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Keats Concordance
 
TEN...............12
Now the Muses had been ten . Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 36
O for ten years, that I may overwhelm Sleep and Poetry, Line 96
Gluts twice ten thousand caverns; till the spell On the Sea, Line 3
Of heaven! Oh Cynthia, ten -times bright and fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 170
And torrent, and ten thousand jutting shapes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 628
Ten hundred years: which gone, I then bequeath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 598
His loath'd existence through ten centuries, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 691
Big as ten There was a naughty boy, Line 34
Until ten thousand now no bigger than Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 61
Will each one swell to twice ten times the size Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 63
Ten hecatombs shall bellow out their last, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 130
A verdict ten -times sworn! Awake - awake- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 146
 
TENANTLESS........1
But an old man's is narrow, tenantless Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 183
 
TEND..............2
That tend thy bidding, I do think the bars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 185
Thither we tend ."- Now in clear light I stood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 49
 
TENDER............49
Ah! you list to the nightingale's tender condoling, To Some Ladies, Line 11
But when I see thee meek, and kind, and tender , Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 9
Who cannot feel for cold her tender feet, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 14
My daring steps: or if thy tender care, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 57
Made him delay to let their tender feet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 85
Soft voices had they, that with tender plea To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 13
Low murmurer of tender lullabies! Sleep and Poetry, Line 12
Of Jove's large eye-brow, to the tender greening Sleep and Poetry, Line 170
When first my senses caught their tender falling. Sleep and Poetry, Line 330
Of upcast eye, and tender pondering! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 122
Which way the tender -legged linnet hops. This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 8
True tender monitors, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 13
With April's tender younglings: next, well trimm'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 138
When snouted wild-boars routing tender corn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 282
In tender pressure. And as a willow keeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 446
On the deer's tender haunches: late, and loth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 908
Doth her resign; and where her tender hands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 945
Are gone in tender madness, and anon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 949
Full of light, incense, tender minstrelsy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 390
Weaving a coronal of tender scions Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 693
Each tender maiden whom he once thought fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 892
And was now rapt in tender hoverings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 931
But thou must nip this tender innocent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 622
Be tender of your strings, ye soothing lutes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 969
To what my own full thoughts had made too tender , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 74
Ye tender bibbers of the rain and dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 571
Tender soever, but is Jove's own care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 878
Why stand we here? Adieu, ye tender pair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 902
Of fish and mice and rats and tender chick. To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 8
Such tender incense in their laurel shade, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 14
Of northern whale; then for the tender prize- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 64
Macaw, and tender av'davat, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 81
Still, still to hear her tender -taken breath, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 13
"O tender spouse of gold Hyperion, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 95
At tender eye-dawn of aurorean love: Ode to Psyche, Line 20
Already with thee! tender is the night, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 35
In tender victory,- but for myself Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 139
With such a tender grace; nor are her wings Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
Then to the tender ear of her June days, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
Too tender of my ignominious life; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 27
With plaints for me, more tender than the voice Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 12
Of sorrow for her tender favourite's woe, Lamia, Part I, Line 291
Why does your tender palm dissolve in dew?"- Lamia, Part I, Line 370
The tender -person'd Lamia melt into a shade. Lamia, Part II, Line 238
Warm breath, light whisper, tender semi-tone, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 3
The tender gaolers of thy waist! What can I do to drive away, Line 51
As in old pictures tender cherubim The Jealousies, Line 37
Her tender heart, and its warm ardours fann'd The Jealousies, Line 116
Gentle and tender , full of soft conceits, The Jealousies, Line 633
 
TENDERER..........3
Are tenderer still. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 16
With every morn their love grew tenderer , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 9
With every eve deeper and tenderer still; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 10
 
TENDEREST.........9
All tenderest birds there find a pleasant screen, Sleep and Poetry, Line 252
That things of delicate and tenderest worth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 367
By tenderest pressure, a faint damask mouth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 405
And by these tenderest , milky sovereignties- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 759
These tenderest , and by the nectar-wine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 760
My tenderest squeeze is but a giant's clutch. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 574
Kneel'd down beside it, and with tenderest force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 779
Tumultuous,- and, in chords that tenderest be, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 290
To dazzle the soft moon, when tenderest clouds Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 228
 
TENDERLY..........8
Of morning roses - riplings tenderly To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 6
Tenderly her fancy from its maiden snow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 29
On one white arm, and tenderly unclos'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 404
And straight all flush'd; so, lisped tenderly , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 54
Lift the latch, ah gently! ah tenderly , sweet, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 17
Cheeks fashion'd tenderly on either side, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 66
Bid the musicians soothe him tenderly . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 80
"Why do you think?" return'd she tenderly : Lamia, Part II, Line 41
 
TENDERNESS........7
Attuning still the soul to tenderness , To Lord Byron, Line 2
Nor e'er will the notes from their tenderness change; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 35
Miltonian storms, and more, Miltonian tenderness ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 58
Such tenderness as mine? Great Dian, why, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 937
For tenderness the arms so idly lain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 61
In tenderness , would I were whole in love! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 472
To wake into a slumberous tenderness ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 247
 
TENDRIL...........2
Through tendril wreaths fantastically creeping. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 170
In harmless tendril they each other chain'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 935
 
TENDRILS..........2
All tendrils green, of every bloom and hue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 410
From weary tendrils , and bow'd branches green, Lamia, Part I, Line 98
 
TENEMENT..........1
A young mind from its bodily tenement . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 325
 
TENFOLD...........1
Of nature's lives and wonders puls'd tenfold , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 105
 
TENOR.............1
In solemn tenor and deep organ tune; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 350
 
TENOUR............1
In solemn tenour and deep organ tone: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 48
 
TENSE.............2
Before the tense string murmur.- To the earth! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 345
Plain in our own original mood and tense , The Jealousies, Line 791
 
TENSER............1
Not make them tenser . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 27a
 
TENT..............8
At last into a dark and vapoury tent - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 597
And, save when Bacchus kept his ivy tent , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 240
The tent of Hesperus and all his train; Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 3
And Neptune made for thee a spumy tent , To Homer, Line 7
Stifling that puny essence in its tent . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 331
The entrance of GERSA'S Tent in the Hungarian Camp. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Setting
I found it in the tent , among some spoils Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 66
Erminia, sir, was hidden in your tent ,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 99
 
TENTED............1
Underneath large blue-bells tented , Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 13
 
TENTH.............1
Well, let us see,- tenth book and chapter nine,- The Jealousies, Line 640
 
TENTING...........1
Or neck and shoulder, nor the tenting swerve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 400
 
TENTS.............4
And poise about in cloudy thunder- tents Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 27
From Gersa's tents . Farewell, old Ethelbert. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 199
Your temper elsewhere, 'mong these burly tents , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
In silken tents , and 'mid light fragrance dozed, The Jealousies, Line 692
 
TERENCE'S.........1
women." Terence's Eunuch. Act 2. Sc. 4 Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
 
TERMINATE.........1
That freshly terminate in open plains, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 116
 
TERMS.............6
We must consult upon our terms of peace. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 159
I cannot, in plain terms , grossly assault Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 57
And kept his rosy terms in idle languishment. Lamia, Part I, Line 199
Spoken to in clear, plain, and open terms , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 15
Then in plain terms , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 16b
On any terms , marry Miss Bellanaine; The Jealousies, Line 461
 
TERRACE...........4
Of the garden- terrace , towards him they bent Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 179
My terrace is well bowered with oranges. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 34
A Cabinet, opening towards a Terrace . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Setting
Upon the terrace ; the refreshing air Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 60
 
TERRIBLE..........3
A terrible division, God of the meridian, Line 6
I will advance a terrible right arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 248
Now saw the light and made it terrible . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 366
 
TERRIER...........1
Terrier , ferret them out! Burn - burn the witch! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 138
 
TERRIFIC..........2
The Passions - a terrific band - Ode to Apollo, Line 26
Besides, there, nightly, with terrific glare, Lamia, Part II, Line 11
 
TERROR............3
Kept off dismay, and terror , and alarm Calidore: A Fragment, Line 145
And not a man but felt the terror in his hair. Lamia, Part II, Line 268
But yet I had a terror of her robes, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 251
 
TERRORS...........1
And terrors manifold divided me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 563
 
TERSE.............1
The grand, the sweet, the terse , the free, the fine; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 54
 
TESTY.............1
Here comes the testy brood. O for a sword! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 5
 
TETHYS............1
Oceanus, and Tethys , in whose lap Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 75
 
TEXT..............2
Beneath the text ; and thus the rhyme The Eve of St. Mark, Line 97
Then pray refer to the text , and you will see The Jealousies, Line 103
 
TEXTURE...........2
Whose airy texture , from a golden string, Lamia, Part II, Line 19
We know her woof, her texture ; she is given Lamia, Part II, Line 232
 
TH'...............6
And th' half seen mossiness of linnets' nests. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 22
As she was wont, th' imagination Sleep and Poetry, Line 265
To pray for mercy on th' elect, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 39
Or, for such trifles, rob th' adorned world Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 88
And breathe themselves at th' Emperor's chamber door, The Jealousies, Line 323
Th' Ambassador's return'd from Pigmio! The Jealousies, Line 551
 
THALIA............1
Than twin sister of Thalia ? Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 38
 
THAMES............2
In lucent Thames reflected:- warm desires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 85
Affright you? Did our old lamenting Thames Sleep and Poetry, Line 212
 
THANK.............13
Rock'd me to patience. Now, thank gentle heaven! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 706
Thank the great gods, and look not bitterly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 807
'Tis true I had no corns - no! thank the fates, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 17
With a queen's awful lips I doubly thank you! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 89
In our prosperity. We thank you, sir. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 131
Hail, my sweet hostess! I do thank the stars, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 12
To say for once I thank you. Sigifred! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 34
Thank you, fair lady - Otho!- Emperor! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 118
To thank thee; here congratulate each other; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 250
Thank God for that! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 190a
Now I thank heaven I am in the toils, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 27
Thank you, old mummy!- now securely I take wing." The Jealousies, Line 603
Thank heaven, I'm hearty yet!- 'twas no such thing:- The Jealousies, Line 715
 
THANK'D...........2
Thank'd heaven that his joy was never ending; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 104
Yes, every god be thank'd , and power benign, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 253
 
THANKS............3
More thanks , good Conrad; for, except my son's, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 43
To royal Gersa with my humble thanks , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 20
Brave captains, thanks ! Enough Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 80b
 
THAT'S............9
Of all that's high, and great, and good, and healing. To George Felton Mathew, Line 10
To say "joy not too much in all that's bloomy." To George Felton Mathew, Line 52
All that's reveal'd from that far seat of blisses, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 47
Who had of all that's sweet tasted, and seen, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 38
'Tis me - my life that's pleaded for! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 59a
We did not tilt each other,- that's a blessing,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 53
That's not well done.- Where is she? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 186
How you can bring her to me." " That's for you, The Jealousies, Line 485
"The Emperor's horrid bad; yes, that's my cue!" The Jealousies, Line 622
 
THATCH............1
With fruit the vines that round the thatch -eves run; To Autumn, Line 4
 
THATE.............2
Whanne thate hir friendes thinke hem bound The Eve of St. Mark, Line 101
Gif thate the modre (God her blesse) The Eve of St. Mark, Line 105
 
THAW..............4
Endymion's spirit melt away and thaw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 501
Those charitable eyes will thaw my heart, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 144
His patient thought, had now begun to thaw , Lamia, Part II, Line 161
Moan, moan; for still I thaw - or give me help: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 430
 
THAWINGS..........1
Nor frozen thawings glue them In drear nighted December, Line 7
 
THEA..............14
Thea , I feel thee ere I see thy face; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 96
Here on this spot of earth. Search, Thea , search! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 116
Search, Thea , search! and tell me, if thou seest Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 121
Thea ! Thea! Thea! where is Saturn?" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 134
Thea! Thea ! Thea! where is Saturn?" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 134
Thea! Thea! Thea ! where is Saturn?" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 134
The rebel three.- Thea was startled up, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 147
Went step for step with Thea through the woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 202
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 3
Then Thea spread abroad her trembling arms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 89
A disanointing poison: so that Thea , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 98
Is Thea , softest-natur'd of our brood." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 335
A midday fleece of clouds. Thea arose The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 454
Goes, step for step, with Thea from yon woods, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 46
 
THEA'S............1
He stood, and heard not Thea's sobbing deep; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 139
 
THEATRES..........1
For as in theatres of crowded men Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 253
 
THEBAN............1
Theban Amphion leaning on his lute: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1002
 
THEFT.............2
Ah! he was one for theft and rape, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 83
His golden throne, bent warm on amorous theft : Lamia, Part I, Line 8
 
THEIRS............3
To embracements warm as theirs makes coy excuse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 533
Content as theirs , Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 13
Couches warm as theirs is cold? Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 70
 
THEME.............9
The sage will mingle with each moral theme To My Brother George (epistle), Line 77
Begetters of our deep eternal theme ! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 10
The quiet glooms of such a piteous theme . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 152
Apollo is once more the golden theme ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 28
Drank. That full draught is parent of my theme . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 46
Can size and shape pervade. The lofty theme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 306
A theme ! a theme! Great Nature! give a theme; To Fanny, Line 5
A theme! a theme ! Great Nature! give a theme; To Fanny, Line 5
A theme! a theme! Great Nature! give a theme ; To Fanny, Line 5
 
THEMES............2
From majesty: but in clear truth the themes Sleep and Poetry, Line 233
Thereby in goodly themes so training him, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 6
 
THEMIS............1
In midst of all lay Themis , at the feet Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 77
 
THEMSELVES........16
Guess where the jaunty streams refresh themselves . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 22
And cool themselves among the em'rald tresses; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 82
The while they cool themselves , they freshness give, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 83
That for themselves a cooling covert make Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 17
Must dreams themselves be; seeing they're more slight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 755
All human; bearing in themselves this good, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 156
What themselves think of it; from forth his eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 540
The doors all look as if they oped themselves , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 49
When weary feet forget themselves upon a pleasant turf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 9
Bestirr'd themselves , thrice horrible and cold; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 256
To hide themselves in forms of beast and bird. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 72
And then they own'd themselves without a blush, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 81
whispering sadly, and ranging themselves ; part entering and part discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
In white robes, and themselves in order placed Lamia, Part II, Line 196
Themselves with what in faery land was sweet, The Jealousies, Line 22
And breathe themselves at th' Emperor's chamber door, The Jealousies, Line 323
 
THENCE............11
Therefrom my liberty; thence too I've seen Sleep and Poetry, Line 292
thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Me even to tears: thence , when a little eas'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 559
Spiral through ruggedest loopholes, and thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 599
And I distilling from it thence to run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 944
Round flowery islands, and take thence a skim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 995
O, not so idle: for down-glancing thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 86
To some black cloud; thence down I'll madly sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 247
I bow'd a tranced vassal: nor would thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 460
For thence her brithers Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 30
I know the covert, for thence came I hither." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 152
 
THEODORE..........5
THEODORE , GONFRID, Officers Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 6,7
Were Theodore and Gonfrid and the rest Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 72
Enter THEODORE and GONFRID. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 125
[Exeunt THEODORE and GONFRID. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 130
Enter SIGIFRED, GONFRID, and THEODORE , meeting. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
 
THERE'S...........22
Yet, for him there's refreshment even in toil; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 147
Is wan on Neptune's blue: yet there's a stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 82
But in the eye of love: there's not a sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 79
As doth the voice of love: there's not a breath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 82
There's a blush for won't, and a blush for shan't, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 5
There's a blush for thought, and a blush for nought, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 7
There's a sigh for yes, and a sigh for no, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 17
There's a beverage brighter and clearer! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 4
For there's Bishop's Teign For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 1
There's Arch Brook For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 7
And there's Larch Brook, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 8
There's the barton rich For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 25
Then there's a little wing, far from the sun, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 45
"Get hence! get hence! there's dwarfish Hildebrand; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 100
Then there's that old Lord Maurice, not a whit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 103
Who never shook before. There's moody death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 4
There's a large cauliflower in each candle, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 15
To whisper, there's the man who took alive King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 31
"I'll trounce 'em!- there's the square-cut chancellor, The Jealousies, Line 145
And as for aqua vitae - there's a mess! The Jealousies, Line 291
There's Bertha Watson,- and Miss Bertha Page,- The Jealousies, Line 376
There's Bertha Blount of York,- and Bertha Knox of Perth." The Jealousies, Line 378
 
THEREAT...........1
To change his purpose. He thereat was stung, Lamia, Part II, Line 69
 
THEREBY...........4
And bent by circumstance, and thereby blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 873
Thereby more conquer'd, than by us the rule Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 216
And, after not long, thirsted, for thereby The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 41
Thereby in goodly themes so training him, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 6
 
THEREFORE.........25
Therefore , great bard, I not so fearfully Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 55
Therefore no insult will I give his spirit, Sleep and Poetry, Line 45
Lifted to the white clouds. Therefore should I Sleep and Poetry, Line 297
Therefore no lover did of anguish die: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 236
Therefore , on every morrow, are we wreathing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 6
Therefore , 'tis with full happiness that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 34
Therefore I eager followed, and did curse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 704
And, therefore , was just going; when, behold! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 893
But could not: therefore all the billows green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 654
Who strive therefore : on the sudden it is won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 532
On earth I may not love thee; and therefore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 659
Therefore for her these vesper-carols are. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 834
Therefore they watch'd a time when they might sift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 465
Therefore 'tis sure a want of Attic taste, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 58
Not therefore veiled quite, blindfold, and hid, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 272
Therefore the operations of the dawn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 294
But thou canst.- Be thou therefore in the van Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 343
Are sweeter; therefore , ye soft pipes, play on; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 12
And therefore fit to calmly put a close Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 211
Which you can save me from,- and therefore safe, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 116
And therefore kept from me your demon's plot Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 138
For coals, and therefore no coals Betty brings. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 7
Therefore , that happiness be somewhat shar'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 177
Therefore he call'd a coach, and bade it drive amain. The Jealousies, Line 225
And therefore duly shall proceed to tell, The Jealousies, Line 790
 
THEREFROM.........2
Therefrom my liberty; thence too I've seen Sleep and Poetry, Line 292
Among these fallen, Saturn's voice therefrom Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 125
 
THEREIN...........3
But put therein some drug design'd Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 3
Of brightness so unsullied, that therein Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 97
Who stood therein did seem of great renown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 168
 
THEREOF...........3
The thought thereof is awful, sweet, and holy, Sleep and Poetry, Line 25
And at the fruits thereof what shapes they be, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 315
In right thereof ; for 'tis the eternal law Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 228
 
THEREON...........5
That, when I think thereon , my spirit clings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 620
But when my eyes with thine thereon could dance: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 150
A table, and, half anguish'd, threw thereon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 255
Save one, who look'd thereon with eye severe, Lamia, Part II, Line 157
Was fainting for sweet food: I look'd thereon The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 233
 
THERETO...........2
Of liny marble, and thereto a train Sleep and Poetry, Line 364
Thereto his beard had not begun to bloom, Character of C.B., Line 6
 
THEREUPON.........2
The quavering thunder thereupon had ceas'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 225
thereupon she, plate, Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
THEREWITH.........2
So wingedly: when we combine therewith , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 813
Her mouth foam'd, and the grass, therewith besprent, Lamia, Part I, Line 148
 
THERMOPYLAE.......1
Thermopylae its heroes - not yet dead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 318
 
THESEUS'..........1
Except in such a page where Theseus' spouse Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 95
 
THESSALY..........1
In music, through the vales of Thessaly : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 144
 
THETIS............2
Welcome the float of Thetis . Long he dwells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 611
And Thetis pearly too.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1005a
 
THETIS'...........1
Wind into Thetis' bower by many a pearly stair; Lamia, Part I, Line 208
 
THEWS.............1
And speak a blessing: Mark me! Thou hast thews Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 588
 
THEY'RE...........3
And when they're come, the very pleasant rout: Sleep and Poetry, Line 322
Must dreams themselves be; seeing they're more slight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 755
They're like the others! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 96
 
THIBET............1
Tow'rds Thibet . Mem.:- birds fly in the night; The Jealousies, Line 645
 
THICK.............18
By a swan's ebon bill; from a thick brake, Sleep and Poetry, Line 226
the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick -sighted: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Anon he stain'd the thick and spongy sod Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 225
Thick , as to curtain up some wood-nymph's home. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 941
Before mine eyes thick films and shadows float- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 323
To where thick myrtle branches, 'gainst his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 378
So thick with leaves and mosses, that they seem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 666
Just within ken, they saw descending thick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 820
Through the thick branches, poor ring-doves sleek forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 327
Whence thick , and green, and beautiful it grew, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 426
Thick night confounds the pine-tops with the clouds: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 80
And hazels thick , dark-stemm'd beneath the shade: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 27
With such a thick skull'd persevering suit? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 200
Were clogg'd in some thick cloud? O, changeful Love, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 32
Stifled beneath the thick oppressive shade Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 19
The woof of darkness, thick , for hid delight; The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 12
For a thick fog - the Princess sulky quite- The Jealousies, Line 647
A motley crowd thick gather'd in the hall, The Jealousies, Line 762
 
THICKET...........3
In thicket hid I curs'd the haggard scene- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 497
Nor muffling thicket interpos'd to dull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 966
The grass, the thicket , and the fruit-tree wild; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 45
 
THICKETS..........1
Of these dull boughs,- this oven of dark thickets ,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 20
 
THIEF.............2
Grief born of thee, young angel! fairest thief ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 108
And the Promethean clay by thief endued, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 955
 
THIEVISH..........1
And then the thievish monkies down would creep When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 90
 
THIGH.............2
Then each on a leg or thigh fastens. The Gothic looks solemn, Line 18
The while one hand, that erst upon his thigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 498
 
THIGHS............1
With my new double-barrel - stew'd the thighs , The Jealousies, Line 650
 
THIMBLE...........2
As a milliner's thimble . I am as brisk, Line 4
A thimble -full of old Jamaica rum." The Jealousies, Line 363
 
THIN..............19
As gracefully descending, light and thin , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 49
So thin a breathing, not the spider's shuttle, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 751
Between her luscious lips and eyelids thin . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 942
Thou madest Pluto bear thin element; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 99
Of weeds were cold beneath his cold thin feet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 195
Are but a slime, a thin pervading scum, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 335
My life from too thin breathing: gone and past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 650
With its green thin spurs For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 17
Fell thin as a young mother's, who doth seek Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 35
And so she ever fed it with thin tears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 425
And the snake all winter- thin Fancy, Line 57
From pleated lawn-frill fine and thin The Eve of St. Mark, Line 53
Thin in the waist, with bushy head of hair, Character of C.B., Line 2
Her eye-brows thin and jet, and hollow eyes. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 115
Where youth grows pale, and spectre- thin , and dies; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 26
To thin the scarlet conclave of old men, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 50
Mov'd the thin linen folds that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 196
Stirr'd the thin folds of gauze that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 218
For of superfluous diamonds I as well may thin it. The Jealousies, Line 621
 
THINE.............88
Hast thou a sword that thine enemy's smart is? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 10
Thine ear, and find thy gentle heart; so well Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 3
Over which thine eyebrows, leaning, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 7
Of thine ankle lightly turn'd: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 25
Cov'ring half thine ivory breast; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 46
Comes thine alabaster steed; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 57
And echo back the voice of thine own tongue? Sleep and Poetry, Line 52
So every tale, does this sweet tale of thine . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 208
That follow'd thine , and thy dear shepherd's kisses: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 240
Where, where slept thine ire, God of the golden bow, Line 7
Think too that all those numbers should be thine ; To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 9
Brighter has it left thine eyes Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 13
Of thine enmossed realms: O thou, to whom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 251
He said: "I feel this thine endearing love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 466
Tell me thine ailment: tell me all amiss!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 519
All records, saving thine , come cool, and calm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 2
Have become indolent; but touching thine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 5
Of icy pinnacles, and dipp'dst thine arms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 208
Into thine arms; to scare Aurora's train, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 696
Around thine aged top, and thy clear fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 722
To pluck thee from me? And, of thine own will, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 750
My lips to thine , that they may richly feast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 771
An immortality of passion's thine : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 808
Thine honied tongue - lute-breathings, which I gasp Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 820
Stifle thine heart no more;- nor be afraid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 979
As if thine eye, high Poet! was not bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 48
Towards her with the Muses in thine heart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 49
The while they feel thine airy fellowship. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 55
Ambitious for the hallowing of thine eyes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 60
The monstrous sea is thine - the myriad sea! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 69
But when my eyes with thine thereon could dance: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 150
Until thou liftedst up thine eyelids fine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 152
Now I begin to feel thine orby power Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 180
Keep back thine influence, and do not blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 182
I know thine inmost bosom, and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 293
As dancingly as thine . Be not afraid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 307
One hair of thine : see how I weep and sigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 583
"What more there is to do, young man, is thine : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 754
Even in the passing of thine honey-moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 917
And this is sure thine other softling - this Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 316
Thine own fair bosom, and I am so near! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 317
Fearless for power of thought, without thine aid?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 361
In thine own depth. Hail, gentle Carian! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 545
To fan-like fountains,- thine illuminings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 584
Heaven shield thee for thine utter loveliness! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 710
Lend thine ear, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 17
And by the kernel of thine earthly love, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 20
Shut up thine olden pages, and be mute. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 4
But I behold thine eyes' well-memoried light; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 6
Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine , Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 1
Some English that might strive thine ear to please. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 4
Will for thine honor and his pleasure try. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 14
And let me call heaven's blessing on thine eyes, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 3
That I may speak my grief into thine ear; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 58
Thine eyes by gazing; but I cannot live Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 63
I'll visit thee for this, and kiss thine eyes, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 335
O Melancholy, turn thine eyes away! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 481
Now fills, O Burns, a space in thine own room, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 2
My pulse is warm with thine old barley-bree, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 5
His seat upon thine a-e, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 26
He cursed thee and thine , both house and land: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 102
Thou art my heaven, and I thine eremite: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 277
Open thine eyes, for meek St. Agnes' sake, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 278
I curse not, for my heart is lost in thine , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 331
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 59
Open thine eyes eterne, and sphere them round Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 117
One avenue was shaded from thine eyes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 186
Rejoice, O Delos, with thine olives green, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 24
Pluck'd witless the weak flowers, till thine arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 74
In midst of this thine hymn, my willing eyes, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 6
Even into thine own soft-conched ear: Ode to Psyche, Line 4
But being too happy in thine happiness,- Ode to a Nightingale, Line 6
Unto thine anger I might well have spoken, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 28
Not to thine ear alone I make confession, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 173
Come close, and let me breathe into thine ear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 126
Large as a god speak out, where all is thine . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 135
Thine arms from forth a pulpit of hot fire Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 91
And, with thine infant fingers, lift the fringe Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
But shall indulge itself about thine heart! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 108
And by thine eyes, and by thy starry crown!" Lamia, Part I, Line 90
"Too frail of heart! for this lost nymph of thine , Lamia, Part I, Line 93
Of thine harmonious sisters keep in tune Lamia, Part I, Line 266
For all thine impious proud-heart sophistries, Lamia, Part II, Line 285
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 361
I humanize my sayings to thine ear, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 2
That thou would wish thine own heart dry of blood, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 5
Or kiss thine eyes, or count thy locks, tress after tress?" The Jealousies, Line 171
For thine imperial absence? Pho! I can The Jealousies, Line 534
 
THING.............52
Stay while I tell thee, fluttering thing , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 5
Of all the secrets of some wond'rous thing Sleep and Poetry, Line 30
As any thing most true; as that the year Sleep and Poetry, Line 294
A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 1
Lay a lost thing upon her paly lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 341
Yes, every thing , even to the pearly cup Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 117
With not a thing to sigh for, or to seek, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 167
Into the bosom of a hated thing . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 280
And find it is the vainest thing to seek; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 571
O 'twas a cruel thing ."- "Now thou dost taunt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 975
Or what a thing is love! 'Tis She, but lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 79
And she would not conceive it. Timid thing ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 403
So, fairy- thing , it shall have lullabies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 575
Must do the thing , or both will be destroy'd."- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 711
A full accomplishment! The thing is done, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 18
And look, quite dead to every worldly thing ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 292
By thinking it a thing of yes and no, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 898
It is a thing I dote on: so I'd fain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 911
In haste to teach the little thing to walk, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 8
If thou didst ever any thing believe, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 59
But for a thing more deadly dark than all; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 266
And put her lean hands to the horrid thing : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 381
Greatly they wonder'd what the thing might mean: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 460
The thing was vile with green and livid spot, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 475
To any living thing , All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 2
O put a gadfly to that thing All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 41
That noises are a common thing All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 51
Or dance, or play, do any thing , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 86
A thing of soft misnomers, so divine And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 3
Or any other wondrous thing Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 6
Every thing is spoilt by use: Fancy, Line 68
Not a senseless, tranced thing , Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 18
Why, pretty thing , could you not live with me? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 8
A poor, weak, palsy-stricken, churchyard thing , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 155
She knelt, so pure a thing , so free from mortal taint. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 225
Though thou forsakest a deceived thing ;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 332
Your poor Ape was a prince, and he, poor thing , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 36
And this thing woe crept in among our hearts, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 254
That was before we knew the winged thing , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 341
Flush every thing that hath a vermeil hue, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 14
Goddess benign, point forth some unknown thing : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 95
I leave it all to fate - to any thing ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 2
Aye, any thing to me, fair creature. Do, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 38
Away, thou guilty thing ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 63b
Making our bright hours muddy, be a thing Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 116
Bearing a fruit more precious! graceful thing , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 83
Happy in beauty, life, and love, and every thing , Lamia, Part I, Line 298
Forgetfulness of every- thing but bliss, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 104
To the great world? Thou art a dreaming thing ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 168
Comes from a play- thing of the Emperor's choice, The Jealousies, Line 332
I say, old hocus, have you such a thing The Jealousies, Line 600
Thank heaven, I'm hearty yet!- 'twas no such thing :- The Jealousies, Line 715
 
THING'S...........1
Upon a dead thing's face my hand I laid; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 618
 
THINGES...........2
He writith; and thinges many mo: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 109
Of swiche thinges I may not shew; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 110
 
THINGS............65
Are things on which the dazzled senses rest Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 17
These pleasant things , and heaven was bedewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 53
Delicious sounds! those little bright-eyed things Calidore: A Fragment, Line 73
Of scribbling lines for you. These things I thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 121
Sounds which will reach the Framer of all things , Sleep and Poetry, Line 39
A sense of real things comes doubly strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 157
To things ye knew not of,- were closely wed Sleep and Poetry, Line 194
These things are doubtless: yet in truth we've had Sleep and Poetry, Line 230
Who simply tell the most heart-easing things . Sleep and Poetry, Line 268
Things such as these are ever harbingers Sleep and Poetry, Line 339
She overlook'd things that I scarce could tell. Sleep and Poetry, Line 395
And taper fingers catching at all things , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 59
As thou exceedest all things in thy shine, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 207
Definitively on these mighty things ; To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 2
Yet, as all things mourn awhile Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 17
That thou dost know of things mysterious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 506
These things which happen. Rightly have they done: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 528
These things , with all their comfortings, are given Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 707
Feel we these things ?- that moment have we stept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 795
Look not so wilder'd; for these things are true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 850
Are things to brood on with more ardency Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 33
There must be surely character'd strange things , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 62
That things of delicate and tenderest worth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 367
Of all these things around us." He did so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 455
And that of all things 'tis kept secretest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 572
Through unknown things ; till exhaled asphodel, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 663
Or by ethereal things that, unconfin'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 25
Kissing dead things to life. The sleeping kine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 57
Above, around, and at his feet; save things Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 121
How his own goddess was past all things fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 190
Like things of yesterday my youthful pleasures. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 337
At things which, but for thee, O Latmian! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 373
These things accomplish'd:- If he utterly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 696
And that affectionate light, those diamond things , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 717
By things I tremble at, and gorgon wrath. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 754
Towards common thoughts and things for very fear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 896
Myself to things of light from infancy; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 958
On things for which no wording can be found; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 962
Beauty, in things on earth and things above; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 21
Beauty, in things on earth and things above; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 21
On mists in idleness: to let fair things Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 11
Things all disjointed come from north and south, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 5
Be my award. Things cannot to the will Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 76
Piteous she look'd on dead and senseless things , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 489
Your honest countenance all things above, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 34
Poor alligators, poor things of one span, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 62
But ye, poor tongueless things , were meant O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 11
Perchance speak, kneel, touch, kiss - in sooth such things have been. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 81
Perplex'd her with a thousand things - The Eve of St. Mark, Line 29
Beautiful things made new, for the surprise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 132
What abject things , what mockeries must ye be, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 101
Such things deserted me and are forgiven, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 83
And, do ye mind, above all things , proclaim Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 70
When simplest things put on a sombre cast; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 123
Things unbeliev'd one hour, so strange they are, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 2
In the dull catalogue of common things . Lamia, Part II, Line 233
Seem'd but the faulture of decrepit things The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 70
Such things as thou art are admitted oft The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 178
Of all external things - they saw me not, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 268
I ached to see what things the hollow brain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 276
Of things as nimbly as the outward eye The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 305
Beautiful things made new for the surprize The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 437
Making comparisons of earthly things ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 3
When, howe'er poor or particolour'd things , What can I do to drive away, Line 10
All things turn'd topsy-turvy in a devil's dance. The Jealousies, Line 756
 
THINK.............68
Minion of grandeur! think you he did wait? Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 5
Think you he nought but prison walls did see, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 6
O let me think it is not quite in vain To Hope, Line 27
Thou wilt think that some amorous zephyr is nigh; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 14
And sit, and rhyme and think on Chatterton; To George Felton Mathew, Line 56
We must think rather, that in a playful mood, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 8
When I think on thy noble countenance: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 52
Must think on what will be, and what has been. To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 8
Pry 'mong the stars, to strive to think divinely: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 8
With hopes that you would one day think the reading To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 81
Than I began to think of rhymes and measures: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 98
And where we think the truth least understood, Addressed to Haydon, Line 5
But let me think away those times of woe: Sleep and Poetry, Line 220
At speaking out what I have dared to think . Sleep and Poetry, Line 300
Into the brain ere one can think upon it; Sleep and Poetry, Line 320
And think that I would not be overmeek To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 5
Think too that all those numbers should be thine; To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 9
Think how near, how near; Hither, hither, love, Line 18
Think how dear, how dear. Hither, hither, love, Line 20
Think not of it, sweet one, so; Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 1
And think of yellow leaves, of owlet's cry, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 182
That, when I think thereon, my spirit clings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 620
That tend thy bidding, I do think the bars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 185
O think how sweet to me the freshening sluice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 326
O think how this dry palate would rejoice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 328
O think how I should love a bed of flowers!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 330
What themselves think of it; from forth his eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 540
O I do think that I have been alone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 801
So softly, Arethusa, that I think Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 976
That I can think away from thee and live!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 184
Think , my deliverer, how desolate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 561
And curb'd, think on't, O Latmian! did I sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 663
To tell; 'tis dizziness to think of it. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 827
Alas, I must not think - by Phoebe, no! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 303
Let me not think , soft Angel! shall it be so? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 304
Say, beautifullest, shall I never think ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 305
To listen and think of love. Still let me speak; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 689
And I do think that at my very birth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 732
To think thee kind, but ah, it will not do! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 737
When I do speak, I'll think upon this hour, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 33
And think that I may never live to trace When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 7
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 13
Or I shall think you knowing; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 2
Yet can I think of thee till thought is blind,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 12
To-night I'll have my friar,- let me think Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 24
That silly youth doth think to make itself And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 4
To think how they may ache in icy hoods and mails. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 18
Where but to think is to be full of sorrow Ode to a Nightingale, Line 27
Gersa, I think you wrong me: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 107b
I think I have a better fame abroad. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
I blush to think of my unchasten'd tongue; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 123
My Prince, you think too harshly- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 47a
Poor self-deceived wretches, who must think Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 76
Without proof could you think me innocent? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 42
I think , nay I am sure, you will grieve much Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 113
Peace! peace, old man! I cannot think she is. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130
I ache to think on't. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 13b
"Why do you think ?" return'd she tenderly: Lamia, Part II, Line 41
Until they think warm days will never cease, To Autumn, Line 10
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,- To Autumn, Line 24
A fever of thyself - think of the earth; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 169
I must not think now, though I saw that face- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 263
Because I think , my lord, he is no man, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 31
The heavens forbid that I should not think so. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 7
Truth! I think so - by heavens, it shall not last. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 35
To think that I must be so near allied The Jealousies, Line 166
"Ah, cursed Bellanaine!" "Don't think of her," The Jealousies, Line 433
Now I think on't, perhaps I could convince The Jealousies, Line 473
 
THINK'ST..........2
Saving of thy sweet self; if thou think'st well The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 341
Thou think'st it brave to take a breathing king, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 28
 
THINKE............1
Whanne thate hir friendes thinke hem bound The Eve of St. Mark, Line 101
 
THINKING..........5
Of over thinking had that moment gone Sleep and Poetry, Line 383
He had left thinking of the mystery,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 930
By thinking it a thing of yes and no, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 898
Thinking on rugged hours and fruitless toil, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 324
I have not ask'd it, ever thinking thee Lamia, Part II, Line 86
 
THINKINGS.........1
For solitary thinkings ; such as dodge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 294
 
THINKS............4
Of Lapland thinks on sweet Arno; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 26
Worse than a housewife's, when she thinks her cream Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 3
And he's awake who thinks himself asleep. O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 14
Who thinks they scandal her who talk about her; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 8
 
THINNEST..........1
She dies at the thinnest cloud; her loveliness Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 81
 
THIRD.............8
A third is in the race! who is the third, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 593
A third is in the race! who is the third , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 593
Each third step did he pause, and listen'd oft Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 194
Kind sister! aye, this third name says you are; Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 17
A third time pass'd they by, and, passing, turn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 21
A third time came they by;- alas! wherefore? Ode on Indolence, Line 41
They know their own thoughts best. As for the third , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 58
With the third part - (yet that is drinking dear!)- The Jealousies, Line 368
 
THIRST............8
My thirst for the world's praises: nothing base, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 770
Dost thou now please thy thirst with berry-juice? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 327
My greedy thirst with nectarous camel-draughts; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 479
Thirst for another love: O impious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 87
Of Jove, those tears have given me a thirst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 123
All my thirst for sweet heart-ache! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 29
Will thirst in drouthy ringlets there; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 57
Besides, I thirst to pledge my lovely bride Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 119
 
THIRSTED..........1
And, after not long, thirsted , for thereby The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 41
 
THIRSTING.........1
Soon they awoke clear eyed: nor burnt with thirsting , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 225
 
THIRSTS...........1
And by mysterious sleights a hundred thirsts appease? Lamia, Part I, Line 285
 
THIRSTY...........2
A noble end, are thirsty every hour. Sleep and Poetry, Line 283
They are all here to-night, the whole blood- thirsty race! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 99
 
THIRTEEN..........1
"Five minutes thirteen seconds after three, The Jealousies, Line 676
 
THIRTY............1
Latitude thirty -six; our scouts descry The Jealousies, Line 643
 
THISTLE...........2
As hath the seeded thistle , when in parle Character of C.B., Line 3
Let spear-grass and the spiteful thistle wage Lamia, Part II, Line 228
 
THISTLEDOWN.......1
Made of rose leaves and thistledown , express, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 571
 
THITHER...........3
Hither and thither all the changing thoughts Sleep and Poetry, Line 287
Go thither quick and so complete my joy. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 56
Thither we tend."- Now in clear light I stood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 49
 
THOMAS............1
INSCRIBED TO THE MEMORY OF THOMAS CHATTERTON Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Dedication
 
THORN.............1
May pierce them on the sudden with the thorn Lamia, Part II, Line 281
 
THORNLESS.........1
About these thornless wilds; her pleasant days Lamia, Part I, Line 95
 
THORNS............3
And thorns of life; forgetting the great end Sleep and Poetry, Line 245
Then let us clear away the choaking thorns Sleep and Poetry, Line 255
In frightful scarlet, and its thorns out-grown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 697
 
THORNY............5
The thorny sharks from hiding-holes, and fright'ning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 89
That glar'd before me through a thorny brake. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 493
His head through thorny -green entanglement Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 41
From dewy sward or thorny spray; Fancy, Line 34
Of the green thorny bloomless hedge, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 9
 
THOROUGH..........3
Easily onward, thorough flowers and weed. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 62
And babbles thorough silence, till her wits Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 948
We dance before him thorough kingdoms wide:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 225
 
THOU'LT...........1
So with the horrors past thou'lt win thy happier fate. On Peace, Line 14
 
THOUGHT...........86
The thought of this great partnership diffuses To George Felton Mathew, Line 8
In shape, that sure no living man had thought Calidore: A Fragment, Line 117
I thought the garden-rose it far excell'd: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 10
But what, without the social thought of thee, To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 13
With heaviness; in seasons when I've thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 3
When some bright thought has darted through my brain: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 114
Of scribbling lines for you. These things I thought To My Brother George (epistle), Line 121
Thus have I thought ; and days on days have flown To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 49
Yet, as my hand was warm, I thought I'd better To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 103
Of sober thought ? Or when starting away, To G.A.W., Line 6
But what is higher beyond thought than thee? Sleep and Poetry, Line 19
The thought thereof is awful, sweet, and holy, Sleep and Poetry, Line 25
The thought of that same chariot, and the strange Sleep and Poetry, Line 161
Men were thought wise who could not understand Sleep and Poetry, Line 184
And thought it Pegasus. Ah dismal soul'd! Sleep and Poetry, Line 187
Thought after thought to nourish up the flame Sleep and Poetry, Line 398
Thought after thought to nourish up the flame Sleep and Poetry, Line 398
Playing in all her innocence of thought . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 100
Catch an immortal thought to pay the debt On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 4
they if I thought a year's castigation would do them any good;- it will not: the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
sad thought for Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
My herald thought into a wilderness: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 59
What it might mean. Perhaps, thought I, Morpheus, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 559
Came not by common growth. Thus on I thought , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 564
With wayward melancholy; and I thought , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 688
For I have ever thought that it might bless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 826
The goal of consciousness? Ah, 'tis the thought , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 283
With melancholy thought : O he had swoon'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 868
Each tender maiden whom he once thought fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 892
High with excessive love. "And now," thought he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 901
One thought beyond thy argent luxuries! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 186
Rheum to kind eyes, a sting to humane thought , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 286
Ere it burst open swift as fairy thought , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 857
To thee! But then I thought on poets gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 27
Thought he, "Why am I not as are the dead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 89
And thought to leave her far away behind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 175
I thought to leave thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 282
Fearless for power of thought , without thine aid?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 361
For at the first, first dawn and thought of thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 734
Even then, that moment, at the thought of this, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 745
We might embrace and die: voluptuous thought ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 759
There's a blush for thought , and a blush for nought, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 7
At thought of idleness cannot be idle, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 13
Be settled, but they tease us out of thought . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 77
Me how to harbour such a happy thought . To J.R., Line 14
I thought the worst was simple misery; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 330
I thought some Fate with pleasure or with strife Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 331
Yet can I think of thee till thought is blind,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 12
But in the world of thought and mental might. Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 14
The lady fainted and he thought her dead, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 69
"I shed no tears;/ Deep thought , or awful vision, I had none;/ By O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 1
But thought no evil O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 40
Through the thought still spread beyond her: Fancy, Line 6
And I have thought it died of grieving; I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 2
Tears, at the thought of those enchantments cold, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 134
Sudden a thought came like a full-blown rose, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 136
Flown, like a thought , until the morrow-day; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 239
She thought her pretty face would please the faeries. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 62
No sooner thought of than adown he lay, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 92
And whom they thought to injure they befriended. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 94
Then living on the earth, with labouring thought Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 279
More thought than woe was in her dusky face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 56
His tongue with the full weight of utterless thought , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 120
Which comes of thought and musing: give us help!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 166
Left murmuring, what deepest thought can tell? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 246
I would not bode of evil, if I thought Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 256
That shadowy thought can win, Ode to Psyche, Line 65
Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 44
Ha! till now I thought Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 62b
A quick plot, swift as thought to save your heads; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 66
The Emperor, with cross'd arms, in thought . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 277b
I thought I did. Alas! I am deceiv'd. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 135
All scope of thought , convulsest my heart's blood Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 78
I thought her dead, and on the lowest step Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 120
So Hermes thought , and a celestial heat Lamia, Part I, Line 22
So noiseless, and he never thought to know. Lamia, Part I, Line 349
But left a thought , a buzzing in his head. Lamia, Part II, Line 29
That but a moment's thought is passion's passing bell. Lamia, Part II, Line 39
His patient thought , had now begun to thaw, Lamia, Part II, Line 161
High as the handles heap'd, to suit the thought Lamia, Part II, Line 218
They come not here, they have no thought to come- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 165
And saw, what first I thought an image huge, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 298
With lowland blood; and lowland blood she thought The Jealousies, Line 80
When Eban thought he heard a soft imperial snore. The Jealousies, Line 324
"I thought you guess'd, foretold, or prophesied, The Jealousies, Line 325
Alter'd her mind, and thought it very nice: The Jealousies, Line 653
 
THOUGHTED.........4
And turn, sole- thoughted , to one Lady there, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 42
Now tiger-passion'd, lion- thoughted , wroth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 68
She set herself, high- thoughted , how to dress Lamia, Part II, Line 115
One- thoughted , never wand'ring, guileless love, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 3
 
THOUGHTFUL........2
Full of this whim was thoughtful Madeline: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 55
Too much upon your thoughtful mood, I will Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 47
 
THOUGHTFULLY......1
Where 'gainst a column he leant thoughtfully Lamia, Part I, Line 316
 
THOUGHTLESS.......8
Yet these I leave as thoughtless as a lark; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 23
Happy and thoughtless of thy day of doom! This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 4
Saturn, sleep on:- O thoughtless , why did I Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 68
But makes surrender to some thoughtless boy, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 3
And, thoughtless ! suffer'd thee to pass alone Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 22
Thoughtless at first, but ere eve's star appeared Lamia, Part I, Line 234
Where they may thoughtless sleep away their days, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 151
Saturn, sleep on:- Me thoughtless , why should I The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 368
 
THOUGHTLESSLY.....2
From their fresh beds, and scattered thoughtlessly I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 45
I wander'd in a forest thoughtlessly , Ode to Psyche, Line 7
 
THOUGHTS..........34
Whilst I my thoughts to thee impart. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 8
And hateful thoughts enwrap my soul in gloom; To Hope, Line 2
So, when dark thoughts my boding spirit shroud, To Hope, Line 46
One's thoughts from such a beauty; when I hear Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 37
Whose words are images of thoughts refin'd, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 11
All meaner thoughts , and take a sweet reprieve Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 5
My happy thoughts sententious; he will teem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 78
Because my thoughts were never free, and clear, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 23
These thoughts now come o'er me with all their might:- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 131
To sooth the cares, and lift the thoughts of man. Sleep and Poetry, Line 247
Hither and thither all the changing thoughts Sleep and Poetry, Line 287
On humbler thoughts , and let this strange assay Sleep and Poetry, Line 313
That nought less sweet might call my thoughts away, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 94
And calmest thoughts come round us - as, of leaves After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 9
Call'd up a thousand thoughts to envelope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 336
Of high and noble life with thoughts so sick? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 758
And there in strife no burning thoughts to heed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 879
And thoughts of self came on, how crude and sore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 275
New sudden thoughts , nor casts his mental slough? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 638
My silent thoughts are echoing from these shells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 913
My very thoughts : in mercy then away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 958
He onward kept; wooing these thoughts to steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 140
To what my own full thoughts had made too tender, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 74
Towards common thoughts and things for very fear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 896
O, I am frighten'd with most hateful thoughts ! Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 1
He chews the honied cud of fair spring thoughts , Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 6
His bitter thoughts to other, well nigh mad Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 164
Where branched thoughts , new grown with pleasant pain, Ode to Psyche, Line 52
Divorce him from your solitary thoughts , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 71
No leveling bluster of my licensed thoughts , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 154
I leave you to your thoughts . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 73b
They know their own thoughts best. As for the third, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 58
My thoughts ! shall I unveil them? Listen then! Lamia, Part II, Line 56
To banish thoughts of that most hateful land, What can I do to drive away, Line 31
 
THOUSAND..........44
But bending in a thousand graceful ways; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 4
With solemn sound,- and thousand others more, How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 12
Yes, thousands in a thousand different ways Sleep and Poetry, Line 148
A thousand handicraftsmen wore the mask Sleep and Poetry, Line 200
A thousand willing agents to obey, Sleep and Poetry, Line 239
Gluts twice ten thousand caverns; till the spell On the Sea, Line 3
proceeds mawkishness, and all the thousand bitters which those men I speak of Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Whose care it is to guard a thousand flocks: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 197
Call'd up a thousand thoughts to envelope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 336
After a thousand mazes overgone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 387
Fell sleek about him in a thousand folds- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 398
Of a thousand fountains, so that he could dash Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 604
And torrent, and ten thousand jutting shapes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 628
O'er studded with a thousand , thousand pearls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 879
O'er studded with a thousand, thousand pearls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 879
A thousand Powers keep religious state, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 30
Aye, thus it was one thousand years ago. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 326
One thousand years!- Is it then possible Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 327
A thousand years with backward glance sublime? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 329
More than one pretty, trifling thousand years; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 579
Has been thy meed for many thousand years; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 777
The other part two thousand years from him Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 43
Then one poor year a thousand years would be, To J.R., Line 3
A thousand men in troubles wide and dark: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 118
This mortal body of a thousand days This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 1
Disturb my slumber of a thousand years? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 22
Until ten thousand now no bigger than Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 61
thousand O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 1
For meet adornment a full thousand years; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 2
For it containeth twenty thousand punks, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 17
Were glowing to receive a thousand guests: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 33
And in the midst, 'mong thousand heraldries, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 214
The Beadsman, after thousand aves told, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 377
Perplex'd her with a thousand things- The Eve of St. Mark, Line 29
Glar'd a blood-red through all its thousand courts, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 179
And thus in thousand hugest phantasies Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 13
And thousand other signs of purer life; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 211
O joy! for now I see a thousand eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 323
No, not a thousand foughten fields could sponge Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 44
You should be, from a thousand , chosen forth Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 36
A wide world, where a thousand new-born hopes Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 181
The myrtle sicken'd in a thousand wreaths. Lamia, Part II, Line 264
Glares a blood red through all the thousand courts, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 27
In the famed memoirs of a thousand years, The Jealousies, Line 86
 
THOUSANDS.........10
Yes, thousands in a thousand different ways Sleep and Poetry, Line 148
These warrior thousands on the field supine:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 734
Such thousands of shut eyes in order plac'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 738
And made those dazzled thousands veil their eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 858
And stars by thousands ! Point me out the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 99
Amid the wreck of thousands I am whole; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 2
With common thousands , into shallow graves. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 129
Muster thy warlike thousands at a nod! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 155
house, and all that was in it, vanished in an instant: many thousands took Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
"Are there not thousands in the world," said I, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 154

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Published @ RC

March 2005