Se - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
SEA...............68
I see you are treading the verge of the sea : To Some Ladies, Line 14
Would be the wonders of the sky and sea ? To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 14
And the broad winged sea -gull never at rest; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 136
His breast is dancing on the restless sea . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 138
Disturbing the grand sea . A drainless shower Sleep and Poetry, Line 235
Spread by the halcyon's breast upon the sea - To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 7
Sinking bewilder'd mid the dreary sea : On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 8
Feast them upon the wideness of the sea ; On the Sea, Line 10
Until ye start, as if the sea nymphs quired. On the Sea, Line 14
More than coral in the sea - You say you love; but with a voice, Line 13
The surgy murmurs of the lonely sea . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 121
A firmament reflected in a sea ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 300
That broodest o'er the troubled sea of the mind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 454
Than those of sea -born Venus, when she rose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 626
Sweet sister, help to stem the ebbing sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 709
Wide sea , that one continuous murmur breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 16
By telling how the sea -born goddess pin'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 458
From thy sea -foamy cradle; or to doff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 699
From the green sea up to my hidden source Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 989
He saw the giant sea above his head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1023
The monstrous sea is thine - the myriad sea! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 69
The monstrous sea is thine - the myriad sea ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 69
Of gone sea -warriors; brazen beaks and targe; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 124
He saw far in the concave green of the sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 191
Of Neptune; and the sea nymphs round his state, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 211
The sea -gulls not more constant; for I had Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 321
And craggy isles, and sea -mew's plaintive cry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 341
Plaining discrepant between sea and sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 342
The poor folk of the sea -country I blest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 368
She fled me swift as sea -bird on the wing, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 404
Cut short its immortality. Sea -flirt! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 581
The sea -swell took her hair. Dead as she was Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 625
"In the wide sea there lives a forlorn wretch, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 689
Huge sea -marks; vanward swelling in array, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 830
A gold-green zenith 'bove the Sea -God's head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 878
And the great Sea -King bow'd his dripping head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 890
She kist the sea -nymph's cheek,- who sat her down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 896
"King of the stormy sea ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 943b
Scoop'd from its trembling sisters of mid- sea , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 998
Through the dark earth, and through the wondrous sea ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 91
To tinge, on syren shores, the salt sea -spry? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 157
Upon a calm sea drifting: and meanwhile Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 406
His very goddess: good-bye earth, and sea , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 431
Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 1
And to the sea as happily dost haste. To the Nile, Line 14
Upon a lampit rock of green sea weed Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 88
The rocks were silent - the wide sea did weave Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 90
Too far into the sea ; where every maw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 94
When we meet over sea and o'er land Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 7
Give answer by thy voice, the sea fowls' screams! To Ailsa Rock, Line 2
Upon hot sand, or flinty road, or sea shore iron scurf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 10
This cathedral of the sea . Not Aladdin magian, Line 38
Where a fledgy sea bird choir Not Aladdin magian, Line 41
The great sea shall war it down, Not Aladdin magian, Line 53
Half-hidden, like a mermaid in sea -weed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 231
So ended Saturn; and the God of the Sea , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 167
Just opposite, an island of the sea , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 275
Doth fear to meet the sea : but sea it met, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 302
Doth fear to meet the sea: but sea it met, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 302
And Phorcus, sea -born, and together strode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 385
"How cam'st thou over the unfooted sea ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 50
What little town by river or sea shore, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 35
Still buds the tree, and still the sea -shores murmur. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 422
Like a vast giant seen by men at sea The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 457
Divine, I say!- What sea -bird o'er the sea What can I do to drive away, Line 15
Divine, I say!- What sea-bird o'er the sea What can I do to drive away, Line 15
A feather on the sea , To Fanny, Line 37
As when the sea , at flow, gluts up once more The Jealousies, Line 737
 
SEAL..............3
The seal on the cold ice with piteous bark Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 116
And seal the hushed casket of my soul. Sonnet to Sleep, Line 14
Return'd the snake, "but seal with oaths, fair God!" Lamia, Part I, Line 88
 
SEALS.............1
And painful vile oblivion seals my eyes: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 87
 
SEAMEN............1
Of seamen , and stout galley-rowers' toil: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 248
 
SEAR..............4
Fire-branded foxes to sear up and singe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 7
The sear faggot blazes bright, Fancy, Line 17
Will sear my plumage newly budded Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 25
Hot, glaz'd, and wide, with lid-lashes all sear , Lamia, Part I, Line 151
 
SEARCH............16
And while, for rhymes, I search around the poles, To My Brothers, Line 5
To search for thee, divine Endymion! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 192
To search it inwards; whence far off appear'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 259
To search the book, and in the warming air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 677
To see such lovely eyes in swimming search Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 63
In search of pleasure throughout every clime: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 275
Search my most hidden breast! By truth's own tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 458
'Tis well nigh past man's search their hearts to see; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 493
Here on this spot of earth. Search , Thea, search! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 116
Here on this spot of earth. Search, Thea, search ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 116
Search , Thea, search! and tell me, if thou seest Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 121
Search, Thea, search ! and tell me, if thou seest Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 121
No, no-where can unriddle, though I search , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 150
I strive to search wherefore I am so sad, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 88
To scour the plains and search the cottages. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 39
To search its sullen entrails rich with ore, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 274
 
SEARCH'D..........2
That out I ran and search'd the forest o'er. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 482
Of vision search'd for him, as one would look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 391
 
SEARCHER..........1
Which is its own great judge and searcher out, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 130
 
SEARCHING.........6
As the sky- searching lark, and as elate. Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 4
Made for our searching : yes, in spite of all, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 11
Of all sweet herbs that searching eye could cull: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 156
Produce more than our searching witnesseth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 834
Through a dim passage, searching till he found Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 709
In such a searching point, were to give up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 29
 
SEARED............1
Are swallow'd all, and made a seared dearth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 368
 
SEARING...........1
Or will he touch me with his searing hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 261
 
SEAS..............14
As o'er Sicilian seas , clear anthems float To George Felton Mathew, Line 14
And float along like birds o'er summer seas ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 57
To seas Ionian and Tyrian. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 363
To northern seas I'll in a twinkling sail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 245
And float my brittle limbs o'er polar seas ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 260
Of visionary seas ! No, never more Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 653
Have rotted on the briny seas ; Robin Hood, Line 45
To visit dolphin-coral in deep seas . To Homer, Line 4
On land, on seas , in pagan-chains, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 91
Of admonitions to the winds and seas , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 109
Like to a diver in the pearly seas , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 355
Have ye beheld the young God of the Seas , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 232
Thy scalding in the seas ? What, have I rous'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 320
Of perilous seas , in faery lands forlorn. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 70
 
SEASON............8
Now 'tis a fairer season ; ye have breathed Sleep and Poetry, Line 221
For a long dreary season , comes a day After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 2
'Gainst the hot season ; the mid forest brake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 18
O may no wintry season , bare and hoary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 54
Hold sphery sessions for a season due. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 33
Before the dawn in season due should blush, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 265
Yet shall I season high my sudden fall Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 269
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, To Autumn, Line 1
 
SEASONABLE........1
Wherewith the seasonable month endows Ode to a Nightingale, Line 44
 
SEASONS...........9
With heaviness; in seasons when I've thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 3
Is made of the four seasons - manifest Sleep and Poetry, Line 295
Are visible above: the Seasons four,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 421
Four seasons fill the measure of the year; Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 1
Four seasons are there in the mind of man. Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 2
Her silver seasons four upon the night, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 84
The sacred seasons might not be disturb'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 293
And of thy seasons be a careful nurse."- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 348
Her silver seasons shedded on the night, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 394
 
SEAT..............4
All that's reveal'd from that far seat of blisses, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 47
In a mossy stone, that sometimes was my seat , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 877
His seat upon thine a-e, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 26
Well done - now those lips and a flowery seat : Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 19
 
SEATED............3
Soon in a pleasant chamber they are seated ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 134
Seated upon an uptorn forest root; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 499
Seated on Elysian lawns Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 11
 
SEATS.............3
The quaintly carv'd seats , and freshening shades; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 6
No, there are throned seats unscalable Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 23
Twelve sphered tables, by silk seats insphered, Lamia, Part II, Line 183
 
SECOND............11
A second self, that each might be redeem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 659
Call me his queen, his second life's fair crown! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 70
But to that second circle of sad hell, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 9
Was hurling mountains in that second war, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 70
The second was Ambition, pale of cheek, Ode on Indolence, Line 26
With darkness, bring the stars to second me, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 27
Enter Second Knight. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 28b
To any but the second man of the realm, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 25
And for the Speaker's second cousin's aunt, The Jealousies, Line 152
And cast a quiet figure in his second floor. The Jealousies, Line 288
To the second chapter of my fortieth book, The Jealousies, Line 706
 
SECONDING.........1
Seconding , ere I speak it, what is now, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
 
SECONDS...........1
"Five minutes thirteen seconds after three, The Jealousies, Line 676
 
SECRECY...........4
Or thou wilt force me from this secrecy , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 780
Of secrecy , the violet:- What strange powers Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 12
In anxious secrecy they took it home, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 401
Which was, to lead him, in close secrecy , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 163
 
SECRESY...........1
And how intriguing secresy is proof Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 177
 
SECRET............16
Keeping secret what is fair. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 50
More secret than a nest of nightingales? Sleep and Poetry, Line 8
Of secret grief, here in this bowery nest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 539
For thou shalt hear this secret all display'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 308
How she might secret to the forest hie; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 338
And to examine it in secret place: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 474
Which none but secret sisterhood may see, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 116
Show thy heart's secret to an ancient Power Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 76
Indeed, my liege, no secret - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 66b
You have my secret , let it not be breath'd. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 1
A woman's secret !- though a fiend she be, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 26
My secret ; which I ever hid from him, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 9
It is no secret , that Erminia, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 98
To find where this sweet nymph prepar'd her secret bed: Lamia, Part I, Line 30
And show to common eyes these secret bowers? Lamia, Part II, Line 149
In the dark secret chambers of her skull The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 278
 
SECRETER..........1
' Endymion! the cave is secreter Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 965
 
SECRETEST.........1
And that of all things 'tis kept secretest . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 572
 
SECRETS...........6
Of all the secrets of some wond'rous thing Sleep and Poetry, Line 30
These secrets struck into him; and unless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 137
To utter secrets , haply I might say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 914
One glance did fully all its secrets tell; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 362
And pardon that thy secrets should be sung Ode to Psyche, Line 3
Of my poor secrets , and so hold a rod Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 117
 
SECT..............4
In sending heathen, Turk, and sect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 41
Sect . 2. Memb. 1. Subs. 1. Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
A paradise for a sect ; the savage too The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 2
Though I have bowstrung many of his sect ; The Jealousies, Line 193
 
SECTION'D.........1
( Section'd and subsection'd with learning sage,) The Jealousies, Line 97
 
SECURE............2
Even so long my sleep has been secure , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 23
Secure ! Methinks I have her in my fist, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 108
 
SECURELY..........1
Thank you, old mummy!- now securely I take wing." The Jealousies, Line 603
 
SECUREST..........1
To some securest lodging - cold perhaps! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 98
 
SECURITY..........1
You live alone in my security : Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
 
SEDGE.............4
Of rivers new with springtide sedge , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 10
The sedge has wither'd from the lake, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 3
Though the sedge is wither'd from the lake, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 47
And see my cool sedge -buried urn, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 32
 
SEE...............245
Oh Europe, let not sceptred tyrants see On Peace, Line 10
And let me see thy sparkling eye; Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 2
For all I see has lost its zest; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 18
Think you he nought but prison walls did see , Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 6
Let me not see our country's honour fade: To Hope, Line 32
O let me see our land retain her soul, To Hope, Line 33
Let me not see the patriot's high bequest, To Hope, Line 37
But let me see thee stoop from heaven on wings To Hope, Line 41
I see you are treading the verge of the sea: To Some Ladies, Line 14
And now! ah, I see it - you just now are stooping To Some Ladies, Line 15
But when I see thee meek, and kind, and tender, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 9
Who joys to see us with his gifts agreeing, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 33
I shall again see Phoebus in the morning: To George Felton Mathew, Line 21
Which every elf and fay had come to see : To George Felton Mathew, Line 28
Ah! I see the silver sheen Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 44
Which, O heavens! I should see , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 47
See with what a stately pace Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 56
Where ye may see a spur in bloody field? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 40
To see wide plains, fair trees and lawny slope: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 66
Delighting much, to see it half at rest, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 15
Friends very dear to him he soon will see ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 58
To see no other verdure that its own; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 2
Yet do I often warmly burn to see Happy is England! I could be content, Line 12
A sudden glow comes on them, nought they see To My Brother George (epistle), Line 21
Would he naught see but the dark, silent blue To My Brother George (epistle), Line 57
And should I ever see them, I will tell you To My Brother George (epistle), Line 65
Now 'tis I see a canvass'd ship, and now To My Brother George (epistle), Line 133
I see the lark down-dropping to his nest, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 135
By this, friend Charles, you may full plainly see To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 21
To see the sun o'er peep the eastern dimness, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 86
To see high, golden corn wave in the light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 92
Perhaps to see shapes of light, aerial lymning, Sleep and Poetry, Line 33
To see the laurel wreath, on high suspended, Sleep and Poetry, Line 35
Till at its shoulders it should proudly see Sleep and Poetry, Line 83
Then will I pass the countries that I see Sleep and Poetry, Line 99
Of human hearts: for lo! I see afar, Sleep and Poetry, Line 125
And now I see them on a green-hill's side Sleep and Poetry, Line 134
See , in another picture, nymphs are wiping Sleep and Poetry, Line 372
We see the waving of the mountain pine; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 128
O'er head we see the jasmine and sweet briar, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 135
To see the brightness in each other's eyes; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 233
Gorgeous as I would have it - only I see On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 10
No wreathed incense do we see upborne To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 3
So gentle are ye that ye could not see , On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 5
O horrid dream - see how his body dips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 12
See it half finished: but let autumn bold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 55
To a wide lawn, whence one could only see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 82
And see that oftentimes the reins would slip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 180
Who lov'st to see the hamadryads dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 236
Leading to universal knowledge - see , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 289
Some were athirst in soul to see again Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 385
So she was gently glad to see him laid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 436
To hear the speckled thrushes, and see feed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 485
"This river does not see the naked sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 540
To what high fane?- Ah! see her hovering feet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 624
In midst of all this heaven? Why not see , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 673
Which we should see but for these darkening boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 863
Blustering about my ears: aye, thou shalt see , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 981
Pavilions him in bloom, and he doth see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 56
There is no depth to strike in: I can see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 161
He cannot see the heavens, nor the flow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 285
Young goddess! let me see my native bowers! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 331
Faint through his careless arms; content to see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 463
Stand anxious: see ! behold!" - This clamant word Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 494
With love - he - but alas! too well I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 550
Touch raptur'd!- See how painfully I flow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 948
Thou couldst rejoice to see my hopeless stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1002
Who, through an idiot blink, will see unpack'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 6
The wilder'd stranger - seeming not to see , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 219
Their melodies, and see their long hair glisten; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 242
I see thy streaming hair! and now, by Pan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 279
From off a crystal pool, to see its deep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 331
For I would watch all night to see unfold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 363
No need to tell thee of them, for I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 393
Am I, that thou may'st plainly see how far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 450
One hair of thine: see how I weep and sigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 583
Who in few minutes more thyself shalt see ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 634
His even breast: see , many steeled squares, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 731
And thou wilt see the issue."- 'Mid the sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 771
As hour-glass sand,- and fast, as you might see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 815
Can see all round upon the calmed vast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 867
Unfortunates on earth, we see at last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 980
See not her charms! Is Phoebe passionless? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 56
To see such lovely eyes in swimming search Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 63
The lady's heart beat quick, and he could see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 99
Close up its bloodshot eyes, nor see despair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 308
Could I thus sail, and see , and thus await Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 360
By Nemesis, I see my spirit flit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 479
'Tis well nigh past man's search their hearts to see ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 493
Castor has tamed the planet Lion, see ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 591
Sorrow is but a shadow: now I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 621
See , through the trees, a little river go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 680
Cresses that grow where no man may them see , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 684
That I may see thy beauty through the night; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 705
To see ye thus,- not very, very sad? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 818
But there are higher ones I may not see , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 853
Well then, I see there is no little bird, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 877
With thy good help, this very night shall see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 887
Sweet Indian, I would see thee once again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 910
His eyes abroad, to see how shadows shifted Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 921
The many, many wonders see , Apollo to the Graces, Line 10
And let me see thy bowers God of the meridian, Line 24
Let me see , and let me write Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 26
Part of the building was a chosen see Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 41
See what is coming from the distance dim! Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 55
In happiness to see beyond our bourn- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 83
Still do I that most fierce destruction see , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 102
"O may I never see another night, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 29
Too many doleful stories do we see , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 93
How could these money-bags see east and west?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 142
Must see behind, as doth the hunted hare. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 144
To-day thou wilt not see him, nor to-morrow, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 231
His image in the dusk she seem'd to see , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 237
To see their sister in her snowy shroud. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 264
And see the spangly gloom froth up and boil: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 326
See , as they creep along the river side, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 345
To see scull, coffin'd bones, and funeral stole; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 356
The people for to see - There was a naughty boy, Line 95
To see if I might know the men, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 15
My eyes are wandering, and I cannot see , This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 7
And you the end will see . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 16
Ever such a dream could see ; Not Aladdin magian, Line 4
Red-Crag, my spectacles! Now let me see ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 29
To see Ben Nevis and to touch his nose? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 46
And lov'd to see a tempting lass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 27
To see what else the moon alone can shew; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 32
And see what more my phantasy can win. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 47
See they glisten in alarm, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 7
Child, I see thee! Child, I've found thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 27
Child, I see thee! Child, I spy thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 29
See , see the lyre, the lyre, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 33
See, see the lyre, the lyre, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 33
And see if it can keep 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 39
Thou shalt see the field-mouse peep Fancy, Line 55
Freckled nest-eggs thou shalt see Fancy, Line 59
That I must see Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 6
Which none but secret sisterhood may see , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 116
To see thee, Porphyro!- St. Agnes' Eve! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 123
That he might see her beauty unespied, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 166
Her own lute thou wilt see : no time to spare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 175
There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see ,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 348
From her fireside she could see The Eve of St. Mark, Line 41
And the world's gaudy ensigns see in shreds. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 12
No one to see my Persian feathers toss, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 12
No one to see my Ape, my Dwarf, my Fool, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 13
You see : I made a whipstock of a wand; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 31
She took it in her head to see the place. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 56
Thea, I feel thee ere I see thy face; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 96
Look up, and let me see our doom in it; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 97
To see and to behold these horrors new? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 233
I cannot see - but darkness, death and darkness. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 242
I see them, on the mortal world beneath, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 334
I see , astonied, that severe content Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 165
And hither came, to see how dolorous fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 240
O joy! for now I see ye are not lost: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 322
O joy! for now I see a thousand eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 323
I see a lily on thy brow La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 9
Let me see the myriad shapes Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 13
And see my cool sedge-buried urn, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 32
Surely I dreamt to-day, or did I see Ode to Psyche, Line 5
I see , and sing, by my own eyes inspired. Ode to Psyche, Line 43
Of every chord, and see what may be gain'd If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 8
I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 41
When shifted round to see the other side; Ode on Indolence, Line 6
See me - 'tis this silvery bill Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 13
We shall soon see him,- for the Emperor, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 105
See you spare him; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 111b
Be cause of feud between us. See ! he comes! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 119
I see 'tis like to be a tedious day. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 71
I must see Ludolph or the - What's that shout? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 82
My lord, forgive me that I cannot see Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 30
I know the clear truth; so would Otho see , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 86
For see - But who are these? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 122a
You see now how I dance attendance here, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 7
Than see you humbled but a half degree! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 15
Could not see all his parent's love aright, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 101
As now I see it. Be not kind to me- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 102
I see how far the slander is abroad. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 41
Come in, and see . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 68a
I see you are thunderstruck. Haste, haste away! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 71
The Emperor will see it. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 79a
By Europe's throned Emperor, to see Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 21
I see in thy mute beauty beaming forth! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
The world is all agape to see dragg'd forth Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 68
Conrad, see all depart not wanted here. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 102
See this innocent! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 117b
I know it - it must be - I see it all! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 259
See him immediately; why not now? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 29
To see me. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 38a
Cannot be done; for see , this chamber-floor Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 45
I would not see thee dragg'd to death by the hair, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 145
For loving Conrad, see you fawn on him. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 175
See the coast clear then. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 176c
There! yonder underneath the boughs I see Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 7
I see you know it all! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 7a
I will see more. Bear you so stout a heart? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 17
Forgive me, but he must not see thy face. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 11
What fearful whispering!- See , see,- Gersa there! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Lady, Line 13
What fearful whispering!- See, see ,- Gersa there! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Lady, Line 13
These lids, I see far fiercer brilliances,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 44
We'll have her presently; aye, you shall see her, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 59
And will be sweeter, when ye see her pace Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 84
I fain would see before I sleep,- and Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 112
In a deep goblet: let me see - what wine? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 120
Made iron-stern by habit! Thou shalt see Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 148
I see it - I see it - I have been wandering! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 175
I see it - I see it - I have been wandering! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 175
And thou shalt see thy sweet nymph even now." Lamia, Part I, Line 122
To see herself escap'd from so sore ills, Lamia, Part I, Line 183
By the wayside to linger, we shall see ; Lamia, Part I, Line 201
"Leave thee alone! Look back! Ah, Goddess, see Lamia, Part I, Line 257
To see her still, and singing so sweet lays; Lamia, Part I, Line 323
That they might see each other while they almost slept; Lamia, Part II, Line 25
Ay, a sweet kiss - you see your mighty woes. Lamia, Part II, Line 55
Around his demon eyes! Corinthians, see ! Lamia, Part II, Line 289
And shall I see thee made a serpent's prey?" Lamia, Part II, Line 298
See , with cross'd arms they sit - ah hapless crew, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 5
Labour for mortal good? I sure should see The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 159
To see them sprawl before me into graves. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 210
What image this, whose face I cannot see , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 213
I ached to see what things the hollow brain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 276
To see as a God sees, and take the depth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 304
Upon an eagle's watch, that I might see , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 309
I come - I see thee, as thou standest there, To Fanny, Line 7
Let none profane my Holy See of Love, To Fanny, Line 51
Blush in your casing helmets!- for see , see! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 3
Blush in your casing helmets!- for see, see ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 3
Are envious which shall see your triumph pass. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 27
'Tis not for worldly pomp I wish to see King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 19
And thou be conscience-calm'd. See , here it is- This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 7
"Do not you see there, lurking in a cloud, The Jealousies, Line 48
Then pray refer to the text, and you will see The Jealousies, Line 103
To Hum the soothsayer, whose name I see The Jealousies, Line 188
One hour, the next shall see him in my grasp, The Jealousies, Line 195
And the next after that shall see him neck'd, The Jealousies, Line 196
Her name, see here, Midsummer, ninety-one." The Jealousies, Line 443
I see the dawning touch'd upon your face; The Jealousies, Line 481
To see my pigsney Bellanaine. Hum! do The Jealousies, Line 547
"Wounds! how they shout!" said Hum, "and there,- see , see, The Jealousies, Line 550
"Wounds! how they shout!" said Hum, "and there,- see, see , The Jealousies, Line 550
See , past the skirts of yon white cloud they go, The Jealousies, Line 553
See scraps of mine will make it worth your while, The Jealousies, Line 562
To examine his scrutoire, and see what's in it, The Jealousies, Line 620
Well, let us see ,- tenth book and chapter nine,- The Jealousies, Line 640
And see what hoity-toity airs she took:) The Jealousies, Line 707
 
SEED..............5
The seed its harvest, or the lute its tones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 840
Or drop a seed , till thou wast wide awake; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 154
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 9
From Pyrrha's pebbles or old Adam's seed . Lamia, Part I, Line 333
Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 313
 
SEEDED............1
As hath the seeded thistle, when in parle Character of C.B., Line 3
 
SEEDS.............1
The seeds and roots in earth God of the golden bow, Line 27
 
SEEING............24
For man's protection. Surely the All- seeing , Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 32
In some black spell; seeing that each one tears Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 6
A leafy luxury, seeing I could please To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 13
Must dreams themselves be; seeing they're more slight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 755
Seeing thou art so gentle. Could I weed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 106
Half seeing visions that might have dismay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 874
Around giddy Endymion; seeing he Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1006
Let it content thee, sister, seeing me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 858
But her full shape would all his seeing fill; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 12
Such seeing hadst thou, as it once befel To Homer, Line 13
And, seeing it asleep, so fled away- As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 6
To the most hateful seeing of itself. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 370
Seeing so many vigilant eyes explore Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 125
Seeing that blood of yours in my warm veins Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 80
At seeing me in this chamber. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 161a
Seeing no Ludolph comes. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 66a
Seeing all their luckless race are dead, save me, Lamia, Part II, Line 96
And seeing ne'er forget. No stir of life The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 310
He'll let me sleep, seeing I fast and pray. The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 14
Sure of a bloody prey, seeing the fens King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Second Knight, Line 14
Which seeing , his high court of parliament The Jealousies, Line 19
Seeing his servant can no further drive The Jealousies, Line 258
And seeing his white teeth, he smiled the more; The Jealousies, Line 272
Seeing her pleasant, tried her with a pun- The Jealousies, Line 654
 
SEEING'S..........1
A desert fills our seeing's inward span; To the Nile, Line 4
 
SEEK..............13
As if for joy he would no further seek ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 98
That what I want I know not where to seek : To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 4
Let him with this sweet tale full often seek On The Story of Rimini, Line 3
With not a thing to sigh for, or to seek , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 167
And find it is the vainest thing to seek ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 571
Let me have music dying, and I seek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 140
Still let me dive into the joy I seek ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 690
Fell thin as a young mother's, who doth seek Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 35
Seek , as they once were sought, in Grecian isles, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 6
Nor in obscured purlieus would he seek Character of C.B., Line 25
Shall we leave these and go seek Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 68
For couriers are abroad to seek you out. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 124
They seek no wonder but the human face; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 163
 
SEEKS.............1
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find To Autumn, Line 13
 
SEEM..............25
May seem a span; let me thy vigils keep O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 6
Apollo chang'd thee; how thou next didst seem To George Felton Mathew, Line 86
Their ladies fair, that in the distance seem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 37
The ripples seem right glad to reach those cresses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 81
But still would seem to droop, to pine, to love. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 176
Where distant ships do seem to show their keels, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 211
Who stood therein did seem of great renown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 168
My sayings will the less obscured seem , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 858
Might seem unholy, be of happy cheer! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 435
Would seem a feather to the mighty prize. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 592
Might seem a work of pain; so not enough Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 382
Snuff at its faint extreme, and seem to tire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 365
Came it? It does not seem my own, and I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 476
Nested in trees, which all do seem to shake Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 28
You know it well enough, where it doth seem Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 33
To smiles and frowns; they seem a lifted mound Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 39
"You seem there in the quiet of content, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 181
The brothers' faces in the ford did seem , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 214
The clouds, the trees, the rounded hills all seem , On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 2
Eagles may seem to sleep wing-wide upon the air; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 19
The sculptur'd dead, on each side, seem to freeze, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 14
Thou canst not surely be the same that thou didst seem ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 144
Then seem impassable. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 127a
One warm, flush'd moment, hovering, it might seem Lamia, Part I, Line 129
"You seem to know"- "I do know," answer'd Hum, The Jealousies, Line 379
 
SEEM'D............40
It seem'd an emerald in the silver sheen Imitation of Spenser, Line 25
Which seem'd full loath this happy world to leave: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 4
The air that floated by me seem'd to say To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 99
Seem'd like a poll of ivy in the teeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 160
A smile was on his countenance; he seem'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 175
Soon, as it seem'd , we left our journeying high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 647
The moments, by some greedy help that seem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 658
Seem'd sooty, and o'er-spread with upturn'd gills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 695
He seem'd to taste a drop of manna-dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 766
It seem'd he flew, the way so easy was; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 69
So thick with leaves and mosses, that they seem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 666
Endymion follow'd - for it seem'd that one Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 927
It seem'd to whirl around me, and a swoon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 416
A gallant vessel: soon she seem'd to sink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 648
It seem'd as when around the pale new moon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 368
Parting they seem'd to tread upon the air, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 73
His image in the dusk she seem'd to see, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 237
Upon the murderous spot she seem'd to grow, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 365
Seem'd taking flight for heaven, without a death, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 8
She seem'd a splendid angel, newly drest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 223
It seem'd he never, never could redeem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 286
While his bow'd head seem'd list'ning to the Earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 20
It seem'd no force could wake him from his place; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 22
While Fate seem'd strangled in my nervous grasp? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 105
Crag jutting forth to crag, and rocks that seem'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 10
Seem'd to say- "Sleep, old man, in safety sleep; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 61
Who seem'd to me, as rugged times then went, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
It seem'd you were in deep discourse together; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 84
She seem'd , at once, some penanced lady elf, Lamia, Part I, Line 55
It seem'd he had lov'd them a whole summer long: Lamia, Part I, Line 250
Until it seem'd a horrid presence there, Lamia, Part II, Line 267
Which, nearer seen, seem'd refuse of a meal The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 30
Builded so high, it seem'd that filmed clouds The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 63
Seem'd but the faulture of decrepit things The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 70
Prodigious seem'd the toil; the leaves were yet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 121
The lowest stair; and as it touch'd, life seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 133
Half closed, and visionless entire they seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 267
While his bow'd head seem'd listening to the Earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 325
It seem'd no force could wake him from his place; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 327
That seem'd throughout with upheld faces paved; The Jealousies, Line 731
 
SEEM'DST..........1
Thou seem'dst my sister: hand in hand we went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 145
 
SEEM'ST...........2
This murky phantasm! thou contented seem'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 466
Who while thou goest ever seem'st to stop, The Jealousies, Line 237
 
SEEMED............1
Who gathering round the altar, seemed to pry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 111
 
SEEMING...........5
The wilder'd stranger - seeming not to see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 219
Its hungry hugeness, seeming ready ripe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 347
Beyond the seeming confines of the space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 513
Seeming with bright eyes to listen. 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 4
Of haggard seeming , but a boon indeed: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 344
 
SEEMLIHED.........1
And then his tongue with sober seemlihed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 950
 
SEEMS.............23
Her form seems floating palpable, and near; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 39
So graceful, that it seems no mortal hand, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 5
And seems from purple clouds to wing its flight. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 45
So scantly, that it seems her bridal night, To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 11
So silently, it seems a beam of light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 4
And seems to listen: O that I might know Sleep and Poetry, Line 153
And seems to one in drowsiness half lost, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 13
Seems at the distance like a crescent moon: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 544
Seems all this poor endeavour after fame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 847
It seems an angry lightning, and doth hiss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 233
Seems to give forth its light in very scorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 24
After some warm delight, that seems to perch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 64
The Centaur's arrow ready seems to pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 597
Now more than ever seems it rich to die, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 55
In haste it seems . Now shall I be in the way, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 121
And teach him, what it seems his nurse could not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 33
It seems I am to wait Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 5b
Seems poverty. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 32a
It seems then, sir, you have found out the man Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 45
And good instructor; but to-night he seems Lamia, Part I, Line 376
But if, as now it seems , your vision rests Lamia, Part II, Line 99
And great unerring Nature once seems wrong. What can I do to drive away, Line 43
To this new-fangled vice, which seems a burr The Jealousies, Line 107
 
SEEN..............67
For sure so fair a place was never seen , Imitation of Spenser, Line 23
Had I e'er seen her from an arbour take Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 40
Or again witness what with thee I've seen , To George Felton Mathew, Line 25
That often must have seen a poet frantic; To George Felton Mathew, Line 38
And th' half seen mossiness of linnets' nests. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 22
Where never yet was ought more earthly seen Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 53
Whence may be seen the castle gloomy, and grand: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 65
Many the wonders I this day have seen : To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 1
The golden lyre itself were dimly seen : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 12
Yet further off, are dimly seen their bowers, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 43
And on the other side, outspread, is seen To My Brother George (epistle), Line 131
Oft have you seen a swan superbly frowning, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 1
Who had of all that's sweet tasted, and seen , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 38
Upon a tyrant's head. Ah! had I never seen , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 72
And many goodly states and kingdoms seen ; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 2
Or hand of hymning angel, when 'tis seen On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 4
Than wings of swans, than doves, than dim- seen eagle? Sleep and Poetry, Line 22
No one who once the glorious sun has seen , Sleep and Poetry, Line 41
Therefrom my liberty; thence too I've seen Sleep and Poetry, Line 292
For over them was seen a free display Sleep and Poetry, Line 392
For not the faintest motion could be seen I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 13
Of all the brightness that mine eyes have seen ! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 206
Sacred to Dian? Haply, thou hast seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 512
Yes, thrice have I this fair enchantment seen ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 918
But the soft shadow of my thrice- seen love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 168
Oft hast thou seen bolts of the thunder hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 205
Disparted, and far upward could be seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 517
Half seen through deepest gloom, and griesly gapes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 629
Have seen a new tinge in the western skies: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 727
This furrow'd visage thou hadst never seen . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 448
Was seen such wonder underneath the stars. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 727
Rich opal domes were seen , on high upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 841
Whence could be seen , direct, a golden gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 855
Of deep- seen wonders motionless,- and blaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 885
Aye, I have seen these signs in one of heaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 912
Cooler than all the wonders he had seen , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1030
To nothing, lov'd a nothing, nothing seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 637
Whose eye has seen the snow clouds hung in mist, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 2
Seen mid the sapphire heaven's deep repose; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 319
On which were many monsters seen , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 78
Again it clos'd and there was nothing seen When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 73
Why do I know ye? why have I seen ye? why Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 231
For I have seen my sons most unlike Gods. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 328
My dispossessor? Have ye seen his face? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 233
These grassy solitudes, and seen the flowers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 57
Though seen of none save him whose strenuous tongue Ode on Melancholy, Line 27
One morn before me were three figures seen , Ode on Indolence, Line 1
Is shifted round, the first seen shades return; Ode on Indolence, Line 8
Have you seen her of late? No? Auranthe, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 112
About a midnight-gallant, seen to climb Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 141
You'll be seen ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 176b
[The doors open. Enter Page. Several women are seen Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
She breath'd upon his eyes, and swift was seen Lamia, Part I, Line 124
Were seen about the markets: none knew where Lamia, Part I, Line 391
Without a gap, yet ne'er before had seen Lamia, Part II, Line 154
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store? To Autumn, Line 12
Which, nearer seen , seem'd refuse of a meal The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 30
The like upon the earth; what I had seen The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 66
Like a vast giant seen by men at sea The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 457
Unmask'd, and being seen - without a blot! I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 4
Remembrance from my eyes? for they have seen , What can I do to drive away, Line 2
And seen her enemies havock'd at her feet. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 23
Where, till the porter answer'd, might be seen , The Jealousies, Line 276
A silver tissue, scantly to be seen , The Jealousies, Line 346
Shook with her agony, till fair were seen The Jealousies, Line 395
And now the fairy escort was seen clear, The Jealousies, Line 577
Was seen , to our immoderate surprise, The Jealousies, Line 761
 
SEER..............4
Of Doris, and the Egean seer , her spouse- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1000
I am no seer ; you know we must obey Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 5
Eban then usher'd in the learned seer : The Jealousies, Line 334
"I'll have a glass of nantz, then,"- said the seer ,- The Jealousies, Line 366
 
SEES..............12
In air he sees white coursers paw, and prance, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 26
These wonders strange he sees , and many more, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 53
By telling what he sees from native merit. Sleep and Poetry, Line 46
And choose each pleasure that my fancy sees ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 104
Of buried griefs the spirit sees , but scarce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 517
With all his sorrowing? He sees her not. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 799
Sees not so much as I; Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 2
Upon the floor the dullest spirit sees Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 35
Pensive awhile she dreams awake, and sees , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 232
The nobles ere he sees you. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 17a
Who comforts those she sees not, who knows not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 270
To see as a God sees , and take the depth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 304
 
SEEST.............4
On this scroll thou seest written in characters fair On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 21
Thou seest it for my happiness, no pearl Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 869
Search, Thea, search! and tell me, if thou seest Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 121
Why should I tell thee what thou so well seest ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 84
 
SEETH.............1
Towers like an ocean-cliff, and whence he seeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 241
 
SEETHE............1
Lay full of darts; for them alone did seethe Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 117
 
SEGMENTS..........1
With those bright languid segments green and prick To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 4
 
SEISURE...........1
Say, is not bliss within our perfect seisure ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 720
 
SEIZ'D............3
In the cold moonshine. Straight he seiz'd her wrist; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 508
He seiz'd my lady's lily hand, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 3
Despondence seiz'd again the fallen Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 379
 
SEIZE.............8
Strive for her son to seize my careless heart; To Hope, Line 14
With fervour seize their adamantine lyres, Ode to Apollo, Line 5
Then the events of this wide world I'd seize Sleep and Poetry, Line 81
That he will seize on trickling honey-combs: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 150
Disabled age shall seize thee; and even then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 595
Of circumstance; yea, seize the arrow's barb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 344
Seize on me unawares,- What can I do to drive away, Line 29
Another sword! and what if I could seize King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 1
 
SELDOM............4
That they seldom meet the eye Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 28
For seldom did she go to chapel-shrift, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 467
And seldom felt she any hunger-pain; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 468
And seldom talk'd of. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 90
 
SELF..............52
And from her own pure self no joy dissembling, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 17
Its mighty self of convoluting sound, Sleep and Poetry, Line 175
Dear as the temple's self , so does the moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 28
Were busiest, into that self -same lawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 108
But in the self -same fixed trance he kept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 403
Her self -possession - swung the lute aside, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 504
A second self , that each might be redeem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 659
Bluster'd, and slept, and its wild self did teaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 687
More self -destroying, leading, by degrees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 799
Life's self is nourish'd by its proper pith, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 814
Worse than the torment's self : but rather tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 177
And thoughts of self came on, how crude and sore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 275
The journey homeward to habitual self ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 276
Him all in all unto her doting self . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 460
Saving Love's self , who stands superb to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 535
Its powerless self : I know this cannot be. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 702
Must surely be self -doomed or he will rue it: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 843
Sweet Arethusa! Dian's self must feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 984
Save of blown self -applause, they proudly mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 13
By thee were fashion'd to the self -same end; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 161
To its huge self ; and the minutest fish Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 207
Forgetful utterly of self -intent; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 386
O such deformities! Old Charon's self , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 503
Have no self -passion or identity. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 477
In self -commitment, thus that meek unknown: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 874
They could not in the self -same mansion dwell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 3
Yet were these Florentines as self -retired Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 129
With a mind self -overaw'd, Fancy, Line 26
Pearled with the self -same shower. Fancy, Line 54
Saving of thy sweet self ; if thou think'st well The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 341
Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty's self . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 36
My strong identity, my real self , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 114
The Titans fierce, self -hid, or prison-bound, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 161
Just at the self -same beat of Time's wide wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 1
With the self -same dews that fell Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 27
Perhaps the self -same song that found a path Ode to a Nightingale, Line 65
To toll me back from thee to my sole self ! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 72
Poor self -deceived wretches, who must think Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 76
Self -influenced; then, in his morning dreams Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 107
Or tears, or ravings, or self -threatened death, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 129
The purple slaughter-house, where Bacchus' self Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 125
Some demon's mistress, or the demon's self . Lamia, Part I, Line 56
Her fearful sobs, self -folding like a flower Lamia, Part I, Line 138
Than throbbing blood, and that the self -same pains Lamia, Part I, Line 308
Besides, for all his love, in self despite, Lamia, Part II, Line 72
Against his better self , he took delight Lamia, Part II, Line 73
Approving all, she faded at self -will, Lamia, Part II, Line 142
Beautiful slaves, and Lamia's self , appear, Lamia, Part II, Line 208
Of all mock lyrists, large self worshipers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 207
And by thy self , forlorn divinity, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 287
The Titans fierce, self -hid, or prison-bound, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 10
He smiled at self , and, smiling, show'd his teeth, The Jealousies, Line 271
 
SELF'S............1
For your self's sake, I do not personate Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 143
 
SELFISHNESS.......1
But Selfishness , Love's cousin, held not long Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 241
 
SEMBLANCE.........2
The semblance of gold rocks and bright gold sands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 742
Tied in a burnish'd knot, their semblance took The Jealousies, Line 269
 
SEMBLANCES........1
Fish- semblances , of green and azure hue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 884
 
SEMELE............1
Young Semele such richness never quaft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 536
 
SEMI..............2
Deep blue eyes, semi -shaded in white lids, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 61
Warm breath, light whisper, tender semi -tone, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 3
 
SEMILUCENT........1
His litter of smooth semilucent mist, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 385
 
SENATE............1
Or, in the senate thunder out my numbers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 75
 
SENATORS..........1
Those green-rob'd senators of mighty woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 73
 
SEND..............15
Not the minutest whisper does it send I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 66
And now at once, adventuresome, I send Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 58
Of some strange history, potent to send Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 324
And weave them dyingly - send honey-whispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 955
Sit thee there, and send abroad, Fancy, Line 25
Fancy, high-commission'd:- send her! Fancy, Line 27
Send forth instantly Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 37b
Will you send yonder knight to me? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 21a
Of your own will? You pleas'd to send for me. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 29
made at parting, and I will forget to send the Emperor letters Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
That, unless heaven would send me back my son, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 28
Be what they may, and send him from the castle Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 55
Patience, good people, in fit time I send Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 75
Did I not send , sir, but a moment past, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 137
And sometimes into cities she would send Lamia, Part I, Line 213
 
SENDETH...........1
It holds the zephyr, ere it sendeth fair Character of C.B., Line 4
 
SENDING...........2
In sending heathen, Turk, and sect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 41
Sending forth Maian incense, spread around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 103
 
SENDS.............3
The hearty grasp that sends a pleasant sonnet Sleep and Poetry, Line 319
Besides, the foolish Prince sends , minute whiles, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 35
To-morrow, when the Emperor sends Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 174b
 
SENNA.............1
A dose of senna -tea, or nightmare Gorgon, The Jealousies, Line 341
 
SENNET............1
[A sennet heard faintly. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 53
 
SENSATION.........1
And the rich notes to each sensation fitting; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 114
 
SENSE.............24
That heats the sense with lewd desiring; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 6
My sense with their deliciousness was spell'd: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 12
A sense of real things comes doubly strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 157
The very sense of where I was might well Sleep and Poetry, Line 396
Thrown in our eyes, genders a novel sense , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 808
Increasing still in heart, and pleasant sense , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 351
Presents immortal bowers to mortal sense ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 438
With golden moss. His every sense had grown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 671
Alpheus! thou enchanter! every sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 965
Shakes hand with our own Ceres; every sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 38
And to this arbitrary queen of sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 459
Nor numbed sense to steel it, In drear nighted December, Line 23
Its sweets in the wrong sense .- Thou dost eclipse Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 12
Sense of the gnawing fire at heart and brain. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 272
More warm than those heroic tints that fill a painter's sense , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 36
And a wave fill'd it, as my sense was fill'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 279
My sense , as though of hemlock I had drunk, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 2
O, why did ye not melt, and leave my sense Ode on Indolence, Line 19
Or hear the voice of busy common- sense ! Ode on Indolence, Line 40
Could taste so nauseous to the bodily sense , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 24
The sleepy thunder? Hast no sense of fear? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 84
When sense of life return'd, I started up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 58
And ears act with that pleasant unison of sense The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 442
Their shutters with a moody sense of wealth, The Jealousies, Line 209
 
SENSELESS.........6
A voice, he had been froze to senseless stone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 200
Ye deaf and senseless minutes of the day, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 76
Piteous she look'd on dead and senseless things, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 489
Not a senseless , tranced thing, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 18
Do you forget that even the senseless door-posts Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 30
O senseless Lycius! Madman! wherefore flout Lamia, Part II, Line 147
 
SENSES............14
Are things on which the dazzled senses rest Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 17
The mountain flowers, when his glad senses caught Calidore: A Fragment, Line 54
All that was for our human senses fitted. Sleep and Poetry, Line 80
When first my senses caught their tender falling. Sleep and Poetry, Line 330
His senses had swoon'd off: he did not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 398
One's senses with so dense a breathing stuff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 381
To his inward senses these words spake aloud; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1020
Shut up your senses , stifle up your ears, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 175
No, no, no. My senses are Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 133b
Where I may all my many senses please, Lamia, Part I, Line 284
More, more he gaz'd: his human senses reel: Lamia, Part II, Line 258
I heard, I look'd: two senses both at once The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 118
Ponderous upon my senses a whole moon. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 392
Praying his royal senses to content The Jealousies, Line 21
 
SENSIBLE..........2
feel sensible are not of such completion as to warrant their passing the press; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Sister, you have grown sensible and wise, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
 
SENSITIVE.........1
Were some most sensitive portion of thy life, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 93
 
SENSUAL...........1
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 13
 
SENT..............22
On holy message sent . - What pleasures higher? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 13
And that warm-hearted Shakspeare sent to meet him To George Felton Mathew, Line 57
Hails it with tears, her stout defender sent : Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 16
Love this boon has sent ; Hither, hither, love, Line 22
So scared, he sent for that "good king of cats," Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 5
A Paphian dove upon a message sent ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 510
Sent me by sad Vertumnus, when his fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 445
Where pleasure may be sent : the nested wren Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 63
And now, O winged Chieftain! thou hast sent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 100
"Why such a golden eve? The breeze is sent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 927
From the ninth sphere to me benignly sent Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 3
But fierce Enceladus sent forth his eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 382
From no less man than Otho, who has sent Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 135
Sent forth with my commands? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 73a
After whose spurring heels he sent me forth, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 13
Full brimm'd, and opposite sent forth a look Lamia, Part II, Line 242
With sad low tones, while thus he spake, and sent The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 410
Meantime he sent a fluttering embassy The Jealousies, Line 28
And order'd some death-warrants to be sent The Jealousies, Line 178
Sent as a present, while yet under age, The Jealousies, Line 183
Vowing he'd have them sent on board the gallies; The Jealousies, Line 223
While the torch-bearing slaves a halloo sent The Jealousies, Line 392
 
SENTENCE..........1
A sentence something worthy of his guilt. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 21
 
SENTENTIOUS.......1
My happy thoughts sententious ; he will teem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 78
 
SENTIMENTAL.......1
A pet-lamb in a sentimental farce! Ode on Indolence, Line 54
 
SEPTEMBER.........1
Cold as sunrise in September , You say you love; but with a voice, Line 7
 
SEPULCHRAL........3
Sepulchral from the distance all around. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 486
Like hoarse night-gusts sepulchral briars among. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 288
And all around each eye's sepulchral cell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 404
 
SEPULCHRE.........1
Carve it upon my 'scutcheon'd sepulchre . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 33
 
SEPULCHRED........1
Sepulchred , where no kindled incense burns, Lamia, Part II, Line 95
 
SEPULCHRES........1
Darkness, and worms, and shrouds, and sepulchres Sleep and Poetry, Line 243
 
SEQUEL............1
The sequel of this day, though labour 'tis immense! The Jealousies, Line 792
 
SEQUENT...........1
So thou wouldst thus, for many sequent hours, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 797
 
SEQUESTER'D.......3
Some flowery spot, sequester'd , wild, romantic, To George Felton Mathew, Line 37
Across the lake; sequester'd leafy glades, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 47
From the sequester'd haunts of gay Titania, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 40
 
SEQUESTERED.......1
And it had gloomy shades, sequestered deep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 67
 
SERAPH............3
Or a rapt seraph in a moonlight beam; To George Felton Mathew, Line 24
A Seraph chosen from the bright abyss Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 317
"And now, my love, my seraph fair, awake! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 276
 
SERAPH'S..........1
Fit for the silv'ring of a seraph's dream; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 38
 
SERE..............2
Where robins hop, and fallen leaves are sere . On The Story of Rimini, Line 14
Among sere leaves and twigs, might all be heard. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 452
 
SERENE............13
Yet did I never breathe its pure serene On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 7
More serene than Cordelia's countenance? Sleep and Poetry, Line 9
Warm and serene , but yet with moistened eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 922
Stood serene Cupids watching silently. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 419
Before the serene father of them all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 929
O golden-tongued Romance, with serene lute! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 1
Scorches and burns our once serene domain. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 63
And one behind the other stepp'd serene , Ode on Indolence, Line 3
Orbing along the serene firmament Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 79
The God on half-shut feathers sank serene , Lamia, Part I, Line 123
Scorches and burns our once serene domain. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 365
The little Bertha's eyes ope on the stars serene ." The Jealousies, Line 396
Of tambourines and pipes, serene and loud, The Jealousies, Line 688
 
SERENELY..........3
Serenely sleep:- she from a casket takes To My Brother George (epistle), Line 93
Or when serenely wand'ring in a trance To G.A.W., Line 5
The blue sky here, and there, serenely peeping I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 169
 
SERENER...........1
My essence? What serener palaces, Lamia, Part I, Line 283
 
SERGE.............1
For old serge hangings,- me, your humble friend, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 36
 
SERIOUS...........5
And from all serious Gods; that our delight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 785
Blown by the serious Zephyrs, gave of sweet Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 207
So serious ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 25a
Yes, so serious , that before Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 25b
Of such deliberate prologue, serious 'haviour. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51
 
SERMON............1
A natural sermon o'er their pebbly beds; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 71
 
SERMON'D..........1
Not sideways sermon'd at. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 16a
 
SERMON'S..........1
More heark'ning to the sermon's horrid sound. Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 4
 
SERPENT...........15
When I have cast this serpent -skin of woe?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 240
Through the cold serpent -pipe refreshfully,- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 412
Like a lithe serpent vast and muscular Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 261
Her head was serpent , but ah, bitter-sweet! Lamia, Part I, Line 59
Her throat was serpent , but the words she spake Lamia, Part I, Line 64
"Thou smooth-lipp'd serpent , surely high inspired! Lamia, Part I, Line 83
"I swear," said Hermes, "by my serpent rod, Lamia, Part I, Line 89
To the swoon'd serpent , and with languid arm, Lamia, Part I, Line 132
Left to herself, the serpent now began Lamia, Part I, Line 146
And dream, when in the serpent prison-house, Lamia, Part I, Line 203
The serpent - Ha, the serpent! certes, she Lamia, Part II, Line 80
The serpent - Ha, the serpent ! certes, she Lamia, Part II, Line 80
"A Serpent !" echoed he; no sooner said, Lamia, Part II, Line 305
conjectures, found her out to be a serpent , a lamia; and that all her furniture Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Whose arms spread straggling in wild serpent forms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 447
 
SERPENT'S.........3
A serpent's plashy neck; its barbed tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 45
An oath, and through the serpent's ears it ran Lamia, Part I, Line 113
And shall I see thee made a serpent's prey?" Lamia, Part II, Line 298
 
SERPENTING........1
Laughing, and wailing, groveling, serpenting , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 501
 
SERPENTRY.........1
Left by men-slugs and human serpentry , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 821
 
SERPENTS..........2
Alecto's serpents ; ravishments more keen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 875
Serpents in red roses hissing; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 15
 
SERPENTS'.........1
Bow'd a fair greeting to these serpents' whine; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 190
 
SERV'D............2
I am but rightly serv'd ." So saying, he Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 944
Serv'd with harsh food, with scum for Sunday-drink. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 89
 
SERVANT...........5
Servant of heroic deed! Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 58
I must be thy sad servant evermore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 301
That he, the servant of their trade designs, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 165
Lady! O would to heaven your poor servant Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 132
Seeing his servant can no further drive The Jealousies, Line 258
 
SERVANT'S.........1
The unworthy welcome of your servant's house? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 78
 
SERVANTS..........7
By her affrighted servants . Next day, hous'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 72
What your poor servants know but too, too well? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 23
Opened - she enter'd with her servants three. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 72
Servants . ALBERT following. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
Break through her weeping servants , till thou com'st Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8
We are your servants . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 44b
Mission'd her viewless servants to enrich Lamia, Part II, Line 136
 
SERVE.............3
Grew strong within me: wherefore serve me so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 971
Have I put forth to serve thee. What, not yet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 906
To serve our joys, would lengthen and dilate. To J.R., Line 8
 
SERVICE...........3
For willing service ; whether to surprise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 264
Could do you better service than mere words! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
To do you every service you can ask. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 32
 
SERVICES..........1
magnificence, with supper-tables, laden with services of gold and silver. A Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
SERVITORS.........1
Came, and who were her subtle servitors . Lamia, Part II, Line 118
 
SESSIONS..........1
Hold sphery sessions for a season due. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 33
 
SET...............36
Will set a green robe floating round her head, Sleep and Poetry, Line 114
I owe to the kind poet who has set On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 5
So all have set my heavier grief above Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 527
Oft have I brought thee flowers, on their stalks set Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 873
Another city doth he set about, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 148
Descried an orbed diamond, set to fray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 245
In all this quiet luxury; and hath set Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 486
Although the sun of poesy is set , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 729
And set those old Chaldeans to their tasks.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 21
To set my dull and sadden'd spirit playing? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 46
That when a man doth set himself in toil Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 3
When the barrel's set abroach, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 9
That set sharp racks at work, to pinch and peel. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 120
And cover'd it with mould, and o'er it set Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 415
Blood-red the sun may set behind black mountain peaks; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 17
Poor skull, thy fingers set ablaze, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 43
Made a dim, silver twilight, soft he set The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 254
Against the window-panes; St. Agnes' moon hath set . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 324
Of Memnon's image at the set of sun Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 374
I set her on my pacing steed, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 21
Can manage those hard rivets to set free Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
To set the silly sort o' the world agape, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 145
Set my life's star! I have liv'd long enough, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
Almost with pleasure. Let them be set free Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 231
For I would not set eyes upon thy shame; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 144
A Banquetting Hall, brilliantly illuminated, and set forth with all Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
To set the place in flames. I pray, hast heard Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 7
Set her before me - never fear I can strike. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 182
We are all weary - faint - set ope the doors- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 194
From his companions, and set forth to walk, Lamia, Part I, Line 231
She set herself, high-thoughted, how to dress Lamia, Part II, Line 115
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, To Autumn, Line 8
With half unravel'd web. I set myself The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 308
Set him before me. Not for the poor sake King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 2
That all her feelings should be set at nought, The Jealousies, Line 78
Then the great Emperor full graceful set The Jealousies, Line 566
 
SETS..............3
( sets him free). Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 116b
He sets his bustling household's wits at work King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 48
Who sets down ev'ry sovereign as a zany,- The Jealousies, Line 161
 
SETTING...........6
Which the glad setting sun in gold doth dress; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 35
The silvery setting of their mortal star. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 359
By this the sun is setting ; we may chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 988
But at the setting I must bid adieu Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 932
Laughing at the clear stream and setting sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 946
The town, the churchyard, and the setting sun, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 1
 
SETTLE............1
And settle all this trouble. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 28a
 
SETTLED...........1
Be settled , but they tease us out of thought. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 77
 
SEVEN.............6
Or keeping watch among those starry seven , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 689
Or the seven stars to light you, Robin Hood, Line 21
Who seven times a day All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 46
When he saw the churches seven , Not Aladdin magian, Line 7
Till Cleopatra lives at Number Seven , And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 9
Aaron's breastplate, and the seven The Eve of St. Mark, Line 33
 
SEVENS............1
Or stand in courtly talk by fives and sevens : Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 43
 
SEVER.............1
That not one fleecy lamb which thus did sever Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 74
 
SEVERAL...........2
Each several one against the other three, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 143
[The doors open. Enter Page. Several women are seen Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
 
SEVERALLY.........2
OTHO. Exeunt severally . The scene closes on them. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
Enter two Captains, severally . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 9
 
SEVERE............8
Some with upholden hand and mouth severe ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 143
Severe before me: persecuting fate! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1006
No god, no demon of severe response, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 2
That inlet to severe magnificence Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 211
He ground severe his skull, with open mouth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 51
I see, astonied, that severe content Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 165
Save one, who look'd thereon with eye severe , Lamia, Part II, Line 157
Love, love alone, has pains severe and many; To Fanny, Line 46
 
SEVERELY..........1
O be propitious, nor severely deem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 183
 
SEXTON............1
You need not be his sexton too: a man Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51

Published @ RC

March 2005