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Keats Concordance
 
ST................18
Not St . John in Patmos' isle, Not Aladdin magian, Line 5
St . Agnes' Eve - Ah, bitter chill it was! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 1
His was harsh penance on St . Agnes' Eve: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 24
On love, and wing'd St . Agnes' saintly care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 44
They told her how, upon St . Agnes' Eve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 46
Save to St . Agnes and her lambs unshorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 71
When they St . Agnes' wool are weaving piously." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 117
" St . Agnes! Ah! it is St. Agnes' Eve- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 118
"St. Agnes! Ah! it is St . Agnes' Eve- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 118
To see thee, Porphyro!- St . Agnes' Eve! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 123
When Madeline, St . Agnes' charmed maid, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 192
In fancy, fair St . Agnes in her bed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 233
Open thine eyes, for meek St . Agnes' sake, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 278
Against the window-panes; St . Agnes' moon hath set. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 324
The winged Lion of St . Mark, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 35
Upon the legend of St . Mark. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 52
Coming down stairs,- by St . Bartholomew! The Jealousies, Line 301
Will end in St . Mark's eve;- you must away, The Jealousies, Line 503
 
STAB..............2
Stab him! O sweetest wife! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 73b
The Earl of Glocester. Stab to the hilts, De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 45
 
STABS.............1
Where, without any word, from stabs he fell. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 296
 
STAFF.............2
As over them a gnarled staff she shook. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 508
On the admiral staff - and to philosophize Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 73
 
STAG..............3
And sorrel untorn by the dew-claw'd stag : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 685
Pick'd like a red stag from the fallow herd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 86
And for the Duke of Bretagne, like a stag King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 17
 
STAGE.............3
(advancing from the back of the stage , whither he had Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 85
The stage -play emperor to entrap applause, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 144
stage , bowing with respect to LUDOLPH, he frowning on them. CONRAD follows. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
 
STAGGERS..........1
[ Staggers and falls into their arms. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 189b
 
STAGNATE..........2
Will stagnate all thy fountains:- tease me not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 954
Painful, clogg'd up and stagnate . Weigh this matter Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 186
 
STAGS.............2
Plenty of posies, great stags , butterflies The Jealousies, Line 449
Bigger than stags ,- a moon,- with other mysteries. The Jealousies, Line 450
 
STAID.............7
And when a tale is beautifully staid , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 129
The staid philosophy. God of the meridian, Line 22
With staid and pious companies, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 15
She staid her vixen fingers for his sake, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 50
An injury may make of a staid man! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 41
to behold. The young man, a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet, able to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
To pamper his slight wooing, warm yet staid : The Jealousies, Line 8
 
STAIDLY...........1
And staidly paces higher up, and higher, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 61
 
STAIN'D...........3
Anon he stain'd the thick and spongy sod Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 225
His blood- stain'd ensigns to the victory Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
Black stain'd with the fat vintage, as it were Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 124
 
STAINED...........1
And purple- stained mouth; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 18
 
STAINS............3
From the sick heavens all unseemly stains . After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 4
Innumerable of stains and splendid dyes, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 212
Thou shalt taste, before the stains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 59
 
STAIR.............6
To hear her morning-step upon the stair . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 24
Old Angela was feeling for the stair , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 191
Wind into Thetis' bower by many a pearly stair ; Lamia, Part I, Line 208
The lowest stair ; and as it touch'd, life seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 133
Feeling, with careful toe, for every stair , The Jealousies, Line 308
The stair -head; that being glutted as a leach, The Jealousies, Line 626
 
STAIRCASE.........1
With liquor and the staircase : verdict - found stone dead. The Jealousies, Line 630
 
STAIRS............8
Were of more soft ascent than lazar stairs ?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 124
Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 355
I found the stairs all dark, the lamps extinct, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 118
I saw the three pass slowly up the stairs , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 11
Coming down stairs ,- by St. Bartholomew! The Jealousies, Line 301
To manage stairs reversely, like a peach The Jealousies, Line 628
"Jostling my way I gain'd the stairs , and ran The Jealousies, Line 784
Down stairs on Crafticanto's evidence; The Jealousies, Line 789
 
STAKE.............1
A hedge- stake - or a ponderous stone to hurl King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 7
 
STALK.............1
He plucks it, dips its stalk in the water: how! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 58
 
STALKS............7
Above the ocean-waves. The stalks , and blades, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 125
In breezy rest among the nodding stalks . Sleep and Poetry, Line 135
Grows lush in juicy stalks , I'll smoothly steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 46
Dew-dabbled on their stalks , the ouzel sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 683
Oft have I brought thee flowers, on their stalks set Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 873
Four lily stalks did their white honours wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 408
And grape stalks but half bare, and remnants more, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 33
 
STALL.............2
As the stall There was a naughty boy, Line 79
Not so! No! She is in temple- stall Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 154
 
STAMMER...........1
To stammer where old Chaucer used to sing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 134
 
STAMP.............3
And many glories of immortal stamp . Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 14
And Isabella did not stamp and rave. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 384
Yet can I stamp my foot upon thy floor, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 9
 
STAMPS............1
The next hour stamps with credit. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 3a
 
STAMPT............2
There standing fierce beneath, he stampt his foot, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 222
He rose, he stampt his foot, he rang the bell, The Jealousies, Line 177
 
STAND.............19
Expectant stand the spheres; Ode to Apollo, Line 19
Or stand in courtly talk by fives and sevens: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 43
My will from its own purpose? who say, " Stand ," To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 10
Nought earthly worth my compassing; so stand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 162
I'd rather stand upon this misty peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 166
Stand anxious: see! behold!" - This clamant word Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 494
To mark these shadowings, and stand in awe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 217
Shall stand before him; whom he shall direct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 709
Why stand we here? Adieu, ye tender pair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 902
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 13
You know the Enchanted Castle - it doth stand Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 26
Of wreathed silver: sumptuous they stand The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 273
Ape, Dwarf, and Fool, why stand you gaping there? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 15
But why do I stand babbling to myself? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 14
Old abbot, stand here forth. Lady Erminia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 111
To this brief tempest. Do you stand possess'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 212
His winged minions in close clusters stand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 41
And knock'd down three cut glasses, and his best ink- stand . The Jealousies, Line 351
"And, Hum, we must not shilly-shally stand ,- The Jealousies, Line 598
 
STANDARD..........4
Holding a poor, decrepid standard out Sleep and Poetry, Line 204
Love's standard on the battlements of song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 41
Cannot refer to any standard law Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 81
Bears his flaunt standard close upon their rear. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, First Knight, Line 13
 
STANDARDS.........1
Legions of holiday; bright standards waved, The Jealousies, Line 733
 
STANDEST..........3
Thou standest safe beneath this statue's knees." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 181
I come - I see thee, as thou standest there, To Fanny, Line 7
And fiddle-faddle standest while you go; The Jealousies, Line 238
 
STANDING..........3
And other spirits there are standing apart Addressed to the Same, Line 9
Standing aloof in giant ignorance, To Homer, Line 1
There standing fierce beneath, he stampt his foot, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 222
 
STANDS............11
Stands venerably proud; too proud to mourn Calidore: A Fragment, Line 39
Stands next door to Wilson the Hosier. The Gothic looks solemn, Line 6
Saving Love's self, who stands superb to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 535
The general gladness: awfully he stands ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 536
"What can I do, Alpheus? Dian stands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1005
"My soul stands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 314b
One hour, half ideot, he stands by mossy waterfall, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 41
Buttress'd from moonlight, stands he, and implores The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 77
He is a fool who stands at pining gaze! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 152
Stands with the door ajar to let him in? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 15
For chalk, I hear, stands at a pretty price; The Jealousies, Line 290
 
STAR..............30
And as, in sparkling majesty, a star To Hope, Line 43
And, smiles with his star -cheering voice sweetly blending, To Some Ladies, Line 19
Pours with the lustre of a falling star . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 42
Bring me a tablet whiter than a star , On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 3
Of their star in the east and gone to worship them. To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 14
The silvery setting of their mortal star . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 359
This said, he rose, faint-smiling like a star Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 990
Out-shooting sometimes, like a meteor- star , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 229
In light, in gloom, in star or blazing sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 95
Written in star -light on the dark above: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1021
And Vesper, risen star , began to throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 485
No bigger than an unobserved star , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 498
The Star -Queen's crescent on her marriage night: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 589
And fall they must, ere a star wink thrice Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 14
Ethereal, flush'd, and like a throbbing star The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 318
With golden star , or dagger bright, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 94
Bright star , would I were stedfast as thou art- Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 1
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 3
To any one particular beauteous star , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 100
Beneath the cherish of a star Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 51
Fairer than Phoebe's sapphire-region'd star , Ode to Psyche, Line 26
Could thy pleas'd star point down upon from heaven Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 8
The star may point oblique. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 11a
Set my life's star ! I have liv'd long enough, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
Whereat the star of Lethe not delay'd Lamia, Part I, Line 81
Thoughtless at first, but ere eve's star appeared Lamia, Part I, Line 234
Mild as a star in water; for so new, Lamia, Part I, Line 382
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 296
No scarecrow, but the fortunate star King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 21b
"Just upon three o'clock, a falling star The Jealousies, Line 667
 
STAR'D............4
He star'd at the Pacific - and all his men On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 12
For when men star'd at what was most divine To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 11
Star'd , where upon their heads the cornice rests, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 35
Star'd at the Fool, the Fool was all agape; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 19
 
STARE.............14
Till the fond, fixed eyes forget they stare . Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 18
Stare at the grandeur of the ballancing? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 30
So that we look around with prying stare , Sleep and Poetry, Line 32
Who feel their arms, and breasts, and kiss and stare , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 229
Many might after brighter visions stare : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 346
And stare them from me? But no, like a spark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 675
Will gulph me - help!" - At this with madden'd stare , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 195
He did not rave, he did not stare aghast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 588
Adieu!" Whereat those maidens, with wild stare , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 903
And I stare where no one stares, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 10
And 'stead of supper she would stare Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 15
For a poor waiter? Why, man, how you stare ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 37
Aye, stare for help! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 48a
What stare outfaces now my silver moon! To Fanny, Line 18
 
STARES............5
But who so stares on him? His sister sure! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 800
And I stare where no one stares , Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 10
It stares , it stares, it stares; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 42
It stares, it stares , it stares; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 42
It stares, it stares, it stares ; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 42
 
STARINGLY.........1
That each at other look'd half staringly ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 149
 
STARK.............2
Came waggish fauns, and nymphs, and satyrs stark , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 534
Till his girths burst and left him naked stark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 86
 
STARLIGHT.........4
These numbers to the night and starlight meek, On The Story of Rimini, Line 7
In starlight , by the three Hesperides. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 453
With starlight gems: aye, all so huge and strange, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 632
Touching with dazzled lips her starlight hand. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 419
 
STARLINGS.........1
A flight of starlings making rapidly The Jealousies, Line 644
 
STARR'D...........2
When I behold, upon the night's starr'd face, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 5
Upon all space: space starr'd , and lorn of light; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 118
 
STARRY............15
Of starry beam, and gloriously bedight, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 7
Had not yet lost those starry diadems I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 6
Open afresh your round of starry folds, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 47
The incense went to her own starry dwelling. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 198
Immortal, starry ; such alone could thus Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 507
Glow-worms began to trim their starry lamps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 141
Or keeping watch among those starry seven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 689
Or lift me with thee to some starry sphere? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 755
Yet, can I not to starry eminence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 777
Yet not entirely; no, thy starry sway Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 178
Push'd through a screen of roses. Starry Jove! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 425
Up in the winds, beneath a starry roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 491
Which starry Uranus with finger bright Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 134
Cluster'd around by all her starry Fays; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 37
And by thine eyes, and by thy starry crown!" Lamia, Part I, Line 90
 
STARS.............49
But this is past. Thou art among the stars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 9
Like those fair stars that twinkle in the heavens. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 44
To show their purple stars , and bells of amber. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 137
Pry 'mong the stars , to strive to think divinely: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 8
The stars look very cold about the sky, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 3
Full in the speculation of the stars . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 189
No! by the eternal stars ! or why sit here To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 5
Among the stars in virgin splendour pours; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 580
When, presently, the stars began to glide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 587
Where falling stars dart their artillery forth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 642
My madness impious; for, by all the stars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 184
Yon centinel stars ; and he who listens to it Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 842
A rough-voic'd war against the dooming stars . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 864
As if the ministring stars kept not apart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 50
Adieu, sweet love, adieu!' - As shot stars fall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 600
Was seen such wonder underneath the stars . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 727
So timidly among the stars : come hither! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 603
With uplift hands I blest the stars of heaven. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 735
His skill in little stars . The teeming tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 789
Or the seven stars to light you, Robin Hood, Line 21
And the black-elm tops 'mong the freezing stars , O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 3
Had taken from the stars its pleasant veil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 82
Had taken from the stars its pleasant veil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 84
And she forgot the stars , the moon, and sun, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 417
Though saphire warm, their stars do never beam; On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 7
And the stars they glisten, glisten, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 3
Hearken, stars , and hearken, spheres; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 11
The stars of heaven, and angels' wings, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 30
Tall oaks, branch-charmed by the earnest stars , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 74
There as he lay, the heaven with its stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 305
Hyperion arose, and on the stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 350
And still they were the same bright, patient stars . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 353
The nightingale had ceas'd, and a few stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 36
What are the stars ? There is the sun, the sun! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 97
And stars by thousands! Point me out the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 99
With buds, and bells, and stars without a name, Ode to Psyche, Line 61
Hail, my sweet hostess! I do thank the stars , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 12
To these fair children, stars of a new age? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 22
With darkness, bring the stars to second me, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 27
Pass the high stars , before sweet embassage Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Skies full of splendid moons, and shooting stars , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 45
Sprinkled with stars , like Ariadne's tiar: Lamia, Part I, Line 58
Eclips'd her crescents, and lick'd up her stars : Lamia, Part I, Line 160
While, like held breath, the stars drew in their panting fires. Lamia, Part I, Line 300
Might spread beneath, as o'er the stars of heaven; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 64
Forests, branch-charmed by the earnest stars , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 373
Spin round, the stars their antient courses keep, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 419
At an enormous figure!- stars not sure!- The Jealousies, Line 296
The little Bertha's eyes ope on the stars serene." The Jealousies, Line 396
 
STARS'............1
Listen, stars' light, listen, listen, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 24
 
START.............10
And start with awe at mine own strange pretence. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 64
Ah, yes! much more would start into his sight- To My Brother George (epistle), Line 63
How she would start , and blush, thus to be caught I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 99
Until ye start , as if the sea nymphs quired. On the Sea, Line 14
At which we start and fret; till in the end, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 809
Methinks it now is at my will to start Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 695
Of Jove - Minerva's start - no bosom shook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 791
How far beyond!" At this a surpris'd start Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 187
A stratagem, that makes the beldame start : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 139
"Lamia, what means this? Wherefore dost thou start ? Lamia, Part II, Line 254
 
STARTED...........13
And then their features started into smiles Calidore: A Fragment, Line 150
And many pleasures to my vision started ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 26
And up I started : Ah! my sighs, my tears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 681
I started up, when lo! refreshfully, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 898
At which he straightway started , and 'gan tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 297
Thou art the man!" Endymion started back Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 255
The Latmian started up: "Bright goddess, stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 457
And in the dawn she started up awake; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 328
Up he started in a trice. Not Aladdin magian, Line 24
Some started on their feet; some also shouted; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 111
Of trumpets - Lycius started - the sounds fled, Lamia, Part II, Line 28
When sense of life return'd, I started up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 58
At this great Caesar started on his feet, The Jealousies, Line 496
 
STARTING..........2
Of sober thought? Or when starting away, To G.A.W., Line 6
A linnet starting all about the bushes: Sleep and Poetry, Line 342
 
STARTLE...........3
To startle princes from their easy slumbers. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 76
And startle the dappled prickets? For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 42
And at the least 'twill startle off her cares." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 40
 
STARTLED..........6
Thus startled unaware, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 58
But that 'tis ever startled by the leap I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 110
Was I in no wise startled . So recline Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 440
And I was startled , when I caught thy name Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 38
He startled her; but soon she knew his face, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 96
The rebel three.- Thea was startled up, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 147
 
STARTLES..........1
Startles the wild bee from the fox-glove bell. O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 8
 
STARTS............1
Starts at the sight of Laura; nor can wean Sleep and Poetry, Line 390
 
STARV'D...........4
Too long, alas, hast thou starv'd on the ruth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 104
But starv'd and died. My sweetest Indian, here, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 648
I saw their starv'd lips in the gloam La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 41
Make lean and lank the starv'd ox while he feeds; What can I do to drive away, Line 41
 
STARVE............1
And I had thee to starve - Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67a
 
STARVED...........1
Or swallow'd by my hunger- starved asp,- The Jealousies, Line 197
 
STATE.............18
That thou must shelter in thy former state ; On Peace, Line 11
What though, for showing truth to flatter'd state , Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 1
When thou sittest in thy state , Ode to Apollo, Line 2
Into a sort of oneness, and our state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 796
A thousand Powers keep religious state , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 30
Of Neptune; and the sea nymphs round his state , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 211
Some friendly monster, pitying my sad state , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 350
Sure never since king Neptune held his state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 726
Into the outer courts of Neptune's state : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 854
O state perplexing! On the pinion bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 439
And then 'twas fit that from this mortal state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 991
The portals of my state ; and, for my own Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 163
Of fear and weakness, and a hollow state . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 178
His crowded state after the victory. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 93
QUEEN MAUD in a chair of state . The EARLS OF GLOCESTER and King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
He's Elfinan's great state -spy militant, The Jealousies, Line 52
That stubborn fool, that impudent state -dun, The Jealousies, Line 160
"Counts of the palace, and the state purveyor The Jealousies, Line 766
 
STATELY...........5
See with what a stately pace Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 56
Beneath the shade of stately banneral, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 38
From stately nave to nave, from vault to vault, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 218
Grew hush; the stately music no more breathes; Lamia, Part II, Line 263
From stately nave to nave, from vault to vault, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 54
 
STATES............1
And many goodly states and kingdoms seen; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 2
 
STATION'D.........1
Cunningly- station'd music dies and swells The Jealousies, Line 570
 
STATUARY..........2
Greek busts and statuary have ever been Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 55
I mark'd the goddess in fair statuary The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 336
 
STATUE'S..........2
It is like a statue's , dead,- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 18
Thou standest safe beneath this statue's knees." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 181
 
STATURE...........4
A man of elegance, and stature tall: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 112
By her in stature the tall Amazon Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 27
Their heads appear'd, and up their stature grew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 87
He lifted up his stature vast, and stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 325
 
STAUNCH...........1
Poison, as every staunch true-born Imaian ought. The Jealousies, Line 81
 
STAY..............32
Stay , ruby breasted warbler, stay, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 1
Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 1
Stay while I tell thee, fluttering thing, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 5
Or did ye stay to give a welcoming Sleep and Poetry, Line 217
Convuls'd and headlong! Stay ! an inward frown Sleep and Poetry, Line 304
Was now his lot. And must he patient stay , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 293
With too much passion, will here stay and pity, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 828
Stay , stay thy weary course, and let me lead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 950
Stay, stay thy weary course, and let me lead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 950
"O I shall die! sweet Venus, be my stay ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1010
The Latmian started up: "Bright goddess, stay ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 457
Engulph for ever. " Stay !" he cried, "ah, stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 908
Engulph for ever. "Stay!" he cried, "ah, stay ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 908
They stay their crystal fretting, In drear nighted December, Line 14
O what can be done? Shall we stay or run? O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 19
When he can stay For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 40
Open your ears and stay your trudge All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 3
Scanty the hour and few the steps, because a longer stay There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 31
But ape. So pray your highness stay awhile; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 38
Yet stay ,- perhaps a charm may call you back, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 84
Illustrious Otho, stay ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 172b
Stay there! No - guess? More princely you must be Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 68
Stay , stay; here is one I have half a word with. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 114
Stay, stay ; here is one I have half a word with. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 114
Thrice villanous, stay there! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 2b
For two of them, they stay away perhaps, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 56
Stay ! though a Naiad of the rivers, stay! Lamia, Part I, Line 261
Stay! though a Naiad of the rivers, stay ! Lamia, Part I, Line 261
Stay ! though the greenest woods be thy domain, Lamia, Part I, Line 263
For pity do not melt!"- "If I should stay ," Lamia, Part I, Line 271
Moneta silent. Without stay or prop The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 388
"Bring Hum to me! But stay - here take my ring, The Jealousies, Line 190
 
STAY'D............7
This ditty to her!- tell her' - so I stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 959
Of his heart's blood: 'twas very sweet; he stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 107
Then 'gan she work again; nor stay'd her care, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 375
Or with a finger stay'd Ixion's wheel. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 30
Stay'd in their birth, even as here 'tis told. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 295
His bright feet touch'd, and there he stay'd to view Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 368
Make soft inquiry; pr'ythee, be not stay'd Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 6
 
STAYING...........1
Staying their wavy bodies 'gainst the streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 73
 
STAYS.............3
And scarcely stays to ope the folding doors: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 70
That stays one moment in an open flower, Sleep and Poetry, Line 3
Who stays me? Speak! Quick! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 186b
 
STEAD.............2
Into the light of heaven, and in their stead Sleep and Poetry, Line 156
To stead thee as a verse in English tongue, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 159
 
STEADFAST.........2
To one, who keeps within his steadfast aim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 848
I have another steadfast one, to uphold Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 162
 
STEADY............2
A steady splendour; but at the tip-top, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 805
Steady thy laden head across a brook; To Autumn, Line 20
 
STEAL.............11
That breath about my eyes? Ah, thou wilt steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 745
Sometimes these very pangs. Dear maiden, steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 985
He onward kept; wooing these thoughts to steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 140
A very brother's yearning for thee steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 294
A greater love through all my essence steal ." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 320
Yet they contriv'd to steal the basil-pot, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 473
"To steal my basil-pot away from me." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 496
To steal my basil-pot away from me!" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 504
O bag-pipe, thou didst steal my heart away; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 9
To steal away, and leave without a task Ode on Indolence, Line 14
Darkness steal out upon the sleepy world Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 30
 
STEALING..........2
Are changed to harmonies, for ever stealing To Kosciusko, Line 7
To entice her to a dive! then stealing in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 941
 
STEALS............1
She unobserved steals unto her throne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 45
 
STEALTH...........3
Her ebon urn, young Mercury, by stealth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 562
With a still, mysterious stealth : Fancy, Line 36
Convey'd in little solder'd pipes by stealth , The Jealousies, Line 212
 
STEDFAST..........8
Of stedfast genius, toiling gallantly! Addressed to Haydon, Line 10
Stedfast upon the matted turf he kept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 151
So kept me stedfast in that airy trance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 585
And opposite the stedfast eye doth meet Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 51
From such a stedfast spell his lady's eyes; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 287
Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art- Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 1
No - yet still stedfast , still unchangeable, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 9
Beneath his white soft temples, stedfast kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 122
 
STEDFASTLY........1
So stedfastly , that the new denizen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 215
 
STEDFASTNESS......2
And lo! - whose stedfastness would never take Addressed to the Same, Line 7
Trembling or stedfastness to this same voice, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 715
 
STEED.............12
Hast thou a steed with a mane richly flowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 9
Comes thine alabaster steed ; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 57
Or wherefore comes that steed so proudly by? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 46
With my own steed from Araby; pluck down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 534
Thou wast my clarion's blast - thou wast my steed - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 167
Her steed a little higher soar'd, and then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 511
Endymion heard not: down his steed him bore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 612
The stranger lighted from his steed , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 1
Bestride your steed while cold is in the skies. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 184
I set her on my pacing steed , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 21
Or hug the golden housings of his steed , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 66
Swift be your steed ! Within this hour Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 78b
 
STEEDS............12
Just as two noble steeds , and palfreys twain, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 77
And steeds with streamy manes - the charioteer Sleep and Poetry, Line 127
The driver of those steeds is forward bent, Sleep and Poetry, Line 152
As she was wont of old? prepare her steeds , Sleep and Poetry, Line 165
The freedom of three steeds of dapple brown: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 167
So from the turf outsprang two steeds jet-black, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 343
Those winged steeds , with snorting nostrils bold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 364
Those two on winged steeds , with all the stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 390
Shall we away?" He rous'd the steeds : they beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 481
My steeds are all pawing on the thresholds of morn: Apollo to the Graces, Line 3
Darken'd the place; and neighing steeds were heard, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 184
Let not her steeds with drowsy-footed pace Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 33
 
STEEL.............7
It hard, and heavy steel : but that indeed Calidore: A Fragment, Line 118
And gave the steel a shining quite transcendent. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 133
Sir Gondibert has doff'd his shining steel , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 138
My stern alarum, and unsheath his steel ; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 74
Nor numbed sense to steel it, In drear nighted December, Line 23
With duller steel than the Persean sword Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 393
The caitiff of the cold steel at his back. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 15
 
STEELED...........3
His even breast: see, many steeled squares, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 731
Amid a camp, whose steeled swarms I dar'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 67
Compact in steeled squares, and speared files, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 162
 
STEEP.............13
Yet over the steep , whence the mountain stream rushes, To Some Ladies, Line 5
Of murky buildings; climb with me the steep ,- O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 3
While his boat hastens to the monstrous steep Sleep and Poetry, Line 88
And each imagined pinnacle and steep On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 3
Even to the steep of Heliconian springs, To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 7
That there is no old power left to steep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 731
The shepherd's pipe come clear from airy steep , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 359
Of some steep mossy hill, where ivy dun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 671
Drown'd wast thou till an earthquake made thee steep - To Ailsa Rock, Line 13
Fledge the wild-ridged mountains steep by steep; Ode to Psyche, Line 55
Fledge the wild-ridged mountains steep by steep ; Ode to Psyche, Line 55
I took compassion on her, bade her steep Lamia, Part I, Line 106
Your voice low," said the Emperor, "and steep The Jealousies, Line 428
 
STEEP'D...........2
When steep'd in dew rich to intoxication. Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 11
And evenings steep'd in honied indolence; Ode on Indolence, Line 37
 
STEEPLE...........2
The steeple -bell rings, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 11
Funeral and steeple -chime; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 11
 
STEEPS............1
Pervaded all the beetling gloomy steeps , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 358
 
STEER.............3
A bower for his spirit, and will steer On The Story of Rimini, Line 12
Grows lush in juicy stalks, I'll smoothly steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 46
There blush'd no summer eve but I would steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 357
 
STEERED...........1
Which gaining presently, she steered light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 429
 
STEM..............4
Which fell profusely from the rose-tree stem ! Imitation of Spenser, Line 33
From round its gentle stem ; let the young fawns, Sleep and Poetry, Line 256
Sweet sister, help to stem the ebbing sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 709
Which now disfigure her fair growing stem , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
 
STEMM'D...........2
The current of my former life was stemm'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 458
And hazels thick, dark- stemm'd beneath the shade: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 27
 
STEMS.............6
Of the wild cat's eyes, or the silvery stems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 50
Their scantly leaved, and finely tapering stems , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 5
Stems thronging all around between the swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 83
Stems the upbursting cold: a wild rose tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 55
From either side their stems branch'd one to one Lamia, Part II, Line 129
Between the tree- stems , marbled plain at first, Lamia, Part II, Line 138
 
STEP..............22
While the young warrior with a step of grace Calidore: A Fragment, Line 124
And winnow from the coming step of time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 819
At last, with sudden step , he came upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 388
One step ? Imagine further, line by line, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 733
At every onward step proud domes arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 836
For by one step the blue sky shouldst thou find, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 678
Each step he took should make his lady's hand Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 5
To hear her morning- step upon the stair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 24
Each third step did he pause, and listen'd oft Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 194
Went step for step with Thea through the woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 202
Went step for step with Thea through the woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 202
With solemn step an awful Goddess came, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 46
Yields to my step aspirant? why should I Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 93
A scorpion, sprawling on the first gold step , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 15
I thought her dead, and on the lowest step Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 120
Go no further; not a step more. Thou art Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 1
A deadly silence step by step increased, Lamia, Part II, Line 266
A deadly silence step by step increased, Lamia, Part II, Line 266
The numbness; strove to gain the lowest step . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 128
Whom thou saw'st step from yon forlornest wood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 333
Goes, step for step, with Thea from yon woods, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 46
Goes, step for step , with Thea from yon woods, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 46
 
STEPHEN...........10
KING STEPHEN King Stephen 1
Alarum. Enter KING STEPHEN , Knights, and Soldiers. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
From Stephen , my good Prince - Stephen - Stephen- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 29
From Stephen, my good Prince - Stephen - Stephen- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 29
From Stephen, my good Prince - Stephen - Stephen - King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 29
Enter STEPHEN unarm'd. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
Yield, Stephen , or my sword's point dip in King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 16
Stephen - me - prisoner. Certes, De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 32
And, Stephen , I must compass it- King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 34a
Of Stephen of Boulogne, our prisoner, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 25
 
STEPHEN'S.........2
Will Stephen's death be mark'd there, my good lord, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 6
For flatteries to ease this Stephen's hours, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 49
 
STEPP'D...........3
No sooner had I stepp'd into these pleasures To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 97
And one behind the other stepp'd serene, Ode on Indolence, Line 3
Slow- stepp'd , and robed in philosophic gown: Lamia, Part I, Line 365
 
STEPPING..........3
Stepping like Homer at the trumpet's call, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 217
A quiver'd Dian. Stepping awfully, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 262
Appear'd, and, stepping to a beauteous corse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 778
 
STEPS.............29
My daring steps : or if thy tender care, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 57
Those marble steps that through the water dip: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 68
Might turn their steps towards the sober ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 356
Some moulder'd steps lead into this cool cell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 869
To mortal steps , before thou canst be ta'en Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 125
Upon the last few steps , and with spent force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 925
His wandering steps , and half-entranced laid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 108
My sullen steps ; another 'fore my eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 605
Down marble steps ; pouring as easily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 814
A humid eye, and steps luxurious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 910
He with light steps went up a western hill, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 79
Scanty the hour and few the steps beyond the bourn of care, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 29
Scanty the hour and few the steps , because a longer stay There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 31
And scarce three steps , ere Music's golden tongue The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 20
Till on the level height their steps found ease: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 88
Of prisoners. Poor prince, forlorn he steps , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 87
And kiss the courtier's missal, its silk steps ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 65
Moved 'twas with careful steps , and hush'd as death: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 4
Follow'd his steps , and her neck regal white Lamia, Part I, Line 243
And pain my steps upon these flowers too rough, Lamia, Part I, Line 273
Reflected in the slabbed steps below, Lamia, Part I, Line 381
And with calm-planted steps walk'd in austere; Lamia, Part II, Line 158
To be approach'd on either side by steps , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 90
These steps , die on that marble where thou art. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 108
Ere thou canst mount up these immortal steps ." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 117
Steps forth my lady bright! What can I do to drive away, Line 47
With hasty steps , wrapp'd cloak, and solemn looks, The Jealousies, Line 219
And evermore thy steps go clatter-clitter; The Jealousies, Line 231
All down the steps ; and, as we enter'd, lo! The Jealousies, Line 754
 
STEPT.............7
Like one who on the earth had never stept - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 404
Feel we these things?- that moment have we stept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 795
They stept into the boat, and launch'd from land. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 992
He stept upon his shepherd throne: the look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 889
He turn'd - there was a whelming sound - he stept , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1018
And over the hush'd carpet, silent, stept , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 251
And towards her stept : she, like a moon in wane, Lamia, Part I, Line 136
 
STERILE...........1
Would strew sweet flowers on a sterile beach. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 371
 
STERN.............7
Till their stern forms before my mind arise: Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 11
My stern alarum, and unsheath his steel; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 74
And pointed out the patriot's stern duty; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 69
For moments few, a temperament as stern Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 473
For scenes like this: an empire stern hast thou; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 960
A pallid gleam across his features stern : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 349
Made iron- stern by habit! Thou shalt see Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 148
 
STERNLY...........1
Beckon me sternly from soft "Lydian airs," To George Felton Mathew, Line 18
 
STEW'D............1
With my new double-barrel - stew'd the thighs, The Jealousies, Line 650
 
STICK.............2
Those velvet ears - but prythee do not stick To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 5
"Gad! he's obliged to stick to business! The Jealousies, Line 289
 
STICKLE...........1
Albert! he cannot stickle , chew the cud Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 103
 
STICKS............1
Foraging for sticks and straw. Fancy, Line 46
 
STIFF.............4
Stiff -holden shields, far-piercing spears, keen blades, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 9
Moves round the point, and throws her anchor stiff . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 24
Sole,- in a stiff , fool-hardy, sulky pride; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 102
Her arms are stiff ,- her fingers clench'd and cold! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 188
 
STIFFENED.........1
For wrath became stiffened ; the sound God of the golden bow, Line 16
 
STIFLE............5
Stifle thine heart no more;- nor be afraid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 979
Old Eolus would stifle his mad spleen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 653
I am to stifle all the heavy sorrow Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 204
Insult, and blind, and stifle up my pomp.- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 245
Shut up your senses, stifle up your ears, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 175
 
STIFLED...........6
About each youthful heart,- with stifled cries, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 95
And puff from the tail's end to stifled throat: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 526
The death-watch tick is stifled . Enter none Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 531
Stifled his voice, and puls'd resolve away- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 45
Her throat in vain, and die, heart- stifled , in her dell. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 207
Stifled beneath the thick oppressive shade Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 19
 
STIFLING..........5
Poor Girl! put on thy stifling widow's weed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 229
Stifling that puny essence in its tent. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 331
Would you were both hears'd up in stifling lead! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
Grew stifling , suffocating, at the heart; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 130
Of stifling numbers ebbs from my full breast. To Fanny, Line 4
 
STILLNESS.........1
Budding - fruit ripening in stillness - autumn suns After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 10
 
STING.............11
Of genius, to flap away each sting To George Felton Mathew, Line 64
Rheum to kind eyes, a sting to humane thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 286
Shewing tooth, tusk, and venom-bag, and sting ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 502
There anguish does not sting ; nor pleasure pall: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 526
O may he ne'er sting you! All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 6
He may sting black and blue. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 8
O let a gadfly's little sting All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 49
The gadfly's little sting . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 56
Pain had no sting , and pleasure's wreath no flower. Ode on Indolence, Line 18
Yet, one day, you must know a grief, whose sting Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 72
The Emperor, empierced with the sharp sting The Jealousies, Line 130
 
STINGING..........2
In blood from stinging whip;- with hollow eyes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 110
Keen, cruel, perceant, stinging : she, as well Lamia, Part II, Line 301
 
STINGS............3
And plays about its fancy, till the stings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 621
How to feed fierce the crooked stings of fire, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 329
Upon the altar of wrath! She stings me through!- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 157
 
STIR..............14
Than the isle of Delos. Echo hence shall stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 966
And listened to the wind that now did stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 294
He did not stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 780b
Without some stir of heart, some malady; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 4
He might not in house, field, or garden stir , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 11
Pray thee be calm and do not quake nor stir , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 38
Like cloud on cloud. No stir of air was there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 7
Dream, and so dream all night without a stir , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 75
Voices of soft proclaim, and silver stir Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 130
Had fix'd his eye, without a twinkle or stir Lamia, Part II, Line 246
And seeing ne'er forget. No stir of life The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 310
Voices of soft proclaim, and silver stir The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 435
Stuck in his moral throat, no coughing e'er could stir . The Jealousies, Line 108
"Venus won't stir a peg without a fee, The Jealousies, Line 298
 
STIRR'D...........4
Before my heedless footsteps stirr'd , and stirr'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 699
Before my heedless footsteps stirr'd, and stirr'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 699
And stirr'd them faintly. Verdant cave and cell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 678
Stirr'd the thin folds of gauze that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 218
 
STIRRING..........1
With flowers, and stirring shades, and baffled beams: Ode on Indolence, Line 44
 
STIRRUP...........1
To fallen princes' necks, as to his stirrup , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
 
STIRS.............2
To trains of peaceful images: the stirs Sleep and Poetry, Line 340
Or from your swelling downs, where sweet air stirs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 201

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Published @ RC

March 2005