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Keats Concordance
 
SAT...............32
Such as sat listening round Apollo's pipe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 141
Where sat Endymion and the aged priest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 357
Sat silent: for the maid was very loth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 711
I sat contemplating the figures wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 886
Of smothering fancies, patiently sat down; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 139
Till, weary, he sat down before the maw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 271
Sat silently. Love's madness he had known: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 860
Endymion sat down, and 'gan to ponder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 886
Upon a weeded rock this old man sat , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 193
His left sat smiling Beauty's paragon. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 865
She kist the sea-nymph's cheek,- who sat her down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 896
I sat a weeping: in the whole world wide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 183
I sat a weeping: what enamour'd bride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 189
"And as I sat , over the light blue hills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 193
Leant to each other trembling, and sat so Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 329
So she sat on the grass debonnairly. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 8
Why she sat drooping by the basil green, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 458
And, patient as a hen-bird, sat her there Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 471
Rough ashes sat he for his soul's reprieve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 26
Down she sat , poor cheated soul, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 69
Ne with lewd ribbalds sat he cheek by jowl, Character of C.B., Line 14
Sat gray-hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 4
Still sat , still snuff'd the incense, teeming up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 167
Instead of thrones, hard flint they sat upon, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 15
And sat me down, and took a mouthed shell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 270
Saturn sat near the Mother of the Gods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 389
The fallen leaves, when I have sat alone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 54
Sat listening; when presently came by Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 121
Lamia, no longer fair, there sat a deadly white. Lamia, Part II, Line 276
Came brief upon mine ear,- "So Saturn sat The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 301
Still fix'd he sat beneath the sable trees, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 446
He sat and cursed a bride he knew he could not touch. The Jealousies, Line 126
 
SATAN.............1
Aye, Satan , does that yerk ye? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 74c
 
SATED.............1
For many moments, ere their ears were sated Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 114
 
SATHAN'S..........1
Of Goddis love and Sathan's force The Eve of St. Mark, Line 108
 
SATURN............32
Than Saturn in his exile; where I brim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 994
Sombre Saturn , Momus hale, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 21
Sat gray-hair'd Saturn , quiet as a stone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 4
" Saturn , look up!- though wherefore, poor old King? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 52
Saturn , sleep on:- O thoughtless, why did I Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 68
Saturn , sleep on! while at thy feet I weep." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 71
Until at length old Saturn lifted up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 89
Of Saturn ; tell me, if this wrinkling brow, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 100
Peers like the front of Saturn . Who had power Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 102
Be of ripe progress - Saturn must be King. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 125
Thea! Thea! Thea! where is Saturn ?" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 134
O Saturn ! come away, and give them heart; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 151
Even now, while Saturn , rous'd from icy trance, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 201
Saturn is fallen, am I too to fall? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 234
And bid old Saturn take his throne again."- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 250
For there thou wilt find Saturn , and his woes. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 346
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 3
Of Saturn , and his guide, who now had climb'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 84
So Saturn , as he walk'd into the midst, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 105
So ended Saturn ; and the God of the Sea, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 167
Of thunder, or of Jove. Great Saturn , thou Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 182
Those pains of mine; O Saturn , hadst thou felt, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 297
Hyperion from the peak loud answered, " Saturn !" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 388
Saturn sat near the Mother of the Gods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 389
Gave from their hollow throats the name of " Saturn !" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 391
Came brief upon mine ear,- "So Saturn sat The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 301
" Saturn ! look up - and for what, poor lost King? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 354
Saturn , sleep on:- Me thoughtless, why should I The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 368
Saturn , sleep on, while at thy feet I weep." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 371
Until old Saturn rais'd his faded eyes, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 400
Of Saturn fill'd the mossy glooms around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 407
Even now, while Saturn , rous'd from icy trance, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 45
 
SATURN'S..........17
Round, vast, and spanning all like Saturn's ring? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 67
But those of Saturn's vintage; mouldering scrolls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 129
The other upon Saturn's bended neck Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 45
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 82
Is Saturn's ; tell me, if thou hear'st the voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 99
And listen'd in sharp pain for Saturn's voice. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 163
And sidelong fix'd her eye on Saturn's face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 91
Among these fallen, Saturn's voice therefrom Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 125
O speak your counsel now, for Saturn's ear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 162
But splendider in Saturn's , whose hoar locks Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 353
There those four shouted forth old Saturn's name; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 387
Is Saturn's ; I, Moneta, left supreme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 226
In Saturn's temple. Then Moneta's voice The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 300
No farther than to where old Saturn's feet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 320
The other upon Saturn's bended neck The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 347
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 381
Listening in their doom for Saturn's voice. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 12
 
SATURNUS'.........1
By old Saturnus' forelock, by his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 956
 
SATYR.............3
"Thou, to whom every faun and satyr flies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 263
Hear us, O satyr king! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 278
Drove Nymph and Satyr from the prosperous woods, Lamia, Part I, Line 2
 
SATYRS............5
Then there were fauns and satyrs taking aim Sleep and Poetry, Line 360
Came waggish fauns, and nymphs, and satyrs stark, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 534
"Whence came ye, jolly Satyrs ! whence came ye! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 228
A nymph, to whom all hoofed Satyrs knelt; Lamia, Part I, Line 14
Of Satyrs , Fauns, and blear'd Silenus' sighs. Lamia, Part I, Line 103
 
SAUCES............1
And sauces held he worthless as the chaff; Character of C.B., Line 12
 
SAV'D.............5
O they had all been sav'd but crazed eld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 661
Sav'd from the shores of darkness, when the waves Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 135
He must be sav'd by fine contrivances; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 20
The little struggler, sav'd from perils dark, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 12
"What am I that should so be sav'd from death? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 138
 
SAVAGE............5
Their savage eyes with unaccustomed lightning. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 90
And in the savage overwhelming lost, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 704
The shark at savage prey - the hawk at pounce, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 103
Not savage , for he saw full many a God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 350
A paradise for a sect; the savage too The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 2
 
SAVAGENESS........1
And with a nimble savageness attacks, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 12
 
SAVE..............44
To save poor lambkins from the eagle's maw; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 267
Was quite forgotten, save of us alone! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 786
Save echo, faint repeating o'er and o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1011
Save of blown self-applause, they proudly mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 13
With nothing save the hollow vast, that foam'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 120
Above, around, and at his feet; save things Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 121
And, save when Bacchus kept his ivy tent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 240
Awhile forgetful of all beauty save Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 450
Pregnant with such a den to save the whole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 544
All the long day; save when he scantly lifted Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 920
Save of the quiet primrose, and the span Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 10
To save thee from a worse. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 28
My pictures all Salvator's, save a few Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 67
Save to St. Agnes and her lambs unshorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 71
Save one old beldame, weak in body and in soul. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 90
Save wings, for heaven:- Porphyro grew faint: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 224
Save now and then the still footfall The Eve of St. Mark, Line 58
Save from one gradual solitary gust Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 76
In smoothest silence, save what solemn tubes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 206
Now lost, save what we find on remnants huge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 281
Without a motion, save of their big hearts Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 26
Save one whom none regarded, Clymene; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 248
Then save me or the passed day will shine Sonnet to Sleep, Line 9
Save me from curious conscience, that still hoards Sonnet to Sleep, Line 11
Save what from heaven is with the breezes blown Ode to a Nightingale, Line 39
Though seen of none save him whose strenuous tongue Ode on Melancholy, Line 27
God save illustrious Otho! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 6b
Into the lap of honour;- save me, knight! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 49
A quick plot, swift as thought to save your heads; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 66
Who, by close stratagems, did save herself, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 145
Well, I give up, and save my prayers for heaven! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 255
To crush or save us? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 7a
Which you can save me from,- and therefore safe, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 116
But make your own heart monitor, and save Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 120
No more, save Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 6b
That, while it smote, still guaranteed to save . Lamia, Part I, Line 339
Seeing all their luckless race are dead, save me, Lamia, Part II, Line 96
Save one, who look'd thereon with eye severe, Lamia, Part II, Line 157
With the fine spell of words alone can save The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 9
Save from one gradual solitary gust, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 375
O save , in charity, To Fanny, Line 23
Save it for me, sweet love! though music breathe To Fanny, Line 25
God save the Empress. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 19a
Save when, for healthful exercise and air, The Jealousies, Line 43
 
SAVED.............2
A famish'd pilgrim,- saved by miracle. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 339
Let her glide on! This danger'd neck is saved , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 6
 
SAVES.............2
Which saves a sick man from the feather'd pall Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 268
That saves him. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 50a
 
SAVING............9
Saving when, with freshening lave, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 31
Their fond imaginations,- saving him Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 393
All records, saving thine, come cool, and calm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 2
Saving , perhaps, some snow-light cadences Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 79
Saving Love's self, who stands superb to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 535
Saving of thy sweet self; if thou think'st well The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 341
Ludolph, you have no saving plea in store? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 104
Saving a tythe which love still open kept, Lamia, Part II, Line 24
Like, saving shoe for sock or stocking, my man John!" The Jealousies, Line 306
 
SAVORY............1
Savory , latter-mint, and columbines, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 576
 
SAVOUR............3
Because my wine was of too poor a savour To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 25
Savour of poisonous brass and metal sick: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 189
Savour of poisonous brass and metals sick. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 33
 
SAW...............90
There the king-fisher saw his plumage bright Imitation of Spenser, Line 10
There saw the swan his neck of arched snow, Imitation of Spenser, Line 14
A lay that once I saw her hand awake, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 38
I saw the sweetest flower wild nature yields, To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 5
Some weeks have pass'd since last I saw the spires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 84
Never again saw he the happy pens Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 70
The quick invisible strings, even though she saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 500
I, who still saw the horizontal sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 529
And lo! from opening clouds, I saw emerge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 591
He saw not fiercer wonders - past the wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 249
So saw he panting light, and towards it went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 383
Upon soft verdure saw , one here, one there, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 385
I saw this youth as he despairing stood: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 561
Over his sullen eyes: I saw him throw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 564
The Latmian saw them minish into nought; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 582
While every eve saw me my hair uptying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 803
He saw the giant sea above his head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1023
He saw far in the concave green of the sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 191
The old man rais'd his hoary head and saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 218
Or tear me piece-meal with a bony saw , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 263
I saw thee, and my blood no longer cold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 304
The more, the more I saw her dainty hue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 408
I saw a fury whetting a death-dart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 558
I saw grow up from the horizon's brink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 647
The tempest came: I saw that vessel's shrouds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 656
He mark'd their brows and foreheads; saw their hair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 741
Just within ken, they saw descending thick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 820
"I saw Osirian Egypt kneel adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 257
I saw parch'd Abyssinia rouse and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 259
I saw the whelming vintage hotly pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 261
He saw her body fading gaunt and spare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 507
For the soothsayers old saw yesternight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 829
Since I saw thee, I have been wide awake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 855
In one swift moment, would what then he saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 907
He saw not the two maidens, nor their smiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 969
Said he saw you in your glory, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 18
And should have been most happy - but I saw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 93
But I saw too distinct into the core Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 96
She saw it waxing very pale and dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 53
When, looking up, he saw her features bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 199
Clearly she saw , as other eyes would know Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 363
And the new morn she saw not: but in peace Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 422
I saw her wrappit in her hood Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 25
When he saw the churches seven, Not Aladdin magian, Line 7
Lo! I saw one sleeping there Not Aladdin magian, Line 11
Fix'd on the floor, saw many a sweeping train The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 58
But she saw not: her heart was otherwhere: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 62
Candlesticks John saw in heaven, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 34
They saw her highness had made up her mind, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 45
The Mule no sooner saw himself alone When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 75
Their sorrows. Pale were the sweet lips I saw , As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 12
His faded eyes, and saw his kingdom gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 90
Of son against his sire. I saw him fall, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 322
I saw my first-born tumbled from his throne! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 323
There saw she direst strife; the supreme God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 92
I saw him on the calmed waters scud, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 236
Not savage, for he saw full many a God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 350
And in each face he saw a gleam of light, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 352
Now saw the light and made it terrible. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 366
And nothing else saw all day long, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 22
I saw pale kings, and princes too, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 37
I saw their starv'd lips in the gloam La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 41
Saw two fair creatures, couched side by side Ode to Psyche, Line 9
I saw my moment. The Hungarians, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 47
Yet, for all this, I never saw a father Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 103
I never saw such prowess. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 57a
To my appalling, I saw too good proof Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 146
In feud with wolves and bears, when no eye saw Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 10
I saw the three pass slowly up the stairs, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 11
I saw thee sitting, on a throne of gold, Lamia, Part I, Line 70
I dreamt I saw thee, robed in purple flakes, Lamia, Part I, Line 76
She saw the young Corinthian Lycius Lamia, Part I, Line 216
Her soft look growing coy, she saw his chain so sure: Lamia, Part I, Line 256
Till she saw him, as once she pass'd him by, Lamia, Part I, Line 315
The Adonian feast; whereof she saw no more, Lamia, Part I, Line 320
Saw this with pain, so arguing a want Lamia, Part II, Line 35
Scarce saw in all the room another face, Lamia, Part II, Line 240
gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
I saw an arbour with a drooping roof The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 25
Then to the west I look'd, and saw far off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 87
And, coming nearer, saw beside the shrine The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 95
This saw that Goddess, and with sacred hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 255
Parted the veils. Then saw I a wan face, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 256
I must not think now, though I saw that face- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 263
Of all external things - they saw me not, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 268
And saw , what first I thought an image huge, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 298
And look'd around, and saw his kingdom gone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 401
When every fair one that I saw was fair, What can I do to drive away, Line 7
Then facing right about, he saw the page, The Jealousies, Line 316
Then turning round, he saw those trembling two: The Jealousies, Line 352
 
SAW'ST............1
Whom thou saw'st step from yon forlornest wood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 333
 
SAWYER............1
And Miss Chip has kiss'd the sawyer , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 19
 
SAY...............83
Keep thy chains burst, and boldly say thou art free; On Peace, Line 12
To say "joy not too much in all that's bloomy." To George Felton Mathew, Line 52
Why westward turn? 'Twas but to say adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 141
The air that floated by me seem'd to say To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 99
Will not some say that I presumptuously Sleep and Poetry, Line 270
Lo! who dares say , "Do this"?- Who dares call down To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 9
My will from its own purpose? who say , "Stand," To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 10
And haply you will say the dewy birth To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 5
You say you love; but with a voice You say you love; but with a voice, Line 1
You say you love; but with a smile You say you love; but with a voice, Line 6
You say you love; but then your lips You say you love; but with a voice, Line 11
You say you love; but then your hand You say you love; but with a voice, Line 16
To put on such a look as would say , Shame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 717
He knew not where; and how he would say , nay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 729
Where'er I look: but yet, I'll say 'tis naught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 985
To gladden thee; and all I dare to say , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 121
Say , I intreat thee, what achievement high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 714
To utter secrets, haply I might say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 914
Say , beautifullest, shall I never think? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 305
Say , is not bliss within our perfect seisure? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 720
As say these sages, health perpetual Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 831
To lure - Endymion, dear brother, say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 845
Turn, damsels! hist! one word I have to say . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 909
And hadst no more to say , All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 24
To boot - say , wretched ingrate, have I not Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 15
Red-Crag, I say ! O I must have you close! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 47
The Queen of Egypt melted, and I'll say And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 16
To hear what I shall say . 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 9
Say , may I be for aye thy vassal blest? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 335
Say , wherefore did I laugh? O mortal pain! Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 6
I cannot say , ' O wherefore sleepest thou?' Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 54
O Titans, shall I say ' Arise!'- Ye groan: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 157
Shall I say ' Crouch!'- Ye groan. What can I then? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 158
Of shapeless Chaos. Say , doth the dull soil Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 217
What pleas'd your Grace to say ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 141a
To say for once I thank you. Sigifred! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 34
And, to say truth, in any Christian arm Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
O 'tis a noble boy!- tut!- what do I say ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
Seem'd to say - "Sleep, old man, in safety sleep; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 61
Say , what noise is that? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 84b
Say no more. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 23b
I say no more. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 5a
No, my good lord, I cannot say I did. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 121
Has just return'd. He bids me say , bright dame, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 10
Say , is not that a German yonder? There! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 14
After that, say and do whate'er you please. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 111
Young man, you heard this virgin say 'twas false,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
'Tis false, I say . What! can you not employ Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 123
Married to-day!- to-day! You did not say so? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 59
Well, Ludolph, what say you? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 35b
Sit. And now, abbot, what have you to say ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 112
Bold sinner, say you so? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 159b
Have his own say ; read me some silly creed Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 42
Say , what is't? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 50b
One who could say ,- here, rule these provinces! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 152
Good, good; he dies. You go, say you? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 181b
Say it at once, sir! dead - dead - is she dead? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 74
What wouldst say ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 115c
Miss'd the way, boy? Say not that on your peril! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 16
Say , how fares the Prince? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 46b
Say you so, Prince? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 52a
I say I quarrell'd with you; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 52b
I pray you mind me not- 'tis sad, I say , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 92
It was no dream; or say a dream it was, Lamia, Part I, Line 126
What canst thou say or do of charm enough Lamia, Part I, Line 274
Let the mad poets say whate'er they please Lamia, Part I, Line 328
Where might my taylor live?- I say again Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 21
And dumb enchantment. Who alive can say The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 11
Touch has a memory. O say , Love, say, What can I do to drive away, Line 4
Touch has a memory. O say, Love, say , What can I do to drive away, Line 4
Divine, I say !- What sea-bird o'er the sea What can I do to drive away, Line 15
Say they are gone,- with the new dawning light What can I do to drive away, Line 46
Why this, you'll say - my Fanny!- is not true; To Fanny, Line 33
He "knew the city," as we say , of yore, The Jealousies, Line 206
"I can't say ," said the monarch, "that may be The Jealousies, Line 397
"And listen to my words. You say you won't, The Jealousies, Line 460
You say you love a mortal. I would fain The Jealousies, Line 463
From peccadilloes. But, sire, as I say , The Jealousies, Line 465
I say no more." "Or good or ill betide, The Jealousies, Line 526
Say you are very sick, and bar the way The Jealousies, Line 535
Should talk of extreme unction, I shall say The Jealousies, Line 538
I say , old hocus, have you such a thing The Jealousies, Line 600
Some histories say that this was Hum's last speech; The Jealousies, Line 623
 
SAY'ST............1
Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 48
 
SAYING............11
Whence I may copy many a lovely saying Sleep and Poetry, Line 65
Her ringlets round her fingers, saying : "Youth! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 103
So saying , this young soul in age's mask Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 310
Of life from charitable voice? No sweet saying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 45
I am but rightly serv'd." So saying , he Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 944
Press'd, saying : "Sister, I would have command, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 975
Saying moreover, "Isabel, my sweet! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 297
So saying with a spirit's glance Not Aladdin magian, Line 56
Saying , "Mercy, Porphyro! hie thee from this place; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 98
So saying , she hobbled off with busy fear. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 181
Bertha or Bellanaine." So saying , he drew The Jealousies, Line 438
 
SAYINGS...........2
My sayings will the less obscured seem, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 858
I humanize my sayings to thine ear, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 2
 
SAYS..............5
Says I, I'll be Jack if you will be Gill- Over the hill and over the dale, Line 7
Says I, 'tis the wind at a parley. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 10
Says I, hold your tongue, you young gipsey. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 14
Kind sister! aye, this third name says you are; Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 17
There he says plainly that she loved a man! The Jealousies, Line 109
 
SC................1
women." Terence's Eunuch. Act 2. Sc . 4 Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
 
SCABBARD..........1
Aye, clutch your scabbard ; but, for prudence' sake, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 168
 
SCAFFOLDING.......1
Penanc'd, and taunted on a scaffolding ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 146
 
SCAITH............1
Which to the oil-trade doth great scaith and harm, The Jealousies, Line 215
 
SCALDING..........2
With many a scalding tear and many a groan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 668
Thy scalding in the seas? What, have I rous'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 320
 
SCALES............3
Whose silken fins and golden scales light Imitation of Spenser, Line 12
And scales upon the beauty of its wings. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 37
Would let me feel their scales of gold and green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 344
 
SCALY.............1
Bearing upon their scaly backs, in files, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 246
 
SCAMPERING........1
Scampering to death at last! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 12a
 
SCAN..............2
With a warm heart, and eye prepared to scan Calidore: A Fragment, Line 29
But there were some who feelingly could scan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 178
 
SCANDAL...........1
Who thinks they scandal her who talk about her; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 8
 
SCANDALISE........1
Upon my marriage-day, and scandalise Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 79
 
SCANS.............1
Scans all the depths of magic, and expounds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 697
 
SCANTILY..........1
If you but scantily hold out the hand, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 78
 
SCANTLY...........5
So scantly , that it seems her bridal night, To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 11
Their scantly leaved, and finely tapering stems, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 5
All the long day; save when he scantly lifted Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 920
A silver tissue, scantly to be seen, The Jealousies, Line 346
Upon the laden wings that scantly could respire. The Jealousies, Line 666
 
SCANTY............5
In other regions, past the scanty bar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 124
Where gingerbread wives have a scanty sale, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 3
Scanty the hour and few the steps beyond the bourn of care, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 29
Scanty the hour and few the steps, because a longer stay There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 31
Locks shining black, hair scanty grey, and passions manifold. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 38
 
SCAPE.............2
Predestin'd for his ear, scape as half check'd King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 54
Congees and scape -graces of every sort, The Jealousies, Line 759
 
SCAR'D............5
'Tis scar'd away by slow returning pleasure. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 909
And tyranny of love be somewhat scar'd ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 174
That scar'd away the meek ethereal Hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 216
Not long delay'd, that scar'd the younger Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 71
That scar'd away the meek ethereal hours The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 60
 
SCARAB............1
In Scarab Street, Panthea, at the Jubal's Head. The Jealousies, Line 90
 
SCARCE............18
With those beauties, scarce discern'd, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 26
Scarce can his clear and nimble eye-sight follow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 13
I slowly sail, scarce knowing my intent; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 18
Scarce can I scribble on; for lovely airs Sleep and Poetry, Line 327
She overlook'd things that I scarce could tell. Sleep and Poetry, Line 395
Easily rolling so as scarce to mar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 166
Of buried griefs the spirit sees, but scarce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 517
Through sights I scarce can bear; God of the meridian, Line 19
Hot to their Councils, scarce content O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 9
Cursing those crimes he scarce could guess, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 33
And scarce three steps, ere Music's golden tongue The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 20
His lady's purpose; and he scarce could brook The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 133
For I am slow and feeble, and scarce dare The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 176
Scarce images of life, one here, one there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 33
A brooklet, scarce espied: Ode to Psyche, Line 12
The news is scarce a minute old with me. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 58
Scarce saw in all the room another face, Lamia, Part II, Line 240
The corridor, and scarce upright could reach The Jealousies, Line 625
 
SCARCELY..........7
And scarcely stays to ope the folding doors: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 70
That scarcely will the very smallest shell On the Sea, Line 6
So anxious for the end, he scarcely wastes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 353
And scarcely for one moment could be caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 388
She scarcely heard: her maiden eyes divine, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 57
Though scarcely heard in many a green recess. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 41
At first, for scarcely was the wine at flow; Lamia, Part II, Line 202
 
SCARE.............3
Into thine arms; to scare Aurora's train, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 696
To scare thee, Melancholy! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 203
Shall scare that infant thunderer, rebel Jove, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 249
 
SCARECROW.........1
No scarecrow , but the fortunate star King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 21b
 
SCARED............2
So scared , he sent for that "good king of cats," Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 5
Till he sheer'd off - the Princess very scared - The Jealousies, Line 683
 
SCARF.............5
Is it a scarf that thy fair lady gave? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 15
Her scarf into a fluttering pavilion; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 628
My lady's maid had a silken scarf , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 13
Then in a silken scarf ,- sweet with the dews Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 409
But new he was and bright as scarf from Persian loom. Character of C.B., Line 9
 
SCARING...........1
O'erwhelming water-courses; scaring out Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 88
 
SCARLET...........6
Through which the poppies show their scarlet coats; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 128
The scarlet coats that pester human-kind. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 130
In frightful scarlet , and its thorns out-grown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 697
Will drop their scarlet berry cups of dew? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 674
She writh'd about, convuls'd with scarlet pain: Lamia, Part I, Line 154
To thin the scarlet conclave of old men, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 50
 
SCATHE............1
And how he died: and then, that love doth scathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 733
 
SCATHING..........2
My fever'd parchings up, my scathing dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 636
Those days, all innocent of scathing war, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 336
 
SCATTER...........2
Those files of dead, scatter the same around, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 770
And from their treasures scatter pearled hail; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 264
 
SCATTER'D.........3
And scatter'd in his face some fragments light. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 774
"And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by." Shakspeare O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 2
They scatter'd ,- daisy, primrose, hyacinth,- The Jealousies, Line 728
 
SCATTERED.........2
From their fresh beds, and scattered thoughtlessly I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 45
For empty shells were scattered on the grass, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 32
 
SCATTERING........1
Then black gnomes scattering sixpences like rain; The Jealousies, Line 583
 
SCENE.............5
The light dwelt o'er the scene so lingeringly. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 5
Into my being, and each pleasant scene Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 37
In thicket hid I curs'd the haggard scene - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 497
OTHO. Exeunt severally. The scene closes on them. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
back scene , guarded by two Soldiers. Lords, Ladies, Knights, Gentlemen, etc., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
SCENES............3
But though I'll gladly trace these scenes with thee, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 9
For scenes like this: an empire stern hast thou; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 960
Shall be to thee a wonder; for the scenes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 244
 
SCENT.............6
A scent of violets, and blossoming limes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 667
Like the hid scent in an unbudded rose? Lamia, Part II, Line 54
Garlands of every green, and every scent Lamia, Part II, Line 215
Of scent , not far from roses. Turning round, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 24
As the moist scent of flowers, and grass, and leaves The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 404
There flowers have no scent , birds no sweet song, What can I do to drive away, Line 42
 
SCENTED...........2
Into the winds: rain- scented eglantine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 100
Where the daisies are rose- scented , Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 14
 
SCEPTER...........1
Welcome, thou young scepter to the realm! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
 
SCEPTRE...........8
Your sceptre worth a straw, your cushions old door mats." Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 8
As Pluto's sceptre , that my words not burn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 474
And sceptre of this kingdom!" Venus said, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 898
Has from thy sceptre pass'd; and all the air Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 58
And thou, bright sceptre , lustrous in my eyes,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 81
Sceptre , and mantle, clasp'd with dewy gem, Lamia, Part I, Line 4
Has from thy sceptre pass'd, and all the air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 360
My sceptre , and my cross-surmounted globe, The Jealousies, Line 407
 
SCEPTRED..........1
Oh Europe, let not sceptred tyrants see On Peace, Line 10
 
SCEPTRES..........1
The kings of Inde their jewel- sceptres vail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 263
 
SCEPTRY...........1
E'en for his Highness Ludolph's sceptry hand, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
 
SCHEMING..........1
To alienate him from your scheming brain, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 70
 
SCHISM............2
Could all this be forgotten? Yes, a schism Sleep and Poetry, Line 181
A heresy and schism , What can I do to drive away, Line 25
 
SCHOLAR...........3
Old scholar of the spheres! Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 2
Your patient scholar . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 12a
Thou art a scholar , Lycius, and must know Lamia, Part I, Line 279
 
SCHOOL............3
A laughing school -boy, without grief or care, Sleep and Poetry, Line 94
And compass vile: so that ye taught a school Sleep and Poetry, Line 196
These day- school hieroglyphics with a sigh; The Jealousies, Line 452
 
SCHOOL'D..........3
Sweet Spirit, thou hast school'd my infancy: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 334
Advised, not school'd , I would be, and henceforth King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 14
School'd in a beckon, learned in a nudge, The Jealousies, Line 248
 
SCHOOLING.........1
Schooling its half-fledg'd little ones to brush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 130
 
SCIENCE...........1
And if your science is not all a sham, The Jealousies, Line 401
 
SCIENTIAL.........1
Not one hour old, yet of sciential brain Lamia, Part I, Line 191
 
SCIONS............1
Weaving a coronal of tender scions Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 693
 
SCOLDS............1
Scolds as King David pray'd, to chouse All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 47
 
SCONCE............1
Long time this sconce a helmet wore, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 49
 
SCOOP'D...........2
Such as ay muster where grey time has scoop'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 649
Scoop'd from its trembling sisters of mid-sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 998
 
SCOOPING..........1
Still scooping up the water with my fingers, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 19
 
SCOPE.............2
Is of too wide, too rainbow-large a scope , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 775
All scope of thought, convulsest my heart's blood Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 78
 
SCORCH............1
To such a dreadful blaze, her side would scorch her hand. The Jealousies, Line 117
 
SCORCHED..........1
Plaited upon his furnace- scorched brow: The Jealousies, Line 508
 
SCORCHES..........2
Scorches and burns our once serene domain. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 63
Scorches and burns our once serene domain. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 365
 
SCORE.............3
That with a score of light green brethren shoots I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 39
This corner holds at least a score , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 92
The gas (objected to on score of health), The Jealousies, Line 211
 
SCORN.............5
Seems to give forth its light in very scorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 24
'Mid looks of love, defiance, hate, and scorn , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 69
For though I scorn Oceanus's lore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 333
Ye love-sick bards, repay her scorn for scorn; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 11
Ye love-sick bards, repay her scorn for scorn ; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 11
 
SCORNER'S.........1
Ne with sly lemans in the scorner's chair; Character of C.B., Line 15
 
SCORPION..........2
A scorpion , sprawling on the first gold step, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 15
So she, a scorpion , preys upon my brain! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 159
 
SCOTLAND..........1
He ran away to Scotland There was a naughty boy, Line 94
 
SCOUR.............2
From rear to van they scour about the plains; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 252
To scour the plains and search the cottages. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 39
 
SCOURGING.........1
Whose winds, all zephyrless, hold scourging rods, What can I do to drive away, Line 37
 
SCOUTS............1
Latitude thirty-six; our scouts descry The Jealousies, Line 643
 
SCOWL.............2
A scowl is sometimes on his brow, but who Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 542
Scowl on, ye fates! until the firmament Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 120
 
SCRAPE............1
To scrape a little favour, 'gan to coax The Jealousies, Line 698
 
SCRAPS............1
See scraps of mine will make it worth your while, The Jealousies, Line 562
 
SCRAWL'D..........1
That scrawl'd black letter; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 16
 
SCREAM............2
Oh pain - for since the eagle's earliest scream Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 25
Than with a frightful scream she vanished: Lamia, Part II, Line 306
 
SCREAMS...........2
Give answer by thy voice, the sea fowls' screams ! To Ailsa Rock, Line 2
Her mother's screams with the striped tiger's blent, The Jealousies, Line 391
 
SCREECH...........2
Not at dog's howl, or gloom-bird's hated screech , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 171
Nor at dog's howl, or gloom-bird's even screech , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 20
 
SCREEN............7
All tenderest birds there find a pleasant screen , Sleep and Poetry, Line 252
An unknown - but no more: we humbly screen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 302
Hung a lush screen of drooping weeds, and spread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 940
Push'd through a screen of roses. Starry Jove! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 425
And the warm angled winter screen , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 77
With plantane, and spice blossoms, made a screen ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 21
And prithee, Hum, behind the screen do peep The Jealousies, Line 430
 
SCREW'D...........1
Lock'd up like veins of metal, crampt and screw'd ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 25
 
SCRIBBLE..........2
Scarce can I scribble on; for lovely airs Sleep and Poetry, Line 327
But scribble poetry- There was a naughty boy, Line 29
 
SCRIBBLING........1
Of scribbling lines for you. These things I thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 121
 
SCRIBBLINGS.......1
Which, had I felt, these scribblings might have been To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 107
 
SCRIBE............3
Too huge for mortal tongue or pen of scribe : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 160
When this warm scribe my hand is in the grave. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 18
Too huge for mortal tongue, or pen of scribe . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 9
 
SCRIP.............1
The scrip , with needments, for the mountain air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 208
 
SCRIPS............1
And shar'd their famish'd scrips . Thus all out-told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 392
 
SCROLL............5
On this scroll thou seest written in characters fair On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 21
Of mighty Poets is made up; the scroll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 724
Grasping this scroll , and this same slender wand. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 670
Began to tear his scroll in pieces small, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 747
And pore on Nature's universal scroll Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 151
 
SCROLLS...........1
But those of Saturn's vintage; mouldering scrolls , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 129
 
SCRUPLE...........1
Has made me scruple whether that same night Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 860
 
SCRUTINIZED.......1
With large limb'd visions. More I scrutinized : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 445
 
SCRUTINY..........2
With sudden scrutiny and gloomless eyes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 80
By patient scrutiny , we may discover Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 242
 
SCRUTOIRE.........1
To examine his scrutoire , and see what's in it, The Jealousies, Line 620
 
SCUD..............2
To scud like a wild bird, and take thee off Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 698
I saw him on the calmed waters scud , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 236
 
SCUDS.............2
She scuds with summer breezes, to pant through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 490
Gulphs in the morning light, and scuds along Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 956
 
SCUFFLE...........1
When in the glorious scuffle they met mine, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 60
 
SCULL.............1
To see scull , coffin'd bones, and funeral stole; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 356
 
SCULLIONS.........2
Lords, scullions , deputy-scullions, with wild cries The Jealousies, Line 763
Lords, scullions, deputy- scullions , with wild cries The Jealousies, Line 763
 
SCULPTUR'D........1
The sculptur'd dead, on each side, seem to freeze, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 14
 
SCULPTURE.........2
Like natural sculpture in cathedral cavern; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 86
Like sculpture builded up upon the grave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 383
 
SCULPTURED........1
Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth- sculptured stone. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 297
 
SCULPTURES........1
Who first were on the earth; and sculptures rude Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 131
 
SCUM..............3
Are but a slime, a thin pervading scum , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 335
And bless indemnity with all that scum ,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 72
Serv'd with harsh food, with scum for Sunday-drink. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 89
 
SCUMMY............2
To breathe away as 'twere all scummy slime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 330
A mist arose, as from a scummy marsh. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 258
 
SCURF.............1
Upon hot sand, or flinty road, or sea shore iron scurf , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 10
 
SCUTCHEON.........1
A shielded scutcheon blush'd with blood of queens and kings. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 216
 
SCYLLA............9
That love should be my bane! Ah, Scylla fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 399
Exclaim, How then, was Scylla quite forgot? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 452
Me back to Scylla o'er the billows rude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 462
I look'd - 'twas Scylla ! Cursed, cursed Circe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 619
I left poor Scylla in a niche and fled. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 635
I told thee of, where lovely Scylla lies; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 720
Press'd its cold hand, and wept,- and Scylla sigh'd! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 780
Then Scylla , blushing sweetly from her dream, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 809
Fair Scylla and her guides to conference; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 894
 
SCYMETAR..........1
Or tiny point of fairy scymetar ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 499
 
SCYMITAR..........1
That silent fury, whose fell scymitar Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 21

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Published @ RC

March 2005