Sus-Sz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
SUSPECT...........2
Albert, I must suspect thee of a crime Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 236
The pledge of favour, that he not suspect The Jealousies, Line 191
 
SUSPENDED.........1
To see the laurel wreath, on high suspended , Sleep and Poetry, Line 35
 
SUSPICION.........2
Of your keen-eyed suspicion ,- she is naught! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 147
It might affright him, fill him with suspicion Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 54
 
SWAGGER...........1
No military swagger of my mind, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 155
 
SWALLOW...........1
The freaks, and dartings of the black-wing'd swallow , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 14
 
SWALLOW'D.........5
Are swallow'd all, and made a seared dearth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 368
Of huge Enceladus swallow'd it in wrath: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 304
O wretched woman! lost, wreck'd, swallow'd up, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 77
"Moan, brethren, moan; for we are swallow'd up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 412
Or swallow'd by my hunger-starved asp,- The Jealousies, Line 197
 
SWALLOW'S.........2
Of a swallow's nest-door, could delay a trace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 753
Deafening the swallow's twitter, came a thrill Lamia, Part II, Line 27
 
SWALLOWS..........4
Swallows obeying the south summer's call, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 816
It swallows cabbages without a spoon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 11
It swallows chairmen, damns, and hackney coaches. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 15
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies. To Autumn, Line 33
 
SWAM..............1
Aye, those fair living forms swam heavenly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 315
 
SWAMP.............2
Cheats us into a swamp , into a fire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 279
Will swamp them girth deep. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Second Knight, Line 15a
 
SWAN..............6
There saw the swan his neck of arched snow, Imitation of Spenser, Line 14
Still warble, dying swan , - still tell the tale, To Lord Byron, Line 13
A black-eyed swan upon the widening stream; To George Felton Mathew, Line 87
Oft have you seen a swan superbly frowning, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 1
"Thou swan of Ganges, let us no more breathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 465
The swan , soft leaning on her fledgy breast, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 101
 
SWAN'S............2
By a swan's ebon bill; from a thick brake, Sleep and Poetry, Line 226
Of a swan's neck unseen among the rushes: Sleep and Poetry, Line 341
 
SWANS.............5
Nor minds he the white swans that dream so sweetly: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 62
Than wings of swans , than doves, than dim-seen eagle? Sleep and Poetry, Line 22
Of flowers, peacocks, swans , and naiads fair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 620
Or swans upon a gentle waterfall. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 817
Of his swift magic. Diving swans appear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 339
 
SWARD.............8
Find a fresh sward beneath it, overgrown Sleep and Poetry, Line 258
Of nymphs approaching fairly o'er the sward : Sleep and Poetry, Line 365
Daisies upon the sacred sward last eve, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 93
Unto the clover- sward , and she has talk'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 503
One moment from his home: only the sward Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 335
To die, when summer dies on the cold sward . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 936
By bards who died content in pleasant sward , Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 7
From dewy sward or thorny spray; Fancy, Line 34
 
SWARE.............1
You heard what oath I sware , as the sun rose, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 27
 
SWARM.............2
When the bee-hive casts its swarm ; Fancy, Line 64
Freckled with red and gold the moving swarm ; The Jealousies, Line 575
 
SWARMING..........1
A hopeless bustle 'mid our swarming arms; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 11
 
SWARMS............3
Where swarms of minnows show their little heads, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 72
Amid a camp, whose steeled swarms I dar'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 67
The city all her unhived swarms had cast, The Jealousies, Line 719
 
SWART.............7
Swart planet in the universe of deeds! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 15
And down some swart abysm he had gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 376
Nurse of swart nations since the world began, To the Nile, Line 5
Her apples were swart blackberries, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 5
Clasp'd like a missal where swart Paynims pray; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 241
Of stone, or marble swart ; their import gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 282
I'll choose a jailor, whose swart monstrous face Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 91
 
SWATH.............1
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers: To Autumn, Line 18
 
SWATHE............1
Its swathe is on the cotton tree; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 21
 
SWAY..............7
And still she governs with the mildest sway : Sleep and Poetry, Line 240
The sway of human hand; gold vase emboss'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 126
Yet not entirely; no, thy starry sway Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 178
To sway their floating morris. "Whose is this? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 426
O bag-pipe, thou didst reassert thy sway ; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 11
Of peaceful sway above man's harvesting, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 110
And peaceful sway above man's harvesting, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 415
 
SWAY'D............3
They sway'd about upon a rocking horse, Sleep and Poetry, Line 186
Sway'd by command, as corn is by the wind? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 19
Sway'd here and there, commanded to and fro, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 2
 
SWAYED............1
Swayed to and fro by every wind and tide? To Fanny, Line 38
 
SWEAR.............14
Press me so sweetly. Now I swear at once Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 798
'Twixt Nothing and Creation, I here swear , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 41
For as he lifted up his eyes to swear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 189
He would swear , for all his oaks, Robin Hood, Line 43
"I will not harm her, by all saints I swear ," The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 145
You are my enemy, I dare here swear Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 150
That, by my love I swear , shall soon be his? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 120
Your plight before, and, by her son, I swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 31
Albert, will you swear ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 33b
I by the banner of Saint Maurice swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 51
That I can swear . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 80a
Wring hands; embrace; and swear how lucky 'twas Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 251
Her lips - I swear no human bones e'er wore Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 71
"I swear ," said Hermes, "by my serpent rod, Lamia, Part I, Line 89
 
SWEAREST..........1
If thou wilt, as thou swearest , grant my boon!" Lamia, Part I, Line 111
 
SWEAT.............1
His Druid locks to shake and ooze with sweat , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 137
 
SWEEP.............3
Some ever-fleeting music on they sweep . Sleep and Poetry, Line 141
How tremulous-dazzlingly the wheels sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 189
To some black cloud; thence down I'll madly sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 247
 
SWEEPING..........5
Branch down sweeping from a tall ash top, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 335
Sweeping , eye-earnestly, through almond vales: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 380
Fix'd on the floor, saw many a sweeping train The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 58
Sure I have heard those vestments sweeping o'er Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 53
Sweeping into this presence, glisten'd o'er Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 85
 
SWEEPS............1
When the prow sweeps into a midnight cove. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 355
 
SWEET.............249
The sweet companions that await on thee; On Peace, Line 6
Let the sweet mountain nymph thy favorite be, On Peace, Line 8
I should have felt a sweet relief, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 23
Of Lapland thinks on sweet Arno; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 26
Sweet Hope, ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 5
Chace him away, sweet Hope, with visage bright, To Hope, Line 17
Sweet Hope, ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 29
Sweet Hope, celestial influence round me shed, To Hope, Line 47
The sweet majestic tone of Maro's lyre; Ode to Apollo, Line 14
For, indeed, 'tis a sweet and peculiar pleasure, To Some Ladies, Line 25
Yet the sweet converse of an innocent mind, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 10
Sweet are the pleasures that to verse belong, To George Felton Mathew, Line 1
And doubly sweet a brotherhood in song; To George Felton Mathew, Line 2
Yet must I dote upon thee, - call thee sweet , Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 9
Kept with such sweet privacy, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 27
Athwart the morning air: some lady sweet , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 13
Of this sweet spot of earth. The bowery shore Calidore: A Fragment, Line 26
Into how sweet a trance his soul was gone, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 83
Come to the earth; with an incline so sweet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 86
From their sweet thrall, and forward gently bending, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 103
The sweet -lipp'd ladies have already greeted Calidore: A Fragment, Line 135
Sweet as blue heavens o'er enchanted isles. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 151
Sweet too the converse of these happy mortals, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 158
Sweet be their sleep. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 162
'Tis very sweet to look into the fair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 2
All meaner thoughts, and take a sweet reprieve Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 5
Happy is England, sweet her artless daughters; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 9
Like a sweet nun in holy-day attire? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 62
Lured by the innocent dimples. To sweet rest To My Brother George (epistle), Line 101
Who had of all that's sweet tasted, and seen, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 38
One who, of late, had ta'en sweet forest walks To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 42
The grand, the sweet , the terse, the free, the fine; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 54
Into the labyrinths of sweet utterance? To G.A.W., Line 4
The thought thereof is awful, sweet , and holy, Sleep and Poetry, Line 25
To woo sweet kisses from averted faces,- Sleep and Poetry, Line 106
Fresh garlands: for sweet music has been heard Sleep and Poetry, Line 223
Mingled indeed with what is sweet and strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 232
Lifts its sweet head into the air, and feeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 250
For sweet relief I'll dwell Sleep and Poetry, Line 312b
To as sweet a silence, when I 'gan retrace Sleep and Poetry, Line 352
The dazzling sun-rise: two sisters sweet Sleep and Poetry, Line 367
His eyes from her sweet face. Most happy they! Sleep and Poetry, Line 391
That the sweet buds which with a modest pride I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 3
Here are sweet peas, on tip-toe for a flight: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 57
With their own sweet delight, and ever nestle I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 76
That nought less sweet might call my thoughts away, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 94
O Maker of sweet poets, dear delight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 116
O'er head we see the jasmine and sweet briar, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 135
And garlands woven of flowers wild, and sweet , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 155
Full of sweet desolation - balmy pain. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 162
So while the Poet stood in this sweet spot, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 177
And brought in faintness solemn, sweet , and slow I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 196
So every tale, does this sweet tale of thine. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 208
And so they stood, fill'd with a sweet surprise, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 234
Sweet Sappho's cheek - a sleeping infant's breath- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 12
Circling from three sweet pair of lips in mirth; To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 4
To keep the reader in so sweet a place, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 3
Come hither all sweet maidens, soberly On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 1
Let him with this sweet tale full often seek On The Story of Rimini, Line 3
In ripest quiet, shadows of sweet sounds; Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 9
Hither, hither, sweet , Hither, hither, love, Line 5
Hither, hither, sweet , Hither, hither, love, Line 7
Think not of it, sweet one, so; Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 1
Do not look so sad, sweet one, Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 5
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 5
Hum about globes of clover and sweet peas, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 52
Of all sweet herbs that searching eye could cull: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 156
Or from your swelling downs, where sweet air stirs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 201
Time's sweet first-fruits - they danc'd to weariness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 321
Sweet poesy by moonlight: besides these, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 369
Peona, his sweet sister: of all those, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 408
Our idle sheep. So be thou cheered, sweet , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 486
More bluely vein'd, more soft, more whitely sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 625
Reflects upon a diamond, my sweet dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 677
Sweet sister, help to stem the ebbing sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 709
Tones ravishment, or ravishment its sweet , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 841
Was pass'd in dreaming. Hearken, sweet Peona! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 861
Its own sweet grief at parting. Overhead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 939
Daily, I pluck sweet flowerets from their bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 954
The close of Troilus and Cressid sweet . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 13
Some holy bark let forth an anthem sweet , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 81
Yet do not so, sweet queen; one torment spar'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 175
But, finding in our green earth sweet contents, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 313
O think how sweet to me the freshening sluice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 326
To your dimpled arms. Once more sweet life begin!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 506
For their sweet queen: when lo! the wreathed green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 516
Thee safely through these wonders for sweet ends. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 575
Haply, like dolphin tumults, when sweet shells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 610
O let me then by some sweet dreaming flee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 703
Two bubbling springs of talk from their sweet lips. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 738
Be ever in these arms? in this sweet spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 741
To the very tune of love - how sweet , sweet, sweet. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 765
To the very tune of love - how sweet, sweet , sweet. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 765
To the very tune of love - how sweet, sweet, sweet . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 765
With fingers cool as aspen leaves. Sweet love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 804
Sweet paining on his ear: he sickly guess'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 856
Now I have tasted her sweet soul to the core Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 904
Sweet Arethusa! Dian's self must feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 984
Of his heart's blood: 'twas very sweet ; he stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 107
Into sweet air; and sober'd morning came Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 115
Would melt at thy sweet breath.- By Dian's hind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 277
Would strew sweet flowers on a sterile beach. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 371
How sweet , and sweeter! for I heard a lyre, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 421
To cradle thee, my sweet , and lull thee: yes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 572
Adieu, sweet love, adieu!' - As shot stars fall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 600
Sweet music breath'd her soul away, and sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 767
All blisses be upon thee, my sweet son!"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 921
"O I shall die! sweet Venus, be my stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1010
Of life from charitable voice? No sweet saying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 45
No hand to toy with mine? No lips so sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 47
Sweet as a muskrose upon new-made hay; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 102
Yet with as sweet a softness as might be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 296
And whisper one sweet word that I may know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 319
This is this world - sweet dewy blossom!"- Woe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 320
At the sweet sleeper,- all his soul was shook,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 453
Alone about the dark - Forgive me, sweet : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 480
And silvery was its passing: voices sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 559
Cool parsley, basil sweet , and sunny thyme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 577
Andromeda! sweet woman! why delaying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 602
Its sides I'll plant with dew- sweet eglantine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 697
Or the sweet name of love had pass'd away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 729
With my own fancies garlands of sweet life, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 750
"I would have thee my only friend, sweet maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 849
Sweet Indian, I would see thee once again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 910
And said, in a new voice, but sweet as love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 978
But with a sweet forgetting In drear nighted December, Line 13
Live temple of sweet noise; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 12
The bitter- sweet of this Shaksperean fruit. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 8
For it sounds of Eve's sweet pippin; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 10
We have not one sweet tooth out. O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 16
O cut the sweet apple and share it! O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 20
Meadows sweet where flames burn under; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 8
All my thirst for sweet heart-ache! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 29
Every delight with sweet remembering, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 13
Where the maidens sweet For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 22
An echo of sweet music doth create Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 62
He tells of the sweet music and the spot Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 65
Until sweet Isabella's untouch'd cheek Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 33
The little sweet doth kill much bitterness; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 98
To make old prose in modern rhyme more sweet : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 156
From his north cavern. So sweet Isabel Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 255
Saying moreover, "Isabel, my sweet ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 297
Sweet Spirit, thou hast school'd my infancy: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 334
Then in a silken scarf,- sweet with the dews Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 409
Sweet basil, which her tears kept ever wet. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 416
Hung over her sweet basil evermore, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 423
Lift up your heads, sweet Spirits, heavily, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 438
For Isabel, sweet Isabel, will die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 486
Now they have ta'en away her basil sweet . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 488
Sweet , sweet is the greeting of eyes, Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 1
Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 1
And sweet is the voice in its greeting, Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 2
Sweet , holy, pure, sacred, and innocent, Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 2
Beyond the sweet and bitter world - beyond it unaware; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 30
Sweet Nevis, do not quake, for though I love Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 33
I meet not such sweet creatures every day. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 41
I must have one sweet buss - I must and shall! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 43
And thy mother sweet is nigh thee! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 30
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth, Fancy, Line 3
O sweet Fancy! let her loose; Fancy, Line 9
Sweet birds antheming the morn: Fancy, Line 42
Oh, sweet Fancy! let her loose; Fancy, Line 67
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth Fancy, Line 77
While she held the goblet sweet , Fancy, Line 88
I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 1
Sweet little red feet! why would you die? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 5
Why would you leave me, sweet bird, why? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 6
Though you've padded his night-cap, O sweet Isabel. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 4
Lift the latch, ah gently! ah tenderly, sweet , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 17
At sweet life leaving, and these arbours green,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 17
Past the sweet Virgin's picture, while his prayer he saith. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 9
Sweet lady, let her pray, and sleep, and dream The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 141
Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 308
Solution sweet : meantime the frost-wind blows The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 322
"My Madeline! sweet dreamer! lovely bride! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 334
Saving of thy sweet self; if thou think'st well The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 341
While play'd the organs loud and sweet . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 22
Their sorrows. Pale were the sweet lips I saw, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 12
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 12
Blown by the serious Zephyrs, gave of sweet Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 207
Sweet -shaped lightnings from the nadir deep Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 276
And palpitations sweet , and pleasures soft, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 313
Where a sweet clime was breathed from a land Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 263
And made sweet moan. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 20
She found me roots of relish sweet , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 25
And the flowers in sweet troubles Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 35
Sweet Dusketha! Paradise! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 86
By sweet enforcement and remembrance dear, Ode to Psyche, Line 2
No voice, no lute, no pipe, no incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 32
Thy voice, thy lute, thy pipe, thy incense sweet Ode to Psyche, Line 46
And, like Andromeda, the sonnet sweet If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 2
But, in embalmed darkness, guess each sweet Ode to a Nightingale, Line 43
Heard melodies are sweet , but those unheard Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 11
At least for me,- so sweet as drowsy noons, Ode on Indolence, Line 36
Though in her lids hung the sweet tears of May; Ode on Indolence, Line 46
No " sweet Auranthes"! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 144
Hail, my sweet hostess! I do thank the stars, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 12
Aye, spite of her sweet looks. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 148b
Dictate my task. Sweet woman,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 39a
Which, lifting sweet abroad its timid green, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
Your blessing, father! Sweet Erminia, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 145
My soft Auranthe, her sweet mercy would Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 169
Pass the high stars, before sweet embassage Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Hear him! He calls you - sweet Auranthe, come! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
A fair bride! A sweet bride! An innocent bride! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 53
Nay, linger not; make no resistance, sweet ;- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 57
And the sweet lady, fair Erminia, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 8
Are dazzled with the sweet proportioning, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 68
Ah! gentlest creature, whose sweet innocence Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 169
To find where this sweet nymph prepar'd her secret bed: Lamia, Part I, Line 30
In vain; the sweet nymph might nowhere be found, Lamia, Part I, Line 31
When move in a sweet body fit for life, Lamia, Part I, Line 39
Her head was serpent, but ah, bitter- sweet ! Lamia, Part I, Line 59
Leave traces in the grass and flowers sweet ; Lamia, Part I, Line 97
And thou shalt see thy sweet nymph even now." Lamia, Part I, Line 122
Wither'd at dew so sweet and virulent; Lamia, Part I, Line 149
Sweet days a lovely graduate, still unshent, Lamia, Part I, Line 198
Came thy sweet greeting, that if thou shouldst fade Lamia, Part I, Line 269
A song of love, too sweet for earthly lyres, Lamia, Part I, Line 299
To see her still, and singing so sweet lays; Lamia, Part I, Line 323
And last, pointing to Corinth, ask'd her sweet , Lamia, Part I, Line 342
The ghost of folly haunting my sweet dreams." Lamia, Part I, Line 377
Where use had made it sweet , with eyelids closed, Lamia, Part II, Line 23
That purple-lined palace of sweet sin, Lamia, Part II, Line 31
Ay, a sweet kiss - you see your mighty woes. Lamia, Part II, Line 55
"Sure some sweet name thou hast, though, by my truth, Lamia, Part II, Line 85
Turning into sweet milk the sophist's spleen. Lamia, Part II, Line 172
No more so strange; for merry wine, sweet wine, Lamia, Part II, Line 211
Brow-beating her fair form, and troubling her sweet pride. Lamia, Part II, Line 248
My sweet bride withers at their potency." Lamia, Part II, Line 290
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, To Autumn, Line 8
Sweet smelling, whose pure kinds I could not know. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 34
Was fainting for sweet food: I look'd thereon The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 233
Which marries sweet sound with the grace of form, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 443
Sweet voice, sweet lips, soft hand, and softer breast, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 2
Sweet voice, sweet lips, soft hand, and softer breast, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 2
That shape, that fairness, that sweet minor zest I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 6
No,- wine is only sweet to happy men; What can I do to drive away, Line 27
There flowers have no scent, birds no sweet song, What can I do to drive away, Line 42
Ah! dearest love, sweet home of all my fears To Fanny, Line 9
Save it for me, sweet love! though music breathe To Fanny, Line 25
To one who loves you as I love, sweet Fanny, To Fanny, Line 42
Eats wholesome, sweet , and palatable food King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 27
Themselves with what in faery land was sweet , The Jealousies, Line 22
With the sweet Princess on her plumaged lair, The Jealousies, Line 40
Sweet Bertha! what crime can it be to glide The Jealousies, Line 169
Tell me how I may that sweet girl embrace,- The Jealousies, Line 484
At his sweet prose, and, if we can, make dance The Jealousies, Line 635
Sweet in the air a mild-toned music plays, The Jealousies, Line 725
 
SWEETEN'D.........1
Their music came to my o'er- sweeten'd soul; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 445
 
SWEETER...........9
Sweeter by far than Hybla's honied roses Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 10
But 'twas not long; for, sweeter than the rill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 339
Sweeter than that nurse Amalthea skimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 448
How sweet, and sweeter ! for I heard a lyre, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 421
Sweeter than those dainty pies Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 8
A voice came sweeter , sweeter than all tune, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 292
A voice came sweeter, sweeter than all tune, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 292
Are sweeter ; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 12
And will be sweeter , when ye see her pace Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 84
 
SWEETEST..........15
Let me awhile thy sweetest comforts borrow: To Hope, Line 22
I saw the sweetest flower wild nature yields, To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 5
That sweetest of all songs, that ever new, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 182
This sweetest day for dalliance was born; Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 15
A well-known voice sigh'd, " Sweetest , here am I!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 714
O sweetest essence! sweetest of all minions! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 983
O sweetest essence! sweetest of all minions! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 983
Sweetest Sorrow! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 280
But starv'd and died. My sweetest Indian, here, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 648
Doves will offer up, and sweetest store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 660
And of three sweetest pleasurings the choice: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 716
Married to green in all the sweetest flowers- Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 10
She sigh'd for Agnes' dreams, the sweetest of the year. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 63
Made tuneable with every sweetest vow; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 309
Stab him! O sweetest wife! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 73b
 
SWEETLY...........14
Byron, how sweetly sad thy melody, To Lord Byron, Line 1
Thou sweetly singest - nought thy hymning mars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 11
And, smiles with his star-cheering voice sweetly blending, To Some Ladies, Line 19
With love-looking eyes, and with voice sweetly bland. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 20
Nor minds he the white swans that dream so sweetly : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 62
Haply 'tis when thy ruby lips part sweetly , To G.A.W., Line 9
And fresh from the clear brook; sweetly they slept I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 9
Press me so sweetly . Now I swear at once Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 798
Then Scylla, blushing sweetly from her dream, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 809
With dumb endeavour sweetly ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 47
Sweetly , with dumb endeavour, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 52
Why not live sweetly as in the green trees? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 10
A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme: Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 4
So sweetly to these ravish'd ears of mine Lamia, Part I, Line 268
 
SWEETNESS.........5
Through sunny air. Add too, the sweetness Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 23
Whence came that high perfection of all sweetness ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 607
And apples, wan with sweetness , gather thee,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 683
Oh! the sweetness of the pain! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 23
O, the sweetness of the pain! What can I do to drive away, Line 54
 
SWEETS............15
I pillow my head on the sweets of the rose, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 38
Who can forget her half retiring sweets ? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 30
Its sweets upon the summer: graceful it grew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 7
That you first taught me all the sweets of song: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 53
The o'erwhelming sweets , 'twill bring to me the fair Sleep and Poetry, Line 62
Gave temperate sweets to that well-wooing sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 101
Of teeming sweets , enkindling sacred fire; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 224
One moment with his hand among the sweets : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 354
Of mealy sweets , which myriads of bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 996
Filling with spiritual sweets to plenitude, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 39
Its sweets in the wrong sense.- Thou dost eclipse Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 12
Instead of sweets , his ample palate took Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 188
Of the sweets of Fairies, Peris, Goddesses, Lamia, Part I, Line 329
Instead of sweets , his ample palate takes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 32
The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone! The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 1
 
SWELL.............17
Its flowery slopes, its river's crystal swell , O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 5
No cuirass glistens on my bosom's swell ; Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 6
Desolate shores, and with its mighty swell On the Sea, Line 2
Stems thronging all around between the swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 83
That flowers would bloom, or that green fruit would swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 836
He wander'd through, oft wondering at such swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 679
Yet look upon it, and 'twould size and swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 206
The sea- swell took her hair. Dead as she was Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 625
'Twas done: and straight with sudden swell and fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 766
And air of visions, and the monstrous swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 652
Will each one swell to twice ten times the size Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 63
As though a tongueless nightingale should swell The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 206
To feel for ever its soft swell and fall, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 11
All as ye pass swell out the monstrous truth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 65
May burst, and swell , and flourish round thy brows, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 30
In one whose brow had no dark veins to swell . Lamia, Part II, Line 77
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells To Autumn, Line 7
 
SWELL'D...........7
What swell'd with pathos, and what right divine: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 55
Had more been heard. Thus swell'd it forth: "Descend, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 202
So from the arbour roof down swell'd an air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 513
I came to a dark valley.- Groanings swell'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 490
Budded, and swell'd , and, full-blown, shed full showers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 799
Still onward; still the splendour gradual swell'd . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 840
Her long black hair swell'd ampler, in display Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 984
 
SWELLING..........12
Rein in the swelling of his ample might? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 48
The sidelong view of swelling leafiness, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 34
Nor will a bee buzz round two swelling peaches, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 66
Who read for me the sonnet swelling loudly To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 60
At swelling apples with a frisky leap Sleep and Poetry, Line 361
Heaves calmly its broad swelling smoothness o'er Sleep and Poetry, Line 377
Were swelling for summer fare; God of the golden bow, Line 28
Or from your swelling downs, where sweet air stirs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 201
Came swelling forth where little caves were wreath'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 665
Wide o'er the swelling streams: and constantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 365
Huge sea-marks; vanward swelling in array, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 830
Swelling upon the silence; dying off; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 376
 
SWELLINGS.........1
Its airy swellings , with a gentle wave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 118
 
SWELLS............5
Then, through thy temple wide, melodious swells Ode to Apollo, Line 13
It swells , it buds, it flowers beneath his sight; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 59
Or they are but the ghosts, the dying swells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 914
In swells unmitigated, still doth last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 425
Cunningly-station'd music dies and swells The Jealousies, Line 570
 
SWELT.............1
And for them many a weary hand did swelt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 107
 
SWEPT.............5
The dew by fairy feet swept from the green, To George Felton Mathew, Line 26
And after him his sacred vestments swept . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 152
Sluggishly by, ere more contentment swept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 916
Where mantles grey have rustled by and swept the nettles green: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 4
His silent sandals swept the mossy green; Lamia, Part I, Line 239
 
SWERV'D...........2
What! if from thee my wandering feet had swerv'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 716
Whose slender feet wide- swerv'd upon the soft Lamia, Part II, Line 178
 
SWERVE............1
Or neck and shoulder, nor the tenting swerve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 400
 
SWEVENIS..........1
-"Als writith he of swevenis The Eve of St. Mark, Line 99
 
SWICHE............1
Of swiche thinges I may not shew; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 110
 
SWIFT.............30
'Mongst boughs pavillion'd, where the deer's swift leap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 7
Is the swift opening of their wide portal, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 30
Parting luxuriant curls;- and the swift bound Sleep and Poetry, Line 334
To the swift treble pipe, and humming string. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 314
Are those swift moments? Whither are they fled? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 971
Went swift beneath the merry-winged guide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 83
Swift as a fathoming plummet down he fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 662
Swift , mad, fantastic round the rocks, and lash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 920
She fled me swift as sea-bird on the wing, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 404
How lightning- swift the change! a youthful wight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 775
Ere it burst open swift as fairy thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 857
Of his swift magic. Diving swans appear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 339
Full facing their swift flight, from ebon streak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 496
Speeding away swift as the eagle bird? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 594
Young feather'd tyrant! by a swift decay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 730
In one swift moment, would what then he saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 907
And when she left, she hurried back, as swift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 469
Ludolph and the swift Arab are the same; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 3
You needs must be. Carry it swift to Otho; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 73
Swift be your steed! Within this hour Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 78b
A quick plot, swift as thought to save your heads; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 66
What swift death wilt thou die? As to the lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 171
Blush'd a live damask, and swift -lisping said, Lamia, Part I, Line 116
She breath'd upon his eyes, and swift was seen Lamia, Part I, Line 124
Their points of contact, and swift counterchange; Lamia, Part I, Line 194
Whom with his sword swift -drawn and nimbly held, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 46
But swift of look, and foot, and wing was he,)- The Jealousies, Line 186
Curricles, or mail-coaches, swift beyond compare." The Jealousies, Line 252
Then Elfinan swift vaulted from the floor, The Jealousies, Line 604
Rode to the Princess swift with spurring heels, The Jealousies, Line 776
 
SWIFTER...........3
Swifter than lightning went these wonders rare; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 621
Swifter than centaurs after rapine bent.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 536
Swifter than sight was gone - even before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 337
 
SWIFTEST..........1
Before three swiftest kisses he had told, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1001
 
SWIFTLY...........6
Be echoed swiftly through that ivory shell Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 2
And through the light the horsemen swiftly glide, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 34
Swiftly I mount, upon wide spreading pinions, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 105
Minutes are flying swiftly ; and as yet On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 1
And, swiftly as a bright Phoebean dart, Lamia, Part I, Line 78
Uplift her from the ground, and swiftly flit The Jealousies, Line 521
 
SWIFTNESS.........1
With metaphysic swiftness , at the mouse; The Jealousies, Line 56
 
SWIM..............5
Above a cloud, and with a gradual swim I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 114
And then were gulph'd in a tumultuous swim : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 571
I'll swim to the syrens, and one moment listen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 241
The thyrsus, that his watching eyes may swim Lamia, Part II, Line 226
So, through a real heaven, on they swim The Jealousies, Line 39
 
SWIMMING..........3
To see such lovely eyes in swimming search Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 63
With aching neck and swimming eyes, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 55
Though swimming through the dance's dangerous wreath, To Fanny, Line 27
 
SWIMS.............3
And in the last sun-beam the sylph lightly swims . O come, dearest Emma!, Line 8
When a new planet swims into his ken; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 10
A fold of lawny mantle dabbling swims Sleep and Poetry, Line 374
 
SWINE.............1
He 'sdeign'd the swine -herd at the wassel bowl, Character of C.B., Line 13
 
SWINGED...........1
From swinged censer teeming; Ode to Psyche, Line 47
 
SWINGING..........1
Like floral-censers swinging light in air; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 27
 
SWIRL.............1
Headlong I darted; at one eager swirl Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 630
 
SWISS.............2
Quoth the dark page; "Oh no!" return'd the Swiss , The Jealousies, Line 281
Replied the Swiss ,- "the nasty, whelping brat!" The Jealousies, Line 314
 
SWITCH............2
I'll switch you soundly and in pieces tear." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 17
The Princess grasp'd her switch , but just in time When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 20
 
SWOLL'N...........1
If shame can on a soldier's vein- swoll'n front King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 1
 
SWOLLEN...........8
Night- swollen mushrooms? Are not our wide plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 215
To its old channel, or a swollen tide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 340
Hung swollen at their backs, and jewel'd sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 313
Battle to the swollen billow-ridge, and drave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 612
Had swollen and green'd the pious charactery, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 790
The vesper hymn, far swollen , soft and full, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 967
And singe away the swollen clouds of Jove, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 330
Prick'd his own swollen veins! Where is my page? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 126
 
SWOON.............9
Of Hero's tears, the swoon of Imogen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 31
It seem'd to whirl around me, and a swoon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 416
Before his goddess, in a blissful swoon . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 999
To tell his forehead's swoon and faint when first began decay, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 26
In sort of wakeful swoon , perplex'd she lay, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 236
And so live ever - or else swoon to death. Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 14
Spare, spare me, my lord; I swoon else. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 12b
The cloudy swoon came on, and down I sunk The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 55
Nice way would be to bring her in a swoon ; The Jealousies, Line 492
 
SWOON'D...........5
His senses had swoon'd off: he did not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 398
With melancholy thought: O he had swoon'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 868
When lulled Argus, baffled, swoon'd and slept, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 2
To the swoon'd serpent, and with languid arm, Lamia, Part I, Line 132
Swoon'd , murmuring of love, and pale with pain. Lamia, Part I, Line 289
 
SWOONING..........6
Nigh swooning , he doth purse his weary lips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 10
That come a swooning over hollow grounds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 286
Even to swooning , why ye, Divinities, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 152
With such an aching heart, such swooning throbs Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
And fell into a swooning love of him. Lamia, Part I, Line 219
Still swooning vivid through my globed brain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 245
 
SWOONS............1
Ripe from hue-golden swoons took all the blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 861
 
SWOOP.............1
A tureen, and three dishes, at one swoop , The Jealousies, Line 670
 
SWOOP'D...........1
And straightway into frightful eddies swoop'd ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 648
 
SWORD.............22
Hast thou a sword that thine enemy's smart is? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 10
Mount his back! thy sword unsheath! Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 61
Is slung with shining cuirass, sword , and shield, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 39
From some old magic like Urganda's sword . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 29
With duller steel than the Persean sword Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 393
He broke his sword , and hither bore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 51
My sword to my own throat, rather than held Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
Who, for your bright sword and clear honesty, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 47
Conrad's sword , his corslet, and his helm, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 69
Or that the sword of some brave enemy Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 3
My sturdier youth, maturing to the sword , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 13
Draw not the sword ; 'twould make an uproar, Duke, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 169
Of that late stounding insult! Why has my sword Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 94
Look! look at this bright sword ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 106
The sword has done its worst; not without worst Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 5
Trespass within the circuit of his sword :- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 15
Whom with his sword swift-drawn and nimbly held, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 46
My sword met his and snapp'd off at the hilts. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 50
Another sword ! and what if I could seize King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 1
Here comes the testy brood. O for a sword ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 5
I'm faint - a biting sword ! A noble sword! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 6
I'm faint - a biting sword! A noble sword ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 6
 
SWORD'S...........1
Yield, Stephen, or my sword's point dip in King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 16
 
SWORDS............4
Would all be lost, unheard, and vain as swords Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 713
They dipp'd their swords in the water, and did tease Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 222
All eyes be muffled, or a hundred swords The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 83
Keeps elbow room amid our eager swords , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 36
 
SWORDSMAN.........1
Not as a swordsman would I pardon claim, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 24
 
SWORE.............2
Took to the cowl,- then rav'd and swore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 53
But, calling interest loyalty, swore faith Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
 
SWORN.............3
Have sworn divorcement 'twixt me and my right. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 116
A verdict ten-times sworn ! Awake - awake- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 146
Shall I, when I have sworn against it, sir? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 27
 
SWUNG.............3
From his right hand there swung a vase, milk-white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 153
Her self-possession - swung the lute aside, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 504
From chain- swung censer teeming; Ode to Psyche, Line 33
 
SYCAMORE..........1
Palm, myrtle, oak, and sycamore , and beech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 20
 
SYCAMORES.........1
Where sycamores and elm trees tall, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 44
 
SYCOPHANTS........1
As these prodigious sycophants disgust Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 25
 
SYDNEY'S..........2
'Tis gallant Sydney's , Russell's, Vane's sad knell, Lines Written on 29 May, Line 5
Musing on Milton's fate - on Sydney's bier- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 10
 
SYLLABLE..........6
No uttered syllable , or, woe betide! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 203
Misers of sound and syllable , no less If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 10
Vouchsafe a syllable , before he bids Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
Wife! Why dost linger on that syllable , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
No syllable of a fit majesty The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 230
To rhyme and syllable his miseries; The Jealousies, Line 124
 
SYLLABLES.........6
Her charming syllables , till indistinct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 444
For venturing syllables that ill beseem Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 151
Moan hither, all ye syllables of woe, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 441
The ponderous syllables , like sullen waves Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 305
Throbb'd with the syllables .- "Mnemosyne! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 82
In mournful syllables . Let but my words reach Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 15
 
SYLLABLING........1
Turn'd - syllabling thus, "Ah, Lycius bright, Lamia, Part I, Line 244
 
SYLPH.............2
And in the last sun-beam the sylph lightly swims. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 8
A blushing fair-eyed purity? A sylph , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 23
 
SYLPHS............1
Responsive to sylphs , in the moon beamy air. To Some Ladies, Line 12
 
SYLVAN............3
Atween the pillars of the sylvan roof, To George Felton Mathew, Line 48
Through the dark pillars of those sylvan aisles. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 968
Sylvan historian, who canst thus express Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 3
 
SYMBOL............5
Be still a symbol of immensity; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 299
Hast thou a symbol of her golden hair? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 609
Straight homeward to their symbol -essences; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 700
To every symbol on his forehead high; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 52
Not there, nor in sign, symbol , or portent Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 139
 
SYMBOLS...........3
O'erwrought with symbols by the deepest groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 198
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 6
Distinct, and visible; symbols divine, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 316
 
SYMMETRY..........1
The blaze, the splendor, and the symmetry , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 241
 
SYMPATHETIC.......1
And with a sympathetic touch unbinds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 785
 
SYMPHONIES........1
Delicious symphonies , like airy flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 798
 
SYMPTOM...........1
Is a good symptom , and most favourable; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 58
 
SYNOD.............1
In silent barren synod met O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 1
 
SYREN.............6
With syren words - Ah, have I really got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 955
To tinge, on syren shores, the salt sea-spry? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 157
Fair Melody! kind Syren ! I've no choice; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 300
Fair plumed syren , queen of far-away! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 2
Won by the syren -trumpets, and the ring Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 14
Of indoor pageantry; while syren whispers, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 53
 
SYRENS............2
I'll swim to the syrens , and one moment listen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 241
The Nereids danc'd; the Syrens faintly sang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 889
 
SYRIAN............1
And here is manna pick'd from Syrian trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 452
 
SYRINX............3
Telling us how fair, trembling Syrinx fled I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 157
Thou wast to lose fair Syrinx - do thou now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 243
Pipes will I fashion of the syrinx flag, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 686
 
SYROPS............2
And lucent syrops , tinct with cinnamon; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 267
Her hair in weird syrops , that would keep Lamia, Part I, Line 107

Published @ RC

March 2005