Sto-Sty - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
STOCKDOVE.........1
The stockdove shall hatch her soft brace and shall coo, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 23
 
STOCKING..........1
Like, saving shoe for sock or stocking , my man John!" The Jealousies, Line 306
 
STOCKINGS.........1
New stockings There was a naughty boy, Line 15
 
STOL'N............1
Stol'n to this paradise, and so entranced, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 244
 
STOLE.............5
Moreover, through the dancing poppies stole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 566
Even to the trees. He rose: he grasp'd his stole , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 230
Stole through its verdurous matting of fresh trees. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 420
And then she hover'd over me, and stole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 446
To see scull, coffin'd bones, and funeral stole ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 356
 
STOLEN............4
Till it has panted round, and stolen a share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 84
Who stolen hast away the wings wherewith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 109
Destroy'd?- how many tit bits stolen ? Gaze To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 3
From high Olympus had he stolen light, Lamia, Book I, Line 9
 
STONE.............18
That balances the heavy meteor- stone ;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 644
In a mossy stone , that sometimes was my seat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 877
A voice, he had been froze to senseless stone ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 200
In ponderous stone , developing the mood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 132
And many other juts of aged stone Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 47
And a large flint- stone weighs upon my feet; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 299
She kiss'd it with a lip more chill than stone , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 371
No, not a stone , or I shall go in fits- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 39
Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth-sculptured stone . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 297
Sat gray-hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 4
Of stone , or marble swart; their import gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 282
Couches of rugged stone , and slaty ridge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 16
And of my ducal palace not one stone Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 8
Was sitting on a square edg'd polish'd stone , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 51
A hedge-stake - or a ponderous stone to hurl King Stephen ACT I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 7
Round to the curb- stone patient dost thou trudge, The Jealousies, Line 247
With liquor and the staircase: verdict - found stone dead. The Jealousies, Line 630
The one he struck stone blind, the other's eyes wox dim. In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 9
 
STONES............8
The meadows runnels, runnels pebble- stones , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 839
The nether sides of mossy stones and rock,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 937
Here are the craggy stones beneath my feet; Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 10
Follow me, child, or else these stones will be thy bier." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 108
The chains lie silent on the footworn stones ;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 368
Of rain and hail- stones , lovers need not tell As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 11
Of Druid stones , upon a forlorn moor, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 35
Which calls them Highland pebble- stones not worth a fly. The Jealousies, Line 747
 
STOOD.............61
There stood a knight, patting the flowing hair Calidore: A Fragment, Line 110
I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 1
So while the Poet stood in this sweet spot, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 177
Who stood on Latmus' top, what time there blew I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 194
Though she stood smiling o'er the sacrifice, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 200
And so they stood , fill'd with a sweet surprise, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 234
There stood a marble alter, with a tress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 90
Who stood therein did seem of great renown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 168
Stood silent round the shrine: each look was chang'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 186
Stood , wan, and pale and with an awed face, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 191
Stood stupefied with my own empty folly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 961
In the fountain's pebbly margin, and she stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 99
And lifted hands, and trembling lips he stood ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 196
His destiny, alert he stood : but when Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 334
Over a bower, where little space he stood ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 381
Stood serene Cupids watching silently. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 419
I saw this youth as he despairing stood : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 561
I fled three days - when lo! before me stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 566
Stood trembling creatures. I beheld the wreck; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 658
Endymion from Glaucus stood apart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 773
At his right hand stood winged Love, and on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 864
They stood in dreams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 887b
"Within his car, aloft, young Bacchus stood , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 209
Stood smiling; merry Hebe laughs and nods; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 437
At which that dark-eyed stranger stood elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 977
Many all day in dazzling river stood , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 111
Lorenzo stood , and wept: the forest tomb Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 275
That old nurse stood beside her wondering, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 377
So he stood in There was a naughty boy, Line 112
He stood in his There was a naughty boy, Line 116
As I stood where a rocky brig Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 9
As I stood its roofing under, Not Aladdin magian, Line 10
To where he stood , hid from the torch's flame, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 93
Had stood a pigmy's height: she would have ta'en Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 28
He stood , and heard not Thea's sobbing deep; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 139
His winged minions in close clusters stood , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 197
Stood full blown, for the God to enter in. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 212
And from the mirror'd level where he stood Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 257
And in her wide imagination stood Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 58
I stood upon a shore, a pleasant shore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 262
He lifted up his stature vast, and stood , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 325
He press'd together, and in silence stood . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 378
Stood bright, amid the sorrow of his peers? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 30
Thus with half-shut suffused eyes he stood , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 44
She stood in tears amid the alien corn; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 67
In chains, as just now stood that noble prince: Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 168
Though bright Apollo's car stood burning here, Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
Stood in the passage whispering; if any Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 3
There as he stood , he heard a mournful voice, Lamia, Book I, Line 35
South-westward to Cleone. There she stood Lamia, Book I, Line 179
She stood : he pass'd, shut up in mysteries, Lamia, Book I, Line 241
Before each lucid pannel fuming stood Lamia, Book II, Line 175
Thus loaded with a feast the tables stood , Lamia, Book II, Line 189
Methought I stood where trees of every clime, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 19
Stood a cool vessel of transparent juice, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 42
My devout lips, than side by side we stood , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 292
Thither we tend."- Now in clear light I stood , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 49
He stung away again, and stood to breathe, King Stephen ACT I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 47
There stood , or hover'd, tremulous in the air, The Jealousies, Line 2
Nor rested till they stood to cool, and fan, The Jealousies, Line 322
Lifted his wings, and stood attentive-wise. The Jealousies, Line 497
 
STOOP.............8
But let me see thee stoop from heaven on wings To Hope, Line 41
And then I'll stoop from heaven to inspire him. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 80
And live for that honor to stoop to thee now, God of the golden bow, Line 35
Who, suddenly, should stoop through the smooth wind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 381
But never may be garner'd. I must stoop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 274
How ye, perforce, must be content to stoop : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 178
As yesterday the Arab made thee stoop . Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 110
Stoop , Hermes, let me breathe upon thy brow, Lamia, Book I, Line 121
 
STOOP'D...........3
Bright signal that she only stoop'd to tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 500
Forward he stoop'd over the airy shore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 356
Like a stoop'd falcon ere he takes his prey. Lamia, Book I, Line 67
 
STOOPING..........3
And now! ah, I see it - you just now are stooping To Some Ladies, Line 15
Stooping their shoulders o'er a horse's prance, Sleep and Poetry, Line 332
Of faeries stooping on their wings sublime The Jealousies, Line 98
 
STOP..............16
Stop and consider! life is but a day; Sleep and Poetry, Line 85
From low hung branches; little space they stop ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 88
So it will pleasure thee, and force thee stop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 436
Their full-veined ears, nostrils blood wide, and stop ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 400
For ever: let our fate stop here - a kid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 633
O who wouldn't stop in a meadow? Over the hill and over the dale, Line 18
He would not stop at home There was a naughty boy, Line 3
To stop and greet them. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 16
Had put a sudden stop to my hot breath, Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 4
And sing for my delight, I'd stop my ears! Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
You suffocate me! Stop this devil's parley, Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
They bade me stop . Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 5a
Must I stop here? Here solitary die? Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 18
There we must stop him. Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 102a
This must not be - stop there! Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 180a
Who while thou goest ever seem'st to stop , The Jealousies, Line 237
 
STOPPING..........1
And I was stopping up my frantic ears, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 290
 
STOPS.............2
So that he here and there full hearted stops ; This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 4
Onward he goes - he stops - his bosom beats Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 355
 
STOPT.............2
Towards the ground; but rested not, nor stopt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 334
Its strain, when other harmonies, stopt short, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 127
 
STORE.............16
So the unnumber'd sounds that evening store ; How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 9
Might I indulge at large in all my store Sleep and Poetry, Line 346
Our feet were soft in flowers. There was store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 665
From these devoted eyes their silver store , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 434
Yet if thou wilt behold all beauty's store , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 58
Green-kyrtled Spring, flush Summer, golden store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 422
Doves will offer up, and sweetest store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 660
Sure I will not believe thou hast such store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 809
With three legs all her store ? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 10
And for the day faint visions there is store ; Ode on Indolence, Line 58
Ludolph, you have no saving plea in store ? Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 104
An ample store of misery thou hast, Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 173
Of cups and goblets, and the store thrice told Lamia, Book II, Line 186
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store ? To Autumn, Line 12
Store of strange vessels, and large draperies, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 73
(Of pastry he got store within the palace,) The Jealousies, Line 218
 
STORED............4
"All cates and dainties shall be stored there The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 173
Was with its stored thunder labouring up. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 41
Clouds of stored summer rains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 58
Was with its stored thunder labouring up. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 343
 
STORES............1
Comparing, joyfully, their plenteous stores Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 389
 
STORIES...........4
The wrong'd Libertas,- who has told you stories To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 44
That smile us on to tell delightful stories . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 124
And I will tell thee stories of the sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 812
Too many doleful stories do we see, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 93
 
STORM.............11
Against an endless storm . Moreover too, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 883
Was woven in with black distinctness; storm , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 200
No housing from the storm and tempests mad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 322
The storm , and through chill aguish gloom outburst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 675
Aw'd from the throne aloof;- and when storm -rent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 871
Than shoots the slanted hail- storm , down he dropt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 333
Morning fair and storm -wreck'd hull; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 13
Will storm his heart, Love's fev'rous citadel: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 84
Hark! 'tis an elfin- storm from faery land, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 343
These lovers fled away into the storm . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 371
I floated with, about that melancholy storm . As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 14
 
STORMED...........1
Ulysses stormed , and his enchanted belt Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 11
 
STORMS............3
And when bleak storms resistless rove, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 17
Miltonian storms , and more, Miltonian tenderness; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 58
All lovers, whom fell storms have doom'd to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 722
 
STORMY............1
"King of the stormy sea! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 943b
 
STORY.............21
And splendidly mark'd with the story divine On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 7
While my story of love I enraptur'd repeat. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 12
"Places of nestling green for Poets made." Story of Rimini I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Epigraph
The light of thy story ? God of the golden bow, Line 10
What mighty power has this gentle story ! This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 10
Will trace the story of Endymion. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 35
I must be near the middle of my story . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 53
He sang the story up into the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 838
With long-forgotten story , and wherein Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 127
So I will in my story straightway pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 397
From where large Hercules wound up his story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 406
And all my story that much passion slew me; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 114
Has my own soul conspired: so my story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 644
To a sheepskin gave the story , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 17
A STORY FROM BOCCACCIO Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Subtitle
And a sad ditty of this story born Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 501
'Tis the same story o'er and o'er,- O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 95
To hear my story . O be gentle to me, Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 114
After the page's story of the death Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 4
Had Lycius liv'd to hand his story down, Lamia, Book II, Line 7
Although her story sounds at first a little queer." The Jealousies, Line 405
 
STOUNDING.........1
Of that late stounding insult! Why has my sword Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 94
 
STOUT.............8
A very Red Cross Knight - a stout Leander - Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 13
Hails it with tears, her stout defender sent: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 16
Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 11
What when a stout unbending champion awes Addressed to Haydon, Line 11
Of seamen, and stout galley-rowers' toil: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 248
Methinks by his stout bearing he should be- Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 15
I will see more. Bear you so stout a heart? Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 17
Stout soldiers posted at the door? Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 10a
 
STOUTER...........1
In stouter hearts than nurse's fear and dread: The Jealousies, Line 68
 
STOUTEST..........1
On abject Caesars - not the stoutest band To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 12
 
STOVE.............1
Has wrought a silence, from the stove there shrills On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 11
 
STRAGGLING........2
His head upon a tuft of straggling weeds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 109
Whose arms spread straggling in wild serpent forms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 447
 
STRAIGHT..........14
These lures I straight forget, - e'en ere I dine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 24
Peona guiding, through the water straight , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 427
And after, straight in that inspired place Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 837
Thou pointest out the way, and straight 'tis won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 96
Straight homeward to their symbol-essences; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 700
Which hurryingly they gain'd, and enter'd straight . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 725
'Twas done: and straight with sudden swell and fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 766
In the cold moonshine. Straight he seiz'd her wrist; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 508
And straight all flush'd; so, lisped tenderly, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 54
And straight she'll run on four. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 12
The Princess took it and, dismounting straight , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 69
Let Albert straight be summon'd. Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 192a
Open it straight ;- hush!- quiet!- my lost boy! Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 37
There ran a stream of lamps straight on from wall to wall. Lamia, Book II, Line 131
 
STRAIGHTWAY.......6
So I straightway began to pluck a posey I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 27
Young Daniel, who did straightway pluck the beam Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 6
And straightway into frightful eddies swoop'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 648
At which he straightway started, and 'gan tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 297
To that same feather'd lyrist, who straightway , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 432
So I will in my story straightway pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 397
 
STRAIN............6
Nor move, till ends the lofty strain , Ode to Apollo, Line 21
Along the reedy stream; a half heard strain , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 161
Its strain , when other harmonies, stopt short, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 127
And then another, then another strain , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 285
And, like an anxious warder, strain his sight Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 17
[A soft strain of music. Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 81
 
STRAIN'D..........1
And twing'd with avarice strain'd out my eyes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 273
 
STRAINED..........1
From over- strained might. Releas'd, he fled Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 263
 
STRAINS...........3
Wild strains to which, spell-bound, the nightingales listened; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 30
No spherey strains by me could e'er be caught To My Brother George (epistle), Line 4
Louder they talk, and louder come the strains Lamia, Book II, Line 204
 
STRAITEN'D........1
Gurgles through straiten'd banks, and still doth fan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 211
 
STRAND............2
The dull shell's echo, from a bowery strand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 274
Dungeoner of my friends, that wicked strand What can I do to drive away, Line 32
 
STRANDS...........1
Islands, and creeks, and amber-fretted strands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 743
 
STRANGE...........55
In this little dome, all those melodies strange , On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 33
That thou hast never told thy travels strange , To George Felton Mathew, Line 90
And start with awe at mine own strange pretence. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 64
These wonders strange he sees, and many more, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 53
More strange , more beautiful, more smooth, more regal, Sleep and Poetry, Line 21
And many a verse from so strange influence Sleep and Poetry, Line 69
The thought of that same chariot, and the strange Sleep and Poetry, Line 161
Paw up against the light, and do strange deeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 166
Strange thunders from the potency of song; Sleep and Poetry, Line 231
On humbler thoughts, and let this strange assay Sleep and Poetry, Line 313
The pipy hemlock to strange overgrowth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 241
Strange ministrant of undescribed sounds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 285
Of some strange history, potent to send Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 324
To golden palaces, strange minstrelsy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 457
So mournful strange . Surely some influence rare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 497
Wrought suddenly in me. What indeed more strange ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 521
The which became more strange , and strange, and dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 570
The which became more strange, and strange , and dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 570
Handfuls of daisies." - "Endymion, how strange ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 632
This all? Yet it is strange , and sad, alas! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 722
There must be surely character'd strange things, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 62
So fairy-quick, was strange ! Bewildered, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 93
'Twas far too strange , and wonderful for sadness; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 219
And more of beautiful and strange beside: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 391
There darts strange light of varied hues and dyes: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 541
With starlight gems: aye, all so huge and strange , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 632
Anon the strange voice is upon the wane- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 849
Strange journeyings! Wherever beauty dwells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 93
My strange love came - Felicity's abyss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 176
Strange matters did it treat of, and drew on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 679
Where these are new and strange , are ominous. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 911
Towards her, and awakes - and, strange , o'erhead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 434
Nor did speed hinder converse soft and strange - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 488
Sang not to her - strange ! that honey Robin Hood, Line 47
Of secrecy, the violet:- What strange powers Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 12
Strange sound it was, when the pale shadow spake; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 281
Paining me through: those sounds grow strange to me, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 311
Though beautiful, cold - strange - as in a dream On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 3
Wherefrom I take strange lore, and read it deep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 148
Of such new tuneful wonder. Is't not strange Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 67
And sure in language strange she said- La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 27
And they were strange to me, as may betide Ode on Indolence, Line 9
And no news! No news! 'Faith! 'tis very strange Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 74
He thus avoids us. Lady, is't not strange ? Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 75
What portent - what strange prodigy is this? Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 60
He has, assure yourself, by some strange means, Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 8
Things unbeliev'd one hour, so strange they are, Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 2
Without surprise, his questions, howe'er strange . Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 18
Of all she list, strange or magnificent: Lamia, Book I, Line 204
No more so strange ; for merry wine, sweet wine, Lamia, Book II, Line 211
Store of strange vessels, and large draperies, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 73
Strange musings to the solitary Pan. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 411
And as his style is of strange elegance, The Jealousies, Line 632
Of darkness, a great mountain ( strange to speak), The Jealousies, Line 661
Some strange Imaian custom. A large bat The Jealousies, Line 674
 
STRANGELY.........1
This may sound strangely : but when, dearest girl, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 868
 
STRANGER..........16
This stranger ay I pitied. For upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 555
The wilder'd stranger - seeming not to see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 219
To sue thee to his heart? Kind stranger -youth! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 401
The stranger from the mountains, breathless, trac'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 737
Speak not of grief, young stranger , or cold snails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 132
"Young stranger ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 273
These words awoke the stranger of dark tresses: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 462
At which that dark-eyed stranger stood elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 977
The stranger lighted from his steed, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 1
The stranger walk'd into the hall, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 5
The stranger walk'd into the bower,- Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 9
And a kiss from the stranger as off he went Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 15
The Stranger next with head on bosom bent Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 6
Again the Stranger sighings fresh did waste. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 8
O Stranger , thou my nerves from pipe didst charm; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 10
Again thou stranger gav'st me fresh alarm- Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 12
 
STRANGER'S........1
I wonder not this stranger's victor-deeds Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 52
 
STRANGEST.........1
The strangest sight - the most unlook'd-for chance- The Jealousies, Line 755
 
STRANGLED.........1
While Fate seem'd strangled in my nervous grasp? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 105
 
STRATAGEM.........1
A stratagem , that makes the beldame start: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 139
 
STRATAGEMS........1
Who, by close stratagems , did save herself, Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 145
 
STRAW.............4
Your sceptre worth a straw , your cushions old door mats." Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 8
Foraging for sticks and straw . Fancy, Line 46
Whose rug is straw , whose wholeness is a crack; The Jealousies, Line 230
Many as bees about a straw -capp'd hive, The Jealousies, Line 260
 
STRAWBERRIES......2
Feed upon apples red, and strawberries , Sleep and Poetry, Line 103
To sing for thee; low creeping strawberries Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 257
 
STRAWBERRY........1
Of periwinkle and wild strawberry , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 101
 
STRAY.............6
As do those brighter drops that twinkling stray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 471
Left his young cheek; and how he used to stray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 728
To stray away into these forests drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 270
Quick cat's-paws on the generous stray -away,- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 135
To make all bare before he dares to stray Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 254
That he may stray league after league some great birthplace to find, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 47
 
STRAY'D...........2
In muffling hands. So temper'd, out he stray'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 873
No further than to where his feet had stray'd , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 16
 
STRAYED...........3
In Spenser's halls he strayed , and bowers fair, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 9
A lamb strayed far a-down those inmost glens, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 69
Was there far strayed from mortality. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1007
 
STRAYING..........3
Straying about, yet coop'd up in the den Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 928
A straying from his toil? Hot Egypt's pest Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 140
Mnemosyne was straying in the world; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 29
 
STRAYS............2
Unfaded amaranth, when wild it strays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 783
Free as the air, invisibly, she strays Lamia, Book I, Line 94
 
STREAK............1
Full facing their swift flight, from ebon streak , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 496
 
STREAK'D..........1
Ocean's blue mantle streak'd with purple, and green. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 132
 
STREAKED..........1
Convolvulus in streaked vases flush; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 415
 
STREAKING.........1
And morning shadows streaking into slimness To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 87
 
STREAKS...........5
Who have left streaks of light athwart their ages: To George Felton Mathew, Line 60
Like to streaks across the sky, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 10
The purple west, and, two bright streaks between, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 11
Like silver streaks across a dolphin's fin, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 50
Made gloom of all her frecklings, streaks and bars, Lamia, Book I, Line 159
 
STREAM............27
For I want not the stream inspiring, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 5
Yet over the steep, whence the mountain stream rushes, To Some Ladies, Line 5
Or a white Naiad in a rippling stream ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 23
Reflect athwart the stream their yellow lustres, To George Felton Mathew, Line 42
Beheld thee, pluck'd thee, cast thee in the stream To George Felton Mathew, Line 82
A black-eyed swan upon the widening stream ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 87
Whene'er I venture on the stream of rhyme; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 16
Small good to one who had by Mulla's stream To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 33
And, like a muddy stream , would bear along Sleep and Poetry, Line 158
Along the reedy stream ; a half heard strain, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 161
A patient watch over the stream that creeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 447
Not to have dipp'd in love's most gentle stream . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 182
In thy deceitful stream , a panting glow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 970
Thou couldst rejoice to see my hopeless stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1002
Into the wide stream came of purple hue- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 195
A little onward ran the very stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 785
Laughing at the clear stream and setting sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 946
Where close by the stream For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 4
Rode past fair Florence, to where Arno's stream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 210
Impossible to melt as iced stream : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 283
A stream went voiceless by, still deadened more Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 11
Past the near meadows, over the still stream , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 76
When to the stream she launches, looks not back Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
There ran a stream of lamps straight on from wall to wall. Lamia, Book II, Line 131
A stream went voiceless by, still deaden'd more The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 315
So in my veins red life might stream again, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 6
Light flags stream out like gauzy tongues of fire; The Jealousies, Line 572
 
STREAM'D..........2
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 214
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 58
 
STREAMING.........3
His diamond path with fretwork, streaming round Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 608
I see thy streaming hair! and now, by Pan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 279
How like a comet he goes streaming on. King Stephen ACT I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 17
 
STREAMLET.........1
That thou wouldst spout a little streamlet o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 718
 
STREAMLET'S.......1
That lean against a streamlet's rushy banks, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 62
 
STREAMLETS........1
Until they came to where these streamlets fall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 419
 
STREAMS...........28
By many streams a little lake did fill, Imitation of Spenser, Line 7
The air is all softness, and chrystal the streams , O come, dearest Emma!, Line 3
Whence gush the streams of song: in happy hour To George Felton Mathew, Line 78
Clear streams , smooth lakes, and overlooking towers. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 68
When streams of light pour down the golden west, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 2
Guess where the jaunty streams refresh themselves. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 22
Staying their wavy bodies 'gainst the streams , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 73
Mingler with leaves, and dew and tumbling streams , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 119
With streams that deepen freshly into bowers. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 48
Along a path between two little streams ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 415
And fitful whims of sleep are made of, streams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 749
Streams subterranean tease their granite beds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 602
The streams with changed magic interlace: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 613
And then the water, into stubborn streams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 622
Ready to snort their streams . In this cool wonder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 885
Those two sad streams adown a fearful dell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1009
Wide o'er the swelling streams : and constantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 365
And murmur about Indian streams ?"- Then she, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 143
"Over wide streams and mountains great we went, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 239
Two liquid pulse streams 'stead of feather'd wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 583
And all its vassal streams , pools numberless, Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 6
When were thy shoulders mantled in huge streams ? To Ailsa Rock, Line 3
Of melody, and streams of flowery verge,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 4
Suddenly on the ocean's chilly streams . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 268
Voiceless, or hoarse with loud tormented streams : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 362
And there by zephyrs, streams , and birds, and bees, Ode to Psyche, Line 56
To thy far wishes will thy streams obey: Lamia, Book I, Line 262
Upon those streams that pulse beside the throat: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 125
 
STREAMY...........1
And steeds with streamy manes - the charioteer Sleep and Poetry, Line 127
 
STREET............6
Of the Market Street For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 23
And enter'd marveling: for they knew the street , Lamia, Book II, Line 152
In Scarab Street , Panthea, at the Jubal's Head. The Jealousies, Line 90
And to old Hum through street and alley hied; The Jealousies, Line 205
And bade the coachman wheel to such a street , The Jealousies, Line 254
Show'd in the pearl-paved street , as in a glass; The Jealousies, Line 265
 
STREETS...........9
The city streets were clean and fair The Eve of St. Mark, Line 4
The silent streets were crowded well The Eve of St. Mark, Line 14
And, little town, thy streets for evermore Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 38
A show-monster about the streets of Prague, Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 167
Henry the Fowler pass'd the streets of Prague. Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 16
And all her populous streets and temples lewd, Lamia, Book I, Line 352
While through the thronged streets your bridal car Lamia, Book II, Line 63
The streets are full of music- King Stephen ACT I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 28a
"Onward we floated o'er the panting streets , The Jealousies, Line 730
 
STRENGTH..........11
In the present strength of manhood, that the high Sleep and Poetry, Line 163
But strength alone though of the Muses born Sleep and Poetry, Line 241
Were I of ample strength for such a freak. To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 8
Hale strength , nor from my bones all marrow drain'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 614
Man feels the gentle anchor pull and gladdens in its strength . There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 40
To make me desolate? whence came the strength ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 103
Its strength for darkness, burrowing like the mole; Sonnet to Sleep, Line 12
To keep thy strength upon its pedestal. Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 165
Strength to thy virgin crownet's golden buds, Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 28
The strength of twenty lions 'gainst a lamb! Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 59
Moan, brethren, moan; for I have no strength left, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 427
 
STRENGTHEN........1
What doth strengthen and what maim. Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 34
 
STRENUOUS.........2
Strenuous with hellish tyranny. Attend! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 687
Though seen of none save him whose strenuous tongue Ode on Melancholy, Line 27
 
STRESS............6
As if soft Pity with unusual stress To Lord Byron, Line 3
And soothe thy lips: hist, when the airy stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 783
Is wan on Neptune's blue: yet there's a stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 82
Those two on winged steeds, with all the stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 390
Let us inspect the lyre, and weigh the stress If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 7
Was acting, that could give so dread a stress The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 279
 
STRETCH...........1
Mark how, possess'd, his lashless eyelids stretch Lamia, Book II, Line 288
 
STRETCH'D.........5
Stretch'd on the grass at my best lov'd employment To My Brother George (epistle), Line 120
Soon were the white doves plain, with necks stretch'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 523
He stretch'd himself in grief and radiance faint. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 304
Stretch'd out, at ease, beneath a glutinous pine; Lamia, Book I, Line 210
And stretch'd her white arm through the hollow dark, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 455
 
STRETCHED.........1
"The stretched metre of an antique song" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Epigraph
 
STRETCHES.........1
Stretches , with all its mist and cloudy rack, Lamia, Book I, Line 178
 
STRETCHING........2
Stretching across a void, then guiding o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 600
Stretching his indolent arms, he took, O bliss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 712
 
STREW.............6
Had taken fairy phantasies to strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 92
Would strew sweet flowers on a sterile beach. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 371
A lullaby to silence.- "Youth! now strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 768
Its bottom will I strew with amber shells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 695
To her for the last time. Night will strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 933
Each a mouth of pearls must strew . Not Aladdin magian, Line 34
 
STREWN............2
Were strewn rich gifts, unknown to any Muse, Lamia, Book I, Line 19
By strewn flowers, torches, and a marriage song, Lamia, Book II, Line 109
 
STRICKEN..........2
A poor, weak, palsy- stricken , churchyard thing, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 155
The bruised remnants of our stricken camp Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 127
 
STRICTLY..........1
More strictly than he said the mass, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 26
 
STRICTURES........2
With special strictures on the horrid crime, The Jealousies, Line 96
Vile strictures on the conduct of a prince The Jealousies, Line 470
 
STRIDE............1
With stride colossal, on from hall to hall; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 195
 
STRIDES...........1
With strides colossal, on from hall to hall; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 39
 
STRIDING..........2
What care, though striding Alexander past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 24
When shapes of old come striding by and visages of old, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 37
 
STRIFE............15
In strife to throw upon the shore a gem Imitation of Spenser, Line 35
Where I may find the agonies, the strife Sleep and Poetry, Line 124
On this poor weakness! but, for all her strife , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 718
And there in strife no burning thoughts to heed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 879
When last the wintry gusts gave over strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 920
Into his eyes. Ah, miserable strife , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 529
Hereat, with many sobs, her gentle strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 825
Of Nereids were about him, in kind strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1014
Thou shouldst be one of all. Ah, bitter strife ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 751
But vain is now the burning, and the strife , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 28
I thought some Fate with pleasure or with strife Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 331
There saw she direst strife ; the supreme God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 92
Unhinges the poor world;- not in that strife , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 147
And love, and pleasure, and the ruddy strife Lamia, Book I, Line 40
A throng of foes; and in this renew'd strife King Stephen ACT I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 49
 
STRIKE............4
There is no depth to strike in: I can see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 161
Set her before me - never fear I can strike . Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 182
Strike for the Cretan isle; and here thou art! Lamia, Book I, Line 79
Apollo's presence when in act to strike Lamia, Book II, Line 79
 
STRIKES...........1
Strikes the twanging harp of war, Ode to Apollo, Line 8
 
STRING............12
And each vibrates the string Ode to Apollo, Line 27
To the swift treble pipe, and humming string . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 314
His name upon the harp- string , should achieve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 725
And thy lyre shall never have a slacken'd string ; Apollo to the Graces, Line 12
Honour to the old bow- string ! Robin Hood, Line 50
Her lute- string gave an echo of his name, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 15
Quickly break her prison- string Fancy, Line 91
Before the tense string murmur.- To the earth! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 345
Like pearl beads dropping sudden from their string : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 284
Fetch me a missal, and a string of beads,- Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 97
Whose airy texture, from a golden string , Lamia, Book II, Line 19
"I'll pull the string ," said he, and further said, The Jealousies, Line 226
 
STRINGS...........12
Then o'er the strings his fingers gently move, Ode to Apollo, Line 40
The silver strings of heavenly harp atween: On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 5
The quick invisible strings , even though she saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 500
One, kneeling to a lyre, touch'd the strings , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 420
Be tender of your strings , ye soothing lutes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 969
And touch the strings into a mystery; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 444
And with melodious chuckle in the strings Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 491
A viol, bow strings torn, cross-wise upon Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 40
Unharm'd, and on the strings 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 45
Of strings in hollow shells; and there shall be Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 131
Whose strings touch'd by thy fingers, all the vast Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 64
Of strings in hollow shells; and let there be The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 436
 
STRIP.............1
And for the youth, quick, let us strip for him Lamia, Book II, Line 225
 
STRIPED...........3
With zebras striped , and sleek Arabians' prance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 244
Striped like a zebra, freckled like a pard, Lamia, Book I, Line 49
Her mother's screams with the striped tiger's blent, The Jealousies, Line 391
 
STRIVE............10
Strive for her son to seize my careless heart; To Hope, Line 14
Pry 'mong the stars, to strive to think divinely: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 8
My soul to nothingness: but I will strive Sleep and Poetry, Line 159
My chain of grief: no longer strive to find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 979
Who strive therefore: on the sudden it is won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 532
Some English that might strive thine ear to please. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 4
Yet do thou strive ; as thou art capable, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 337
Why should I strive to show what from thy lips Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 85
I strive to search wherefore I am so sad, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 88
Preeminence and safety, I will strive Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 164
 
STRIVEN...........3
Endymion: yet hourly had he striven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 395
Art thou not cruel? Ever have I striven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 736
So most maliciously, so madly striven Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 227
 
STRIVES...........2
Itself, and strives its own delights to hide- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 344
And strives in vain to unsettle and wield Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 414
 
STRIVING..........7
In striving from its crystal face to take To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 8
Than to be crush'd, in striving to uprear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 40
Circling about her waist, and striving how Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 940
Striving their ghastly malady to cheer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 897
Striving to be itself, what dungeon climes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 259
For there was striving , in its piteous tongue, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 282
While I am striving how to fill my heart Lamia, Book II, Line 50
 
STRODE............1
And Phorcus, sea-born, and together strode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 385
 
STROKES...........2
Counting his woe-worn minutes, by the strokes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 50
Fall'n beneath the dockyard strokes , Robin Hood, Line 44
 
STROLLING.........1
Why linger you so, the wild labyrinth strolling ? To Some Ladies, Line 9
 
STRONG............11
Of all unworthiness; and how the strong of arm Calidore: A Fragment, Line 144
Like a strong giant, and my spirit teaze Sleep and Poetry, Line 82
A sense of real things comes doubly strong , Sleep and Poetry, Line 157
Mingled indeed with what is sweet and strong , Sleep and Poetry, Line 232
Uplifting his strong bow into the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 345
Warming and glowing strong in the belief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 299
Grew strong within me: wherefore serve me so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 971
My strong identity, my real self, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 114
A power more strong in beauty, born of us Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 213
Still whole. I have surviv'd. My arm is strong ,- Otho the Great, ACT IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 134
The strong Iberian juice? or mellow Greek? Otho the Great, ACT V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 121
 
STRONGER..........2
Growing, like Atlas, stronger from its load? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 63
Perverse, with stronger fancy to reclaim Lamia, Book II, Line 70
 
STROVE............10
To those who strove with the bright golden wing To George Felton Mathew, Line 63
For a mortal youth, and how she strove to bind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 459
Ever pursued, the other strove to shun- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 928
And strove who should be smother'd deepest in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 936
Thus strove by fancies vain and crude to clear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 722
Whisper'd I and strove to kiss Not Aladdin magian, Line 22
Against these plagues he strove in vain; for Fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 96
I strove against thee and my hot-blood son, Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 21
Stung my own ears - I strove hard to escape The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 127
The numbness; strove to gain the lowest step. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 128
 
STROWN............1
And the riches of Flora are lavishly strown ; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 2
 
STRUCK............12
And, truly, I would rather be struck dumb, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 824
At last, by hap, through some young trees it struck , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 931
These secrets struck into him; and unless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 137
My spirit struck from all the beautiful! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 171
And bound it round Endymion: then struck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 752
Was struck , and all were dreamers. At the last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 900
All passion struck , Spirit here that reignest, Line 9
And struck a lamp from the dismal coal, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 70
At last it struck him to pretend to sleep, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 89
From Lycius answer'd, as heart- struck and lost, Lamia, Book II, Line 293
Struck from the paved level up my limbs, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 123
The one he struck stone blind, the other's eyes wox dim. In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 9
 
STRUCK'DST........1
Thou, Jove-like, struck'dst thy forehead, Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 95
 
STRUGGLE..........5
And eagles struggle with the buffeting north Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 643
And made his hands to struggle in the air, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 136
Held struggle with his throat but came not forth; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 252
Most like the struggle at the gate of death; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 126
What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 9
 
STRUGGLED.........1
Upon the grass I struggled hard against The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 53
 
STRUGGLER.........1
The little struggler , sav'd from perils dark, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 12
 
STRUGGLES.........2
And wonders; struggles to devise some blame; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 716
Imagination's struggles , far and nigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 155
 
STRUGGLING........2
Struggling , and blood, and shrieks - all dimly fades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 10
The final gulphing; the poor struggling souls: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 659
 
STRUNG............3
Oh brush not yet the pearl strung spray, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 3
On many harps, which he has lately strung ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 52
Inhabited her frail- strung heart as his. Lamia, Book I, Line 309
 
STUBBED...........1
For a throng'd tavern,- and these stubbed trees Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 35
 
STUBBLE...........2
Of happiness! ye on the stubble droop, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 273
And touch the stubble -plains with rosy hue; To Autumn, Line 26
 
STUBBORN..........6
Speak, stubborn earth, and tell me where, O where Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 608
The stubborn canvas for my voyage prepar'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 772
And then the water, into stubborn streams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 622
And crimson mouthed shells with stubborn curls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 880
Thee the waves awful bow. Fast, stubborn rock, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 946
That stubborn fool, that impudent state-dun, The Jealousies, Line 160
 
STUBBORN'D........1
Stubborn'd with iron. All were not assembled: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 17
 
STUCK.............4
With leaves stuck in them; and the Neptune be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 883
And, plashing among bedded pebbles, stuck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 932
Of disappointment stuck in me so sore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 481
Stuck in his moral throat, no coughing e'er could stir. The Jealousies, Line 108
 
STUDDED...........2
O'er studded with a thousand, thousand pearls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 879
From its quilled sheath, and studded Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 26
 
STUDIED...........1
Studied from that old spirit-leaved book Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 133
 
STUDS.............1
That time thou didst adorn, with amber studs , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 924
 
STUFF.............2
One's senses with so dense a breathing stuff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 381
And rifled,- stuff ! the horses' hoofs have minced it! Otho the Great, ACT I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 68
 
STUFF'D...........2
The brain, new stuff'd , in youth, with triumphs gay The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 40
Of hopes, and stuff'd with many memories, Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 184
 
STUMBLED..........1
That fierce complain to silence: where I stumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 488
 
STUMBLING.........1
From stumbling over stumps and hillocks small; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 418
 
STUMBLINGS........1
My stumblings down some monstrous precipice: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 703
 
STUMPS............1
From stumbling over stumps and hillocks small; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 418
 
STUN..............3
Uprisen o'er chaos: and with such a stun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 247
Not being quite recover'd from the stun Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51
But how in the world can I contrive to stun The Jealousies, Line 158
 
STUNG.............8
O shell-borne Neptune, I am pierc'd and stung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 238
She fled ere I could groan for mercy. Stung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 601
They stung the feather'd horse: with fierce alarm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 555
The gadfly he hath stung me sore- All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 5
"O ye, whom wrath consumes! who, passion- stung , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 173
To change his purpose. He thereat was stung , Lamia, Book II, Line 69
Stung my own ears - I strove hard to escape The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 127
He stung away again, and stood to breathe, King Stephen ACT I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 47
 
STUNNING..........2
Smote 'twixt the horns by the death- stunning mace Otho the Great, ACT II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 131
Stunning the vestibule from wall to wall, The Jealousies, Line 764
 
STUNT.............1
(Like a stunt bramble by a solemn pine) The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 293
 
STUPEFIED.........2
Stood stupefied with my own empty folly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 961
Into forgetfulness; when, stupefied , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 681
 
STUPID............3
Fell into nothing - into stupid sleep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 678
But the stupid eye of mortal Not Aladdin magian, Line 45
'Tis now free to stupid face, Not Aladdin magian, Line 50
 
STURDIER..........1
My sturdier youth, maturing to the sword, Otho the Great, ACT III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 13
 
STUTTERING........1
Whisper'd the guide, stuttering with joy, "even now." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 745
 
STY...............1
Envy, and Malice to their native sty ? Addressed to Haydon, Line 12
 
STYGIAN...........1
And take a dream 'mong rushes Stygian , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 505
 
STYLE.............2
Those nows you managed in a special style ." The Jealousies, Line 560
And as his style is of strange elegance, The Jealousies, Line 632

Published @ RC

March 2005