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Keats Concordance
 
SABBATH...........3
Upon a Sabbath day it fell; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 1
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 2
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 13
 
SABLE.............5
And like fair veins in sable marble flow. To Lord Byron, Line 12
Spun round in sable curtaining of clouds; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 271
Imagination from the sable charm The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 10
Still fix'd he sat beneath the sable trees, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 446
The sable -pointed heads of firs and pines The Jealousies, Line 555
 
SABRE.............2
Naked and sabre -like against my heart. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 557
Mustachios, ear-ring, nose-ring, and his sabre keen. The Jealousies, Line 279
 
SACRAMENTAL.......1
The sacramental cake: To Fanny, Line 53
 
SACRED............23
In other ages - cold and sacred busts Sleep and Poetry, Line 357
Daisies upon the sacred sward last eve, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 93
And after him his sacred vestments swept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 152
Of teeming sweets, enkindling sacred fire; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 224
Sacred to Dian? Haply, thou hast seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 512
Of sacred ditamy, and poppies red: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 555
In sacred custom, that he well nigh fear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 258
"Arise, good youth, for sacred Phoebus' sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 292
Held sacred for thy bower, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 171
Who, to thy sacred and ennobled hearse, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 8
O Phoebus, that I had thy sacred word Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 30
Persuade her sacred tongue All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 50
Sweet, holy, pure, sacred , and innocent, Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 2
Dares to pass our sacred ways, Not Aladdin magian, Line 36
Of incense, breath'd aloft from sacred hills, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 187
The sacred seasons might not be disturb'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 293
By Oxus or in Ganges' sacred isles. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 60
Who hath forsaken old and sacred thrones Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 77
Oh! thou good man, against whose sacred head Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 140
For somewhere in that sacred island dwelt Lamia, Part I, Line 13
Each by a sacred tripod held aloft, Lamia, Part II, Line 177
This saw that Goddess, and with sacred hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 255
Of incense breath'd aloft from sacred hills, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 31
 
SACRIFICE.........11
Like a fresh sacrifice ; or, if I can bear Sleep and Poetry, Line 61
Though she stood smiling o'er the sacrifice , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 200
The day of sacrifice ? Or, have new sorrows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 45
On our souls' sacrifice . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 977
With cypress, on a day of sacrifice . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 838
Would offer a burnt sacrifice of verse Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 9
The sacrifice goes on; the pontif knife Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 20
Who are these coming to the sacrifice ? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 31
Being garnish'd for the sacrifice , and I, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 155
To sacrifice to Jove, whose temple there Lamia, Part I, Line 227
"The sacrifice is done, but not the less The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 241
 
SACRIFICIAL.......1
Even so that lofty sacrificial fire, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 102
 
SACRILEGIOUS......1
To choak my utterance sacrilegious here?" The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 140
 
SACRISTAN.........1
Proteus is my sacristan . Not Aladdin magian, Line 44
 
SAD...............78
'Tis gallant Sydney's, Russell's, Vane's sad knell, Lines Written on 29 May, Line 5
Byron, how sweetly sad thy melody, To Lord Byron, Line 1
Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 1
Should sad Despondency my musings fright, To Hope, Line 9
Of Montmorenci. Why so sad a moan? Sleep and Poetry, Line 89
To woo its own sad image into nearness: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 174
Of young Narcissus, and sad Echo's bale. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 180
Do not look so sad , sweet one, Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 5
Sad and fadingly: Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 6
sad thought for Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Green'd over April's lap? No howling sad Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 217
On either side; pitying the sad death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 327
Her motherly cheeks. Arous'd from this sad mood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 343
Alone and sad . No, I will once more raise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 477
This all? Yet it is strange, and sad , alas! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 722
And then the ballad of his sad life closes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 735
Bear up against it: so farewel, sad sigh; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 974
Sent me by sad Vertumnus, when his fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 445
So sad , so melancholy, so bereft! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 685
Too palpable before me - the sad look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 790
Doff all sad fears, thou white deliciousness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1000
Those two sad streams adown a fearful dell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1009
Some friendly monster, pitying my sad state, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 350
Redemption sparkles!- I am sad and lost." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 51
I must be thy sad servant evermore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 301
Sad Zephyr droops the clouds like weeping willow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 369
To see ye thus,- not very, very sad ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 818
If it were heaven's will, on our sad fate." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 976
I love to mark sad faces in fair weather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 5
Dancing music, music sad , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 18
A whole long month of May in this sad plight Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 25
It made sad Isabella's eyelids ache, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 327
From the deep throat of sad Melpomene! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 442
And a sad ditty of this story born Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 501
Sad tears am shedding. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 44
They were my pleasures, they my sad life's end; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 11
It is a gorgeous room, but somewhat sad ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 48
And those sad eyes were spiritual and clear: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 310
Heart! thou and I are here sad and alone; Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 5
Yet lingeringly did the sad Ape forth draw When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 67
But to that second circle of sad hell, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 9
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 88
There is sad feud among ye, and rebellion Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 321
In sad demeanour, solemn, undisturb'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 330
Sad sign of ruin, sudden dismay, and fall! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 336
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 3
Thus grew it up - "Not in my own sad breast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 129
That it enforc'd me to bid sad farewell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 238
To all my empire: farewell sad I took, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 239
All the sad spaces of oblivion, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 359
Thus in alternate uproar and sad peace, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 1
What sorrow thou canst feel; for I am sad Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 69
I strive to search wherefore I am so sad , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 88
Where palsy shakes a few, sad , last gray hairs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 25
Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 66
Aye, father;- but the fire in my sad breast Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 136
'Tis very sad . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 151b
A sad delay. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 63a
With sad lips I shall; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 148b
To know thee sad thus, will unloose my tongue Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 14
With the sad Emperor they are closeted; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 10
Will blow one half of your sad doubts away. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 61
Sad , that the fairest creature of the earth- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 91
I pray you mind me not- 'tis sad , I say, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 92
Now to be punish'd,- do not look so sad ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 143
The only sad one; for thou didst not hear Lamia, Part I, Line 72
For pity do not this sad heart belie- Lamia, Part I, Line 259
Why will you plead yourself so sad forlorn, Lamia, Part II, Line 49
With its sad echo did the silence break. Lamia, Part II, Line 270
Long treasured tears. "This temple sad and lone The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 221
And so by turns - till sad Moneta cried, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 240
So at the view of sad Moneta's brow, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 275
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 387
With sad low tones, while thus he spake, and sent The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 410
Who on a wide plain gather in sad troops, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 43
In silence, not insulting his sad doom King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 52
"By thy ungallant bearing and sad mien, The Jealousies, Line 244
About this time,- a sad old figure of fun; The Jealousies, Line 656
 
SADDEN'D..........3
Or by the song of Erin pierc'd and sadden'd : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 112
To set my dull and sadden'd spirit playing? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 46
My sickness, with a brother's sadden'd eye, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 71
 
SADDENS...........1
And yet the evening listens. He who saddens O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 12
 
SADDLE............2
No more a princess shall side saddle me. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 78
To girth my saddle ! And those devil's beads Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 96
 
SADLY.............3
How lone he was once more, and sadly press'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 857
A shade! Yet sadly I predestinate! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 28
whispering sadly , and ranging themselves; part entering and part discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
SADNESS...........8
Of sadness . O that she would take my vows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 951
'Twas far too strange, and wonderful for sadness ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 219
Of fever'd sadness , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 64
Deep in the shady sadness of a vale Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 1
His soul shall taste the sadness of her might, Ode on Melancholy, Line 29
In one room music, in another sadness , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 278
Deep in the shady sadness of a vale, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 294
Somewhat in sadness , but pleas'd in the main, The Jealousies, Line 453
 
SAFE..............23
That same Adonis, safe in the privacy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 479
Olympus! we are safe ! Now, Carian, break Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 764
With the tinge of love, panting in safe alarm.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 314
These forests, and to thee they safe shall be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 994
I'll put your basket all safe in a nook Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 13
Safe on the lowly ground, she bless'd her fate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 73
We're safe enough; here in this arm-chair sit, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 106
From fright of dim espial. Safe at last, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 185
To a safe level matting. Now prepare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 196
So, I am safe emerged from these broils! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 1
Look, woman, look, your Albert is quite safe ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 120
I can, all safe in body and in soul, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 15
In wintry winds the simple snow is safe , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 26
What nerveless minions of safe palaces! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
My safety lies, then, Sigifred, I'm safe . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 59
upon her, sure as a wen. We are safe . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 61
Conrad, be they in your safe custody, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 238
I am safe ! Coward! why am I in fear? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 102
Which you can save me from,- and therefore safe , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 116
Hid in the forest, safe from my revenge, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 32
As those who, safe together met alone Lamia, Part I, Line 302
Thou standest safe beneath this statue's knees." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 181
But a fierce demon 'nointed safe from wounds King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 32
 
SAFELY............4
Thee safely through these wonders for sweet ends. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 575
And left me tossing safely . But the crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 352
So that the jewel, safely casketed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 431
Whom, with but one attendant, safely lain The Jealousies, Line 34
 
SAFETY............6
We feel the safety of a hawthorn glade: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 130
Seem'd to say- "Sleep, old man, in safety sleep; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 61
Preeminence and safety , I will strive Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 164
My safety lies, then, Sigifred, I'm safe. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 59
Thy fate. Your safety I have bought to-day Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 141
Is thy own safety ; thou hast dated on The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 144
 
SAGACIOUS.........1
But his sagacious eye an inmate owns: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 366
 
SAGE..............16
The sage will mingle with each moral theme To My Brother George (epistle), Line 77
For what has made the sage or poet write I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 125
Before that care-worn sage , who trembling felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 290
Had we both perish'd?"- "Look!" the sage replied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 717
Visage sage at pantomime; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 10
Sophist and sage , from no Athenian grove, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 168
Sage advice; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 24b
"Tis Apollonius sage , my trusty guide Lamia, Part I, Line 375
What for the sage , old Apollonius? Lamia, Part II, Line 222
Into forgetfulness; and, for the sage , Lamia, Part II, Line 227
Are useless: sure a poet is a sage ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 189
To sage advisers let me ever bend King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 10
(Section'd and subsection'd with learning sage ,) The Jealousies, Line 97
The plain-dress'd sage and spangled blackamoor, The Jealousies, Line 321
My Bertha!" "Bertha! Bertha!" cried the sage , The Jealousies, Line 371
In after time a sage of mickle lore, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 1
 
SAGE'S............1
Thou wast the mountain-top - the sage's pen- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 164
 
SAGELY............1
He'll surmise sagely of a dwelling-house, The Jealousies, Line 58
 
SAGES.............4
With reverence would we speak of all the sages To George Felton Mathew, Line 59
As say these sages , health perpetual Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 831
When sages look'd to Egypt for their lore. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 33
Which sages and keen-eyed astrologers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 278
 
SAID..............88
Said the good man to Calidore alert; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 123
It has been said , dear George, and true I hold it, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 23
With him," said I, "will take a pleasant charm; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 129
From out his eye, and said - "I do not deem Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 7
He said : "I feel this thine endearing love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 466
And earnestly said : "Brother, 'tis vain to hide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 505
And said , "Art thou so pale, who wast so bland Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 517
She said with trembling chance: "Is this the cause? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 721
If any said 'twas love: and yet 'twas love; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 730
Said I, low voic'd: ' Ah, whither! 'Tis the grot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 943
This said , he rose, faint-smiling like a star Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 990
But Venus, bending forward, said : "My child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 548
Said he, "will all this gush of feeling pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 681
Of that dark gulph he wept, and said : "I urge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1013
Echo into oblivion, he said :- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 233
And sceptre of this kingdom!" Venus said , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 898
Long have I said , how happy he who shrives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 26
"Dear lady," said Endymion, "'tis past: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 137
At last he said : "Poor lady, how thus long Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 298
"Alas!" said he, "were I but always borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 615
And twang'd it inwardly, and calmly said : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 848
Endymion said : "Are not our fates all cast? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 901
Gave utterance as he entered: "Ha! I said , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 951
Endymion!" said Peona, "we are here! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 972
And said , in a new voice, but sweet as love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 978
Was never said in rhyme. In drear nighted December, Line 24
Said he saw you in your glory, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 18
"How ill she is," said he, "I may not speak, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 37
So said he one fair morning, and all day Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 41
So said , his erewhile timid lips grew bold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 69
Their footing through the dews; and to him said , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 180
"Love, Isabel!" said he, "I was in pain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 201
Good bye! I'll soon be back."- "Good bye!" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
"Ha! ha!" said she, "I knew not this hard life, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 329
With death, as life. The ancient harps have said , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 396
'Twas hid from her: "For cruel 'tis," said she, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 495
"I am Lycidas," said he, Not Aladdin magian, Line 25
More strictly than he said the mass, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 26
The joys of all his life were said and sung: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 23
"Now tell me where is Madeline," said he, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 114
"It shall be as thou wishest," said the Dame: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 172
"Ah, Porphyro!" said she, "but even now The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 307
Than he prick'd up his ears and said , "Well done; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 76
Well done - for by what Mr. Dwarfy said , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 81
Wide glaring for revenge!"- As this he said , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 324
Perplex'd, the while melodiously he said : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 49
Or I have dream'd."- "Yes," said the supreme shape, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 61
And sure in language strange she said - La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 27
Well said , Sir Albert. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 93a
No. None at all. When have I said a lie? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 96
Observe what I have said ,- show no surprise. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 21
Where she doth breathe!" "Bright planet, thou hast said ," Lamia, Part I, Line 87
"I swear," said Hermes, "by my serpent rod, Lamia, Part I, Line 89
Blush'd a live damask, and swift-lisping said , Lamia, Part I, Line 116
Said Lamia, "here, upon this floor of clay, Lamia, Part I, Line 272
It cannot be - adieu!" So said , she rose Lamia, Part I, Line 286
Her face so long in Corinth, where, she said , Lamia, Part I, Line 311
While hurried Lamia trembled: "Ah," said he, Lamia, Part I, Line 368
"I'm wearied," said fair Lamia: "tell me who Lamia, Part I, Line 371
Trembled; she nothing said , but, pale and meek, Lamia, Part II, Line 65
Whispering in midnight silence, said the youth, Lamia, Part II, Line 84
"I have no friends," said Lamia, "no, not one; Lamia, Part II, Line 92
Lycius," said he, "for uninvited guest Lamia, Part II, Line 165
"Fool!" said the sophist, in an under-tone Lamia, Part II, Line 291
"A Serpent!" echoed he; no sooner said , Lamia, Part II, Line 305
Then said the veiled shadow - "Thou hast felt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 141
Thy doom."- "High Prophetess," said I, "purge off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 145
"Are there not thousands in the world," said I, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 154
I would no more of that; for, as I said , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 18
So said , one minute's while his eyes remain'd The Jealousies, Line 172
"I'll pull the string," said he, and further said, The Jealousies, Line 226
"I'll pull the string," said he, and further said , The Jealousies, Line 226
And said : "Don't tell me what you want, Eban; The Jealousies, Line 317
"He dreams," said Hum, "or I have ever lied, The Jealousies, Line 327
"Eban," said he, "as slaves should taste the fruits The Jealousies, Line 353
"A simple boon!" said Elfinan, "thou may'st The Jealousies, Line 364
"I'll have a glass of nantz, then,"- said the seer,- The Jealousies, Line 366
Said Hum, "in duty, and in vassalage, The Jealousies, Line 374
"I can't say," said the monarch, "that may be The Jealousies, Line 397
"Upon my honour!" said the son of Cham, The Jealousies, Line 403
Cham is said to have been the inventor of magic. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
He said , smack'd his moist lips, and gave a pleasant frown. The Jealousies, Line 423
Your voice low," said the Emperor, "and steep The Jealousies, Line 428
I've said it, sire; you only have to choose The Jealousies, Line 437
Said gentle Hum; "the nights draw in apace; The Jealousies, Line 479
"Wounds! how they shout!" said Hum, "and there,- see, see, The Jealousies, Line 550
He bow'd at Bellanaine, and said - "Poor Bell! The Jealousies, Line 609
And used, as we ourselves have just now said , The Jealousies, Line 627
 
SAID'ST...........1
Let me behold, according as thou said'st , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 289
 
SAIL..............8
I slowly sail , scarce knowing my intent; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 18
To goodly vessels; many a sail of pride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 20
To northern seas I'll in a twinkling sail , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 245
Could I thus sail , and see, and thus await Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 360
Slowly they sail , slowly as icy isle Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 405
A white sail shews above the green-head cliff, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 23
Eager to sail their orb; the porches wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 297
The promise of fair sail beyond the Rhone, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
 
SAILING...........4
Watching the sailing cloudlet's bright career, To one who has been long in city pent, Line 11
O'er sailing the blue cragginess, a car Sleep and Poetry, Line 126
By a bright something, sailing down apace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 602
Am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 187
 
SAILS.............5
To meet his rosy child, with feathery sails , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 379
Cowering their tawny brushes. Silent sails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 647
With toying oars and silken sails they glide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 249
Of passion-flower;- just in time there sails Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 45
My ship of fortune furl'd her silken sails ,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 5
 
SAINT.............6
As you were Saint Cupid's nun, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 8
Was built by Cuthbert de Saint Aldebrim; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 44
With silver saint in golden rays, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 44
And on her hair a glory, like a saint : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 222
A saint er its nativitie, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 104
I by the banner of Saint Maurice swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 51
 
SAINTE............2
Somdel of Sainte Cicilie; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 112
Of Sainte Markis life and dethe." The Eve of St. Mark, Line 114
 
SAINTLY...........2
On love, and wing'd St. Agnes' saintly care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 44
And dazed with saintly imageries. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 56
 
SAINTS............8
All saints to give him sight of Madeline, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 78
And tell me how" - "Good saints ! not here, not here; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 107
"I will not harm her, by all saints I swear," The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 145
And twilight saints , and dim emblazonings, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 215
Azure saints mid silver rays, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 32
Than that same quick-eyed pagan's. By the saints , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 45
The saints will bless you for this pious care. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 200
Would I were with the saints to pray for you! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Erminia, Line 9
 
SAITH.............2
Past the sweet Virgin's picture, while his prayer he saith . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 9
His prayer he saith , this patient, holy man; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 10
 
SAKE..............23
To pick up the keep- sake intended for me. To Some Ladies, Line 16
The social smile, the chain for freedom's sake : Addressed to the Same, Line 6
For the mere sake of truth; as 'tis a ditty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 829
"Arise, good youth, for sacred Phoebus' sake ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 292
O let me hear thee speak, for Cupid's sake ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 430
Canst thou read aught? O read for pity's sake ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 763
And, for my sake , let this young maid abide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 865
And all night kept awake, for sinners' sake to grieve. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 27
Open thine eyes, for meek St. Agnes' sake , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 278
She staid her vixen fingers for his sake , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 50
For prophecies of thee, and for the sake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 78
Both for his sake and mine, and to make glad Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 69
For your self's sake , I do not personate Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 143
sake , will be dumb as the grave. Erminia has my shame fix'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 60
So keep your wits at work, for your own sake , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 64
Aye, clutch your scabbard; but, for prudence' sake , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 168
And would, for your sake , she were innocent. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 76
For the sake of my fair newly wedded wife, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 142
Came, as through bubbling honey, for Love's sake , Lamia, Part I, Line 65
For truth's sake , what woe afterwards befel, Lamia, Part I, Line 395
Set him before me. Not for the poor sake King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 2
A pigeon's somerset, for sport or change's sake . The Jealousies, Line 45
For your convenience, and her dear nerves' sake ; The Jealousies, Line 491
 
SALADIN...........1
I mean a tripple- Saladin , whose eyes, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
 
SALAMANDER........1
SALAMANDER , ZEPHYR, DUSKETHA, AND BREAMA Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, Dramatis Personae
 
SALE..............1
Where gingerbread wives have a scanty sale , Over the hill and over the dale, Line 3
 
SALLIES...........1
Incognito upon his errand sallies , The Jealousies, Line 220
 
SALLOWS...........4
To the o'erhanging sallows : blades of grass I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 67
To margin sallows , were the leaves he spied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 341
Athwart the sallows of a river nook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 392
Among the river sallows , borne aloft To Autumn, Line 28
 
SALMON'S..........1
Of the salmon's mouth, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 11
 
SALPIETRO.........1
" Salpietro !" exclaim'd Hum, "is the dog there? The Jealousies, Line 311
 
SALT..............3
Salt tears were coming, when I heard my name Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 963
To tinge, on syren shores, the salt sea-spry? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 157
Or on the rainbow of the salt sand-wave, Ode on Melancholy, Line 16
 
SALUTARY..........1
Came salutary as I waded in; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 610
 
SALUTATION........3
Such salutation argues a glad heart Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 130
To give fit salutation . Methought I heard, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 26
My salutation as befits the time. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 54
 
SALUTED...........1
Saluted , as we pass'd, an early rook- The Jealousies, Line 709
 
SALUTING..........1
At the open doors, with wide saluting eyes, The Jealousies, Line 758
 
SALVATION.........1
Spoil his salvation for a fierce miscreed? On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 14
 
SALVATOR'S........1
My pictures all Salvator's , save a few Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 67
 
SALVERS...........2
The lustrous salvers in the moonlight gleam; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 284
With all my jewell'd salvers , silver and gold, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 12
 
SAMARCAND.........1
From silken Samarcand to cedar'd Lebanon. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 270
 
SAME..............49
The thought of that same chariot, and the strange Sleep and Poetry, Line 161
Were busiest, into that self- same lawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 108
But in the self- same fixed trance he kept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 403
Has made me scruple whether that same night Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 860
The same bright face I tasted in my sleep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 895
To that same feather'd lyrist, who straightway, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 432
That same Adonis, safe in the privacy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 479
Those same dark curls blown vagrant in the wind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 562
Those same full fringed lids a constant blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 563
By thee were fashion'd to the self- same end; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 161
Grasping this scroll, and this same slender wand. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 670
Those files of dead, scatter the same around, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 770
Of those same fragrant exhalations bred, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 435
When that same treacherous wax began to run, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 443
Trembling or stedfastness to this same voice, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 715
In that same void white Chastity shall sit, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 883
Do you get health - and Tom the same - I'll dance, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 110
They could not in the self- same mansion dwell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 3
They could not, sure, beneath the same roof sleep Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 7
She spoilt her half-done broidery with the same . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 16
Because her face was turn'd to the same skies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 22
How was it these same ledger-men could spy Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 137
'Tis the same story o'er and o'er,- O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 95
A very Eden that same place must be! Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 5
And, in the same moment - hark! Fancy, Line 43
Pearled with the self- same shower. Fancy, Line 54
Thou canst not surely be the same that thou didst seem." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 144
And still they were the same bright, patient stars. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 353
Just at the self- same beat of Time's wide wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 1
Where other hearts are sick of the same bruise; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 104
With the self- same dews that fell Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 27
To my essence are the same ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 77
Who breeding flowers, will never breed the same : Ode to Psyche, Line 63
Perhaps the self- same song that found a path Ode to a Nightingale, Line 65
The same that oft-times hath Ode to a Nightingale, Line 68
Than that same quick-eyed pagan's. By the saints, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 45
Ludolph and the swift Arab are the same ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 3
Let me look well: your features are the same , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 39
Your gait the same , your hair of the same shade, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 40
Your gait the same, your hair of the same shade, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 40
Than throbbing blood, and that the self- same pains Lamia, Part I, Line 308
And a few Persian mutes, who that same year Lamia, Part I, Line 390
As were his limbs of life, from that same night. Lamia, Part II, Line 308
I look'd upon them; still they were the same ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 385
And plot, in the same minute, how to chouse The Jealousies, Line 59
"At the same time, Eban,"- (this was his page, The Jealousies, Line 181
"At the same time, Eban, this instant go The Jealousies, Line 187
"Take this same book,- it will not bite you, sire; The Jealousies, Line 514
"What shall I do with this same book?" "Why merely The Jealousies, Line 523
 
SAMENESS..........1
Through winding passages, where sameness breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 235
 
SAMPLER...........1
A sampler hoarded slyly, good as new, The Jealousies, Line 440
 
SANCTITY..........1
Thus violate thy bower's sanctity ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 106
 
SANCTUARY.........4
Yield from thy sanctuary some clear air, Sleep and Poetry, Line 56
Of sanctuary splendour, not a sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 9
A rosy sanctuary will I dress Ode to Psyche, Line 59
Of an old sanctuary with roof august, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 62
 
SAND..............13
Their silver bellies on the pebbly sand . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 77
The gradual sand that through an hour glass runs- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 13
On gold sand impearl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 102b
And leave a black memorial on the sand ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 262
As hour-glass sand ,- and fast, as you might see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 815
Moved either host. On a wide sand they met, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 822
Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand , Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 2
Along the flat brown sand . I was at home, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 92
Upon hot sand , or flinty road, or sea shore iron scurf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 10
Along the margin- sand large foot-marks went, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 15
I threw my shell away upon the sand , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 278
Or on the rainbow of the salt sand -wave, Ode on Melancholy, Line 16
Along the margin sand large footmarks went The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 319
 
SANDALS...........5
Her silver sandals , ere deliciously Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 501
Sandals more interwoven and complete If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 5
In placid sandals , and in white robes graced: Ode on Indolence, Line 4
His silent sandals swept the mossy green; Lamia, Part I, Line 239
Shuffled their sandals o'er the pavement white, Lamia, Part I, Line 356
 
SANDIES...........1
Two or three sandies Two or three posies, Line 17
 
SANDS.............10
Than the shell, from the bright golden sands of the ocean To Some Ladies, Line 23
O'er pebbly crystal, and o'er golden sands ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 92
The semblance of gold rocks and bright gold sands , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 742
She dabbles, on the cool and sluicy sands : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 946
A virgin light to the deep; my grotto- sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 113
And pour to death along some hungry sands ."- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1004
Hung swollen at their backs, and jewel'd sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 313
Caught infant-like from the far-foamed sands . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 172
On sands , or in great deeps, vermillion turn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 20
The sands of thy short life are spent this hour, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 114
 
SANDY.............4
foundations are too sandy . It is just that this youngster should die away: a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Like melodies upon a sandy plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 683
Towards it by a sandy path, and lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1020
Woodlark may sing from sandy fern,- the sun may hear his lay; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 14
 
SANE..............1
Both together, sane and mad; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 19
 
SANEST............1
With sanest lips I vow me to the number Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 885
 
SANG..............10
Spread greyly eastward, thus a chorus sang : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 231
He sang the story up into the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 838
"I touch'd no lute, I sang not, trod no measures: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 338
The Nereids danc'd; the Syrens faintly sang ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 889
Yet wast thou patient. Then sang forth the Nine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 11
For pity sang this roundelay- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 145
Sang not to her - strange! that honey Robin Hood, Line 47
Sang , of delicious love and honey'd dart; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 78
O melody no more! for while I sang , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 272
Nor even Apollo when he sang alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 74
 
SANGUINE..........1
With sanguine feverous boiling gurge of pulse. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 28
 
SANGUINEOUS.......1
Fierce and sanguineous as 'twas possible Lamia, Part II, Line 76
 
SANK..............8
And soon it lightly dipt, and rose, and sank , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 425
O'erpowered me - it sank . Then 'gan abate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 674
At Neptune's feet he sank . A sudden ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1013
Sank in her pillow. Shaded was her dream The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 281
Upon his knees he sank , pale as smooth-sculptured stone. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 297
Told of his rage, ere he thus sank and pined. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 43
The God on half-shut feathers sank serene, Lamia, Part I, Line 123
He sank supine beside the aching ghost. Lamia, Part II, Line 294
 
SANS..............3
You may do so sans objection Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 3
In Provence call'd, "La belle dame sans mercy": The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 292
They cried - "La belle dame sans merci La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 39
 
SANTON............1
Built by a banish'd santon of Chaldee: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 42
 
SAPHIRE...........1
Though saphire warm, their stars do never beam; On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 7
 
SAPIENTIAE........1
The dentes sapientiae of mice The Jealousies, Line 292
 
SAPLESS...........1
Gaunt, wither'd, sapless , feeble, cramp'd, and lame. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 638
 
SAPPHIRE..........4
Of sapphire columns, or fantastic bridge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 238
Sapphire queen of the mid-May; Fancy, Line 52
Seen mid the sapphire heaven's deep repose; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 319
Fairer than Phoebe's sapphire -region'd star, Ode to Psyche, Line 26
 
SAPPHIRED.........1
A child's soul through the sapphired canvas bear, The Jealousies, Line 38
 
SAPPHIRES.........1
Of all her sapphires , greens, and amethyst, Lamia, Part I, Line 162
 
SAPPHO'S..........2
Sappho's meek head was there half smiling down Sleep and Poetry, Line 381
Sweet Sappho's cheek - a sleeping infant's breath- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 12
 
SARACENIC.........1
That Saracenic meteor of the fight, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 20
 
SASH..............3
Yet can I ope thy window- sash to find This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 10
His silvery trowsers, and his silken sash The Jealousies, Line 268
"Zooks!" exclaim'd Hum, as up the sash he drew, The Jealousies, Line 542

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Published @ RC

March 2005