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Keats Concordance
 
SOMBRE............10
The region; nor bright, nor sombre wholly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 222
In sombre chariot; dark foldings thrown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 641
Sombre Saturn, Momus hale, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 21
O Echo, Echo, from some sombre isle, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 435
Drench'd about the sombre rocks; Not Aladdin magian, Line 15
It should be rich and sombre , and the moon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 26
In letters raven- sombre , you may trace Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 53
More horrid still. Above a sombre cliff Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 86
When simplest things put on a sombre cast; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 123
Ran imageries from a sombre loom. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 77
 
SOMDEL............1
Somdel of Sainte Cicilie; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 112
 
SOMEBODY..........4
Here's somebody coming, here's somebody coming! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 9
Here's somebody coming, here's somebody coming! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 9
Here's somebody here and here's somebody there! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 13
Here's somebody here and here's somebody there! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 13
 
SOMERSET..........1
A pigeon's somerset , for sport or change's sake. The Jealousies, Line 45
 
SOMETHING.........13
Came to his ear, like something from beyond Calidore: A Fragment, Line 100
Something more high perplexing in thy face!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 515
By a bright something , sailing down apace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 602
Pigeons and doves: Adonis something mutter'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 497
Working within him into something dreary,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 634
From something of material sublime, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 69
Something of quick dispatch, for should she hear, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 168
Something has vext you, Albert. There are times Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 122
Of something more, more than her empery Lamia, Part II, Line 36
'Twas Apollonius: something too he laugh'd, Lamia, Part II, Line 159
A sentence something worthy of his guilt. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 21
As backwards as he can,- is't something new? The Jealousies, Line 302
The monster's always after something new," The Jealousies, Line 545
 
SOMETIME..........5
Be moved for days from whence it sometime fell, On the Sea, Line 7
Lispings empyrean will I sometime teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 819
So you sometime follow me Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 44
And in those meads where sometime she might haunt, Lamia, Part I, Line 18
Sometime to-day I must contrive a minute, The Jealousies, Line 618
 
SOMETIMES.........21
Sometimes , when the good knight his rest would take, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 19
Yet do I sometimes feel a languishment Happy is England! I could be content, Line 5
Sometimes I lost them, and then found again; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 125
Coming sometimes like fearful claps of thunder, Sleep and Poetry, Line 27
And sometimes like a gentle whispering Sleep and Poetry, Line 29
Sometimes it gives a glory to the voice, Sleep and Poetry, Line 37
Sometimes goldfinches one by one will drop I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 87
Of newest joys upon that alp. Sometimes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 666
Mark me, Peona! that sometimes it brought Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 689
In a mossy stone, that sometimes was my seat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 877
Out-shooting sometimes , like a meteor-star, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 229
A scowl is sometimes on his brow, but who Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 542
Sometimes like delicatest lattices, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 614
Sometimes these very pangs. Dear maiden, steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 985
Sometimes the learned eremite, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 93
Flush'd angerly: while sometimes eagle's wings, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 182
Sometimes the counsel of a dying man Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 41
And sometimes into cities she would send Lamia, Part I, Line 213
But lets it sometimes pace abroad majestical, Lamia, Part II, Line 59
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find To Autumn, Line 13
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep To Autumn, Line 19
 
SOMEWHAT..........6
A horrid nightmare, similar somewhat , Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 9
And tyranny of love be somewhat scar'd! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 174
It is a gorgeous room, but somewhat sad; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 48
I would enquire somewhat of him: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 61b
Therefore, that happiness be somewhat shar'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 177
Somewhat in sadness, but pleas'd in the main, The Jealousies, Line 453
 
SOMEWHERE.........5
God rest her aged bones somewhere - Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 29
Somewhere between the throne, and where I sit Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 115
For somewhere in that sacred island dwelt Lamia, Part I, Line 13
Somewhere in the column headed letter B The Jealousies, Line 101
For signature:- somewhere the tempest fell, The Jealousies, Line 179
 
SON...............41
Dear child of sorrow! son of misery! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 2
Strive for her son to seize my careless heart; To Hope, Line 14
I leave them as a father does his son . Sleep and Poetry, Line 404
Great son of Dryope, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 290
Ah, smile not so, my son : I tell thee true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 552
All blisses be upon thee, my sweet son !"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 921
Danae's Son , before Jove newly bow'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 606
Son of the old moon-mountains African! To the Nile, Line 1
A buried miser's only son , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 74
But he has never been a king's son since When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 34
And sky-engendered, Son of Mysteries Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 310
Of son against his sire. I saw him fall, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 322
In men who die.- This is the grief, O Son ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 335
LUDOLPH, his Son Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 2
Against the Emperor had suborn'd his son ,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 38
In such a sickly longing for his son . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 104
I strove against thee and my hot-blood son , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 21
And my son too, pity he is not here. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 63
A father's ears with tidings of his son . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 70
His son to be that unknown Mussleman Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 12
For the first glimpse of such a son return'd; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 18
But as a son . The bronz'd centurion, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 25
And parley with him, as a son should do, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 95
How the relationship of father and son Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 98
Hearing that his brave son had reappeared, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 19
Father and son each other repossess. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 36
Annuls all feel of kindred. What is son ,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 63
I come to greet you as a loving son , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 78
Your plight before, and, by her son , I swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 31
That, unless heaven would send me back my son , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 28
Peace, my son ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 98b
Not to thy noble son , whose yeasting youth Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 178
O, my poor boy! My son ! My son! My Ludolph! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 1
O, my poor boy! My son! My son ! My Ludolph! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 1
Dear son , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 151b
To-morrow, son , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 164b
Oh, my son ! my son! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 179b
Oh, my son! my son ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 179b
His son shall never touch that bishopric; The Jealousies, Line 146
I'll give no garter to his eldest son ; The Jealousies, Line 155
"Upon my honour!" said the son of Cham, The Jealousies, Line 403
 
SON'S.............3
More thanks, good Conrad; for, except my son's , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 43
A father his son's debtor, or to heal Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 38
O heavy crime! that your son's blinded eyes Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 100
 
SONG..............45
And all the powers of song combine, Ode to Apollo, Line 43
And doubly sweet a brotherhood in song ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 2
Whence gush the streams of song : in happy hour To George Felton Mathew, Line 78
Deaf to the nightingale's first under- song ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 61
Clear was the song from Philomel's far bower; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 154
That I should never hear Apollo's song , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 9
Would never teach a rural song to me: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 14
That you first taught me all the sweets of song : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 53
Or by the song of Erin pierc'd and sadden'd: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 112
Strange thunders from the potency of song ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 231
The Cricket's song , in warmth increasing ever, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 12
"The stretched metre of an antique song " Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Epigraph
Bearing the burden of a shepherd song ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 136
His early song against yon breezy sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 221
Love's standard on the battlements of song . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 41
Amid the thrush's song . Away! Avaunt! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 974
A war- song of defiance 'gainst all hell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 603
Made a delighted way. Then dance, and song , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 933
To bring thee nearer to that golden song Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 957
Lull'd with its simple song his fluttering breast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1031
Onward these myriads - with song and dance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 243
Remember'd from its velvet summer song . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 297
The buoyant life of song can floating be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 352
Truth the best music in a first-born song . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 773
Of madness?- God of Song , God of the meridian, Line 17
Gone, the song of Gamelyn; Robin Hood, Line 34
And yet my song comes native with the warmth; O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 10
If he could hear his lady's matin- song , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 195
And through it moan'd a ghostly under- song , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 287
The simple plaining of a minstrel's song ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 388
Rounded by thee, my song should die away, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 12
That a song There was a naughty boy, Line 101
Ink'd purple with a song concerning dying; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 43
For a song and for a charm- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 6
To even song and vesper prayer. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 18
In which the Zephyr breathes the loudest song , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 26
A fairy's song . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 24
Dance, and Provencal song , and sunburnt mirth! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 14
Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Ode to a Nightingale, Line 65
Thy song , nor ever can those trees be bare; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 16
Her tears from matins until even song Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 120
And, like new flowers at morning song of bees, Lamia, Part I, Line 142
A song of love, too sweet for earthly lyres, Lamia, Part I, Line 299
By strewn flowers, torches, and a marriage song , Lamia, Part II, Line 109
There flowers have no scent, birds no sweet song , What can I do to drive away, Line 42
 
SONGS.............9
Be lull'd with songs of mine. Fair world, adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 103
The songs of birds - the whisp'ring of the leaves- How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 10
That sweetest of all songs , that ever new, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 182
Then old songs waken from enclouded tombs; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 787
Gone mad through olden songs and poesies. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 54
Were richer than the songs of Grecian years?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 126
With songs of misery, music of our woes; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 269
For ever piping songs for ever new; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 24
Where are the songs of spring? Ay, where are they? To Autumn, Line 23
 
SONNET............3
Who read for me the sonnet swelling loudly To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 60
The hearty grasp that sends a pleasant sonnet Sleep and Poetry, Line 319
And, like Andromeda, the sonnet sweet If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 2
 
SONNETS...........4
To sigh out sonnets to the midnight air! To Hope, Line 28
As to my sonnets , though none else should heed them, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 117
Why, you might read two sonnets , ere they reach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 69
To hatch into sonnets - Two or three posies, Line 28
 
SONOROUS..........1
Or the deep key of Jove's sonorous mouth, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 25
 
SONS..............5
And warm thy sons !" Ah, my dear friend and brother, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 109
Beckon'd their sons to silence; while each cheek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 188
Sons , daughters, and a home like honied hive. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 21
For I have seen my sons most unlike Gods. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 328
Though feminine, than any of her sons : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 55
 
SOON..............53
How soon the film of death obscur'd that eye, Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 3
How soon that voice, majestic and elate, Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 5
Friends very dear to him he soon will see; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 58
And soon upon the lake he skims along, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 60
Soon in a pleasant chamber they are seated; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 134
He mourns that day so soon has glided by: To one who has been long in city pent, Line 12
'Tis not content so soon to be alone. On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 14
I shall as soon pronounce which Grace more neatly To G.A.W., Line 13
To the trees and mountains; and there soon appear Sleep and Poetry, Line 137
Soon they awoke clear eyed: nor burnt with thirsting, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 225
soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
That whisper round a temple become soon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 27
Soon the assembly, in a circle rang'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 185
And soon it lightly dipt, and rose, and sank, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 425
Soon was he quieted to slumbrous rest: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 442
But soon she came, with sudden burst, upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 503
Soon , as it seem'd, we left our journeying high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 647
She could as soon have crush'd away the life Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 719
In backward yawns. But all were soon alive: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 510
Soon were the white doves plain, with necks stretch'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 523
And soon , returning from love's banishment, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 525
Bewitch'd me towards; and I soon was near Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 495
Met palsy half way: soon these limbs became Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 637
A gallant vessel: soon she seem'd to sink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 648
Soon with an eagle nativeness their gaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 860
So wait awhile expectant. Pr'ythee soon , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 916
There curl'd a purple mist around them; soon , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 367
Good bye! I'll soon be back."- "Good bye!" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
Not long - for soon into her heart a throng Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 245
Soon she turn'd up a soiled glove, whereon Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 369
For simple Isabel is soon to be Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 446
Such a taint, and soon unweave Not Aladdin magian, Line 48
And went to sleep again. Soon she was rous'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 71
Another way he went, and soon among The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 25
From hurry to and fro. Soon , up aloft, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 30
He startled her; but soon she knew his face, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 96
But soon his eyes grew brilliant, when she told The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 132
Soon , trembling in her soft and chilly nest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 235
Soon wild commotions shook him, and made flush Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 124
We shall soon see him,- for the Emperor, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 105
Return with what good speed you may; for soon Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 158
That, by my love I swear, shall soon be his? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 120
And what you soon will learn, I would have turn'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
Wife! so soon ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 75a
And soon his eyes had drunk her beauty up, Lamia, Part I, Line 251
Soon was God Bacchus at meridian height; Lamia, Part II, Line 213
Inverts it - dips the handle, and lo, soon Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 11
Of the soon fading jealous caliphat; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 48
The current of your heart from me so soon : To Fanny, Line 22
Whereat, to calm their fears, he promised soon The Jealousies, Line 24
Soon as (according to his promises) The Jealousies, Line 127
I'll show them very soon , to all their shames, The Jealousies, Line 139
You must away this morning." "Hum! so soon ?" The Jealousies, Line 494
 
SOONER............7
No sooner had I stepp'd into these pleasures To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 97
You know I'd sooner be a clapping bell Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 107
The Mule no sooner saw himself alone When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 75
No sooner thought of than adown he lay, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 92
Against me, who would sooner crush and grind Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 163
"A Serpent!" echoed he; no sooner said, Lamia, Part II, Line 305
No sooner had this conjuration pass'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 291
 
SOOTH.............9
In magical powers to bless, and to sooth . On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 20
In magical powers, to bless and to sooth . On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 44
Than to sing out and sooth their wavy hair. Sleep and Poetry, Line 180
To sooth the cares, and lift the thoughts of man. Sleep and Poetry, Line 247
Of fondest beauty; fonder, in fair sooth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 394
Perchance speak, kneel, touch, kiss - in sooth such things have been. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 81
'Tis sooth indeed, we know it to our sorrow- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 39
Sooth I am as sick for you! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 63
Encourag'd by the sooth voice of the shade, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 155
 
SOOTH'D...........2
Poor Cynthia greeted him, and sooth'd her light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 104
But sooth'd as now, flash'd sudden everywhere, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 873
 
SOOTHE............5
And soothe thy lips: hist, when the airy stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 783
By our eternal hopes, to soothe , to assuage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1015
O let it blush so ever! let it soothe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 312
Bid the musicians soothe him tenderly. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 80
What taste of purer air hast thou to soothe Lamia, Part I, Line 282
 
SOOTHED...........4
And soothed them into slumbers full and deep. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 224
It soothed each to be the other by; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 6
Her soothed limbs, and soul fatigued away; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 238
Or on the open turf their soothed eyelids closed. The Jealousies, Line 693
 
SOOTHER...........1
With jellies soother than the creamy curd, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 266
 
SOOTHEST..........1
O soothest Sleep! if so it please thee, close, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 5
 
SOOTHING..........8
Soothing with placid brow our late distress, On Peace, Line 3
With forehead to the soothing breezes bare, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 56
What is more soothing than the pretty hummer Sleep and Poetry, Line 2
"O thou, for whose soul- soothing quiet, turtles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 247
Hither, most gentle sleep! and soothing foil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 705
Of soothing warmth, of dalliance supreme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 439
Be tender of your strings, ye soothing lutes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 969
I will invent what soothing means I can. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 56
 
SOOTHINGLY........1
Full soothingly to every nested finch: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 504
 
SOOTHLY...........2
Go, pretty page, and soothly tell,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 12
Soothly I am sick for you. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 40
 
SOOTHSAYER........1
To Hum the soothsayer , whose name I see The Jealousies, Line 188
 
SOOTHSAYERS.......1
For the soothsayers old saw yesternight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 829
 
SOOTY.............2
Seem'd sooty , and o'er-spread with upturn'd gills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 695
She whisk'd against their eyes the sooty oil. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 521
 
SOPHIST...........2
Sophist and sage, from no Athenian grove, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 168
"Fool!" said the sophist , in an under-tone Lamia, Part II, Line 291
 
SOPHIST'S.........2
Turning into sweet milk the sophist's spleen. Lamia, Part II, Line 172
Then Lamia breath'd death breath; the sophist's eye, Lamia, Part II, Line 299
 
SOPHISTRIES.......1
For all thine impious proud-heart sophistries , Lamia, Part II, Line 285
 
SORCERER..........1
Of you my brain will split! Bald sorcerer ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 204
 
SORDID............1
Ever from their sordid urns unto the shore, What can I do to drive away, Line 35
 
SORE..............7
And thoughts of self came on, how crude and sore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 275
Of disappointment stuck in me so sore , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 481
Three hours they labour'd at this travail sore ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 382
The gadfly he hath stung me sore - All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 5
But sickness smites the conscience sore ; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 50
And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 30
To see herself escap'd from so sore ills, Lamia, Part I, Line 183
 
SORELY............2
Sorely she wept until the night came on, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 234
Sorely she grieved, and wetted three or four The Jealousies, Line 82
 
SORREL............2
Patting against the sorrel as she goes. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 98
And sorrel untorn by the dew-claw'd stag: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 685
 
SORROW............49
O'ershading sorrow doth not make thee less To Lord Byron, Line 6
Dear child of sorrow ! son of misery! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 2
Tells to my fearful breast a tale of sorrow , To Hope, Line 20
And cruelly left him to sorrow , and anguish. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 28
When some melodious sorrow spells mine eyes. Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 14
And breath'd a sister's sorrow to persuade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 410
Shut her pure sorrow drops with glad exclaim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 490
Like sorrow came upon me, heavier still, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 913
Sorrow the way to death; but patiently Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 973
His sister's sorrow ; and his wanderings all, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 898
Had he then wrong'd a heart where sorrow kept? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 284
Warbling for very joy mellifluous sorrow - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 471
"O Sorrow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 146
"O Sorrow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 152
"O Sorrow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 158
"O Sorrow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 164
"To Sorrow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 173
"Come then, Sorrow ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 279
Sweetest Sorrow ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 280
Most like with joy gone mad, with sorrow cloy'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 495
Sorrow is but a shadow: now I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 621
And yet the tears she wept were tears of sorrow ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 725
And pluck the sorrow from our huntsmen's brows. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 840
We miscal grief, bale, sorrow , heartbreak, woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 942
Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 1
I am to stifle all the heavy sorrow Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 204
And the next day will be a day of sorrow . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 232
And sorrow for her love in travels rude. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 248
'Tis sooth indeed, we know it to our sorrow - When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 39
How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 35
Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty's self. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 36
And all the gloom and sorrow of the place, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 91
More sorrow like to this, and such like woe, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 159
His spirit to the sorrow of the time; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 301
Yet let me tell my sorrow , let me tell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 259
A solitary sorrow best befits Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 5
Stood bright, amid the sorrow of his peers? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 30
What sorrow thou canst feel; for I am sad Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 69
Where but to think is to be full of sorrow Ode to a Nightingale, Line 27
Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose, Ode on Melancholy, Line 15
But for poor Ludolph, he is food for sorrow ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 153
When I have wept for sorrow ; but methinks Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 88
On my poor brain, such cruel - cruel sorrow , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 108
Of sorrow for her tender favourite's woe, Lamia, Part I, Line 291
With such a sorrow . "Shade of Memory!" The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 282
And in her sorrow nearer woman's tears. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 338
And all the gloom and sorrow of the place, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 402
More sorrow like to this, and such-like woe, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 8
Bad reasons for her sorrow , as appears The Jealousies, Line 85
 
SORROW'S..........1
A partner in your sorrow's mysteries; Ode on Melancholy, Line 8
 
SORROWFUL.........3
For one as sorrowful : thy cheek is pale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 75
Such cool and sorrowful offerings, thou art fond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 438
That leaves a heart high- sorrowful and cloy'd, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 29
 
SORROWING.........4
Fly from all sorrowing far, far away; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 20
Lay sorrowing ; when every tear was born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 467
With all his sorrowing ? He sees her not. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 799
So woful, and of such deep sorrowing , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 160
 
SORROWS...........6
The day of sacrifice? Or, have new sorrows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 45
Of their sorrows and delights; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 31
Their sorrows . Pale were the sweet lips I saw, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 12
Of sorrows at his words; at last with pain Lamia, Part II, Line 67
Luxurious in her sorrows , soft and new. Lamia, Part II, Line 74
Not pin'd by human sorrows , but bright blanch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 257
 
SORRY.............2
These sorry pages; then the verse would soar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 719
I'm sorry I can hear no more. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 70a
 
SORT..............10
Of a peculiar sort ,- a consummation;- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 106
Into a sort of oneness, and our state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 796
Tripp'd lightly on, in sort of deathful glee; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 945
Lost in a sort of purgatory blind, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 80
In sort of wakeful swoon, perplex'd she lay, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 236
And in her bearing was a sort of hope, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 148
To set the silly sort o' the world agape, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 145
In pale contented sort of discontent, Lamia, Part II, Line 135
And with a sort of lackeying friendliness King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 42
Congees and scape-graces of every sort , The Jealousies, Line 759
 
SORTS.............1
Of man: though no great minist'ring reason sorts Sleep and Poetry, Line 288
 
SOT...............1
That any Daniel, though he be a sot , Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 12
 
SOUGHT............7
Pan is no longer sought , I feel a free, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 12
Endymion sought around, and shook each bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 94
I sought for her smooth arms and lips, to slake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 478
Puzzled those eyes that for the centre sought ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 387
Long have I sought for rest, and, unaware, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 879
Seek, as they once were sought , in Grecian isles, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 6
Ere I met you, I sought him every where; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 131
 
SOUL..............90
And let me in it drown my soul : Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 2
So fled thy soul into the realms above, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 4
Attuning still the soul to tenderness, To Lord Byron, Line 2
And hateful thoughts enwrap my soul in gloom; To Hope, Line 2
O let me see our land retain her soul , To Hope, Line 33
His soul looks out through renovated eyes. Ode to Apollo, Line 12
The soul delighted on each accent dwells,- Ode to Apollo, Line 15
And melt the soul to pity and to love. Ode to Apollo, Line 41
E'en then my soul with exultation dances Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 7
Into how sweet a trance his soul was gone, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 83
And there into delight my soul deceive. Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 8
Verses from which the soul would never wean: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 108
That my own soul has to itself decreed. Sleep and Poetry, Line 98
My soul to nothingness: but I will strive Sleep and Poetry, Line 159
The soul is lost in pleasant smotherings: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 132
of a man is healthy; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
My soul ; that I may dare, in wayfaring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 133
"O thou, for whose soul -soothing quiet, turtles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 247
Some were athirst in soul to see again Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 385
My soul to keep in its resolved course." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 488
A breeze, most softly lulling to my soul ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 567
So passionately bright, my dazzled soul Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 594
My soul with under darkness; to entice Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 702
Thy soul of care, by heavens, I would offer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 107
No, no, too eagerly my soul deceives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 701
His soul will 'scape us - O felicity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 763
My soul of any rest: yet must I hence: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 776
The lyre of his soul Eolian tun'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 866
Now I have tasted her sweet soul to the core Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 904
Blushing into my soul , and let us fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 986
About the labyrinth in his soul of love. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 141
Eas'd in one accent his o'er-burden'd soul , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 229
So saying, this young soul in age's mask Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 310
"My soul stands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 314b
Their music came to my o'er-sweeten'd soul ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 445
My soul page after page, till well-nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
Sweet music breath'd her soul away, and sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 767
Ah me, how I could love!- My soul doth melt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 71
I have a triple soul ! O fond pretence- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 95
Do gently murder half my soul , and I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 309
At the sweet sleeper,- all his soul was shook,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 453
Yet did she merely weep - her gentle soul Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 470
I do, I do.- What is this soul then? Whence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 475
Made for the soul to wander in and trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 514
O happy spirit-home! O wondrous soul ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 543
Aye, his lull'd soul was there, although upborne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 549
Into a labyrinth now my soul would fly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 630
Has my own soul conspired: so my story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 644
Bent his soul fiercely like a spiritual bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 847
To a young Delian oath - aye, by thy soul , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 18
To thee my soul is flown, God of the meridian, Line 3
Aye, when the soul is fled God of the meridian, Line 9
But to thy cheek my soul doth take its flight: Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 8
Till, in his soul dissolv'd, they come to be Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 7
My soul is to its doom: I would not grieve Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 61
Ah! when a soul doth thus its freedom win, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 219
And filling it once more with human soul ? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 358
My head is light with pledging a great soul , This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 6
Despair forbad his soul to climb O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 62
Noble soul that pranceth! Spirit here that reignest, Line 14
Save one old beldame, weak in body and in soul . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 90
"Ah! why wilt thou affright a feeble soul ? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 154
Her soothed limbs, and soul fatigued away; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 238
Or I shall drowse beside thee, so my soul doth ache." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 279
Down she sat, poor cheated soul , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 69
But after water-brooks this pilgrim's soul Character of C.B., Line 16
And seal the hushed casket of my soul . Sonnet to Sleep, Line 14
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad Ode to a Nightingale, Line 57
Will silent be; and not a soul to tell Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 39
And drown the wakeful anguish of the soul . Ode on Melancholy, Line 10
His soul shall taste the sadness of her might, Ode on Melancholy, Line 29
My soul had been a lawn besprinkled o'er Ode on Indolence, Line 43
I can, all safe in body and in soul , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 15
A trusty soul ? A good man in the camp? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 2
So white as your soul is, if that but be Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
My soul for foot-ball at hell's holiday! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 30
Juggler! May I come near you! On my soul Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 205
We are without conjecture; not a soul Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 274
"Of personal beauty and untainted soul "? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 22
There goes a spotted soul Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 48b
Of the weak body and soul ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 3a
His drooping head, and clear his soul of doubt, Lamia, Part I, Line 305
Your soul in mine, and labyrinth you there Lamia, Part II, Line 53
And every soul from human trammels freed, Lamia, Part II, Line 210
Since every man whose soul is not a clod The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 13
Yourself - your soul - in pity give me all, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 9
My soul upon that dazzling breast! What can I do to drive away, Line 49
Ah! if you prize my subdued soul above To Fanny, Line 49
A child's soul through the sapphired canvas bear, The Jealousies, Line 38
He goes on to expose, with heart and soul , The Jealousies, Line 93
 
SOUL'D............1
And thought it Pegasus. Ah dismal soul'd ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 187
 
SOUL'S............6
Is my soul's pleasure; and it sure must be O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 12
Rather than shadow our own soul's daytime Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 70
At such a time the soul's a child, in childhood is the brain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 23
But in the very next he reads his soul's memorial: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 42
Rough ashes sat he for his soul's reprieve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 26
The soul's fine palate. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26a
 
SOULS.............21
A gentle empire o'er fraternal souls . To My Brothers, Line 4
Unnumber'd souls breathe out a still applause, Addressed to Haydon, Line 13
Out the dark mysteries of human souls Sleep and Poetry, Line 289
Unto our souls , and bound to us so fast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 31
Nor with aught else can our souls interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 812
If human souls did never kiss and greet? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 842
Yet, in our very souls , we feel amain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 12
Of his fair eyes run liquid through their souls . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 544
Writ in the tongue of heaven, by those souls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 130
The final gulphing; the poor struggling souls : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 659
On barren souls . Great Muse, thou know'st what prison, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 20
Souls of poets dead and gone, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 1
Souls of poets dead and gone, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 23
And keep our souls in one eternal pant! To J.R., Line 12
Ye have left your souls on earth! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 2
Have ye souls in heaven too, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 3
And the souls ye left behind you Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 25
Where your other souls are joying, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 27
Here, your earth-born souls still speak Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 29
Ye have left your souls on earth! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 38
Ye have souls in heaven too, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 39
 
SOULS'............1
On our souls' sacrifice. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 977
 
SOUND.............34
While the trumpets sound afar; Ode to Apollo, Line 10
With solemn sound ,- and thousand others more, How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 12
A meaner sound than Raphael's whispering. Addressed to the Same, Line 8
Its mighty self of convoluting sound , Sleep and Poetry, Line 175
Delicious Avon, with a mournful sound , Sleep and Poetry, Line 214
More heark'ning to the sermon's horrid sound . Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 4
For wrath became stiffened; the sound God of the golden bow, Line 16
Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound . On the Sea, Line 4
And some kept up a shrilly mellow sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 146
Where there was never sound of mortal men, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 78
Alive, and dazzling cool, and with a sound , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 609
And 'tis but echo'd from departing sound , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 850
They sound as through the whispering of trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 934
He turn'd - there was a whelming sound - he stept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1018
A sound of moan, an agony of sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 485
A sound of moan, an agony of sound , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 485
And thou wilt see the issue."- 'Mid the sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 771
Of underwood, and to the sound is bent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 42
But in the eye of love: there's not a sound , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 79
No sound so loud as when on curtain'd bier Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 530
He flapp'd towards the sound . Alas, no charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 556
This may sound strangely: but when, dearest girl, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 868
And hearkening for a love- sound , doth devour Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 11
Strange sound it was, when the pale shadow spake; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 281
Sound mournfully upon the winds and low; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 445
The sound of merriment and chorus bland: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 95
In all the house was heard no human sound . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 356
No other sound succeeds; but ceasing here, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 124
Misers of sound and syllable, no less If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 10
Ho! let the music sound ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 202
But yesterday? And, at the trumpet sound , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 68
To smother up this sound of labouring breath, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 29
Or on a half-reap'd furrow sound asleep, To Autumn, Line 16
Which marries sweet sound with the grace of form, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 443
 
SOUNDED...........2
Still sounded in my ears, when I no more To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 123
Sounded tempests to the feast Robin Hood, Line 8
 
SOUNDEDST.........1
How heavenward thou soundedst , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 11
 
SOUNDING..........4
Has it been ever sounding for those ears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 840
It was a sounding grotto, vaulted, vast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 878
With such a poor and sickly sounding pause, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 439
Trumpets sounding a victory. Enter GLOCESTER, Knights, and King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
 
SOUNDLESS.........1
When the soundless earth is muffled, Fancy, Line 19
 
SOUNDLY...........1
I'll switch you soundly and in pieces tear." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 17
 
SOUNDS............26
Delicious sounds ! those little bright-eyed things Calidore: A Fragment, Line 73
So the unnumber'd sounds that evening store; How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 9
To a loud hymn, that sounds far, far away To Kosciusko, Line 13
Sounds which will reach the Framer of all things, Sleep and Poetry, Line 39
Bubbles a pipe; fine sounds are floating wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 228
So in fine wrath some golden sounds he won, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 203
In ripest quiet, shadows of sweet sounds ; Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 9
Whose mellow reeds are touch'd with sounds forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 205
Strange ministrant of undescribed sounds , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 285
There hollow sounds arous'd me, and I sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 651
An exil'd mortal, sounds its pleasant name! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 316
Brushing, awakened: then the sounds again Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 379
O let me melt into thee; let the sounds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 815
The meanings of all motions, shapes, and sounds ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 698
Of light, soft, unseen leaves of sounds divine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 800
For it sounds of Eve's sweet pippin; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 10
No, the bugle sounds no more, Robin Hood, Line 11
The clarion sounds ; and from a postern grate Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 61
While little sounds of life are round me knelling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 308
Paining me through: those sounds grow strange to me, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 311
And wandering sounds , slow-breathed melodies; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 208
A living death was in each gush of sounds , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 281
Before our lips knew else but solemn sounds ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 340
Could e'er have touch'd there. Sounds AEolian Lamia, Part I, Line 386
Of trumpets - Lycius started - the sounds fled, Lamia, Part II, Line 28
Although her story sounds at first a little queer." The Jealousies, Line 405
 
SOUP..............1
And then for supper, 'stead of soup and poaches, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 14
 
SOUR..............1
A bitter coolness; the ripe grape is sour : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 35
 
SOURCE............3
Close to the source , bright, pure, and undefil'd, To George Felton Mathew, Line 77
Hereat Peona, in their silver source , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 489
From the green sea up to my hidden source Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 989
 
SOUTH.............9
Born of the gentle south , and clears away After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 3
To slumbery pout; just as the morning south Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 406
Swallows obeying the south summer's call, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 816
From natural west, and east, and south , and north, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 876
Things all disjointed come from north and south , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 5
O for a beaker full of the warm South , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 15
South -westward to Cleone. There she stood Lamia, Part I, Line 179
Of columns north and south , ending in mist The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 84
Shifts sudden to the south , the small warm rain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 98
 
SOUTHERN..........1
For o'er the southern moors I have a home for thee." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 351
 
SOUTHEY...........1
Better than Southey it had been, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 29
 
SOV'REIGNTY.......2
His sov'reignty , and rule, and majesty;- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 165
His sov'reignty , and rule, and majesty; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 14
 
SOVEREIGN.........9
Due reverence to your most sovereign eyes. To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 14
So dear a picture of his sovereign power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 548
O sovereign power of love! O grief! O balm! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1
A sovereign quell is in his waving hands; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 537
My sovereign vision.- Dearest love, forgive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 183
Death as a sovereign right unto a king King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 42
To our late sovereign lord, your noble sire, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 40
To Pigmio, of Imaus sovereign , The Jealousies, Line 29
Who sets down ev'ry sovereign as a zany,- The Jealousies, Line 161
 
SOVEREIGNTIES.....1
And by these tenderest, milky sovereignties - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 759
 
SOVEREIGNTY.......1
That is the top of sovereignty . Mark well! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 205
 
SOVRAN............2
Majesties, sovran voices, agonies, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 115
Veil'd Melancholy has her sovran shrine, Ode on Melancholy, Line 26
 
SOWING............1
In sowing time ne'er would I dibble take, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 153

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Published @ RC

March 2005