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Keats Concordance
 
T'................2
Hadst figur'd t' other day, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 22
A brace of toads, than league with them t' oppress Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 164
 
TA'EN.............9
One who, of late, had ta'en sweet forest walks To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 42
To mortal steps, before thou canst be ta'en Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 125
But not ta'en out. Why, there was not a slope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 791
Lorenzo had ta'en ship for foreign lands, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 226
Now they have ta'en away her basil sweet. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 488
If lucky gadfly had but ta'en All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 25
Had stood a pigmy's height: she would have ta'en Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 28
I, for a moment-whiles, was prisoner ta'en Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67
And ta'en his favour. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 62a
 
TABBIES...........1
And two or three tabbies Two or three posies, Line 18
 
TABLE.............4
My table coverlets of Jason's fleece Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 62
A table , and, half anguish'd, threw thereon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 255
'Cross the broad table , to beseech a glance Lamia, Part II, Line 243
Lay it on Bertha's table , close beside The Jealousies, Line 524
 
TABLES............3
magnificence, with supper- tables , laden with services of gold and silver. A Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Twelve sphered tables , by silk seats insphered, Lamia, Part II, Line 183
Thus loaded with a feast the tables stood, Lamia, Part II, Line 189
 
TABLET............2
Chequer my tablet with their quivering shades. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 126
Bring me a tablet whiter than a star, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 3
 
TABLETS...........1
Write on my tablets all that was permitted, Sleep and Poetry, Line 79
 
TAIL..............4
And sports with half his tail above the waves. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 52
And spreaded tail , a vulture could not glide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 867
You gentlemen immediately turn tail - Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 9
"Show him a mouse's tail , and he will guess, The Jealousies, Line 55
 
TAIL'D............2
Vermilion- tail'd , or finn'd with silvery gauze; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 111
And long- tail'd pheasants, and a rising sun, The Jealousies, Line 448
 
TAIL'S............2
And puff from the tail's end to stifled throat: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 526
Thy tail's tip is nicked off - and though the fists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 11
 
TAILED............1
With speed of fire- tailed exhalations; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 367
 
TAILS.............2
Uplifted drowsily, and nervy tails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 646
Lashed from the crystal roof by fishes' tails . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 111
 
TAINT.............3
Such a taint , and soon unweave Not Aladdin magian, Line 48
She knelt, so pure a thing, so free from mortal taint . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 225
A deadly breath went forth to taint and blast Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 154
 
TAINTLESS.........2
Thou dipp'st them in the taintless wave; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 32
Were full of pestilent light; our taintless rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 694
 
TAK'ST............1
And in the evening tak'st a double row The Jealousies, Line 241
 
TAKE..............64
Had I e'er seen her from an arbour take Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 40
Sometimes, when the good knight his rest would take , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 19
All meaner thoughts, and take a sweet reprieve Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 5
Adventurous knights take up their dinted shields: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 4
In striving from its crystal face to take To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 8
To take him to a desert rude, and bare, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 28
With him," said I, "will take a pleasant charm; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 129
And lo! - whose stedfastness would never take Addressed to the Same, Line 7
O'er which it well might take a pleasant sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 109
To take in draughts of life from the gold fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 656
Of sadness. O that she would take my vows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 951
To take a fancied city of delight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 143
To scud like a wild bird, and take thee off Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 698
Round flowery islands, and take thence a skim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 995
In sowing time ne'er would I dibble take , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 153
And take a dream 'mong rushes Stygian, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 505
To take a latest glimpse at his sheep-fold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 995
If impiously an earthly realm I take . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 854
But to thy cheek my soul doth take its flight: Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 8
Would all their colours from the sunset take : Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 68
Take refuge.- Of bad lines a centaine dose Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 112
To take the rich-ored driftings of the flood. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 112
Fair reader, at the old tale take a glance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 389
Take you to real happiness and give Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 20
Take lawyer's nose and put it to't All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 15
Take you a bundle of the largest pines, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 57
Full blown, and such warmth for the morning take ; Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 22
Ah, silver shrine, here will I take my rest The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 337
And bid old Saturn take his throne again."- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 250
Wherefrom I take strange lore, and read it deep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 148
If ye will take that comfort in its truth. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 180
Or liker still to one who should take leave Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 127
From the mountain soil they take , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 60
To take into the air my quiet breath; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 54
Do you not count, when I am queen, to take Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 115
When will he take that grandchild in his arms, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 119
Who dares take such large charter from our smiles! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 70
I cannot. Take her. Fair Erminia, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 139
For me! I take no personal revenge Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 232
Until most easy matters take the shape Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 125
Take tribute from those cities for thyself! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 153
Take farewell too of worldly vanities. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 173
Her ears, and she shall take them coupled with Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 16
What may it be? No trifle can take place Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
There she is! take that! and that! no, no, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 185
Take away the dagger. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ethelbert, Line 189b
Romeo! Arise! take snuffers by the handle; Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 14
To see as a God sees, and take the depth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 304
Intense, that death would take me from the vale The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 397
And ever ready was to take her course What can I do to drive away, Line 12
Take horse, my lord. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 26a
And take the flattering freshness of the air, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 2
Did no one take him at a vantage then? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 44
Yes, of thy madness thou shalt take the meed- King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 19
Thou think'st it brave to take a breathing king, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 28
Of no use at a need? Take that- King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, A Soldier, Line 39a
She chose to "promener a l'aile," or take The Jealousies, Line 44
"Bring Hum to me! But stay - here take my ring, The Jealousies, Line 190
"Certes, monsieur were best take to his feet, The Jealousies, Line 257
Anon, I'll tell what course were best to take ; The Jealousies, Line 493
" Take this same book,- it will not bite you, sire; The Jealousies, Line 514
And take some more wine, Hum;- O, heavens! I burn The Jealousies, Line 530
Thank you, old mummy!- now securely I take wing." The Jealousies, Line 603
(Much like our Boswell's), we will take a glance The Jealousies, Line 634
 
TAKEN.............10
Had taken fairy phantasies to strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 92
Had taken from the stars its pleasant veil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 82
Had taken from the stars its pleasant veil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 84
Upon his lips, and taken the soft lute Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 278
Had taken captive her two eyes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 27
Still, still to hear her tender- taken breath, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 13
She has taken flight from me, then let her soar,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 151
Though I alone were taken in these toils, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 61
He must by this have fallen. Baldwin is taken ; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 16
The bridal embassy had taken wing, The Jealousies, Line 128
 
TAKES.............11
Serenely sleep:- she from a casket takes To My Brother George (epistle), Line 93
That is the Grasshopper's - he takes the lead On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 5
Takes as a long lost right the feel of May, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 6
Pictur'd in western cloudiness, that takes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 741
Takes glimpses of thee; thou art a relief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 66
Still fed by melting ice, he takes a draught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 535
Takes in all beauty with an easy span: Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 4
Then takes his lamp, and riseth from his knees, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 11
Like a stoop'd falcon ere he takes his prey. Lamia, Part I, Line 67
No, no, there Mr. Werter takes his spoon, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 10
Instead of sweets, his ample palate takes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 32
 
TAKING............6
Then there were fauns and satyrs taking aim Sleep and Poetry, Line 360
And clumps of woodbine taking the soft wind I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 36
Seem'd taking flight for heaven, without a death, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 8
Taking on me a woman's privilege, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 29
So taking a disguise;- you shall behold her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 72
habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
TALE..............36
Still warble, dying swan, - still tell the tale , To Lord Byron, Line 13
The enchanting tale - the tale of pleasing woe. To Lord Byron, Line 14
The enchanting tale - the tale of pleasing woe. To Lord Byron, Line 14
Tells to my fearful breast a tale of sorrow, To Hope, Line 20
A sun-beamy tale of a wreath, and a chain; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 22
And list to the tale of the wreath, and the chain, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 39
Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 1
Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 11
Yet must I tell a tale of chivalry: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 45
And gentle tale of love and languishment? To one who has been long in city pent, Line 8
Some tale of love and arms in time of old. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 18
For she's to read a tale of hopes, and fears; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 97
The reading of an ever-changing tale ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 91
A lovely tale of human life we'll read. Sleep and Poetry, Line 110
And when a tale is beautifully staid, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 129
Nor was it long ere he had told the tale I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 179
So every tale , does this sweet tale of thine. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 208
So every tale, does this sweet tale of thine. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 208
This pleasant tale is like a little copse: This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 1
Let him with this sweet tale full often seek On The Story of Rimini, Line 3
Frozen in that old tale Arabian. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 406
Forgetting the old tale . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 780a
For he left the merry tale Robin Hood, Line 31
Dear Reynolds, I have a mysterious tale Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 86
Unknown of any, free from whispering tale . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 86
Grant thou a pardon here, and then the tale Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 153
Could keep him off so long? They spake a tale Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 260
Fair reader, at the old tale take a glance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 389
To speak:- O turn thee to the very tale , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 391
New to the feet, although the tale a hundred times be told: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 6
Beside a crumple-leaved tale of love; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 37
A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme: Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 4
You cannot credit such a monstrous tale . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 138
The ignominy of that whisper'd tale Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 140
That is a doubtful tale from faery land, Lamia, Part II, Line 5
A Faery Tale , by Lucy Vaughan Lloyd of China Walk, Lambeth The Jealousies, Subtitle
 
TALES.............4
Such tales as needs must with amazement spell you. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 66
All lovely tales that we have heard or read: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 22
About the dewy forest, whisper tales ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 131
Tales and golden histories Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 21
 
TALK..............16
Or stand in courtly talk by fives and sevens: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 43
In times long past; to sit with them, and talk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 387
Two bubbling springs of talk from their sweet lips. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 738
Before our forests heard the talk of men; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 6
We'll talk about - no more of dreaming.- Now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 669
That housewives talk of. But the spirit-blow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 899
Who thinks they scandal her who talk about her; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 8
[They talk apart. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 14b
Talk not with eyes, but speak your curses out Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 162
To talk of horrors on our wedding-night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 27
A little talk with her - no harm - haste! haste! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 181
Perhaps grown wearied of their Corinth talk : Lamia, Part I, Line 232
As men talk in a dream, so Corinth all, Lamia, Part I, Line 350
Louder they talk , and louder come the strains Lamia, Part II, Line 204
"Really you must not talk of him, indeed." The Jealousies, Line 65
Should talk of extreme unction, I shall say The Jealousies, Line 538
 
TALK'D............3
Unto the clover-sward, and she has talk'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 503
And seldom talk'd of. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 90
Talk'd of one Master Hubert, deep in her esteem. The Jealousies, Line 711
 
TALKS.............4
With him who elegantly chats, and talks - To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 43
The charioteer with wond'rous gesture talks Sleep and Poetry, Line 136
On heaven's pavement; brotherly he talks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 408
Talks off the mighty frowning from his brow, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 43
 
TALL..............13
A man of elegance, and stature tall : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 112
Through its tall woods with high romances blent: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 4
Branch down sweeping from a tall ash top, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 335
Tall chestnuts keep away the sun and moon:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 207
Beyond the tall tree tops; and in less time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 332
And tall as Amazon: Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 26
Where sycamores and elm trees tall , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 44
By her in stature the tall Amazon Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 27
Tall oaks, branch-charmed by the earnest stars, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 74
Are shaded in a forest of tall spears, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 27
What tribe?"- The tall shade veil'd in drooping white The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 194
Then the tall shade in drooping linens veil'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 216
She's very delicate,- not over tall ,- The Jealousies, Line 476
 
TALLER............1
The taller grasses and full-flowering weed, Lamia, Part I, Line 44
 
TALLIED...........1
Their verses tallied . Easy was the task: Sleep and Poetry, Line 199
 
TALONS............1
Thy latent talons in me - and upraise To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 6
 
TALUS.............1
When, meeting Artegall and Talus grim, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 8
 
TAM...............2
Young Tam came up an' eyed me quick Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 33
Braw Tam was daffed like a chick, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 35
 
TAMBOUR...........2
A tambour frame, with Venus sleeping there, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 38
Quickly on this feast-night: by the tambour frame The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 174
 
TAMBOURINES.......1
Of tambourines and pipes, serene and loud, The Jealousies, Line 688
 
TAME..............6
And one will teach a tame dove how it best Sleep and Poetry, Line 111
O misery of hell! resistless, tame , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 266
On one, and felt himself in spleen to tame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 346
Tame on thy finger; to the River-gods, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 707
More tame for his gray hairs - Alas me! flit! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 104
Shadow'd Enceladus; once tame and mild Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 66
 
TAMED.............3
Castor has tamed the planet Lion, see! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 591
He had not with his tamed leopards play'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 794
To be so tamed ? so- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 43a
 
TANGLED...........6
Dancing their sleek hair into tangled curls; Sleep and Poetry, Line 150
This tangled thread, and wind it to a clue. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 756
Of tangled wonder, breathless and aghast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 655
Since I was tangled in thy beauty's web, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 3
Sobb'd Clymene among her tangled hair. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 76
The life she had so tangled in her mesh: Lamia, Part I, Line 295
 
TANN'D............1
And the tann'd harvesters rich armfuls took. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 441
 
TANTALISED........1
Grievously are we tantalised , one and all; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 1
 
TANTALISES........1
Merciful love that tantalises not, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 2
 
TANTALIZES........1
And tantalizes long; at last he drinks, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 417
 
TANTALUS'.........1
was, like Tantalus' Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
TAPER.............5
And taper fingers catching at all things, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 59
Meekly through billows:- when like taper -flame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 116
To Vesper, for a taper silver-clear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 704
And they shall bring thee taper fishing-rods Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 708
Out went the taper as she hurried in; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 199
 
TAPER'S...........2
Softly they blew aside the taper's flame; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 153
With silver taper's light, and pious care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 194
 
TAPERING..........1
Their scantly leaved, and finely tapering stems, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 5
 
TAPERNESS.........1
A rose leaf round thy finger's taperness , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 782
 
TAPERS............1
The tapers keep aside an hour and more, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 31
 
TAPERS'...........1
Exalt amid the tapers' shine The Eve of St. Mark, Line 118
 
TAPESTRIES........2
And anger their live tapestries ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 20
Their lustres with the gloomier tapestries - Lamia, Part I, Line 53
 
TARAXA............1
Bloody Taraxa , is among the dead. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 136
 
TARGE.............1
Of gone sea-warriors; brazen beaks and targe ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 124
 
TARN..............1
With fairy fishes from the mountain tarn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 693
 
TARRIED...........1
passions, though not this of love, tarried with her a while to his great Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
TARRY.............2
"No!" exclaimed he, "why should I tarry here?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 295
tarry with her, Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
TART..............1
Caricature was vain, and vain the tart lampoon. The Jealousies, Line 18
 
TARTAR............2
Aspiring as a Tartar khan, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 68
Hunted me as a Tartar does the boar, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 51
 
TARTARUS..........1
O Tartarus ! but some few days agone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 269
 
TARTARY...........1
Old Tartary the fierce! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 262
 
TASK..............10
Their verses tallied. Easy was the task : Sleep and Poetry, Line 199
Ah, what a task ! upon my bended knees, Sleep and Poetry, Line 310
Now as we speed towards our joyous task ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 309
He must pursue this task of joy and grief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 702
The moving waters at their priestlike task Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 5
To steal away, and leave without a task Ode on Indolence, Line 14
Welcome task ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 116b
Dictate my task . Sweet woman,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 39a
Mine is a cruel task : she is not dead, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 75
Of that fierce threat, and the hard task proposed. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 120
 
TASKS.............2
And set those old Chaldeans to their tasks .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 21
Of unachievable tasks ; small rivulets Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 126
 
TASSELL'D.........2
The black tassell'd trencher and common hat; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 9
And tassell'd round with weeping meteors! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 39
 
TASSO'S...........2
Next, thy Tasso's ardent numbers Ode to Apollo, Line 36
While Tasso's page was floating in a breeze To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 30
 
TASTE.............29
Taste the high joy none but the bless'd can prove. As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 8
Ah! I will taste that dew, for me 'tis meet, Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 12
Who let me taste that more than cordial dram, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 64
Taste their pure fountains. First the realm I'll pass Sleep and Poetry, Line 101
To taste the luxury of sunny beams I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 74
necessarily taste in going over the following pages. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
He seem'd to taste a drop of manna-dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 766
'Tis in the breath of heaven: thou dost taste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 310
Freedom as none can taste it, nor dost waste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 311
So cool a purple: taste these juicy pears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 444
Until we taste the life of love again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 772
To taste the gentle moon, and freshening beads, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 110
If thou art ripe to taste a long love dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 440
Green rushes like our rivers, and dost taste To the Nile, Line 12
And I must taste the blossoms that unfold Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 67
Though I forget the taste of earthly bliss, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 315
And taste the music of that vision pale. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 392
And may it taste to you like good old wine, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 19
That gods might know my own particular taste . Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 4
To taste of pleasure, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 76
Therefore 'tis sure a want of Attic taste , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 58
Also, when he would taste the spicy wreaths Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 186
Thou shalt taste , before the stains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 59
His soul shall taste the sadness of her might, Ode on Melancholy, Line 29
Could taste so nauseous to the bodily sense, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 24
What taste of purer air hast thou to soothe Lamia, Part I, Line 282
Flush angerly: when he would taste the wreaths The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 30
"Eban," said he, "as slaves should taste the fruits The Jealousies, Line 353
"In preference to these, I'll merely taste The Jealousies, Line 362
 
TASTED............7
Who had of all that's sweet tasted , and seen, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 38
The same bright face I tasted in my sleep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 895
Cool grass, nor tasted the fresh slumberous air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 290
Now I have tasted her sweet soul to the core Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 904
The two deliverers tasted a pure wine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 801
By those loosen'd hips, you have tasted the pips, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 11
By angel tasted , or our mother Eve; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 31
 
TASTEFUL..........1
Ah, sure no tasteful nook would be without them; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 30
 
TASTES............1
She tastes unseen; unseen her nimble feet Lamia, Part I, Line 96
 
TASTING...........3
For tasting joys like these, sure I should be To My Brother George (epistle), Line 111
Cloys with tasting : What do then? Fancy, Line 15
Tasting of Flora and the country green, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 13
 
TATTER'D..........1
Though now 'tis tatter'd ; leaving my bark bar'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 773
 
TATTLE............1
But let us leave this idle tittle tattle The Jealousies, Line 118
 
TAUGHT............7
That you first taught me all the sweets of song: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 53
And compass vile: so that ye taught a school Sleep and Poetry, Line 196
This morn, my friend, and yester evening taught To J.R., Line 13
Ere the God of Torment taught her Fancy, Line 82
That was before our brows were taught to frown, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 339
For I was taught in Paradise Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 6
My echo, my taught parrot! but I fear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 40
 
TAUNT.............2
O 'twas a cruel thing."- "Now thou dost taunt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 975
But you must taunt this dove, for she hath lost Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 125
 
TAUNTED...........2
Men I have spurn'd, and women I have taunted ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 34
Penanc'd, and taunted on a scaffolding! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 146
 
TAUNTS............1
That makes thee thus unarm'd throw taunts at us? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 15
 
TAVERN............4
Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern ? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 4
Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern ? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 26
For a throng'd tavern ,- and these stubbed trees Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 35
Some tavern -brawl? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Line 42b Line 42a
 
TAVERNS...........1
Shall lodge in shabby taverns upon tick; The Jealousies, Line 151
 
TAWNY.............2
Tawny and gold, ooz'd slowly from far lands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 114
Cowering their tawny brushes. Silent sails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 647
 
TAYLOR............2
Where may your taylor live?" "I may not tell- Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 19
Where might my taylor live?- I say again Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 21
 
TEA...............3
Nibble their toasts, and cool their tea with sighs, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 2
Forget their tea - forget their appetite. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 4
A dose of senna- tea , or nightmare Gorgon, The Jealousies, Line 341
 
TEABOARD..........1
Across the teaboard draws a long wet mark. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 13
 
TEACH.............9
Would never teach a rural song to me: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 14
And one will teach a tame dove how it best Sleep and Poetry, Line 111
Coral tinted teach no blisses, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 12
Lispings empyrean will I sometime teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 819
O love! how potent hast thou been to teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 92
In haste to teach the little thing to walk, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 8
Teach us, here, the way to find you, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 26
Thus ye teach us, every day, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 35
And teach him, what it seems his nurse could not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 33
 
TEACHER'S.........1
From his old teacher's wrinkled countenance, Lamia, Part II, Line 244
 
TEAM..............1
Slants over blue dominion. Thy bright team Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 955
 
TEAR..............23
We well might drop a tear for him, and Burns. To George Felton Mathew, Line 71
E'en like the passage of an angel's tear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 13
Full often dropping a delicious tear , Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 13
Of mailed heroes should tear off my crown:- To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 13
To moralize upon a smile or tear , On The Story of Rimini, Line 10
Give it not a tear ; Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 2
Lay sorrowing; when every tear was born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 467
Immortal tear -drops down the thunderer's beard; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 476
Or tear me piece-meal with a bony saw, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 263
With many a scalding tear and many a groan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 668
Began to tear his scroll in pieces small, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 747
Behold!"- Two copious tear -drops instant fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 900
Wilt fall asleep? O let me sip that tear ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 318
Go, shed one tear upon my heather-bloom, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 303
I'll switch you soundly and in pieces tear ." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 17
When thou dost shed a tear : explain thy griefs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 70
Shed no tear - O shed no tear! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 1
Shed no tear - O shed no tear ! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 1
Shed no tear ! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 8
Shed no tear - O shed no tear! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 15
Shed no tear - O shed no tear ! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 15
That I might give it to my hounds to tear ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 94
Flash'd phosphor and sharp sparks, without one cooling tear . Lamia, Part I, Line 152
 
TEARFUL...........1
And tearful ladies made for love, and pity: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 47
 
TEARING...........1
That he is tearing you, sir, bit by bit." The Jealousies, Line 328
 
TEARS.............68
As if to glean the ruddy tears , it tried, Imitation of Spenser, Line 32
Amid the gloom of grief and tears . Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 24
From thy fair name, and waters it with tears ! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 14
And tears 'mong the dewdrops of morning oft glistened. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 32
Hails it with tears , her stout defender sent: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 16
And whether there were tears of languishment, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 88
The sun, when first he kist away the tears To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 2
In some black spell; seeing that each one tears Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 6
The silvery tears of April? - Youth of May? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 10
Weep! I'll count the tears : Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 10
Aught else, aught nearer heaven, than such tears ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 474
And up I started: Ah! my sighs, my tears , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 681
Salt tears were coming, when I heard my name Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 963
For others, good or bad, hatred and tears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 4
Of Hero's tears , the swoon of Imogen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 31
Me even to tears : thence, when a little eas'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 559
A quill immortal in their joyous tears . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 732
Entranced vows and tears . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 827a
His tears , who weeps for thee. Where dost thou sigh? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 77
I oft have dried my tears when thou hast smil'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 144
He had in truth; and he was ripe for tears . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 288
With tears , and smiles, and honey-words she wove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 426
An urn of tears , as though thou wert cold dead; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 432
That but for tears my life had fled away!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 75
Of Jove, those tears have given me a thirst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 123
Brimming the water-lily cups with tears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 186
Thy tears are flowing.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 610
And yet the tears she wept were tears of sorrow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 725
And yet the tears she wept were tears of sorrow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 725
Yet often have I, on the brink of tears , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 778
If looks speak love-laws, I will drink her tears , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 39
Too many tears for lovers have been shed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 90
Gush'd with more pride than do a wretch's tears ?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 122
Had made a miry channel for his tears . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 280
With tears , as chilly as a dripping well, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 406
Sweet basil, which her tears kept ever wet. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 416
And moisten'd it with tears unto the core. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 424
And so she ever fed it with thin tears , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 425
Sad tears am shedding. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 44
"I shed no tears ;/ Deep thought, or awful vision, I had none;/ By O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 1
That now in vain are weeping their last tears , Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 16
Flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 21
Tears , at the thought of those enchantments cold, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 134
Good Angela, believe me by these tears ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 150
So came these words and went; the while in tears Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 79
Meanwhile in other realms big tears were shed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 158
Could glimmer on their tears ; where their own groans Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 6
He listen'd, and he wept, and his bright tears Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 42
She stood in tears amid the alien corn; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 67
Though in her lids hung the sweet tears of May; Ode on Indolence, Line 46
Upon your skirts had fallen no tears of mine. Ode on Indolence, Line 50
Farewell! and by these tears believe, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 115b
Is quench'd with inward tears ! I must rejoice Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 137
Her tears from matins until even song Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 120
Tears , tears of misery. O, the heavy day! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 90
Tears, tears of misery. O, the heavy day! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 90
Or tears , or ravings, or self-threatened death, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 129
Tears , human tears! Do you repent you then Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 86
Tears, human tears ! Do you repent you then Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 86
Those tears will wash away a just resolve, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 145
Full of adoring tears and blandishment, Lamia, Part I, Line 135
Long treasured tears . "This temple sad and lone The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 221
And in her sorrow nearer woman's tears . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 338
So came these words, and went; the while in tears The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 378
In melancholy realms big tears are shed, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 7
Dry up your tears , and do not look so blue; The Jealousies, Line 51
White Provence rose-leaves with her faery tears , The Jealousies, Line 83
Honouring with royal tears the poor homespun; The Jealousies, Line 446
 
TEAS'D............1
I cannot tell. Let me no more be teas'd - Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 22
 
TEASE.............9
How vain for me the niggard muse to tease : To George Felton Mathew, Line 73
And towers of amethyst,- would I so tease Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 745
Streams subterranean tease their granite beds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 602
Will stagnate all thy fountains:- tease me not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 954
Be settled, but they tease us out of thought. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 77
They dipp'd their swords in the water, and did tease Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 222
To sleep and Oberon will tease . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 38
Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 44
Why wilt thou tease impossibility Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 199
 
TEASING...........1
Why then should man, teasing the world for grace, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 13
 
TEAZ'D............1
For this my love: for vexing Mars had teaz'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 558
 
TEAZE.............2
Like a strong giant, and my spirit teaze Sleep and Poetry, Line 82
Bluster'd, and slept, and its wild self did teaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 687
 
TEDIOUS...........5
Then up he rose, like one whose tedious toil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 226
But for one moment in the tedious hours, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 79
I see 'tis like to be a tedious day. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 71
Not so tedious , Conrad. No, no, no, no,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 81
Out, tedious monk! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 160a
 
TEEM..............1
My happy thoughts sententious; he will teem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 78
 
TEEM'D............1
Large honey-combs of green, and freshly teem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 667
 
TEEMING...........13
Of teeming sweets, enkindling sacred fire; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 224
And plunder'd vines, teeming exhaustless, pleach'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 927
The teeming earth a sudden witness bore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 338
All through the teeming year: so thou wilt shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 661
His skill in little stars. The teeming tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 789
Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 2
Couch'd in the teeming grass, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 7
Still sat, still snuff'd the incense, teeming up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 167
From chain-swung censer teeming ; Ode to Psyche, Line 33
From swinged censer teeming ; Ode to Psyche, Line 47
And from the teeming marrow of thy brain Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 96
Teeming with odours. Lamia, regal drest, Lamia, Part II, Line 133
Still sits, still snuffs the incense teeming up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 16
 
TEEN..............1
Or rob from aged Lear his bitter teen : Imitation of Spenser, Line 22
 
TEETH.............9
Seem'd like a poll of ivy in the teeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 160
Perhaps her teeth are not the fairest pearl; Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 3
The teeth complete, so white and small, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 56
Clench'd her small teeth , and held her lips apart, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 43
Their clenched teeth still clench'd, and all their limbs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 24
And in thy teeth I give thee back the lie! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
He smiled at self, and, smiling, show'd his teeth , The Jealousies, Line 271
And seeing his white teeth , he smiled the more; The Jealousies, Line 272
Show'd teeth again, and smiled as heretofore, The Jealousies, Line 274
 
TEIGN.............3
For there's Bishop's Teign For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 1
And King's Teign For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 2
And Coomb at the clear Teign head- For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 3
 
TEKEL.............1
Old "Mene, Mene, Tekel , Upharsin." Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 54
 
TELL..............96
Ah! could I tell the wonders of an isle Imitation of Spenser, Line 19
Stay while I tell thee, fluttering thing, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 5
Still warble, dying swan, - still tell the tale, To Lord Byron, Line 13
I will tell thee my blisses, which richly abound On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 19
Thrown by the pitiless world. We next could tell To George Felton Mathew, Line 65
Of our own Alfred, of Helvetian Tell ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 67
Tell me what thou wouldst have been? Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 43
Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 1
Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 11
Ah! shall I ever tell its cruelty, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 23
Yet must I tell a tale of chivalry: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 45
And tell thee that my prayer is very meek; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 62
And should I ever see them, I will tell you To My Brother George (epistle), Line 65
The might of Alfred, and the shaft of Tell ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 70
That I can never tell what mood is best. To G.A.W., Line 12
Who simply tell the most heart-easing things. Sleep and Poetry, Line 268
She overlook'd things that I scarce could tell . Sleep and Poetry, Line 395
Tell him, I have you in my world of blisses: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 54
That smile us on to tell delightful stories. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 124
Tell but one wonder of thy bridal night! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 210
Cynthia! I cannot tell the greater blisses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 239
Who, who could tell how much Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 5
And tell me lovely Jesus Y O grant that like to Peter I, Line 3
Of turf and slanting branches: who could tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 84
Tell me thine ailment: tell me all amiss!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 519
Tell me thine ailment: tell me all amiss!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 519
And then I fell asleep. Ah, can I tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 572
Speak, stubborn earth, and tell me where, O where Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 608
What I know not: but who, of men, can tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 835
This ditty to her!- tell her' - so I stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 959
Of any spirit to tell , but one of those Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 250
At which he straightway started, and 'gan tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 297
Ah, smile not so, my son: I tell thee true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 552
Enchantress! tell me by this soft embrace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 756
And I will tell thee stories of the sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 812
To tell thee briefly all my joy and pain. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 317
No need to tell thee of them, for I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 393
These uttering lips, while I in calm speech tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 475
With dry cheek who can tell ? While thus my might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 616
Thy brain to loss of reason: and next tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 643
To tell ; 'tis dizziness to think of it. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 827
Tell me, my lady-queen, how to espouse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 841
Thy spirit in the wonders I shall tell . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 862
Thy gentle mew - and tell me all thy frays To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 7
And yet I will, and tell my love all plain: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 38
One glance did fully all its secrets tell ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 362
To tell his forehead's swoon and faint when first began decay, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 26
Mankind can tell of heaven: mist is spread Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 7
The lion's roaring, and can tell Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 11
Softly tell her not to fear Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 10
Go, pretty page, and soothly tell ,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 12
He ventures in: let no buzz'd whisper tell : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 82
And tell me how" - "Good saints! not here, not here; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 107
"Now tell me where is Madeline," said he, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 114
"O tell me, Angela, by the holy loom The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 115
Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell : Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 1
"O mighty Princess, did you ne'er hear tell When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 22
Of rain and hail-stones, lovers need not tell As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 11
Look up, and tell me if this feeble shape Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 98
Is Saturn's; tell me, if thou hear'st the voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 99
Of Saturn; tell me, if this wrinkling brow, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 100
Search, Thea, search! and tell me, if thou seest Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 121
What can I? Tell me, all ye brethren Gods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 160
Left murmuring, what deepest thought can tell ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 246
Yet let me tell my sorrow, let me tell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 259
Yet let me tell my sorrow, let me tell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 259
"Now ye are flames, I'll tell you how to burn, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 327
That thou shouldst weep, so gifted? Tell me, youth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 68
Why should I tell thee what thou so well seest? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 84
O tell me, lonely Goddess, by the harp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 108
Tell me why thus I rave, about these groves! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 110
Will silent be; and not a soul to tell Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 39
Tell him how feeble is that tyranny, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 97
To tell the Emperor you will haste to him? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
Tell him, moreover, I am prisoner Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 74
I have good news to tell you, Ethelbert. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 143
His pages,- so they tell me,- to enquire Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 36
Tell me,- the league of devils? Confess - confess- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
Tell me where that detested woman is, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 3
But first 'tis fit to tell how she could muse Lamia, Part I, Line 202
"I'm wearied," said fair Lamia: " tell me who Lamia, Part I, Line 371
And but the flitter-winged verse must tell , Lamia, Part I, Line 394
As her weak hand could any meaning tell , Lamia, Part II, Line 302
Where may your taylor live?" "I may not tell - Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 19
I cannot tell . Let me no more be teas'd- Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 22
For Poesy alone can tell her dreams, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 8
"Thou art no poet; may'st not tell thy dreams"? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 12
Majestic shadow, tell me: sure not all The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 187
Majestic shadow, tell me where I am: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 211
As many a poor felon does not live to tell . The Jealousies, Line 180
And said: "Don't tell me what you want, Eban; The Jealousies, Line 317
Tell me some means to get the lady here." The Jealousies, Line 402
Tell me how I may that sweet girl embrace,- The Jealousies, Line 484
Anon, I'll tell what course were best to take; The Jealousies, Line 493
A laughing!- snapp'd his fingers!- shame it is to tell ! The Jealousies, Line 612
And therefore duly shall proceed to tell , The Jealousies, Line 790
 
TELLEN............1
Bot I must tellen verilie The Eve of St. Mark, Line 111
 
TELLING...........7
By telling what he sees from native merit. Sleep and Poetry, Line 46
Telling us how fair, trembling Syrinx fled I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 157
In telling of this goodly company, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 129
By telling how the sea-born goddess pin'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 458
And many a chapel bell the hour is telling , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 310
Me the great pain of telling . You must know. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 121
Telling me only where my nymph is fled,- Lamia, Part I, Line 86
 
TELLS.............7
Tells to my fearful breast a tale of sorrow, To Hope, Line 20
The while he tells of grief, around a funeral pyre. Ode to Apollo, Line 17
And now it tells me, that in worlds unknown, To Kosciusko, Line 5
It tells me too, that on a happy day, To Kosciusko, Line 9
Of godlike hardship tells me I must die On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 4
He tells of the sweet music and the spot Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 65
Our barber tells me too are on the rise,- The Jealousies, Line 293
 
TELLUS............3
And Tellus feels his forehead's cumbrous load. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 71
Fall!- No, by Tellus and her briny robes! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 246
Who cost her mother Tellus keener pangs, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 54
 
TEMPE.............2
Nor unto Tempe , where Jove griev'd a day, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 8
In Tempe or the dales of Arcady? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 7
 
TEMPER............12
That with its tyrant temper best accords, Ode to Apollo, Line 28
Often 'tis in such gentle temper found On the Sea, Line 5
In such wise, in such temper , so aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 490
Temper my lonely hours God of the meridian, Line 23
The Duke is out of temper ; if he knows Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 145
How this proud temper with clear reason squares. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 31
You know his temper , hot, proud, obstinate; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 89
Without that tyrant temper , you so blame, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 8
Your temper elsewhere, 'mong these burly tents, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
Down, down, proud temper ! down, Auranthe's pride! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 74
Love thwarted in bad temper oft has vent: The Jealousies, Line 176
His Majesty will know her temper time enough. The Jealousies, Line 702
 
TEMPER'D..........3
Temper'd with coolness. How they ever wrestle I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 75
Glance but one little beam of temper'd light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 172
In muffling hands. So temper'd , out he stray'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 873
 
TEMPERAMENT.......1
For moments few, a temperament as stern Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 473
 
TEMPERATE.........7
Gave temperate sweets to that well-wooing sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 101
Unto the temperate air: then high it soar'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 86
Hurry distracted from Sol's temperate beam, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1003
Yet at the moment, temperate was my blood- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 40
Upon his mortal days with temperate blood, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 2
A temperate lily, temperate as fair; To Fanny, Line 30
A temperate lily, temperate as fair; To Fanny, Line 30
 
TEMPERING.........1
Its tempering coolness, to my life akin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 609
 
TEMPEST...........6
Increasing gradual to a tempest rage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 523
The tempest came: I saw that vessel's shrouds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 656
Most piously;- all lovers tempest -tost, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 703
To this brief tempest . Do you stand possess'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 212
Mutter'd, like tempest in the distance brew'd, Lamia, Part I, Line 353
For signature:- somewhere the tempest fell, The Jealousies, Line 179
 
TEMPESTS..........3
No housing from the storm and tempests mad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 322
Of all his rebel tempests . Dark clouds faint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 953
Sounded tempests to the feast Robin Hood, Line 8
 
TEMPLE............18
Then, through thy temple wide, melodious swells Ode to Apollo, Line 13
Of pleasure's temple . Round about were hung Sleep and Poetry, Line 355
A hymn from Dian's temple ; while upswelling, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 197
That whisper round a temple become soon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 27
Beyond the matron- temple of Latona, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 862
A mimic temple , so complete and true Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 257
Behind great Dian's temple . I'll be yon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 914
Walk'd towards the temple grove with this lament: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 926
Live temple of sweet noise; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 12
Fairer than these, though temple thou hast none, Ode to Psyche, Line 28
Ay, in the very temple of Delight Ode on Melancholy, Line 25
Not so! No! She is in temple -stall Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 154
To sacrifice to Jove, whose temple there Lamia, Part I, Line 227
At Venus' temple porch, 'mid baskets heap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 317
Of some arch'd temple door, or dusky colonnade. Lamia, Part I, Line 361
Long treasured tears. "This temple sad and lone The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 221
By this last temple , by the golden age, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 285
In Saturn's temple . Then Moneta's voice The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 300
 
TEMPLE'S..........2
Dear as the temple's self, so does the moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 28
His paces back into the temple's chief; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 298
 
TEMPLES...........12
Nor with hot fingers, nor with temples bursting: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 226
In the sun's eye, and 'gainst my temples press To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 6
And with the balmiest leaves his temples bind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 382
How he does love me! His poor temples beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 764
Palm-shaded temples , and high rival fanes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 59
Beneath his white soft temples , stedfast kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 122
This nail is in my temples ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 129a
White temples , of exactest elegance, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 64
And all her populous streets and temples lewd, Lamia, Part I, Line 352
War on his temples . Do not all charms fly Lamia, Part II, Line 229
Wander'd on fair-spaced temples ; no soft bloom Lamia, Part II, Line 273
And suffer'd in these temples ; for that cause The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 180
 
TEMPT.............1
Do not tempt me to throttle you on the gorge, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 35
 
TEMPTATION........1
This fierce temptation went: and thou may'st not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 451
 
TEMPTERS..........1
From mortal tempters all to make retreat,- The Jealousies, Line 25
 
TEMPTING..........2
Hang in thy vision like a tempting fruit, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 442
And lov'd to see a tempting lass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 27

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Published @ RC

March 2005