy pride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 392
And so he kept, until the rosy veils Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 112
My madness! let it mantle rosy -warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 313
A rosy sanctuary will I dress Ode to Psyche, Line 59
His rosy eloquence, and thus inquired: Lamia, Part I, Line 82
And kept his rosy terms in idle languishment. Lamia, Part I, Line 199
Now, when the wine has done its rosy deed, Lamia, Part II, Line 209
As pale it lay upon the rosy couch: Lamia, Part II, Line 250
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue; To Autumn, Line 26
 
ROT...............1
Rot on the pavement where thou rotted'st half."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 153
 
ROTTED............1
Have rotted on the briny seas; Robin Hood, Line 45
 
ROTTED'ST.........1
Rot on the pavement where thou rotted'st half."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 153
 
ROTTEN............1
Many old rotten -timber'd boats there be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 18
 
ROUGE.............1
By many a damsel hoarse and rouge of cheek; Character of C.B., Line 23
 
ROUGH.............9
Of my rough verses not an hour misspent; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 82
A rough -voic'd war against the dooming stars. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 864
Rough billows were my home by night and day,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 320
Of Cynthia he heard not, though rough briar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 965
Upon rough marble diadem, that hill's eternal crown. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 44
Loves not too rough a treatment, gentle sir; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 37
Rough ashes sat he for his soul's reprieve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 26
In these rough times. Brave soldier, as you pass Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 19
And pain my steps upon these flowers too rough , Lamia, Part I, Line 273
 
ROUGHNESS.........1
Of human words! roughness of mortal speech! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 818
 
ROUND.............99
Which round its marge reflected woven bowers, Imitation of Spenser, Line 8
Sweet Hope, celestial influence round me shed, To Hope, Line 47
Full, and round like globes that rise Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 21
Round about with eager pry. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 30
Wraps round her ample robe with happy trembling. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 18
And makes the gazers round about the ring Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 29
Round the wide hall, and show their happy faces; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 42
Nor will a bee buzz round two swelling peaches, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 66
All the green leaves that round the window clamber, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 136
Is looking round about him with a fond, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 141
Mark the bright silver curling round her prow. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 134
Round , vast, and spanning all like Saturn's ring? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 67
Round many western islands have I been On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 3
The while let music wander round my ears, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 9
Through cloudless blue, and round each silver throne. To Kosciusko, Line 8
A glowing splendour round about me hung, Sleep and Poetry, Line 51
Keeping a silence round a sleeping maid; Sleep and Poetry, Line 68
Round my fire-side, and haply there discover Sleep and Poetry, Line 72
Will set a green robe floating round her head, Sleep and Poetry, Line 114
Tipt round with silver from the sun's bright eyes. Sleep and Poetry, Line 132
Huge as a planet, and like that roll round , Sleep and Poetry, Line 176
It is to hover round our pleasant hills! Sleep and Poetry, Line 207
Delight you? Did ye never cluster round Sleep and Poetry, Line 213
From round its gentle stem; let the young fawns, Sleep and Poetry, Line 256
To cluster round it when we next shall meet. Sleep and Poetry, Line 326
Are fluttering round the room like doves in pairs; Sleep and Poetry, Line 328
Careless, and grand - fingers soft and round Sleep and Poetry, Line 333
Of pleasure's temple. Round about were hung Sleep and Poetry, Line 355
Far round the horizon's crystal air to skim, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 17
And let long grass grow round the roots to keep them I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 32
Round which is heard a spring-head of clear waters I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 41
Open afresh your round of starry folds, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 47
How silent comes the water round that bend; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 65
A little space, with boughs all woven round ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 166
The church bells toll a melancholy round , Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 1
And calmest thoughts come round us - as, of leaves After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 9
Haply a halo round the moon - a glee To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 3
Round the patient year- God of the golden bow, Line 6
To tie for a moment thy plant round his brow, God of the golden bow, Line 32
Bring round the heart an undescribable feud; On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 10
That whisper round a temple become soon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 27
Edg'd round with dark tree tops? through which a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 86
Who gathering round the altar, seemed to pry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 111
Earnestly round as wishing to espy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 112
Such as sat listening round Apollo's pipe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 141
Stood silent round the shrine: each look was chang'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 186
Or to tread breathless round the frothy main, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 270
Anger our huntsmen: Breather round our farms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 283
Guarding his forehead, with her round elbow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 416
Her pearl round ears, white neck, and orbed brow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 616
A rose leaf round thy finger's taperness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 782
Round every spot where trod Apollo's foot; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 790
Bushes and trees do lean all round athwart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 865
Edges them round , and they have golden pits: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 875
Round every leaf, that all those gentle lispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 956
What a calm round of hours shall make my days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 983
Her ringlets round her fingers, saying: "Youth! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 103
To make a coronal; and round him grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 409
His diamond path with fretwork, streaming round Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 608
Swift, mad, fantastic round the rocks, and lash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 920
Were rippling round her dainty fairness now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 939
Round flowery islands, and take thence a skim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 995
Of Neptune; and the sea nymphs round his state, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 211
Till round his wither'd lips had gone a smile. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 225
And buoyant round my limbs. At first I dwelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 384
Round every isle, and point, and promontory, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 405
And bound it round Endymion: then struck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 752
Can see all round upon the calmed vast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 867
Till it has panted round , and stolen a share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 84
A crescent he had carv'd, and round it spent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 788
Moves round the point, and throws her anchor stiff. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 24
While little sounds of life are round me knelling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 308
And, after looking round the champaign wide, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 347
Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 6
Still as the silence round about his lair; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 5
Open thine eyes eterne, and sphere them round Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 117
Spun round in sable curtaining of clouds; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 271
Found way from forth the thunders round his head! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 325
Of Ops the queen all clouded round from sight; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 78
To hover round my head, and make me sick Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 288
Kept undulation round his eager neck. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 132
When shifted round to see the other side; Ode on Indolence, Line 6
Is shifted round , the first seen shades return; Ode on Indolence, Line 8
He would be watching round the castle-walls, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 16
Curling, like spaniels, round my father's feet. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 82
May burst, and swell, and flourish round thy brows, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 30
And tassell'd round with weeping meteors! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 39
Round bush and tree, soft-brushing, in his speed, Lamia, Part I, Line 43
Wheels round its dazzling spokes."- The lady's cheek Lamia, Part II, Line 64
On the high couch he lay!- his friends came round - Lamia, Part II, Line 309
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To Autumn, Line 4
Of scent, not far from roses. Turning round , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 24
"By all the gloom hung round thy fallen house, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 284
Spin round , the stars their antient courses keep, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 419
They told the truth, though, round , the snowy locks The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 452
Round to the curb-stone patient dost thou trudge, The Jealousies, Line 247
Then turning round , he saw those trembling two: The Jealousies, Line 352
Trot round the quarto - ordinary time! The Jealousies, Line 638
Or round white columns wreath'd from capital to plinth. The Jealousies, Line 729
 
ROUNDED...........2
Rounded by thee, my song should die away, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 12
The clouds, the trees, the rounded hills all seem, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 2
 
ROUNDELAY.........3
For pity sang this roundelay - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 145
Of some gold tinge, and plays a roundelay Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 252
Or your very roundelay Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 24
 
ROUS'D............6
Rous'd by his whispering footsteps murmured faint: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 268
Shall we away?" He rous'd the steeds: they beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 481
And went to sleep again. Soon she was rous'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 71
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 201
Thy scalding in the seas? What, have I rous'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 320
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 45
 
ROUSE.............4
I saw parch'd Abyssinia rouse and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 259
Could rouse from that fine relish, that high feast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 554
Rouse from his heavy slumber and instill Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 4
Peace! nor contrive thy mistress' ire to rouse ," The Jealousies, Line 61
 
ROUSING...........1
Rousing them from pleasure's lair:- Ode to Apollo, Line 39
 
ROUT..............6
And when they're come, the very pleasant rout : Sleep and Poetry, Line 322
My love's far dwelling. Though the playful rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 179
And from a basket emptied to the rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 510
Chilly lovers, what a rout Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 64
The day appear'd, and all the gossip rout . Lamia, Part II, Line 146
"Does not your master give a rout to-night?" The Jealousies, Line 280
 
ROUTED............1
Are routed loose about the plashy meads, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 6
 
ROUTINE...........1
And all the smooth routine of gallantries, The Jealousies, Line 760
 
ROUTING...........2
When snouted wild-boars routing tender corn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 282
Or routing out of Hyperborean hordes, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 21
 
ROVE..............2
And when bleak storms resistless rove , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 17
So haply when I rove in some far vale, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 55
 
ROW...............3
And in the evening tak'st a double row The Jealousies, Line 241
Of our Imperial Basilic; a row The Jealousies, Line 751
Marching a- row , each other slipshod treads; The Jealousies, Line 769
 
ROWEL.............1
Ply well the rowel with faint trembling heels, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 11
 
ROWERS'...........1
Of seamen, and stout galley- rowers' toil: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 248
 
ROWS..............2
So in that crystal place, in silent rows , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 735
Three rows of oars are lightening moment-whiles Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 57
 
ROYAL.............11
Until his royal spirit softly ebbs Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 106
To royal Gersa with my humble thanks, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 20
Hail, royal Hun! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 81b
The heralds have prepared a royal lists; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 33
That royal porch, that high-built fair demesne; Lamia, Part II, Line 155
Royal Maud King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 20b
Praying his royal senses to content The Jealousies, Line 21
Fell on the sofa on his royal side. The Jealousies, Line 202
Honouring with royal tears the poor homespun; The Jealousies, Line 446
There, put it underneath your royal arm; The Jealousies, Line 515
Of moth's down, to make soft the royal beds, The Jealousies, Line 767
 
RUB...............2
And rub your flinty back against it - budge! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 50
The moment then - for then will Red-Crag rub Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 65
 
RUBB'D............1
And rubb'd his sides against the mossed bark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 85
 
RUBBING...........2
And rubbing of white hands, and sparkling eyes: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 96
Rubbing their sleepy eyes with lazy wrists, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 508
 
RUBIEST...........1
From lips the courtliest and the rubiest King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 55
 
RUBIOUS...........2
Pout her faint lips anew with rubious health; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
And rubious -argent: of all these bereft, Lamia, Part I, Line 163
 
RUBY..............4
Cast upward, through the waves, a ruby glow: Imitation of Spenser, Line 13
Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 1
Haply 'tis when thy ruby lips part sweetly, To G.A.W., Line 9
By nightshade, ruby grape of Proserpine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 4
 
RUDDERS...........1
Rudders that for a hundred years had lost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 125
 
RUDDY.............7
As if to glean the ruddy tears, it tried, Imitation of Spenser, Line 32
I sue not for my ruddy drops of life, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 546
All ruddy ,- for here death no blossom nips. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 740
For power to speak; but still the ruddy tide Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 44
And in-door melodies; nor the ruddy wine Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 49
And do its ruddy office. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 24a
And love, and pleasure, and the ruddy strife Lamia, Part I, Line 40
 
RUDE..............13
To take him to a desert rude , and bare, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 28
But no confusion, no disturbance rude How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 7
That mingles Grecian grandeur with the rude On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
O ye whose ears are dinned with uproar rude , On the Sea, Line 11
Whose flitting lantern, through rude nettle-briar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 278
Who first were on the earth; and sculptures rude Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 131
More did I love to lie in cavern rude , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 354
Me back to Scylla o'er the billows rude . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 462
And sorrow for her love in travels rude . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 248
To trust, fair Madeline, to no rude infidel. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 342
Nay open speech, rude mockery grown common, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
Complete and ready for the revels rude , Lamia, Part II, Line 144
Or with a rude hand break To Fanny, Line 52
 
RUDELY............2
That such fair clusters should be rudely torn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 44
Is rudely slighted? Who am I to wait? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 66
 
RUE...............3
That when through heavy hours I used to rue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 553
Must surely be self-doomed or he will rue it: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 843
Away, away, or I shall dearly rue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 957
 
RUEFUL............1
Sigh'd; rueful again the piteous bag-pipe went; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 7
 
RUEFULLY..........1
"Why do you shudder, love, so ruefully ? Lamia, Part I, Line 369
 
RUFFIAN...........1
Or look with ruffian passion in her face: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 149
 
RUFFLE............1
And dance, and ruffle their garments black. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 88
 
RUFFLED...........2
Their ruffled locks where meeting hazels darken; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 237
O it has ruffled every spirit there, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 534
 
RUFFLES...........1
Of ruffles all the surface of the lake To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 7
 
RUFFY.............1
Powder'd bag-wigs and ruffy -tuffy heads The Jealousies, Line 770
 
RUG...............1
Whose rug is straw, whose wholeness is a crack; The Jealousies, Line 230
 
RUGGED............8
While to the rugged north our musing turns To George Felton Mathew, Line 70
Forth from a rugged arch, in the dusk below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 639
His rugged forehead in a mantle pale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 395
Thinking on rugged hours and fruitless toil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 324
Gazed at such a rugged wonder. Not Aladdin magian, Line 9
Couches of rugged stone, and slaty ridge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 16
Who seem'd to me, as rugged times then went, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
The rugged founts of the Peraean rills, Lamia, Part I, Line 176
 
RUGGEDEST.........1
Spiral through ruggedest loopholes, and thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 599
 
RUIN..............8
Such innocence to ruin , - who vilely cheats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 35
There must be too a ruin dark, and gloomy, To George Felton Mathew, Line 51
Cling to the ruin , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 4
He sipp'd no olden Tom, or ruin blue, Character of C.B., Line 21
Sad sign of ruin , sudden dismay, and fall! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 336
Hungry for evidence to ruin me; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 33
For all this came a ruin : side by side Lamia, Part II, Line 16
For ruin and dismay they well foresaw, The Jealousies, Line 12
 
RULE..............12
To musty laws lined out with wretched rule Sleep and Poetry, Line 195
In ministring the potent rule of fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 366
His sov'reignty, and rule , and majesty;- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 165
Thereby more conquer'd, than by us the rule Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 216
You would not wear a crown, or rule a kingdom, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 77
One who could say,- here, rule these provinces! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 152
His young disciple. "'Tis no common rule , Lamia, Part II, Line 164
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line, Lamia, Part II, Line 235
His sov'reignty, and rule , and majesty; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 14
To rule in Pylos with a Nestor's beard. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 12
Of the wide kingdom's rule and government, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 12
A faery city, 'neath the potent rule The Jealousies, Line 3
 
RULED.............2
That deep-brow'd Homer ruled as his demesne; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 6
Unruffled, like high Gods, ye liv'd and ruled : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 331
 
RULING............1
Found ourselves ruling new and beauteous realms. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 201
 
RUM...............1
A thimble-full of old Jamaica rum ." The Jealousies, Line 363
 
RUMBLED...........1
Then came a conquering earth-thunder, and rumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 487
 
RUMBLES...........2
Rumbles reluctant o'er our fallen house; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 61
Rumbles reluctant o'er our fallen house; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 363
 
RUMBLINGS.........1
Or the low rumblings earth's regions under; Sleep and Poetry, Line 28
 
RUMMER............1
Instead of a pitiful rummer , Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 5
 
RUMOURS...........1
Among the midnight rumours from the camp. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
 
RUMPLE............1
O who would not rumple the daisies there, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 19
 
RUMPLING..........1
Frill- rumpling elbows brew up many a bother, The Jealousies, Line 773
 
RUN...............19
Their rich brimm'd goblets, that incessant run To My Brother George (epistle), Line 39
Ah! rather let me like a madman run Sleep and Poetry, Line 301
And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 3
And then I run into most wild surmises On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 13
For meadows where the little rivers run . On The Story of Rimini, Line 4
And run in mazes of the youngest hue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 42
The lark was lost in him; cold springs had run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 102
Who dives three fathoms where the waters run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 639
Of his fair eyes run liquid through their souls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 544
And I distilling from it thence to run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 944
When that same treacherous wax began to run , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 443
O what can be done? Shall we stay or run ? O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 19
And she forgot the dells where waters run , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 419
And straight she'll run on four. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 12
And off he went, run , trot, or any how. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 96
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run ; To Autumn, Line 4
Or a sharp needle run into her back an inch. The Jealousies, Line 72
The Viscount B. shall live at cut-and- run ; The Jealousies, Line 157
And, as we shaped our course, this, that way run , The Jealousies, Line 723
 
RUNG..............2
But that her bell has rung . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 52
But no - already had his deathbell rung ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 22
 
RUNNELS...........3
The meadows runnels , runnels pebble-stones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 839
The meadows runnels, runnels pebble-stones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 839
Runnels may kiss the grass on shelves and shallows clear, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 15
 
RUNNING...........3
Of rivers, nor hill-flowers running wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 286
O let me slake it at the running springs! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 320
His running , lying, flying foot-man too,- The Jealousies, Line 53
 
RUNS..............2
The gradual sand that through an hour glass runs - After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 13
She fathoms eddies, and runs wild about Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 87
 
RURAL.............2
And ev'ry rural bliss destroy, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 18
Would never teach a rural song to me: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 14
 
RUSH..............4
For down they rush as though they would be free, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 13
Fair faces and a rush of garments white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 124
With mingled bubblings and a gentle rush , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 420
Of flowers, rush of rivers, and the tombs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 642
 
RUSH'D............4
Until into earth's deep maw he rush'd : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 899
I rush'd into the folly! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 208
Anon rush'd by the bright Hyperion; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 57
Smiling. Anon upon him rush'd once more King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 48
 
RUSHES............10
Yet over the steep, whence the mountain stream rushes , To Some Ladies, Line 5
Of a swan's neck unseen among the rushes : Sleep and Poetry, Line 341
Winding through palmy fern, and rushes fenny, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 80
Lay, half asleep, in grass and rushes cool, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 134
Yet must I be a coward!- Horror rushes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 789
And take a dream 'mong rushes Stygian, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 505
Green rushes like our rivers, and dost taste To the Nile, Line 12
She plaited mats o' rushes , Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 22
Though the rushes that will make 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 18
From rushes green, and brakes, and cowslip'd lawns, Lamia, Part I, Line 6
 
RUSHY.............1
That lean against a streamlet's rushy banks, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 62
 
RUSSELL'S.........1
'Tis gallant Sydney's, Russell's , Vane's sad knell, Lines Written on 29 May, Line 5
 
RUSSIAN...........1
Who came unmaimed from the Russian frost. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 23
 
RUSTED............1
Old rusted anchors, helmets, breast-plates large Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 123
 
RUSTLE............6
Than the soft rustle of a maiden's gown I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 95
Coming with softest rustle through the trees; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 154
And where dark yew trees, as we rustle through, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 673
Rustle of the reaped corn; Fancy, Line 41
The rustle of those ample skirts about Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 56
This rustle of the trees! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 30a
 
RUSTLED...........3
His long hair rustled like a flame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 19
Where mantles grey have rustled by and swept the nettles green: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 4
Hyperion slid into the rustled air, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 2
 
RUSTLING..........4
Or of the dead leaves rustling drearily, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 6
Down in the blue-bells, or a wren light rustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 451
A rustling noise of leaves, and out there flutter'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 496
Her rich attire creeps rustling to her knees: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 230
 
RUTH..............3
Look'd up: a conflicting of shame and ruth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 761
Too long, alas, hast thou starv'd on the ruth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 104
Through the sad heart of Ruth , when, sick for home, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 66
 
RUTHLESS..........1
"Shut, shut those juggling eyes, thou ruthless man! Lamia, Part II, Line 277


About this Page

Published @ RC

March 2005