Si-Sk - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry - Romantic Circles

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Keats Concordance
 
SIAM..............1
Call'd doves of Siam , Lima mice, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 79
 
SIAMESIAN.........1
Than vase grotesque and Siamesian jar; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 57
 
SICILIAN..........3
As o'er Sicilian seas, clear anthems float To George Felton Mathew, Line 14
In earlier Sicilian ? or thy smiles Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 5
As Proserpine still weeps for her Sicilian air. Lamia, Part I, Line 63
 
SICILY............1
That writhes about the roots of Sicily : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 244
 
SICK..............34
The languid sick ; it cool'd their fever'd sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 223
From the sick heavens all unseemly stains. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 4
Like a sick eagle looking at the sky. On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 5
From a sick dove. At length, to break the pause, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 720
Of high and noble life with thoughts so sick ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 758
Leaving us fancy- sick . No, no, I'm sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 853
Brain- sick shepherd prince, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 43b
Aye, sleep; for when our love- sick queen did weep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 481
Sick hearted, weary - so I took a whim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 269
Unto my friend, while sick and ill he lies. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 32
Still am I sick of it: and though to-day Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 99
And with sick longing all the night outwear, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 23
Fell sick within the rose's just domain, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 34
Keeps head against the freshets. Sick and wan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 213
And the sick west continually bereaves Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 251
Which saves a sick man from the feather'd pall Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 268
Sickly imagination and sick pride On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 11
A dove forlorn and lost with sick unpruned wing." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 333
Savour of poisonous brass and metal sick : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 189
Where other hearts are sick of the same bruise; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 104
To hover round my head, and make me sick Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 288
Soothly I am sick for you. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 40
Sooth I am as sick for you! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 63
Ye love- sick bards, repay her scorn for scorn; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 11
Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 66
For I am sick and faint with many wrongs, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 115
Still very sick , my lord; but now I went, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 1
Of her sick eye-lids; that those eyes may glow Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 39
That we believe him sick , which must not be. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 55
Tiptoe with white arms spread. He, sick to lose Lamia, Part I, Line 287
Savour of poisonous brass and metals sick . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 33
His gleaming battle axe being slaughter sick , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 38
I'll show him that his speeches made me sick , The Jealousies, Line 148
Say you are very sick , and bar the way The Jealousies, Line 535
 
SICKEN'D..........1
The myrtle sicken'd in a thousand wreaths. Lamia, Part II, Line 264
 
SICKENING.........2
How sickening , how dark the dreadful leisure Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 910
When in mid-May the sickening east wind The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 97
 
SICKENS...........1
Sickens our fearful ewes; and we have had Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 218
 
SICKLE............1
In Autumn's sickle , Winter frosty hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 423
 
SICKLY............4
Sweet paining on his ear: he sickly guess'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 856
Sickly imagination and sick pride On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 11
In such a sickly longing for his son. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 104
With such a poor and sickly sounding pause, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 439
 
SICKNESS..........5
But sickness smites the conscience sore; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 50
His deep heart- sickness for a rebel child. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 39
My sickness , with a brother's sadden'd eye, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 71
In sickness not ignoble, I rejoice, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 184
By an immortal sickness which kills not; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 258
 
SICKNESSE.........1
Than I, for I n'ad sicknesse nor disese." Chaucer Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
 
SIDE..............62
Rippled delighted up the flowery side ; Imitation of Spenser, Line 31
Where on one side are covert branches hung, To George Felton Mathew, Line 45
On either side . These, gentle Calidore Calidore: A Fragment, Line 32
On one side is a field of drooping oats, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 127
And on the other side , outspread, is seen To My Brother George (epistle), Line 131
Round my fire- side , and haply there discover Sleep and Poetry, Line 72
And now I see them on a green-hill's side Sleep and Poetry, Line 134
Through sunny meadows, that outskirt the side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 250
On either side ; pitying the sad death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 327
Until, from the horizon's vaulted side , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 349
Dried carefully on the cooler side of sheaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 439
Huge dens and caverns in a mountain's side : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 650
Past them, but he must brush on every side . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 868
Until it reached a splashing fountain's side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 84
At this, from every side they hurried in, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 507
Blackening on every side , and overhead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 630
On either side outgush'd, with misty spray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 918
With rapture to the other side of the world! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 250
Went forward with the Carian side by side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 311
Went forward with the Carian side by side : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 311
He shall deposit side by side, until Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 705
He shall deposit side by side , until Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 705
Put sleekly on one side with nicest care; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 742
"Beneath my palm trees, by the river side , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 182
"Beneath my palm trees, by the river side , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 188
Beneath dark palm trees by a river side ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 192
Too well awake, he feels the panting side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 440
His heart beat awfully against his side ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 42
See, as they creep along the river side , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 345
With a waist and with a side Fancy, Line 84
The sculptur'd dead, on each side , seem to freeze, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 14
Paining with eloquence her balmy side ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 205
Then by the bed- side , where the faded moon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 253
With a huge empty flaggon by his side : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 364
No more a princess shall side saddle me. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 78
To the knotty side of an old pollard tree When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 84
Didst find a lyre all golden by thy side , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 63
On the cold hill's side . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 36
On the cold hill's side . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 44
Saw two fair creatures, couched side by side Ode to Psyche, Line 9
Saw two fair creatures, couched side by side Ode to Psyche, Line 9
Up the hill- side ; and now 'tis buried deep Ode to a Nightingale, Line 77
With bowed necks, and joined hands, side -faced; Ode on Indolence, Line 2
When shifted round to see the other side ; Ode on Indolence, Line 6
Or side by side with whelmed mariners. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 123
Or side by side with whelmed mariners. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 123
For me, with horses by the forest- side Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 180
Cheeks fashion'd tenderly on either side , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 66
On this side of Jove's clouds, to escape the sight Lamia, Part I, Line 10
For all this came a ruin: side by side Lamia, Part II, Line 16
For all this came a ruin: side by side Lamia, Part II, Line 16
When from the slope side of a suburb hill, Lamia, Part II, Line 26
Of palm and plantain, met from either side , Lamia, Part II, Line 126
From either side their stems branch'd one to one Lamia, Part II, Line 129
To be approach'd on either side by steps, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 90
A grain of gold upon a mountain's side , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 272
My devout lips, than side by side we stood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 292
My devout lips, than side by side we stood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 292
Put your soft hand upon your snowy side , To Fanny, Line 34
To such a dreadful blaze, her side would scorch her hand. The Jealousies, Line 117
Fell on the sofa on his royal side . The Jealousies, Line 202
Along the forest side ! Now amber lines The Jealousies, Line 557
 
SIDED.............3
Golden, or rainbow- sided , or purplish, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 110
Freckle-wing'd and lizard- sided ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 73
So rainbow- sided , touch'd with miseries, Lamia, Part I, Line 54
 
SIDELONG..........7
The sidelong view of swelling leafiness, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 34
Nymph of the downward smile, and sidelong glance, To G.A.W., Line 1
Down sidelong aisles, and into niches old. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 264
With sidelong laughing; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 211
Sidelong its rich antiquity, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 42
And sidelong fix'd her eye on Saturn's face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 91
For sidelong would she bend, and sing La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 23
 
SIDES.............8
Its sides are tinged with a resplendent glow, To Lord Byron, Line 10
Upon the sides of Latmos was outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 63
The nether sides of mossy stones and rock,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 937
Of river sides , and woods, and heathy waste, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 303
Its sides I'll plant with dew-sweet eglantine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 697
Did you get here? O I shall split my sides ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 31
And rubb'd his sides against the mossed bark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 85
I look'd around upon the carved sides The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 61
 
SIDEWAY...........1
Officiously. Sideway his face repos'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 403
 
SIDEWAYS..........3
As Venus looking sideways in alarm. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 220
Nor look behind, nor sideways , but require The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 53
Not sideways sermon'd at. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 16a
 
SIEGE.............1
And share his mouldy ratio in a siege . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 83
 
SIEVE.............1
Thou must hold water in a witch's sieve , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 120
 
SIFT..............1
Therefore they watch'd a time when they might sift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 465
 
SIFTED............1
Hast sifted well the atom-universe; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 183
 
SIGH..............43
To sigh out sonnets to the midnight air! To Hope, Line 28
Soft, plaintive, and melting, for ever will sigh ; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 34
So fondly I'll breathe, and so softly I'll sigh , O come, dearest Emma!, Line 13
And then, thou wilt know that the sigh comes from me. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 16
Born of the very sigh that silence heaves: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 12
Sigh thou mayest, but bid it go Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 3
Through his forgotten hands: then would they sigh , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 181
Where every zephyr- sigh pouts, and endows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 376
Or maiden's sigh , that grief itself embalms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 402
Faint fare-thee-wells, and sigh -shrilled adieus!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 690
Old ditties sigh above their father's grave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 788
May sigh my love unto her pitying! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 957
No sighs but sigh -warm kisses or light noise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 967
Bear up against it: so farewel, sad sigh ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 974
One sigh doth echo, one poor sob doth pine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 6
From every wasting sigh , from every pain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 126
With not a thing to sigh for, or to seek, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 167
Nor sigh of his, nor plaint, nor passion'd moan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 201
His tears, who weeps for thee. Where dost thou sigh ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 77
And so I can prepare without a sigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 316
One hair of thine: see how I weep and sigh , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 583
A woman's sigh alone and in distress? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 55
Not to companion thee, and sigh away Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 135
O what a sigh she gave in finishing, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 291
One sigh of real breath - one gentle squeeze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 665
And speak not one pale word, and sigh no more. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 808
O sigh not so! O sigh not so! O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 9
O sigh not so! O sigh not so! O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 9
There's a sigh for yes, and a sigh for no, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 17
There's a sigh for yes, and a sigh for no, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 17
And a sigh for I can't bear it! O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 18
Laugh and sigh , and laugh again, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 22
And we will sigh in the daisy's eye Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 15
Unknown, Lethean, sigh to us - O sigh! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 436
Unknown, Lethean, sigh to us - O sigh ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 436
From isles Lethean, sigh to us - O sigh! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 484
From isles Lethean, sigh to us - O sigh ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 484
And moan forth witless words with many a sigh ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 303
Too heavy a sigh would kill him, or do worse. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 19
Marrying to every word a twinborn sigh ; Lamia, Part I, Line 341
Of joys; and she began to moan and sigh Lamia, Part II, Line 37
"Why do you sigh , fair creature?" whisper'd he: Lamia, Part II, Line 40
These day-school hieroglyphics with a sigh ; The Jealousies, Line 452
 
SIGH'D............10
That I have sigh'd for: with so deadly gasp Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 525
At which I sigh'd that I could not pursue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 589
There hollow sounds arous'd me, and I sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 651
A well-known voice sigh'd , "Sweetest, here am I!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 714
Sweet music breath'd her soul away, and sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 767
Press'd its cold hand, and wept,- and Scylla sigh'd ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 780
Sigh'd ; rueful again the piteous bag-pipe went; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 7
She sigh'd for Agnes' dreams, the sweetest of the year. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 63
And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 30
Or sigh'd , or blush'd, or on spring-flowered lea Lamia, Part I, Line 187
 
SIGHED............1
All Berthas!" sighed the Emperor. "I engage," The Jealousies, Line 373
 
SIGHING...........10
There, oft would he bring from his soft sighing lute On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 29
For there the lily, and the musk-rose, sighing , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 89
Nought but a lovely sighing of the wind I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 160
That 'tis their sighing , wailing ere they go Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 12
Amid her window-flowers,- sighing ,- weaning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 28
In chastity: yes, Pallas has been sighing , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 802
And over it a sighing voice expire. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 422
Sighing , an elephant appear'd and bow'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 537
Sighing all day - and still she kiss'd, and wept. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 408
Two muffled up,- one sighing heavily, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 122
 
SIGHINGLY.........1
And breathe them sighingly among the boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 952
 
SIGHINGS..........1
Again the Stranger sighings fresh did waste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 8
 
SIGHS.............19
Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 1
As if he always listened to the sighs Sleep and Poetry, Line 386
They gave each other's cheeks; with all their sighs , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 145
Blush-tinted cheeks, half smiles, and faintest sighs , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 619
And up I started: Ah! my sighs , my tears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 681
With sighs , and an alas!- Endymion! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 736
No sighs but sigh-warm kisses or light noise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 967
With deep-drawn sighs was quieting, he went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 255
Than sighs could fathom, or contentment reach: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 395
Were clos'd in sullen moisture, and quick sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 469
The little flowers felt his pleasant sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 677
Will shade us with their wings. Those fitful sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 981
Too many sighs give we to them in fee, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 91
Of high Olympus utter'd slavish sighs . Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 8
The hallow'd hour was near at hand: she sighs The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 66
Sighs , too, as mournful as that Memnon's harp Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 376
Moans from my heart, and sighs not counterfeit. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 17
Of Satyrs, Fauns, and blear'd Silenus' sighs . Lamia, Part I, Line 103
Nibble their toasts, and cool their tea with sighs , Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 2
 
SIGHT.............39
My sight will never more be blest, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 17
Scarce can his clear and nimble eye- sight follow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 13
Ah, yes! much more would start into his sight - To My Brother George (epistle), Line 63
Starts at the sight of Laura; nor can wean Sleep and Poetry, Line 390
And springing up, they met the wond'ring sight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 227
And shaping visions all about my sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 568
My sight right upward: but it was quite dazed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 601
When I have told thee how my waking sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 859
Wrapping all objects from my smothered sight , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 901
It swells, it buds, it flowers beneath his sight ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 59
But rather, giving them to the filled sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 402
But for her comforting! unhappy sight , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 530
No sight can bear the lightning of his bow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 538
Of sanctuary splendour, not a sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 9
A sight too fearful for the feel of fear: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 496
Then was appalling silence: then a sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 527
Swifter than sight was gone - even before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 337
How they can dive in sight and unseen rise- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 342
At sight of such a dismal labouring, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 379
There is a triple sight in blindness keen; To Homer, Line 12
O horrible! to lose the sight of well remember'd face, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 33
And keep his vision clear from speck, his inward sight unblind. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 48
Even so vague is man's sight of himself. Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 9
Of eye- sight on cinque coloured potter's clay Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 60
All saints to give him sight of Madeline, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 78
Of Ops the queen all clouded round from sight ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 78
At sight of the dejected King of Day, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 380
and Attendants. The Soldiers halt at the gate, with banners in sight . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
But now my sight is clear; forgive me, lady. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 23
And, like an anxious warder, strain his sight Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 17
Instant dismiss'd the Council from his sight , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 20
To all men's sight , a lady innocent. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 139
And throw these jewels from my loathing sight ,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 96
Was ever such a sight ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 1a
Out of his sight a father whom he loves; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 22
On this side of Jove's clouds, to escape the sight Lamia, Part I, Line 10
They melted from my sight into the woods: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 459
Faded the sight of beauty from my eyes, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 6
The strangest sight - the most unlook'd-for chance- The Jealousies, Line 755
 
SIGHTED...........1
the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick- sighted : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
 
SIGHTS............1
Through sights I scarce can bear; God of the meridian, Line 19
 
SIGIFRED..........19
SIGIFRED , an Officer, friend of Ludolph Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 5
To say for once I thank you. Sigifred ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 34
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
The Emperor must not know it, Sigifred . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 6
Still it must not be known, good Sigifred ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 10
And, Sigifred , with all his love of justice, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 118
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
My safety lies, then, Sigifred , I'm safe. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 59
Conrad, we would be private! Sigifred ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 71
[Exeunt CONRAD and SIGIFRED . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 73
Enter SIGIFRED . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 32b
Who goes there? Count Sigifred ? Ha! ha! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 33
Nothing, Sigifred . Farewell! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 62b
Enter GERSA and SIGIFRED . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 273
Enter SIGIFRED , GONFRID, and THEODORE, meeting. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
Enter LUDOLPH, followed by SIGIFRED and Page. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 22
My father keeps away. Good friend - ah! Sigifred ?- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 110
[Exit SIGIFRED . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 117
[Enter OTHO, ERMINIA, ETHELBERT, SIGIFRED , and Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 140
 
SIGN..............10
Sign of the enchanter's death; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 62
Nor mark'd with any sign or charactery- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 762
Mine host's sign -board flew away, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 14
Underneath a new old sign Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 19
Sad sign of ruin, sudden dismay, and fall! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 336
Among immortals when a God gives sign , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 118
Not there, nor in sign , symbol, or portent Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 139
Waiting but for your sign to pull them up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 137
Yet at the slightest nod, or hint, or sign , The Jealousies, Line 246
Wish'd, trusted, hoped 'twas no sign of decay- The Jealousies, Line 714
 
SIGNAL............2
My spear aloft, as signal for the chace- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 532
Bright signal that she only stoop'd to tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 500
 
SIGNATURE.........1
For signature :- somewhere the tempest fell, The Jealousies, Line 179
 
SIGNS.............4
His friends, the dearest. Hushing signs she made, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 409
Aye, I have seen these signs in one of heaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 912
These brethren having found by many signs Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 161
And thousand other signs of purer life; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 211
 
SILENCE...........48
'Tis awful silence then again: Ode to Apollo, Line 18
And as its martial notes to silence flee, Ode to Apollo, Line 31
Enough their whitest arms in silence clinging: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 11
And their faint cracklings o'er our silence creep To My Brothers, Line 2
Keeping a silence round a sleeping maid; Sleep and Poetry, Line 68
In happy silence , like the clear Meander Sleep and Poetry, Line 74
We rest in silence , like two gems upcurl'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 120
Beneath the silence of a poplar shade; Sleep and Poetry, Line 278
The silence when some rhymes are coming out; Sleep and Poetry, Line 321
To as sweet a silence , when I 'gan retrace Sleep and Poetry, Line 352
Born of the very sigh that silence heaves: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 12
Has wrought a silence , from the stove there shrills On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 11
Beckon'd their sons to silence ; while each cheek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 188
The sudden silence , or the whispers low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 399
And babbles thorough silence , till her wits Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 948
Melting to silence , when upon the breeze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 80
All courts and passages, where silence dead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 267
Obstinate silence came heavily again, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 335
Broke through the careful silence ; for they heard Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 495
Silence was music from the holy spheres; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 675
Long time in silence did their anxious fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 733
He rose in silence , and once more 'gan fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 118
That fierce complain to silence : where I stumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 488
Then was appalling silence : then a sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 527
A lullaby to silence .- "Youth! now strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 768
Of health by due; where silence dreariest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 539
It comes in silence - now 'tis hidden all. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 60
And to the silence made a gentle moan, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 238
Still as the silence round about his lair; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 5
Which comes upon the silence , and dies off, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 77
In smoothest silence , save what solemn tubes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 206
They guarded silence , when Oceanus Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 245
In pale and silver silence they remain'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 356
He press'd together, and in silence stood. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 378
Thou foster-child of silence and slow time, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 2
Silence ! and hear the magic of a name- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 92
Silence ! Gag up their mouths! I cannot bear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 261
A muffled death, ensnared in horrid silence ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26
A whisper in this silence that he's dead! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 45
Among the gods!- and silence is as natural. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 30
Whispering in midnight silence , said the youth, Lamia, Part II, Line 84
A deadly silence step by step increased, Lamia, Part II, Line 266
With its sad echo did the silence break. Lamia, Part II, Line 270
There was a silence while the altar's blaze The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 232
Swelling upon the silence ; dying off; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 376
In silence , not insulting his sad doom King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 52
And in the icy silence of the tomb, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 3
And with a slave-like silence closed the door, The Jealousies, Line 204
 
SILENCED..........1
So she was silenced , and fair Bellanaine, The Jealousies, Line 73
 
SILENCER..........1
Silencer of dragon's yell. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 64
 
SILENT............54
To feel the beauty of a silent eve, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 3
Would he naught see but the dark, silent blue To My Brother George (epistle), Line 57
Gush ever and anon with silent creep, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 100
Silent , upon a peak in Darien. On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 14
Silent entangler of a beauty's tresses! Sleep and Poetry, Line 15
A silent space with ever sprouting green. Sleep and Poetry, Line 251
How silent comes the water round that bend; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 65
Watching the silent air; God of the golden bow, Line 26
Now while the silent workings of the dawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 107
Stood silent round the shrine: each look was chang'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 186
By many a summer's silent fingering; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 432
Sat silent : for the maid was very loth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 711
The silent mysteries of earth, descend!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 214
Whose silent wheels, fresh wet from clouds of morn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 519
Cowering their tawny brushes. Silent sails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 647
My silent thoughts are echoing from these shells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 913
And, silent as a consecrated urn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 32
Of silent happiness, of slumberous ease: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 324
So in that crystal place, in silent rows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 735
All suddenly were silent . A soft blending Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 941
No word return'd: both lovelorn, silent , wan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 764
Into those holy groves, that silent are Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 913
Silent is the ivory shrill Robin Hood, Line 13
The rocks were silent - the wide sea did weave Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 90
Though Dido silent is in under-grove, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 99
There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 1
To find a bard's low cradle place about the silent north. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 28
In silent barren synod met O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 1
And silent was the flock in woolly fold: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 4
Pale, lattic'd, chill, and silent as a tomb. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 113
And over the hush'd carpet, silent , stept, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 251
The chains lie silent on the footworn stones;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 368
The silent streets were crowded well The Eve of St. Mark, Line 14
All was gloom, and silent all, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 57
All was silent , all was gloom, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 67
With music wing'd instead of silent plumes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 287
A wondrous lesson in thy silent face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 112
Will silent be; and not a soul to tell Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 39
Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 44
Was it a silent deep-disguised plot Ode on Indolence, Line 13
And wish'd with silent curses in my grave, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 122
That silent fury, whose fell scymitar Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 21
I am silent , sire. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 101b
Against Erminia. Silent ? Be so still; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
Silent ,- without revenge,- pshaw!- bitter end,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 21
A gnawing - silent - deadly, quiet death! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 23
His silent sandals swept the mossy green; Lamia, Part I, Line 239
The silent -blessing fate, warm cloister'd hours, Lamia, Part II, Line 148
Motion'd him to be silent ; vainly so, Lamia, Part II, Line 303
wept, and desired Apollonius to be silent , but he would not be moved, and Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
The embossed roof, the silent massy range The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 83
Moneta silent . Without stay or prop The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 388
(Now all was silent ) gave a deadly lie The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 449
In the silent pages of our chroniclers. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 5
 
SILENTLY..........9
That falls through the clear ether silently . To one who has been long in city pent, Line 14
So silently , it seems a beam of light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 4
Stood serene Cupids watching silently . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 419
Sat silently . Love's madness he had known: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 860
Took silently their foot-prints. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 314a
Collected silently in holes and corners, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
The God, dove-footed, glided silently Lamia, Part I, Line 42
Silently paced about, and as she went, Lamia, Part II, Line 134
Crept silently , and waited in distress, The Jealousies, Line 337
 
SILENUS...........2
And near him rode Silenus on his ass, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 215
Like a Silenus on an antique vase. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 56
 
SILENUS'..........1
Of Satyrs, Fauns, and blear'd Silenus' sighs. Lamia, Part I, Line 103
 
SILK..............6
Her silk had play'd in purple phantasies, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 370
And kiss the courtier's missal, its silk steps? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 65
Twelve sphered tables, by silk seats insphered, Lamia, Part II, Line 183
Might fancy-fit his brows, silk -pillow'd at his ease. Lamia, Part II, Line 220
Let o'er the silk his propping elbow slide, The Jealousies, Line 200
Of glossy silk , soft, smooth, and meadow-green, The Jealousies, Line 344
 
SILKEN............23
Whose silken fins and golden scales light Imitation of Spenser, Line 12
Cynthia is from her silken curtains peeping To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 10
Made silken ties, that never may be broken. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 238
For on a silken couch of rosy pride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 392
And silken traces tighten'd in descent; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 524
With toying oars and silken sails they glide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 249
My lady's maid had a silken scarf, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 13
A golden galley all in silken trim! Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 56
Then in a silken scarf,- sweet with the dews Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 409
Of the Fancy's silken leash; Fancy, Line 90
With a silken thread of my own hand's weaving: I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 4
The maiden's chamber, silken , hush'd, and chaste; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 187
From silken Samarcand to cedar'd Lebanon. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 270
And silken furr'd Angora cat. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 82
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 82
And all her silken flanks with garlands drest? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 34
My ship of fortune furl'd her silken sails,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 5
Should fright her silken casements, and dismay Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 4
Is no more valid than a silken leash Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 99
Around the silken couches, wondering Lamia, Part II, Line 197
A soft and silken mat for Saturn's feet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 381
His silvery trowsers, and his silken sash The Jealousies, Line 268
In silken tents, and 'mid light fragrance dozed, The Jealousies, Line 692
 
SILKINESS.........1
And from the pillowy silkiness that rests I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 188
 
SILKS.............1
In silks with spangles shower'd, and bow'd to Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 89
 
SILL..............1
And lighted graceful on the window- sill ; The Jealousies, Line 605
 
SILLY.............6
Of flowers, garlands, love-knots, silly posies, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 938
That silly youth doth think to make itself And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 4
It warm is on the silly sheep; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 23
To set the silly sort o' the world agape, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 145
So act the lion with this silly gnat? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 223
Have his own say; read me some silly creed Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 42
 
SILV'RING.........2
Silv'ring the untainted gushes of its rill; Imitation of Spenser, Line 4
Fit for the silv'ring of a seraph's dream; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 38
 
SILV'RY...........1
From silv'ry ripple, up to beauty's queen; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 39
 
SILVER............80
It seem'd an emerald in the silver sheen Imitation of Spenser, Line 25
As from the darkening gloom a silver dove As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 1
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head. To Hope, Line 6
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head! To Hope, Line 24
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head! To Hope, Line 30
That fill the skies with silver glitterings! To Hope, Line 42
Waving thy silver pinions o'er my head. To Hope, Line 48
A silver trumpet Spenser blows, Ode to Apollo, Line 30
If a cherub, on pinions of silver descending, To Some Ladies, Line 17
Ah! I see the silver sheen Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 44
A trumpet's silver voice. Ah! it was fraught Calidore: A Fragment, Line 55
The silver clouds, far - far away to leave Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 4
Like silver streaks across a dolphin's fin, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 50
Mark the bright silver curling round her prow. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 134
Or of those silver lamps that burn on high, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 7
The silver strings of heavenly harp atween: On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 5
Through cloudless blue, and round each silver throne. To Kosciusko, Line 8
Tipt round with silver from the sun's bright eyes. Sleep and Poetry, Line 132
Their silver bellies on the pebbly sand. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 77
Or by the moon lifting her silver rim I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 113
The silver lamp,- the ravishment,- the wonder- I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 147
Her languid arms in silver slumber dying: Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 3
Was hung a silver bugle, and between Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 173
Hereat Peona, in their silver source, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 489
I watch and dote upon the silver lakes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 740
In the middle of a brook,- whose silver ramble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 933
Doth more avail than these: the silver flow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 30
Too keen in beauty, for thy silver prow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 181
Whether to silver grots, or giant range Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 237
Where with thy silver bow and arrows keen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 304
Blue heaven, and a silver car, air-borne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 518
Waiting for silver -footed messages. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 51
Thou dost bless every where, with silver lip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 56
From these devoted eyes their silver store, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 434
Toss'd up the silver spume against the clouds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 655
When, from thy diadem, a silver gleam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 954
The earnest trumpet spake, and silver thrills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 197
To the silver cymbals' ring! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 260
To catch a glance at silver throated eels,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 393
Her silver sandals, ere deliciously Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 501
Not Hesperus: lo! upon his silver wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 567
Love's silver name upon the meadow's face. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 700
To Vesper, for a taper silver -clear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 704
Light, as reflected from a silver flame: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 983
And the moon, all silver proud, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 3
And fattening his silver gill. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 12
Sits in silver plight, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 35
And from them comes a silver flash of light Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 51
An untumultuous fringe of silver foam Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 91
Tinting with silver wan your marble tombs. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 440
With silver saint in golden rays, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 44
Ah! woe is me! poor Silver -wing! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 1
Poor Silver -wing! Ah! woe is me! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 5
The silver , snarling trumpets 'gan to chide: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 31
With silver taper's light, and pious care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 194
And on her silver cross soft amethyst, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 221
Made a dim, silver twilight, soft he set The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 254
Of wreathed silver : sumptuous they stand The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 273
Ah, silver shrine, here will I take my rest The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 337
Azure saints mid silver rays, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 32
Her silver seasons four upon the night, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 84
Voices of soft proclaim, and silver stir Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 130
Those silver wings expanded sisterly, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 296
In pale and silver silence they remain'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 356
Call'd Vesper, who with silver veil Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 52
Blue, silver -white, and budded Tyrian, Ode to Psyche, Line 14
With all my jewell'd salvers, silver and gold, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 12
With silver index, bidding thee make peace? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 9
magnificence, with supper-tables, laden with services of gold and silver . A Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Slung from the spheres; gauzes of silver mist, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 37
And full of silver moons, that, as she breathed, Lamia, Part I, Line 51
Spoilt all her silver mail, and golden brede; Lamia, Part I, Line 158
Thy spheres, and as thy silver proxy shine? Lamia, Part I, Line 267
Where hung a silver lamp, whose phosphor glow Lamia, Part I, Line 380
"My silver planet, both of eve and morn! Lamia, Part II, Line 48
Her silver seasons shedded on the night, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 394
Voices of soft proclaim, and silver stir The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 435
What stare outfaces now my silver moon! To Fanny, Line 18
A silver tissue, scantly to be seen, The Jealousies, Line 346
Sherry in silver , hock in gold, or glass'd champagne?" The Jealousies, Line 360
 
SILVER'D..........2
The loveliest moon, that ever silver'd o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 592
Tripp'd in blue silver'd slippers to the gate When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 70
 
SILVERLY..........3
Till it begins to progress silverly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 541
In the dusk heavens silverly , when they Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 486
Leave the dinn'd air vibrating silverly . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 128
 
SILVERY...........15
Of the wild cat's eyes, or the silvery stems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 50
The silvery tears of April? - Youth of May? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 10
Made every eastern cloud a silvery pyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 96
With silvery oak apples, and fir cones brown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 276
The silvery setting of their mortal star. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 359
Of silvery enchantment!- who, upfurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 461
Vermilion-tail'd, or finn'd with silvery gauze; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 111
Then heighten'd just above the silvery heads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 603
Of green or silvery bower doth enshrine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 73
Beyond a silvery shower, was the arch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 852
And silvery was its passing: voices sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 559
Let thy white shoulders silvery and bare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 587
And make its silvery splendour pant with bliss. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 102
See me - 'tis this silvery bill Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 13
His silvery trowsers, and his silken sash The Jealousies, Line 268
 
SIMILAR...........1
A horrid nightmare, similar somewhat, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 9
 
SIMPLE............17
And after parting beds of simple flowers, Imitation of Spenser, Line 6
Enough their simple loveliness for me, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 10
With simple flowers: let there nothing be Sleep and Poetry, Line 259
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 15
And, for those simple times, his garments were Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 171
No higher bard than simple maidenhood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 726
Lull'd with its simple song his fluttering breast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1031
O then, O then, thou wast a simple name! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 204
And bless our simple lives. My Indian bliss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 663
Fair Isabel, poor simple Isabel! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 1
I thought the worst was simple misery; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 330
The simple plaining of a minstrel's song! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 388
For simple Isabel is soon to be Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 446
Rich in the simple worship of a day. Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 14
Your spleens with so few simple words as these? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 321
In wintry winds the simple snow is safe, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 26
"A simple boon!" said Elfinan, "thou may'st The Jealousies, Line 364
 
SIMPLES...........1
With two or three simples Two or three posies, Line 2
 
SIMPLEST..........4
Even at the simplest vassal of thy power; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 35
"O Father, I am here the simplest voice, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 252
I this, your gentle niece - the simplest flower Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
When simplest things put on a sombre cast; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 123
 
SIMPLICITY........1
Oh! what a power has white simplicity ! This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 9
 
SIMPLY............2
Who simply tell the most heart-easing things. Sleep and Poetry, Line 268
And they were simply gordian'd up and braided, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 614
 
SIN...............7
O 'tis a very sin Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 937b
As the break-covert blood-hounds of such sin : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 221
Thy face - I sin against thy native skies. On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 14
Concerning what will make that sin -worn cheek Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
That purple-lined palace of sweet sin , Lamia, Part II, Line 31
They wept, he sinn'd, and still he would sin on, The Jealousies, Line 15
They dreamt of sin , and he sinn'd while they slept; The Jealousies, Line 16
 
SINCE.............33
Some weeks have pass'd since last I saw the spires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 84
But many days have past since last my heart To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 109
Since I have walk'd with you through shady lanes To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 115
And nothing since has floated in the air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 496
What promise hast thou faithful guarded since Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 44
Since Ariadne was a vintager, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 443
But ever since I heedlessly did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 969
Sure never since king Neptune held his state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 726
Of love? Now this is cruel. Since the hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 904
Since to a woe like this I have been led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 90
For the first time, since he came nigh dead born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 371
For, never since thy griefs and woes began, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 546
Since in my arbour I did sing to thee. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 826
Since I saw thee, I have been wide awake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 855
Since men knew nor rent nor leases. Robin Hood, Line 10
Since I was tangled in thy beauty's web, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 3
Nurse of swart nations since the world began, To the Nile, Line 5
How long is't since the mighty power bid To Ailsa Rock, Line 5
Oh pain - for since the eagle's earliest scream Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 25
Since Knox, the revolutionist, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 14
Since Merlin paid his Demon all the monstrous debt. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 171
He play'd an ancient ditty, long since mute, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 291
But he has never been a king's son since When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 34
And slept there since . Upon the sodden ground Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 17
Their wisdom long since fled.- Two wings this orb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 283
A few days since , I was an open rebel,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 37
Since under my glad roof, propitiously, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 35
Had I known that of him I have since known, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 47
For the first time, since first he harbour'd in Lamia, Part II, Line 30
Since every man whose soul is not a clod The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 13
Foughten long since by giant hierarchy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 223
That since belong'd to Admiral De Witt, The Jealousies, Line 416
In loving pretty little Bertha, since The Jealousies, Line 475
 
SING..............40
How sing the splendour of the revelries, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 35
That maids will sing them on their bridal night. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 82
Than to sing out and sooth their wavy hair. Sleep and Poetry, Line 180
To some lone spirits who could proudly sing Sleep and Poetry, Line 218
Nibble the little cupped flowers and sing . Sleep and Poetry, Line 254
What first inspired a bard of old to sing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 163
To stammer where old Chaucer used to sing . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 134
To sing for thee; low creeping strawberries Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 257
O charitable Echo! hear, and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 958
What misery most drowningly doth sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 281
To laugh, and play, and sing , and loudly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 515
And sing above this gentle pair, like lark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 720
No one but thee hath heard me blithely sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 156
We sing , and we adore! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 967
I saw parch'd Abyssinia rouse and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 259
Thy lute-voic'd brother will I sing ere long, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 774
Since in my arbour I did sing to thee. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 826
Through the golden day will sing . Apollo to the Graces, Line 14
So it is: yet let us sing , Robin Hood, Line 49
And sing to it one latest lullaby; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 340
Spirits of grief, sing not your "Well-a-way!" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 485
May I sing to thee Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 2
And Pan made sing for thee his forest-hive; To Homer, Line 8
She wove and she would sing . Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 20
Whilst I in dudgeon sing . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 4
Woodlark may sing from sandy fern,- the sun may hear his lay; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 14
This was the porter!- he could sing , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 85
I sing an infant's lullaby, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 13
While the autumn breezes sing . Fancy, Line 66
Where the nightingale doth sing Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 17
For thou art weak to sing such tumults dire: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 4
And no birds sing . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 4
For sidelong would she bend, and sing La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 23
And no birds sing . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 48
I see, and sing , by my own eyes inspired. Ode to Psyche, Line 43
Still wouldst thou sing , and I have ears in vain- Ode to a Nightingale, Line 59
And sing for my delight, I'd stop my ears! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
Into another, she began to sing , Lamia, Part I, Line 297
he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Hedge-crickets sing ; and now with treble soft To Autumn, Line 31
 
SINGE.............2
Fire-branded foxes to sear up and singe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 7
And singe away the swollen clouds of Jove, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 330
 
SINGED............1
Then passing by the Princess, singed her hoop: The Jealousies, Line 671
 
SINGEST...........2
Thou sweetly singest - nought thy hymning mars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 11
Singest of summer in full-throated ease. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 10
 
SINGETH...........2
Chaster than a nun's, who singeth You say you love; but with a voice, Line 2
Apollo singeth , while his chariot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 958
 
SINGING...........6
Beauties of deeper glance, and hear their singing , Happy is England! I could be content, Line 13
Shapes from the invisible world, unearthly singing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 186
Singing alone, and fearfully,- how the blood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 727
New singing for our maids shalt thou devise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 839
It spoils the singing of the nightingale. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 85
To see her still, and singing so sweet lays; Lamia, Part I, Line 323
 
SINGLE............2
Its fiery vigil in her single breast; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 242
Fair creature, bless me with a single word! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
 
SINGLENESS........1
Oft may be found a " singleness of aim," Addressed to Haydon, Line 6
 
SINGS.............6
The chantry boy sings , The Gothic looks solemn, Line 10
She sings but to her love, nor e'er conceives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 830
Over the vanish'd bliss. Ah! what is it sings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 932
A full-brimm'd goblet, dances lightly, sings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 416
He leans away for highest heaven and sings , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 568
Paddles a little tune and sings 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 46
 
SINK..............6
Till its echoes depart; then I sink to repose. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 40
And sink thus low! but I will ease my breast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 538
A gallant vessel: soon she seem'd to sink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 648
Sink downward to his dusky cave again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 384
Till love and fame to nothingness do sink . When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 14
A long life in the foulest sink o' the world! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
 
SINKING...........4
Sinking away to his young spirit's night, On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 7
Sinking bewilder'd mid the dreary sea: On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 8
Deeper and deeper sinking , until drown'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 963
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies; To Autumn, Line 29
 
SINKS.............4
Fatigued he sinks into some pleasant lair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 6
He sinks adown a solitary glen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 77
And lost in pleasure at her feet he sinks , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 418
Alas! my wearied heart within me sinks , The Jealousies, Line 165
 
SINN'D............4
Weigh down thy nature. Hast thou sinn'd in aught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 508
Whose snowy timid hand has never sinn'd Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 24
They wept, he sinn'd , and still he would sin on, The Jealousies, Line 15
They dreamt of sin, and he sinn'd while they slept; The Jealousies, Line 16
 
SINNER............1
Bold sinner , say you so? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 159b
 
SINNERS'..........1
And all night kept awake, for sinners' sake to grieve. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 27
 
SINS..............1
Bearing more woe than all his sins deserve. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 176
 
SIP...............4
In milky nest, and sip them off at leisure. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 10
But sip , and twitter, and their feathers sleek; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 89
As if, athirst with so much toil, 'twould sip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 88
Wilt fall asleep? O let me sip that tear! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 318
 
SIPP'D............2
He sipp'd no olden Tom, or ruin blue, Character of C.B., Line 21
Sipp'd by the wander'd bee, the which I took, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 43
 
SIPPING...........1
Sipping beverage divine, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 20
 
SIPS..............3
And sips its freshness from the little rills; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 91
"O known Unknown! from whom my being sips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 739
Turning to poison while the bee-mouth sips : Ode on Melancholy, Line 24
 
SIR...............27
Ah! courteous Sir Knight, with large joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 17
When the kind voice of good Sir Clerimond Calidore: A Fragment, Line 99
'Tis the far-fam'd, the brave Sir Gondibert, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 122
Sir Gondibert has doff'd his shining steel, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 138
Ha! ha! Sir Dainty! there must be a nurse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 570
When Sir Snap is with his lawyer, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 17
Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 1
Loves not too rough a treatment, gentle sir ; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 37
Sir , Convent Garden is a monstrous beast; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 9
In short, sir , 'tis a very place for monks, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 16
In our prosperity. We thank you, sir . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 131
Your message, sir ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 141b
Well said, Sir Albert. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 93a
Well, sir ! What! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 17b
What would you, sir ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 82a
If I have any knowledge of you, sir , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 112
And you could free me; but remember, sir , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 62
No more insult, sir . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 167b
It seems then, sir , you have found out the man Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 45
Say it at once, sir ! dead - dead - is she dead? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 74
Whimpering away my reason! Hark 'e, sir ,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 97
Erminia, sir , was hidden in your tent,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 99
There, sir , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 8b
Did I not send, sir , but a moment past, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 137
Shall I, when I have sworn against it, sir ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 27
Against the Emperor's wedding;- and, sir , this The Jealousies, Line 284
That he is tearing you, sir , bit by bit." The Jealousies, Line 328
 
SIRE..............19
The utmost privilege that ocean's sire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 376
Of son against his sire . I saw him fall, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 322
Phorcus, the sire of Gorgons. Neighbour'd close Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 74
Of all our slain battalions. Sire , reflect, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 125
If ever, sire , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 149b
Of favour with my sire than I can have. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 29
That they, against the winter of thy sire , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 29
This was but half expected, my good sire , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 73
I am silent, sire . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 101b
You may not, sire ; 'twould overwhelm him quite, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 17
Beseech you, sire , forbear. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 36a
To our late sovereign lord, your noble sire , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 40
He fill'd a bumper. "Great sire , do not weep! The Jealousies, Line 425
I've said it, sire ; you only have to choose The Jealousies, Line 437
" Sire , this is Bertha Pearl's neat handy-work, The Jealousies, Line 442
From peccadilloes. But, sire , as I say, The Jealousies, Line 465
" Sire you must be in Kent by twelve o'clock at noon." The Jealousies, Line 495
"Take this same book,- it will not bite you, sire ; The Jealousies, Line 514
"If ever you have leisure, sire , you shall The Jealousies, Line 561
 
SIRRAH............1
Give me the picklock, sirrah , and go play." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 64
 
SIRS..............1
On your peril, sirs , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 53b
 
SISTER............31
Than twin sister of Thalia? Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 38
Peona, his sweet sister : of all those, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 408
Not - thy soft hand, fair sister ! let me shun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 611
Sweet sister , help to stem the ebbing sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 709
Eterne Apollo! that thy sister fair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 42
Thou seem'dst my sister : hand in hand we went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 145
"Come hither, Sister of the Island!" Plain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 14
But who so stares on him? His sister sure! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 800
Let it content thee, sister , seeing me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 858
With thee as a dear sister . Thou alone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 866
Press'd, saying: " Sister , I would have command, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 975
What love Lorenzo for their sister had, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 162
They told their sister how, with sudden speed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 225
To see their sister in her snowy shroud. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 264
Give me your patience, sister , while I frame Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 1
As this poor offering to you, sister mine. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 16
Kind sister ! aye, this third name says you are; Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 17
And his twin- sister sleeping in their bower, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 32
Sister -in-law to jealous Potiphar; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 10
AURANTHE, Conrad's Sister Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 15
You guess aright. And, sister , slurring o'er Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 21
Yes, sister , but it does regard you greatly, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
Sister , this way; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 142b
More than a brother of a sister ought, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 146
Franconia's fair sister , 'tis I mean. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 113
You - go to your sister there and plot again, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 65
Best ask your lady sister , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 70b
Sister , you have grown sensible and wise, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
Your lady sister , if I guess aright, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 171
Where is his sister ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7b
I won't speak to his sister or his mother! The Jealousies, Line 156
 
SISTER'S..........5
And breath'd a sister's sorrow to persuade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 410
His sister's sorrow; and his wanderings all, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 898
This sister's love with me?" Like one resign'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 872
Should in their sister's love be blithe and glad, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 166
Of brother's eyes, of sister's brow, constant to every place; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 34
 
SISTERHOOD........6
With others of the sisterhood . Hard by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 418
Of Dian's sisterhood ; and, kind lady, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 886
Which none but secret sisterhood may see, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 116
Demand the holy sisterhood in our name Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 198
Here in this camp, where all the sisterhood , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 75
Herself, and all her sisterhood . She false! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 129
 
SISTERLY..........2
Of sisterly affection. Can I want Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 473
Those silver wings expanded sisterly , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 296
 
SISTERS...........7
The dazzling sun-rise: two sisters sweet Sleep and Poetry, Line 367
Dearest of sisters , what my life shall be; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 982
O, I am full of gladness! Sisters three, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 251
Scoop'd from its trembling sisters of mid-sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 998
To all the regent sisters of the Nine, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 15
Her sisters larchen trees- Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 10
Of thine harmonious sisters keep in tune Lamia, Part I, Line 266
 
SIT...............31
When by my solitary hearth I sit , To Hope, Line 1
There, beauteous Emma, I'll sit at thy feet, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 11
And sit , and rhyme and think on Chatterton; To George Felton Mathew, Line 56
To sit upon an Alp as on a throne, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 7
And often, when I sit me down to rhyme, How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 5
No! by the eternal stars! or why sit here To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 5
Sit ye near some old cavern's mouth and brood On the Sea, Line 13
And through whole solemn hours dost sit , and hearken Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 238
In times long past; to sit with them, and talk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 387
And curb'd, think on't, O Latmian! did I sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 663
As newly come of heaven, dost thou sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 962
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 4
Long didst thou sit amid our regions wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 8
Where didst thou melt to? By thee will I sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 632
To sit beneath a fair lone beechen tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 767
In that same void white Chastity shall sit , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 883
They could not sit at meals but feel how well Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 5
He reads it on the mountain's height, where chance he may sit down There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 43
And I must sit to supper with my friar. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 71
Sit thee by the ingle, when Fancy, Line 16
Sit thee there, and send abroad, Fancy, Line 25
We're safe enough; here in this arm-chair sit , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 106
Somewhere between the throne, and where I sit Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 115
And then upon the grass I sit , and moan, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 90
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 24
Sit . And now, abbot, what have you to say? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 112
I could now sit upon the ground, and shed Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 89
Erminia; here sit by me, gentle girl; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 7
Pensive they sit , and roll their languid eyes, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 1
See, with cross'd arms they sit - ah hapless crew, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 5
Drink up your brandy, and sit down by me, The Jealousies, Line 399
 
SITH..............1
I was to top the heavens. Dear maid, sith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 110
 
SITS..............10
When, like a cloud, he sits upon the air, To Hope, Line 15
Is made of love and friendship, and sits high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 801
Or 'tis the cell of Echo, where she sits , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 947
And there she sits most meek and most alone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 46
Sits in silver plight, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 35
As one who sits ashore and longs perchance To Homer, Line 3
As spectacled she sits in chimney nook. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 131
Sits in the banquet-room among his chiefs; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 62
"Alas, my friend! your coat sits very well: Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 18
Still sits , still snuffs the incense teeming up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 16
 
SITTEST...........1
When thou sittest in thy state, Ode to Apollo, Line 2
 
SITTING...........12
What time you were before the music sitting , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 113
And, sitting down close by, began to muse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 558
Now he is sitting by a shady spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 53
An old man sitting calm and peacefully. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 192
Sitting upon a rock above the spray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 646
Sitting beneath the midmost forest tree, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 144
And now am sitting on you just to bate, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 4
Here sitting like an angel newly-shent, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 125
I saw thee sitting , on a throne of gold, Lamia, Part I, Line 70
By her glad Lycius sitting , in chief place, Lamia, Part II, Line 239
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor, To Autumn, Line 14
Was sitting on a square edg'd polish'd stone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 51
 
SIX...............4
To the eastern gates, and full six dewy hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 264
Enter ETHELBERT and six Monks. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 185
Latitude thirty- six ; our scouts descry The Jealousies, Line 643
At six we heard Panthea's churches ring- The Jealousies, Line 718
 
SIXPENCE..........1
I would not give a sixpence for her head." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 82
 
SIXPENCES.........1
Then black gnomes scattering sixpences like rain; The Jealousies, Line 583
 
SIZE..............9
Of every shape and size , even to the bulk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 881
Yet look upon it, and 'twould size and swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 206
Through portal columns of a giant size , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 811
The size There was a naughty boy, Line 82
Another cannot wake thy giant size ! To Ailsa Rock, Line 14
Will each one swell to twice ten times the size Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 63
Hover'd about, a giant size , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 74
Written in small crow-quill size The Eve of St. Mark, Line 96
Can size and shape pervade. The lofty theme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 306
 
SKEIN.............2
Ah, gentle! 'tis as weak as spider's skein ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 757
A longer skein of wit in Convent Garden. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 4
 
SKELETONS.........1
Of ancient Nox;- then skeletons of man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 133
 
SKETCH............1
A noble nature; and would faintly sketch Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 58
 
SKIDDAW'S.........1
Or from old Skiddaw's top, when fog conceals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 394
 
SKIES.............24
That fill the skies with silver glitterings! To Hope, Line 42
From the censer to the skies Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 22
In which a spirit new come from the skies Calidore: A Fragment, Line 120
For skies Italian, and an inward groan Happy is England! I could be content, Line 6
Then felt I like some watcher of the skies On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 9
Wheel downward come they into fresher skies , Sleep and Poetry, Line 131
With the conquering sun of spring, and left the skies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 921
Dazzled to trace it in the sunny skies . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 68
Have seen a new tinge in the western skies : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 727
Their tiptop nothings, their dull skies , their thrones- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 15
A new appareling for western skies ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 464
It forces us in summer skies to mourn: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 84
Because her face was turn'd to the same skies ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 22
Bestride your steed while cold is in the skies . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 184
And greet thee morn and even in the skies ." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 336
Thy face - I sin against thy native skies . On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 14
First with the whales, last with the eagle skies ; To Ailsa Rock, Line 12
Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 1
Not to pure Ida with its snow-cold skies , As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 7
Let me breathe upon their skies , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 19
Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 33
Skies full of splendid moons, and shooting stars, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 45
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies . To Autumn, Line 33
Now breathing its new bloom upon the skies , The Jealousies, Line 502
 
SKIFF.............1
My skiff along green shelving coasts, to hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 358
 
SKILL.............3
His skill in little stars. The teeming tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 789
And with poor skill let pass into the breeze Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 273
I fear me he is past my skill . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Physician, Line 174a
 
SKILLESS..........1
Or I am skilless quite: an idle tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 909
 
SKIM..............2
Far round the horizon's crystal air to skim , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 17
Round flowery islands, and take thence a skim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 995
 
SKIMM'D...........1
Sweeter than that nurse Amalthea skimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 448
 
SKIMMING..........1
'Mong the light skimming gondolas far parted, To George Felton Mathew, Line 15
 
SKIMS.............2
And soon upon the lake he skims along, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 60
That skims , or dives, or sleeps, 'twixt cape and cape. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 204
 
SKIN..............3
When I have cast this serpent- skin of woe?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 240
Ere a lean bat could plump its wintery skin , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 377
Cast on sunny bank its skin ; Fancy, Line 58
 
SKIRTS............5
Upon the skirts of human-nature dwelling Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 306
The rustle of those ample skirts about Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 56
Upon your skirts had fallen no tears of mine. Ode on Indolence, Line 50
To-night, upon the skirts of the blind wood Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 147
See, past the skirts of yon white cloud they go, The Jealousies, Line 553
 
SKULKS............1
Skulks to his cavern, 'mid the gruff complaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 952
 
SKULL.............8
Infant playing with a skull ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 12
This skull -cap wore the cowl from sloth, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 19
Poor skull , thy fingers set ablaze, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 43
This lily colour'd skull , with all O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 55
This ideot- skull belong'd to one, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 73
A skull upon a mat of roses lying, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 42
He ground severe his skull , with open mouth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 51
In the dark secret chambers of her skull The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 278
 
SKULL'D...........1
With such a thick skull'd persevering suit? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 200
 
SKULLS............1
The brethren's skulls mourn, dewy wet, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 5
 
SKY...............33
And, in its middle space, a sky that never lowers. Imitation of Spenser, Line 9
Through clouds of fleecy white, laughs the coerulean sky . Imitation of Spenser, Line 27
As the sky -searching lark, and as elate. Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 4
Like to streaks across the sky , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 10
He bares his forehead to the cool blue sky , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 6
What time the sky -lark shakes the tremulous dew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 2
Would be the wonders of the sky and sea? To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 14
The stars look very cold about the sky , Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 3
The blue sky here, and there, serenely peeping I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 169
Like a sick eagle looking at the sky . On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 5
His early song against yon breezy sky , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 221
With crystal mocking of the trees and sky . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 422
"This river does not see the naked sky , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 540
But lapp'd and lull'd along the dangerous sky . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 646
Right upward, through the bushes, to the sky . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 872
Am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 187
And I will tell thee stories of the sky , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 812
These dreary caverns for the open sky . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 987
Plaining discrepant between sea and sky . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 342
But for the portraiture of clouds and sky : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 883
Presumptuous against love, against the sky , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 639
For by one step the blue sky shouldst thou find, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 678
My bowl is the sky , Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 7
And yet I never look on midnight sky , Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 5
Hearken, thou eternal sky - 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 12
To banish Even from her sky . Fancy, Line 24
Of the sky -children; I will give command: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 133
And sky -engendered, Son of Mysteries Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 310
Frosty creatures of the sky ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 88
Or Vesper, amorous glow-worm of the sky ; Ode to Psyche, Line 27
What, man, do you mistake the hollow sky Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 34
Of the sky children."- So he feebly ceas'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 438
To travel such a distance through the sky , The Jealousies, Line 489
 
SKYEY.............1
A skyey masque, a pinion'd multitude,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 558


Published @ RC

March 2005