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Keats Concordance
 
SUB...............1
Noiseless, sub -marine cloudlets, glittering Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 874
 
SUBDUED...........4
Subdued majesty with this glad time. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 964
Came tragic; passion not to be subdued , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 247
And, all subdued , consented to the hour Lamia, Part II, Line 82
Ah! if you prize my subdued soul above To Fanny, Line 49
 
SUBJECT...........3
We'll meet upon our subject . Farewell, Count! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 63
Let us resume his subject if you please: The Jealousies, Line 122
Not, like a subject , foolish matters mince. The Jealousies, Line 472
 
SUBLIME...........8
Over their beauties, earthly, or sublime : How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 4
A thousand years with backward glance sublime ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 329
O shell-borne King sublime ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 965
Foot-feather'd Mercury appear'd sublime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 331
From something of material sublime , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 69
Whether his labours be sublime or low- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 173
Of faeries stooping on their wings sublime The Jealousies, Line 98
March, little Pegasus, with pawing hoof sublime ! The Jealousies, Line 639
 
SUBLIMELY.........1
Bards, that erst sublimely told Ode to Apollo, Line 3
 
SUBMISSIVE........1
Submissive of knee-bent obeisance, The Jealousies, Line 753
 
SUBORN'D..........1
Against the Emperor had suborn'd his son,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 38
 
SUBS..............1
Sect. 2. Memb. 1. Subs . 1. Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
SUBSECTION'D......1
(Section'd and subsection'd with learning sage,) The Jealousies, Line 97
 
SUBSERVIENT.......1
As if she had not pomp subservient ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 47
 
SUBSIDE...........1
Subside , if not to dark blue nativeness. Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 8
 
SUBSIDING.........1
With the subsiding crystal: as when ocean Sleep and Poetry, Line 376
 
SUBSTANCE.........2
A substance or a shadow, wheresoe'er Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 24
gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
SUBSTANCES........1
If he explores all forms and substances Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 699
 
SUBTERRANEAN......1
Streams subterranean tease their granite beds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 602
 
SUBTLE............6
More subtle cadenced, more forest wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 494
Into its airy channels with so subtle , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 750
That they are still the air, the subtle food, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 157
Any more subtle fluid in her veins Lamia, Part I, Line 307
Came, and who were her subtle servitors. Lamia, Part II, Line 118
So fine, so subtle , felt the tyranny The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 119
 
SUBTLEST..........1
The subtlest excuser of small faults; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 10
 
SUBURB............2
When from the slope side of a suburb hill, Lamia, Part II, Line 26
And vanish'd, bird-like, o'er the suburb trees, The Jealousies, Line 129
 
SUBURBS...........2
suburbs of Corinth, and told him she was a Phoenician by birth, and if he would Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Came from the northern suburbs ; rich attire The Jealousies, Line 574
 
SUCCEED...........1
But it is done - succeed the verse or fail- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 157
 
SUCCEEDS..........1
No other sound succeeds ; but ceasing here, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 124
 
SUCCOUR...........1
A hand heaven made to succour the distress'd; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 106
 
SUCCUMB...........1
You will to-morrow succumb to his wishes, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
 
SUCK..............1
Still suck their fill of light from sun and moon, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 421
 
SUCK'D............2
If with thy mother's milk thou hast suck'd in Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
Suck'd to my grave amid a dreary calm! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 27
 
SUCKING...........1
Where through some sucking pool I will be hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 249
 
SUCKLING..........1
She took me like a child of suckling time, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 456
 
SUDDEN............46
A sudden glow comes on them, nought they see To My Brother George (epistle), Line 21
To sudden veneration: women meek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 187
The sudden silence, or the whispers low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 399
But soon she came, with sudden burst, upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 503
Vexing conceptions of some sudden change; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 236
At last, with sudden step, he came upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 388
Of sudden voices, echoing, "Come! come! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 501
Death had come sudden ; for no jot he mov'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 566
Sudden a poplar's height, and 'gan to enclose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 607
New sudden thoughts, nor casts his mental slough? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 638
Of sudden exaltation: but, "Alas!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 680
A huntress free in" - At this, sudden fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1008
And sudden cannon. Ah! how all this hums, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 18
Left sudden by a dallying breath of air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 117
Oft-times upon the sudden she laugh'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 509
'Twas done: and straight with sudden swell and fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 766
Out-sparkling sudden like an upturn'd gem, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 777
But sooth'd as now, flash'd sudden everywhere, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 873
At Neptune's feet he sank. A sudden ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1013
The teeming earth a sudden witness bore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 338
Who strive therefore: on the sudden it is won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 532
Sudden it came, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 37
Sudden from his turfed grave, Robin Hood, Line 39
O' the sudden , and receive thy spiriting:- Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 10
My sudden adoration, my great love! Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 7
They told their sister how, with sudden speed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 225
Then with her knife, all sudden , she began Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 367
Sudden a thought came like a full-blown rose, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 136
Sad sign of ruin, sudden dismay, and fall! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 336
Like pearl beads dropping sudden from their string: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 284
With sudden scrutiny and gloomless eyes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 80
And, on the sudden , fainting with surprise, Ode to Psyche, Line 8
Sudden from heaven like a weeping cloud, Ode on Melancholy, Line 12
Appear'd, a sudden host, in the open day. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
Lest our rent banners, too o' the sudden shown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
But this so sudden kindness makes me dumb. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 30
Had put a sudden stop to my hot breath, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 4
Yet shall I season high my sudden fall Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 269
Upon me sudden ! for I cannot meet, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 17
Then sudden it grew hot, and all the pains Lamia, Part II, Line 252
May pierce them on the sudden with the thorn Lamia, Part II, Line 281
Shifts sudden to the south, the small warm rain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 98
Sudden the music ceased, sudden the hand The Jealousies, Line 348
Sudden the music ceased, sudden the hand The Jealousies, Line 348
Elfinan snatch'd it with a sudden jerk, The Jealousies, Line 444
Came sudden 'fore my face, and brush'd against my hat. The Jealousies, Line 675
 
SUDDENLY..........16
Come cool and suddenly against his face, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 6
All suddenly , with joyful cries, there sped Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 109
Who, suddenly , should stoop through the smooth wind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 381
Wrought suddenly in me. What indeed more strange? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 521
There blossom'd suddenly a magic bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 554
And, downward, suddenly began to dip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 87
More suddenly than doth a moment go, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1021
To breathlessness, and suddenly a warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 106
His features were so lifeless. Suddenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 220
All suddenly were silent. A soft blending Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 941
He ceased - she panted quick - and suddenly The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 295
Suddenly on the ocean's chilly streams. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 268
Till suddenly a splendour, like the morn, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 357
I have intruded here thus suddenly , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 134
Melted and disappear'd as suddenly ; Lamia, Part I, Line 166
Burning,- when suddenly a palsied chill The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 122
 
SUE...............9
To sue her gentle ears for whose fair head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 953
To sue thee to his heart? Kind stranger-youth! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 401
I sue not for my happy crown again; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 543
I sue not for my phalanx on the plain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 544
I sue not for my lone, my widow'd wife; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 545
I sue not for my ruddy drops of life, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 546
Or sue the fair Apollo and he will Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 3
What! would you have me sue before his throne, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 64
What is it? By your father's love, I sue Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 152
 
SUEING............1
From their poor breasts went sueing to her ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 519
 
SUFFER............3
Nor suffer thy pale forehead to be kiss'd Ode on Melancholy, Line 3
I would not Albert suffer any wrong. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 110
Rather suffer me Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 114b
 
SUFFER'D..........2
And, thoughtless! suffer'd thee to pass alone Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 22
And suffer'd in these temples; for that cause The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 180
 
SUFFERED..........1
Hadst caught the tones, nor suffered them to die. To Lord Byron, Line 5
 
SUFFERER..........1
Just when the sufferer begins to burn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 533
 
SUFFERING.........2
And air, and pains, and care, and suffering ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 432
Suffering a daily death from evil tongues; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 45
 
SUFFOCATE.........2
And suffocate true blessings in a curse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 370
You suffocate me! Stop this devil's parley, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
 
SUFFOCATING.......2
A bitter death,- a suffocating death,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 22
Grew stifling, suffocating , at the heart; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 130
 
SUFFRANCE.........1
By horrid suffrance - mightily forlorn. Sleep and Poetry, Line 388
 
SUFFUSED..........1
Thus with half-shut suffused eyes he stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 44
 
SUGAR.............1
An old lion sugar -cates of mild reprieve? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 172
 
SUIT..............3
Has any here a lawyer suit All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 13
With such a thick skull'd persevering suit ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 200
High as the handles heap'd, to suit the thought Lamia, Part II, Line 218
 
SUITS.............1
To-morrow, or the next day, as time suits , The Jealousies, Line 355
 
SULK..............1
In which whales harbour close, to brood and sulk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 882
 
SULKY.............2
Sole,- in a stiff, fool-hardy, sulky pride; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 102
For a thick fog - the Princess sulky quite- The Jealousies, Line 647
 
SULLEN............15
A heavy ditty, and the sullen day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 684
Onward it flies. From languor's sullen bands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 66
Were clos'd in sullen moisture, and quick sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 469
Over his sullen eyes: I saw him throw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 564
My sullen steps; another 'fore my eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 605
For my own sullen conquering: to him Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 619
And there is sullen mist; even so much Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 6
Had spent their malice, and the sullen rear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 40
That sullen ferment, which for wondrous ends Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 193
The ponderous syllables, like sullen waves Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 305
And every height, and every sullen depth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 361
And with a sullen rigour obstinate Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 49
Sullen against the wind! If in two angry brows Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 58
To search its sullen entrails rich with ore, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 274
Had spent their malice, and the sullen rear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 342
 
SULLENLY..........1
And sullenly drifting: yet my higher hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 774
 
SULLY.............1
Then wherefore sully the entrusted gem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 757
 
SULPHUR...........3
A vein of sulphur - go, dear Red-Crag, go- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 49
Where, finding sulphur , a quadruple wrath Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 146
Spitting, from forth its sulphur -baken peak, The Jealousies, Line 662
 
SULTRY............1
Where is your hand, father?- what sultry air! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 193
 
SUM...............1
Left it to pay the piper - a good sum - The Jealousies, Line 696
 
SUMMER............50
When summer nights the dews bestow, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 9
And summer suns enrich the day, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 10
Of whitest cassia, fresh from summer showers: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 96
Its sweets upon the summer : graceful it grew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 7
And float with them about the summer waters. Happy is England! I could be content, Line 14
And float along like birds o'er summer seas; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 57
What is more gentle than a wind in summer ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 1
A pigeon tumbling in clear summer air; Sleep and Poetry, Line 93
Of summer nights collected still to make Sleep and Poetry, Line 191
Upon their summer thrones; there too should be I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 37
In summer luxury,- he has never done On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 6
Like rose-leaves with the drip of summer rains. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 8
Were swelling for summer fare; God of the golden bow, Line 28
Their summer coolness: pent up butterflies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 258
Vesper, the beauty-crest of summer weather; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 363
The summer time away. One track unseams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 74
Each summer time to life. Lo! this is he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 478
She scuds with summer breezes, to pant through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 490
Arise! awake! Clear summer has forth walk'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 502
Be incense-pillow'd every summer night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 999
And, in the summer tide of blossoming, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 155
There blush'd no summer eve but I would steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 357
And never was a day of summer shine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 361
Remember'd from its velvet summer song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 297
Green-kyrtled Spring, flush Summer , golden store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 422
Warm as a dove's nest among summer trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 666
Bows down his summer head below the west. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 930
To die, when summer dies on the cold sward. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 936
Apollo's summer look; In drear nighted December, Line 12
My wine overbrims a whole summer ; Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 6
Be with me in the summer days, and I Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 13
He hath his summer , when luxuriously Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 5
A pleasant summer level For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 21
It forces us in summer skies to mourn: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 84
Lady! thou leadest me to summer clime, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 66
The short-lived, paly summer is but won On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 5
Yawning and doating a whole summer long, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 6
All delights of summer weather; Fancy, Line 32
Its light balloons into the summer air; Character of C.B., Line 5
As when, upon a tranced summer -night, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 72
Clouds of stored summer rains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 58
Singest of summer in full-throated ease. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 10
The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 50
The blissful cloud of summer -indolence Ode on Indolence, Line 16
It seem'd he had lov'd them a whole summer long: Lamia, Part I, Line 250
Unveil'd the summer heaven, blue and clear, Lamia, Part II, Line 21
For summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells. To Autumn, Line 11
Of moss, was spread a feast of summer fruits, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 29
As when, upon a tranced summer night, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 372
A frost upon his summer ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 57a
 
SUMMER'S..........9
Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 1
When Cynthia smiles upon a summer's night, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 93
Be the summer's wife. Hither, hither, love, Line 12
By many a summer's silent fingering; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 432
Swallows obeying the south summer's call, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 816
As from the westward of a summer's night; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 52
Summer's joys are spoilt by use, Fancy, Line 10
Not so much life as on a summer's day Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 8
As in the zoning of a summer's day The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 312
 
SUMMERS...........1
Ourselves whole summers by a river glade; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 811
 
SUMMIT............3
Gilds the bright summit of some gloomy cloud; To Hope, Line 44
Who on Helvellyn's summit , wide awake, Addressed to the Same, Line 3
From a tree's summit ; a poor Indian's sleep Sleep and Poetry, Line 87
 
SUMMON............3
To summon all the downiest clouds together Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 364
To summon harmful lightning, and make yawn Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 83
(Lycius was gone to summon all his kin) Lamia, Part II, Line 112
 
SUMMON'D..........1
Let Albert straight be summon'd . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 192a
 
SUMMONER..........3
A summoner ,- she will obey my call, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 76
Of his great summoner , and made retreat Lamia, Part I, Line 11
A meaner summoner might do as well- King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 23
 
SUMMONS...........1
A higher summons :- still didst thou betake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 16
 
SUMMUM............1
And as this is the summum bo- All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 53
 
SUMPTUOUS.........1
Of wreathed silver: sumptuous they stand The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 273
 
SUN...............72
When it flutters in sun -beams that shine through a fountain? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 4
A sun -beamy tale of a wreath, and a chain; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 22
And in the last sun -beam the sylph lightly swims. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 8
Just when the sun his farewell beam has darted: To George Felton Mathew, Line 16
And make "a sun -shine in a shady place": To George Felton Mathew, Line 75
Just as the sun was from the east uprising; To George Felton Mathew, Line 80
And come like a clear sun -rise to my mind; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 50
Which the glad setting sun in gold doth dress; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 35
The sun , when first he kist away the tears To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 2
Like the bright spots that move about the sun ; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 40
To see the sun o'er peep the eastern dimness, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 86
That glance so brightly at the new sun -rise. Sleep and Poetry, Line 18
No one who once the glorious sun has seen, Sleep and Poetry, Line 41
The morning sun -beams to the great Apollo Sleep and Poetry, Line 60
Over some precipice; let the hot sun Sleep and Poetry, Line 302
The dazzling sun -rise: two sisters sweet Sleep and Poetry, Line 367
When all the birds are faint with the hot sun , On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 2
A sun - a shadow of a magnitude. On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 14
Who loves to peer up at the morning sun , On The Story of Rimini, Line 1
From our dark spirits. Such the sun , the moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 13
Gave temperate sweets to that well-wooing sun ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 101
To feel this sun -rise and its glories old. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 106
When last the sun his autumn tresses shook, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 440
And, when the pleasant sun is getting low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 483
I, who still saw the horizontal sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 529
The rather for the sun unwilling leaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 547
Not oat-sheaves drooping in the western sun ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 610
Of grasshoppers against the sun . She weeps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 715
With the conquering sun of spring, and left the skies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 921
By this the sun is setting; we may chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 988
Through the green evening quiet in the sun , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 71
Old darkness from his throne: 'twas like the sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 246
Although the sun of poesy is set, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 729
O that her shining hair was in the sun , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 943
In light, in gloom, in star or blazing sun , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 95
The poet's harp - the voice of friends - the sun ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 165
The comfortable sun . I was athirst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 676
Tall chestnuts keep away the sun and moon:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 207
And always, at the rising of the sun , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 254
For soaring too audacious in the sun , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 442
Laughing at the clear stream and setting sun , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 946
You may go, with sun or moon, Robin Hood, Line 20
The pleasant sun -rise; green isles hast thou too, To the Nile, Line 13
Of Cynthia:- the wide palace of the sun ; Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 2
The sun , with his great eye, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 1
Gleams in the sun , the milk-white heifer lows, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 21
Then there's a little wing, far from the sun , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 45
And bade the sun farewell, and joy'd his fill. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 80
Into the sun -rise, o'er the balustrade Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 178
Come down, we pray thee, ere the hot sun count Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 187
Lustre into the sun , and put cold doom Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 277
And she forgot the stars, the moon, and sun , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 417
The town, the churchyard, and the setting sun , On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 1
When from the sun was thy broad forehead hid? To Ailsa Rock, Line 4
Woodlark may sing from sandy fern,- the sun may hear his lay; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 14
Blood-red the sun may set behind black mountain peaks; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 17
And where the sun on fiercest phosphor shines Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 58
With the spheres of sun and moon; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 6
Meantime I will keep watch on thy bright sun , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 347
Of Memnon's image at the set of sun Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 374
Where was he, when the Giant of the Sun Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 29
What are the stars? There is the sun , the sun! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 97
What are the stars? There is the sun, the sun ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 97
Of the golden-presenc'd sun . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 47
But fadeth at the greeting of the sun : Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 27
Here is proof palpable as the bright sun ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 5
You heard what oath I sware, as the sun rose, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 27
More generous to me than autumn- sun Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 166
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun ; To Autumn, Line 2
Still suck their fill of light from sun and moon, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 421
And long-tail'd pheasants, and a rising sun , The Jealousies, Line 448
"As flowers turn their faces to the sun , The Jealousies, Line 721
 
SUN'S.............5
Tipt round with silver from the sun's bright eyes. Sleep and Poetry, Line 132
In the sun's eye, and 'gainst my temples press To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 6
For the sun's purple couch; to emulate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 365
From man to the sun's God; yet unsecure: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 168
From man to the Sun's God: yet unsecure; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 17
 
SUNBEAMS..........3
Like sunbeams in a cloudlet nested Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 51
Which at this moment is in sunbeams drest: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 140
Sleep in the lap of thunder or sunbeams , To Ailsa Rock, Line 7
 
SUNBURNT..........2
A crowd of shepherds with as sunburnt looks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 139
Dance, and Provencal song, and sunburnt mirth! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 14
 
SUNDAY............1
Serv'd with harsh food, with scum for Sunday -drink. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 89
 
SUNG..............13
Heroic deeds, and sung of fate, Ode to Apollo, Line 4
'Mong which the nightingales have always sung To George Felton Mathew, Line 46
The glorious features of the bards who sung Sleep and Poetry, Line 356
That in these days your praises should be sung I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 51
Dew-dabbled on their stalks, the ouzel sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 683
And poisoned was my spirit: despair sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 602
An echo of thee in the north-wind sung . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 160
Still is the burthen sung - "O cruelty, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 503
The joys of all his life were said and sung : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 23
And pardon that thy secrets should be sung Ode to Psyche, Line 3
Who sung far different notes into mine ears. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 42
For so delicious were the words she sung , Lamia, Part I, Line 249
Those melodies sung into the world's ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 188
 
SUNK..............4
Felt faint, and would have sunk among the rest, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 106
One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk : Ode to a Nightingale, Line 4
The cloudy swoon came on, and down I sunk The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 55
The superannuations of sunk realms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 68
 
SUNKEN............3
To my down- sunken hours, and with thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 708
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 2
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 295
 
SUNLIGHT..........1
Certes, a father's smile should, like sunlight , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 117
 
SUNNY.............10
Through sunny air. Add too, the sweetness Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 23
To taste the luxury of sunny beams I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 74
Than a sunny hill: Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 14
Through sunny meadows, that outskirt the side Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 250
Were deepest dungeons; heaths and sunny glades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 693
Dazzled to trace it in the sunny skies. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 68
And if I guess'd not so, the sunny beam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 577
Cool parsley, basil sweet, and sunny thyme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 577
Cast on sunny bank its skin; Fancy, Line 58
O, for some sunny spell What can I do to drive away, Line 44
 
SUNRISE...........3
Cold as sunrise in September, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 7
Like callow eagles at the first sunrise . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 859
Were shut against the sunrise evermore. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 86
 
SUNS..............2
And summer suns enrich the day, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 10
Budding - fruit ripening in stillness - autumn suns After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 10
 
SUNSET............3
For, as the sunset peeps into a wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 382
Would all their colours from the sunset take: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 68
The chilly sunset faintly told The Eve of St. Mark, Line 7
 
SUNSETS...........1
A light as of four sunsets , blazing forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 877
 
SUNSHINE..........2
Of golden sunshine , Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 14
Blinded alike from sunshine and from rain, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 242
 
SUP...............1
Sup and bowse from horn and can. Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 12
 
SUPERANNUATIONS...1
The superannuations of sunk realms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 68
 
SUPERB............2
Saving Love's self, who stands superb to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 535
Thou superb , plum'd, and helmeted renown, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 10
 
SUPERBLY..........1
Oft have you seen a swan superbly frowning, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 1
 
SUPERFLUOUS.......1
For of superfluous diamonds I as well may thin it. The Jealousies, Line 621
 
SUPERIOR..........2
Fill with superior bliss, or, at desire As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 11
There must be some superior costliness, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 33
 
SUPERIOUR.........1
And make superiour each delight. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 16
 
SUPERSEDETH.......1
And supersedeth quite the use of the glow-worm. The Jealousies, Line 216
 
SUPERSTITION'S....1
He died ere superstition's gall O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 59
 
SUPINE............3
These warrior thousands on the field supine :- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 734
And couch supine their beauties, lily white; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 52
He sank supine beside the aching ghost. Lamia, Part II, Line 294
 
SUPINELY..........1
Or, on the wavy grass outstretch'd supinely , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 7
 
SUPPER............5
No, nor when supper came, nor after that,- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 119
And 'stead of supper she would stare Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 15
And then for supper , 'stead of soup and poaches, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 14
And I must sit to supper with my friar. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 71
magnificence, with supper -tables, laden with services of gold and silver. A Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
SUPPERLESS........1
As, supperless to bed they must retire, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 51
 
SUPPLIANT.........1
With hope that gloss of words, or suppliant action, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 128
 
SUPPORT...........1
Oh! for enough life to support me on Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 1
 
SUPPORTED.........1
Supported him - no pulse, or breath they found, Lamia, Part II, Line 310
 
SUPPORTRESS.......1
Supportress of the faery-roof, made moan Lamia, Part II, Line 123
 
SUPPORTS..........1
Supports an old bishop and crosier; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 3
 
SUPPOSE...........2
might/ Rest I ne wist, for there n'as erthly wight/ [As I suppose ] had more of Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
Well, suppose this Albert here; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 38b
 
SUPREMACY.........1
And only blind from sheer supremacy , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 185
 
SUPREME...........13
Of light is poesy; 'tis the supreme of power; Sleep and Poetry, Line 236
Of soothing warmth, of dalliance supreme ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 439
Our piety to Neptunus supreme !"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 808
Those eyes, those passions, those supreme pearl springs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 718
Of supreme darkness which thou feddest on O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 6
And all those acts which Deity supreme Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 111
There saw she direst strife; the supreme God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 92
He lean'd; not rising, from supreme contempt. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 308
Or I have dream'd."- "Yes," said the supreme shape, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 61
Or, at thy supreme desire, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 83
Of my great love for thee, my supreme child! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 125
Is Saturn's; I, Moneta, left supreme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 226
And all those acts which deity supreme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 416
 
SURCHARG'D........1
An unknown time, surcharg'd with grief, away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 292
 
SURE..............45
For sure so fair a place was never seen, Imitation of Spenser, Line 23
Is my soul's pleasure; and it sure must be O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 12
In shape, that sure no living man had thought Calidore: A Fragment, Line 117
For tasting joys like these, sure I should be To My Brother George (epistle), Line 111
If I do hide myself, it sure shall be Sleep and Poetry, Line 275
Ah, sure no tasteful nook would be without them; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 30
Were I in such a place, I sure should pray I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 93
He was a Poet, sure a lover too, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 193
Leaving us fancy-sick. No, no, I'm sure , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 853
Sure never since king Neptune held his state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 726
For dainty toying. Cupid, empire- sure , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 931
Bewitch'd I sure must be, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 277
And this is sure thine other softling - this Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 316
But who so stares on him? His sister sure ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 800
Sure I will not believe thou hast such store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 809
Is sure enough to make a mortal man Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 960
Is sure enough - and so "here follows prose." Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 113
They could not, sure , beneath the same roof sleep Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 7
In spirit sure I had a call- All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 35
A nightmare sure - What, madam, was it you? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 27
Therefore 'tis sure a want of Attic taste, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 58
Sure I have heard those vestments sweeping o'er Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 53
And sure in language strange she said- La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 27
Are you sure , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 103b
upon her, sure as a wen. We are safe. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 61
I think, nay I am sure , you will grieve much Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 113
Blessings upon you, daughter! Sure you look Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 120
Believe me, I am well nigh sure - Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 146a
Ludolph, old Ethelbert, be sure , comes not Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 107
Might have been trodden out, all sure and hush'd; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 18
Albert, you jest; I'm sure you must. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 150b
Sure this should be some splendid burial. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Second Lady, Line 12
Its most ambiguous atoms with sure art; Lamia, Part I, Line 196
Her soft look growing coy, she saw his chain so sure : Lamia, Part I, Line 256
" Sure some sweet name thou hast, though, by my truth, Lamia, Part II, Line 85
Labour for mortal good? I sure should see The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 159
Majestic shadow, tell me: sure not all The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 187
Are useless: sure a poet is a sage; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 189
For by my burning brain I measured sure The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 393
Sure of a bloody prey, seeing the fens King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Second Knight, Line 14
Into times past, yet to be echoed sure King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 4
It may read well, but sure 'tis out of date King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 33
At an enormous figure!- stars not sure !- The Jealousies, Line 296
To- "Hush - hush!" cried Eban, " sure that is he The Jealousies, Line 300
"Made racy - ( sure my boldness is misplaced!)- The Jealousies, Line 367
 
SURELY............21
For man's protection. Surely the All-seeing, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 32
Ah! surely it must be whene'er I find To George Felton Mathew, Line 36
And wilt surely never spill Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 67
Ah! surely he had burst our mortal bars; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 190
Surely the mind of man is closely bound Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 5
So mournful strange. Surely some influence rare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 497
There must be surely character'd strange things, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 62
Must surely be self-doomed or he will rue it: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 843
Ah! surely that light peeps from Vesper's eye, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 78
He leant, wretched. He surely cannot now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 86
Thou surely canst not bear a mind in pain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 811
O may dark fancies err! they surely do; To the Nile, Line 9
They could not surely give belief, that such Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 461
Thou canst not surely be the same that thou didst seem." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 144
In cool mid-forest. Surely I have traced Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 55
Surely I dreamt to-day, or did I see Ode to Psyche, Line 5
Surely you spared him at my earnest prayer? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 64
Albert has surely fail'd me! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 61c
No! Do I? Surely I am still to learn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 113
"Thou smooth-lipp'd serpent, surely high inspired! Lamia, Part I, Line 83
And knowing surely she could never win Lamia, Part II, Line 113
 
SURER.............2
Let me entwine thee surer , surer - now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 752
Let me entwine thee surer, surer - now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 752
 
SUREST............1
Before they fix'd upon a surest way Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 171
 
SURETY............1
And surety give to love and brotherhood. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 9
 
SURFACE...........2
'Gainst the smooth surface , and to mark anon, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 17
Of ruffles all the surface of the lake To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 7
 
SURGE.............1
But as the murmuring surge . Chilly and numb Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 243
 
SURGES............2
And I was gazing on the surges prone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 667
While the surges washed his feet Not Aladdin magian, Line 13
 
SURGY.............1
The surgy murmurs of the lonely sea. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 121
 
SURLY.............1
Their surly eyes brow-hidden, heavy paws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 645
 
SURMISE...........3
Look'd at each other with a wild surmise - On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 13
Or more complete to overwhelm surmise ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 522
He'll surmise sagely of a dwelling-house, The Jealousies, Line 58
 
SURMISED..........1
To a few paces; not at all surmised Lamia, Part I, Line 346
 
SURMISES..........1
And then I run into most wild surmises On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 13
 
SURMOUNTED........1
My sceptre, and my cross- surmounted globe, The Jealousies, Line 407
 
SURNAME...........1
Named Bertha; but her surname will not come, The Jealousies, Line 381
 
SURPASS...........1
Do not those curls of glossy jet surpass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 60
 
SURPASS'D.........1
Of one fair palace, that far far surpass'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 847
 
SURPASSING........1
Surpassing wan Moneta by the head, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 337
 
SURPRIS'D.........3
How far beyond!" At this a surpris'd start Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 187
Till a faint dawn surpris'd them. Glaucus cried, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 832
Blush keenly, as with some warm kiss surpris'd . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 22
 
SURPRISE..........11
And so they stood, fill'd with a sweet surprise , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 234
For willing service; whether to surprise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 264
They led on first, bent to her meek surprise , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 810
And catch the cheated eye in wide surprise , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 341
Beautiful things made new, for the surprise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 132
And, on the sudden, fainting with surprise , Ode to Psyche, Line 8
My joys with such opprobrious surprise ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 80
Without surprise , his questions, howe'er strange. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 18
Observe what I have said,- show no surprise . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 21
Princess turn'd dainty, to our great surprise , The Jealousies, Line 652
Was seen, to our immoderate surprise , The Jealousies, Line 761
 
SURPRISED.........1
Surprised me even from a sleepless night; Sleep and Poetry, Line 400
 
SURPRISES.........1
Surprises me!- they too at these high games! The Jealousies, Line 142
 
SURPRIZE..........2
But, what creates the most intense surprize , Ode to Apollo, Line 11
Beautiful things made new for the surprize The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 437
 
SURRENDER.........2
So faint a kindness, such a meek surrender Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 73
But makes surrender to some thoughtless boy, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 3
 
SURROUNDED........1
The dwellings of this war- surrounded isle; On Peace, Line 2
 
SURVIV'D..........1
Still whole. I have surviv'd . My arm is strong,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 134
 
SURVIVE...........1
If he survive one hour, then may I die Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 11

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Published @ RC

March 2005