Thr-Tim - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
THRALDOM..........2
A net whose thraldom was more bliss than all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 427
And kept in thraldom by our enemy, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 194
 
THRALL............5
And hold my faculties so long in thrall , To George Felton Mathew, Line 19
From their sweet thrall , and forward gently bending, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 103
Yes: now I am no longer wretched thrall , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 333
Hath thee in thrall !" La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 40
Or living on perhaps, your wretched thrall , I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 11
 
THREAD............4
He had touch'd his forehead, he began to thread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 266
This tangled thread , and wind it to a clue. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 756
There came before my eyes that wonted thread Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 2
With a silken thread of my own hand's weaving: I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 4
 
THREADBARE........1
From the left pocket of his threadbare hose, The Jealousies, Line 439
 
THREAT............4
He spake, and ceas'd, the while a heavier threat Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 251
"To the Duke Conrad. Forget the threat you Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 55
Of that fierce threat , and the hard task proposed. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 120
But of its threat she took the utmost heed; The Jealousies, Line 70
 
THREAT'NING.......1
While from beneath the threat'ning portcullis Calidore: A Fragment, Line 79
 
THREATENED........1
Or tears, or ravings, or self- threatened death, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 129
 
THREATENING.......1
Its threatening edge against a good king's quiet; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50
 
THREATS...........1
Not so much at your threats , as at your voice, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 131
 
THREE.............73
O for three words of honey, that I might I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 209
Circling from three sweet pair of lips in mirth; To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 4
The freedom of three steeds of dapple brown: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 167
Who dives three fathoms where the waters run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 639
In starlight, by the three Hesperides. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 453
O, I am full of gladness! Sisters three , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 251
I fled three days - when lo! before me stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 566
Even for common bulk, those olden three , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 848
A three days' journey in a moment done: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 253
And of three sweetest pleasurings the choice: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 716
And languish'd there three days. Ye milder powers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 747
His own particular fright, so these three felt: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 890
Before three swiftest kisses he had told, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1001
Which of the fairest three Apollo to the Graces, Line 1
Which of the fairest three Apollo to the Graces, Line 4
Three rows of oars are lightening moment-whiles Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 57
To spur three leagues towards the Apennine; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 186
Of a poor three hours' absence? but we'll gain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 205
Three hours they labour'd at this travail sore; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 382
In washing tubs three There was a naughty boy, Line 62
With three legs all her store? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 10
Like three fit wines in a cup, Fancy, Line 38
And scarce three steps, ere Music's golden tongue The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 20
Know you the three ' great crimes' in faery land? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 24
The next, the last, the direst of the three , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 28
A quavering like three reeds before the wind- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 46
They all three wept - but counsel was as vain When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 65
Opened - she enter'd with her servants three . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 72
The rebel three .- Thea was startled up, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 147
One against one, or two, or three , or all Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 142
Each several one against the other three , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 143
Two or three posies Two or three posies, Line 1
With two or three simples Two or three posies, Line 2
Two or three noses Two or three posies, Line 3
With two or three pimples- Two or three posies, Line 4
Two or three wise men Two or three posies, Line 5
And two or three ninnies Two or three posies, Line 6
Two or three purses Two or three posies, Line 7
And two or three guineas Two or three posies, Line 8
Two or three raps Two or three posies, Line 9
At two or three doors Two or three posies, Line 10
Two or three naps Two or three posies, Line 11
Of two or three hours- Two or three posies, Line 12
Two or three cats Two or three posies, Line 13
And two or three mice Two or three posies, Line 14
Two or three sprats Two or three posies, Line 15
Two or three sandies Two or three posies, Line 17
And two or three tabbies Two or three posies, Line 18
To or three dandies- Two or three posies, Line 19
Two or three smiles Two or three posies, Line 21
And two or three frowns Two or three posies, Line 22
Two or three miles Two or three posies, Line 23
To two or three towns Two or three posies, Line 24
Two or three pegs Two or three posies, Line 25
For two or three bonnets Two or three posies, Line 26
Two or three dove's eggs Two or three posies, Line 27
One morn before me were three figures seen, Ode on Indolence, Line 1
And ached for wings, because I knew the three : Ode on Indolence, Line 24
So, ye three ghosts, adieu! Ye cannot raise Ode on Indolence, Line 51
I saw the three pass slowly up the stairs, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 11
There should be three more here: Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 55b
The unchanging gloom, and the three fixed shapes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 391
Three then with tiger leap upon him flew, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 45
Sorely she grieved, and wetted three or four The Jealousies, Line 82
And knock'd down three cut glasses, and his best ink-stand. The Jealousies, Line 351
Then pages three and three; and next, slave-held, The Jealousies, Line 584
Then pages three and three ; and next, slave-held, The Jealousies, Line 584
"Just upon three o'clock, a falling star The Jealousies, Line 667
A tureen, and three dishes, at one swoop, The Jealousies, Line 670
She clapp'd her hands three times, and cried out ' Whoop!'- The Jealousies, Line 673
"Five minutes thirteen seconds after three , The Jealousies, Line 676
"At half-past three arose the cheerful moon- The Jealousies, Line 685
She wish'd a game at whist - made three revokes- The Jealousies, Line 700
 
THRESHOLD.........6
As from thy threshold ; day by day hast been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 206
That he might at the threshold one hour wait Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 382
Pass by unheeded as a threshold brook. Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 12
Came slope upon the threshold of the west; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 204
Upon the threshold of this house of joy- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 188
Is sloping to the threshold of the west. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 48
 
THRESHOLDS........1
My steeds are all pawing on the thresholds of morn: Apollo to the Graces, Line 3
 
THREW.............8
Which the emerald waves at your feet gladly threw . To Some Ladies, Line 24
A fresh-blown musk-rose; 'twas the first that threw To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 6
He threw himself, and just into the air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 711
And threw warm gules on Madeline's fair breast, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 218
A table, and, half anguish'd, threw thereon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 255
I threw my shell away upon the sand, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 278
So threw the goddess off, and won his heart Lamia, Part I, Line 336
And threw their moving shadows on the walls, Lamia, Part I, Line 359
 
THRICE............8
Or thrice my palate moisten: but when I mark Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 25
Yes, thrice have I this fair enchantment seen; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 918
But the soft shadow of my thrice -seen love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 168
And fall they must, ere a star wink thrice Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 14
Bestirr'd themselves, thrice horrible and cold; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 256
Thrice villanous, stay there! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 2b
Of cups and goblets, and the store thrice told Lamia, Part II, Line 186
Thrice emptied could pour forth, at banqueting The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 36
 
THRILL............2
Desponding, o'er the marble floor's cold thrill . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 338
Deafening the swallow's twitter, came a thrill Lamia, Part II, Line 27
 
THRILLING.........2
His warm arms, thrilling now with pulses new, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 102
Thrilling liquidity of dewy piping. Sleep and Poetry, Line 371
 
THRILLS...........1
The earnest trumpet spake, and silver thrills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 197
 
THRIVED...........1
So thrived I as a rebel,- and, behold! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 42
 
THROAT............12
And puff from the tail's end to stifled throat : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 526
From the deep throat of sad Melpomene! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 442
What his horny throat expresseth; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 12
Her throat in vain, and die, heart-stifled, in her dell. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 207
Held struggle with his throat but came not forth; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 252
Thus answer'd, while his white melodious throat Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 81
My sword to my own throat , rather than held Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
I must confess,- and cut my throat ,- to-day? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 31
Of a man drowning on his hateful throat . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 272
Her throat was serpent, but the words she spake Lamia, Part I, Line 64
Upon those streams that pulse beside the throat : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 125
Stuck in his moral throat , no coughing e'er could stir. The Jealousies, Line 108
 
THROAT'S..........1
Deaf to his throbbing throat's long, long melodious moan. Lamia, Part I, Line 75
 
THROATED..........3
To catch a glance at silver throated eels,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 393
Began calm- throated . Throughout all the isle Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 38
Singest of summer in full- throated ease. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 10
 
THROATS...........1
Gave from their hollow throats the name of "Saturn!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 391
 
THROBB'D..........1
Throbb'd with the syllables.- "Mnemosyne! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 82
 
THROBBING.........3
Ethereal, flush'd, and like a throbbing star The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 318
Deaf to his throbbing throat's long, long melodious moan. Lamia, Part I, Line 75
Than throbbing blood, and that the self-same pains Lamia, Part I, Line 308
 
THROBS............2
Of which the throbs were born. This still alarm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 357
With such an aching heart, such swooning throbs Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
 
THROE.............2
When all was darkened, with Etnean throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 585
And Vesper, risen star, began to throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 485
 
THROES............3
A noise of harmony, pulses and throes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 791
Like what was never heard in all the throes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 825
Winging along where the great water throes ? What can I do to drive away, Line 17
 
THRON'D...........1
Of thron'd Apollo, could breathe back the lyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 362
 
THRONE............23
To sit upon an Alp as on a throne , Happy is England! I could be content, Line 7
Through cloudless blue, and round each silver throne . To Kosciusko, Line 8
The face of Poesy: from off her throne Sleep and Poetry, Line 394
To bow for gratitude before Jove's throne . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 150
From thy blue throne , now filling the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 171
Old darkness from his throne : 'twas like the sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 246
To Jove's high throne , and by her plainings drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 475
He stept upon his shepherd throne : the look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 889
She unobserved steals unto her throne , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 45
And then, behold! large Neptune on his throne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 862
Aw'd from the throne aloof;- and when storm-rent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 871
A new magnificence. On oozy throne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 993
His heart leapt up as to its rightful throne , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 445
Somewhere between the throne , and where I sit Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 115
And bid old Saturn take his throne again."- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 250
Fain would he have commanded, fain took throne Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 290
I saw my first-born tumbled from his throne ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 323
And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 36
What! would you have me sue before his throne , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 64
Conducting to the throne high canopied. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 16
His golden throne , bent warm on amorous theft: Lamia, Part I, Line 8
I saw thee sitting, on a throne of gold, Lamia, Part I, Line 70
In vain the pulpit thunder'd at the throne , The Jealousies, Line 17
 
THRONED...........3
No, there are throned seats unscalable Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 23
And when they reach'd the throned eminence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 895
By Europe's throned Emperor, to see Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 21
 
THRONES...........4
Upon their summer thrones ; there too should be I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 37
Their tiptop nothings, their dull skies, their thrones - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 15
Instead of thrones , hard flint they sat upon, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 15
Who hath forsaken old and sacred thrones Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 77
 
THRONG............7
Among the throng . His youth was fully blown, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 169
Flutter'd and laugh'd, and oft-times through the throng Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 932
Join this bright throng , and nimble follow whither Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 604
Not long - for soon into her heart a throng Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 245
And there her women, in a mournful throng , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 2
With an unbidden presence the bright throng Lamia, Part II, Line 167
A throng of foes; and in this renew'd strife King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 49
 
THRONG'D..........3
Amid the timbrels, and the throng'd resort The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 67
For a throng'd tavern,- and these stubbed trees Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 35
From the throng'd towers of Lincoln hath look'd down, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 21
 
THRONGED..........1
While through the thronged streets your bridal car Lamia, Part II, Line 63
 
THRONGING.........2
Stems thronging all around between the swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 83
The which I breathe away, and thronging come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 336
 
THRONGS...........1
These will in throngs before my mind intrude: How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 6
 
THROSTLE'S........1
Let in the budding warmth and throstle's lay; Ode on Indolence, Line 48
 
THROTTLE..........1
Do not tempt me to throttle you on the gorge, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 35
 
THROTTLED.........1
You shall not throttled be in marriage noose; The Jealousies, Line 436
 
THROUGHOUT........10
Throughout my bondage." Thus discoursing, on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 723
In search of pleasure throughout every clime: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 275
Diffus'd unseen throughout eternal space: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 318
The heaven itself, is blinded throughout night. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 38
Began calm-throated. Throughout all the isle Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 38
The colours all inflam'd throughout her train, Lamia, Part I, Line 153
Throughout her palaces imperial, Lamia, Part I, Line 351
Throughout , as fearful the whole charm might fade. Lamia, Part II, Line 124
Reach the hill top, and now throughout the valley shines." The Jealousies, Line 558
That seem'd throughout with upheld faces paved; The Jealousies, Line 731
 
THROW.............10
In strife to throw upon the shore a gem Imitation of Spenser, Line 35
Over his sullen eyes: I saw him throw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 564
But to throw back at times her veiling hair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 376
Throw them from the windows! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 166
And throw these jewels from my loathing sight,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 96
Throw down those imps and give me victory. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 431
Throw me upon thy tripod, till the flood To Fanny, Line 3
Throw your slack bridles o'er the flurried manes, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 10
That makes thee thus unarm'd throw taunts at us? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 15
Throw in a hint, that if he should neglect The Jealousies, Line 194
 
THROWN............6
Thrown by the pitiless world. We next could tell To George Felton Mathew, Line 65
Thrown in our eyes, genders a novel sense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 808
In sombre chariot; dark foldings thrown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 641
She gaz'd into the fresh- thrown mould, as though Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 361
Of youth and beauty should be thrown aside Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 455
There must be Gods thrown down, and trumpets blown Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 127
 
THROWS............2
Moves round the point, and throws her anchor stiff. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 24
Or wait the Amen ere thy poppy throws Sonnet to Sleep, Line 7
 
THRUMMING.........1
Thrumming on an empty can Robin Hood, Line 26
 
THRUSH............3
Utter a gorgon voice? Does yonder thrush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 129
And hedge for the thrush to live in, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 27
Were lingering in the heavens, while the thrush Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 37
 
THRUSH'S..........1
Amid the thrush's song. Away! Avaunt! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 974
 
THRUSHES..........1
To hear the speckled thrushes , and see feed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 485
 
THUMB.............2
Miller's thumb There was a naughty boy, Line 75
Holding it by his thumb and finger full in view. The Jealousies, Line 441
 
THUND'ROUS........1
And the parle of voices thund'rous ; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 8
 
THUNDER...........27
Or, in the senate thunder out my numbers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 75
Coming sometimes like fearful claps of thunder , Sleep and Poetry, Line 27
The darkness,- loneliness,- the fearful thunder ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 148
Of breeding thunder God of the golden bow, Line 17
Till the thunder was mute? God of the golden bow, Line 22
Of abrupt thunder , when Ionian shoals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 310
Oft hast thou seen bolts of the thunder hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 205
Like thunder clouds that spake to Babylon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 20
And poise about in cloudy thunder -tents Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 27
Then came a conquering earth- thunder , and rumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 487
I heard their cries amid loud thunder -rolls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 660
Disclos'd the thunder -gloomings in Jove's air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 872
As of a thunder cloud. When arrows fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 326
And hear a merry laugh amid the thunder ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 6
Sleep in the lap of thunder or sunbeams, To Ailsa Rock, Line 7
Was with its stored thunder labouring up. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 41
Thy thunder , conscious of the new command, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 60
The quavering thunder thereupon had ceas'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 225
With thunder , and with music, and with pomp: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 121
Of thunder , or of Jove. Great Saturn, thou Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 182
I have heard the cloudy thunder : Where is power? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 103
Your hand - I go! Ha! here the thunder comes Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 57
The sleepy thunder ? Hast no sense of fear? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 84
The little thunder of your fretful tongue, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 60
Is all spar'd from the thunder of a war The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 222
Was with its stored thunder labouring up. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 343
Thy thunder , captious at the new command, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 362
 
THUNDER'D.........1
In vain the pulpit thunder'd at the throne, The Jealousies, Line 17
 
THUNDERBOLT.......4
Ere the dread thunderbolt could reach? How! Sleep and Poetry, Line 274
A Jovian thunderbolt : arch Hebe brings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 415
Not thunderbolt on thunderbolt, till all Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 311
Not thunderbolt on thunderbolt , till all Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 311
 
THUNDERER.........3
The Thunderer grasp'd and grasp'd, God of the golden bow, Line 13
The Thunderer frown'd and frown'd; God of the golden bow, Line 14
Shall scare that infant thunderer , rebel Jove, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 249
 
THUNDERER'S.......1
Immortal tear-drops down the thunderer's beard; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 476
 
THUNDERINGS.......2
In rolling out upfollow'd thunderings , To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 6
To burst with hoarest thunderings , and wipe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 348
 
THUNDEROUS........2
Of thunderous waterfalls and torrents hoarse, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 8
Our minute's glance; a busy thunderous roar, The Jealousies, Line 735
 
THUNDERS..........3
Nor move till Milton's tuneful thunders cease, Ode to Apollo, Line 22
Strange thunders from the potency of song; Sleep and Poetry, Line 231
Found way from forth the thunders round his head! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 325
 
THUNDERSTRUCK.....1
I see you are thunderstruck . Haste, haste away! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 71
 
THWART............1
I will encounter his thwart spleen myself, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 91
 
THWARTED..........4
Indeed I am - thwarted , affrighted, chidden, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 753
Feel curs'd and thwarted , when the liegeless air Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 92
That not in the smallest point should he be thwarted , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 30
Love thwarted in bad temper oft has vent: The Jealousies, Line 176
 
THYME.............2
Wild thyme , and valley-lilies whiter still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 157
Cool parsley, basil sweet, and sunny thyme ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 577
 
THYRSUS...........1
The thyrsus , that his watching eyes may swim Lamia, Part II, Line 226
 
THYSELF...........6
Thyself to choose the richest, where we might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 998
Who in few minutes more thyself shalt see?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 634
Turn, thou court-Janus, thou forget'st thyself ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 248
Take tribute from those cities for thyself ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 153
A fever of thyself - think of the earth; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 169
Imperial Elfinan, go hang thyself or drown! The Jealousies, Line 144
 
TIAR..............1
Sprinkled with stars, like Ariadne's tiar : Lamia, Part I, Line 58
 
TIARA.............2
Till Miss's comb is made a pearl tiara , And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 7
With plume, tiara , and all rich array, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 38
 
TICK..............2
The death-watch tick is stifled. Enter none Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 531
Shall lodge in shabby taverns upon tick ; The Jealousies, Line 151
 
TIDE..............10
Slopings of verdure through the glassy tide , Imitation of Spenser, Line 29
To its old channel, or a swollen tide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 340
And, in the summer tide of blossoming, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 155
Resuming quickly thus; while ocean's tide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 312
At brim of day- tide , on some grassy lea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 366
"Dost thou not mark a gleaming through the tide , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 718
Nor care for wind and tide . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 250
For power to speak; but still the ruddy tide Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 44
They were enthroned, in the even tide , Lamia, Part II, Line 17
Swayed to and fro by every wind and tide ? To Fanny, Line 38
 
TIDES.............3
Blue tides may sluice and drench their time in caves and weedy There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 18
My life is but the life of winds and tides , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 341
No more than winds and tides can I avail:- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 342
 
TIDINGS...........4
Conrad! what tidings ? Good, if I may guess Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 17
What tidings of the battle? Albert? Ludolph? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 19
What then! No tidings of my friendly Arab? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 36
A father's ears with tidings of his son. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 70
 
TIE...............4
To tie for a moment thy plant round his brow, God of the golden bow, Line 32
Worse than the torment's self: but rather tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 177
Bright signal that she only stoop'd to tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 500
Against all elements, against the tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 640
 
TIED..............5
Felt not more tongue- tied than Endymion. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 444
Were not so tongue- tied ,- no, they went O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 8
O what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 3
Buckled and tied with many a twist and plait? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 88
Tied in a burnish'd knot, their semblance took The Jealousies, Line 269
 
TIES..............2
Made silken ties , that never may be broken. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 238
Or friend,- or brother,- or all ties of blood,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 64
 
TIGER.............6
Onward the tiger and the leopard pants, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 241
As are the tiger -moth's deep-damask'd wings; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 213
Now tiger -passion'd, lion-thoughted, wroth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 68
Three then with tiger leap upon him flew, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 45
From a Man- Tiger -Organ, prettiest of his toys." The Jealousies, Line 333
Than the Emperor when he play'd on his Man- Tiger -Organ. The Jealousies, Line 342
 
TIGER'S...........2
And to him the tiger's yell Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 13
Her mother's screams with the striped tiger's blent, The Jealousies, Line 391
 
TIGERS............1
Whereon were broider'd tigers with black eyes, The Jealousies, Line 447
 
TIGHE.............1
The blessings of Tighe had melodiously given; To Some Ladies, Line 20
 
TIGHT.............9
Honour to tight little John, Robin Hood, Line 55
Ye tight little fairy, just fresh from the dairy, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 3
Tight at 's back There was a naughty boy, Line 19
Wolf's-bane, tight -rooted, for its poisonous wine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 2
He's very close to Otho, a tight leach! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 56
Because I hold those base weeds with tight hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
The tight -wound energies of his despair, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 26
Tight -footed for the deed! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 167a
Too tight ,- the book!- my wand!- so, nothing is forgot." The Jealousies, Line 549
 
TIGHTEN...........2
When he doth tighten up the golden reins, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 550
Tighten my belt a little,- so, so,- not The Jealousies, Line 548
 
TIGHTEN'D.........1
And silken traces tighten'd in descent; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 524
 
TILBURIES.........1
To whisking tilburies , or phaetons rare, The Jealousies, Line 251
 
TILL..............81
Till , so unwilling, thou unturn'dst the key? Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 7
Nor move, till ends the lofty strain, Ode to Apollo, Line 21
Nor move till Milton's tuneful thunders cease, Ode to Apollo, Line 22
Till its echoes depart; then I sink to repose. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 40
Till the fond, fixed eyes forget they stare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 18
Till the day of resurrection; Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 4
Till their stern forms before my mind arise: Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 11
No, nor till cordially you shook my hand To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 121
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 8
Till at its shoulders it should proudly see Sleep and Poetry, Line 83
As hard as lips can make it: till agreed, Sleep and Poetry, Line 109
Till in the bosom of a leafy world Sleep and Poetry, Line 119
Till , like the certain wands of Jacob's wit, Sleep and Poetry, Line 198
Bending their graceful figures till they meet Sleep and Poetry, Line 368
O'er which the mind may hover till it dozes; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 108
Till the thunder was mute? God of the golden bow, Line 22
Gluts twice ten thousand caverns; till the spell On the Sea, Line 3
Haunt us till they become a cheering light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 30
Plainer and plainer shewing, till at last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 125
Till it is hush'd and smooth! O unconfin'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 455
Till it begins to progress silverly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 541
And plays about its fancy, till the stings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 621
A fellowship with essence; till we shine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 779
At which we start and fret; till in the end, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 809
And babbles thorough silence, till her wits Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 948
Till , weary, he sat down before the maw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 271
Through unknown things; till exhaled asphodel, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 663
Through a dim passage, searching till he found Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 709
Then all its buried magic, till it flush'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 900
Follow'd their languid mazes, till well nigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 929
Till thou hadst cool'd their cheeks deliciously: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 148
Or drop a seed, till thou wast wide awake; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 154
Till round his wither'd lips had gone a smile. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 225
Her charming syllables, till indistinct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 444
My soul page after page, till well-nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
They went till unobscur'd the porches shone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 724
Till a faint dawn surpris'd them. Glaucus cried, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 832
Till Triton blew his horn. The palace rang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 888
Before me, till from these enslaving eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 50
Till it has panted round, and stolen a share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 84
The light - the dusk - the dark - till break of day!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 136
Though he should dance from eve till peep of day- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 169
Till love and fame to nothingness do sink. When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 14
Nobody knew whither, till Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 15
Till I feel in the brain Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 9
Till our brains intertwine Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 15
Till , in his soul dissolv'd, they come to be Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 7
Drown'd wast thou till an earthquake made thee steep- To Ailsa Rock, Line 13
Yet can I think of thee till thought is blind,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 12
And then, from twelve till two, this Eden made is Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 12
Till Miss's comb is made a pearl tiara, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 7
Till Cleopatra lives at Number Seven, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 9
Till his girths burst and left him naked stark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 86
Rose, one by one, till all outspreaded were; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 287
Till on the level height their steps found ease: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 88
Not thunderbolt on thunderbolt, till all Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 311
Till suddenly a splendour, like the morn, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 357
Mov'd in these vales invisible till now? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 52
Pluck'd witless the weak flowers, till thine arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 74
Not till this moment did I ever feel Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 92
Ha! till now I thought Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 62b
Till flurried danger held the mirror up, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 80
Be not so rash; wait till his wrath shall pass, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 105
From the first shoot till the unripe mid-May, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 134
Till we determine some fit punishment. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 239
How shall I bear my life till Albert comes? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 91
Be speedy, darkness! Till that comes, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 182b
Break through her weeping servants, till thou com'st Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8
Long have I loved thee, yet till now not loved: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 19
Till she saw him, as once she pass'd him by, Lamia, Part I, Line 315
There was a noise of wings, till in short space Lamia, Part II, Line 120
Till , checking his love trance, a cup he took Lamia, Part II, Line 241
And so by turns - till sad Moneta cried, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 240
Throw me upon thy tripod, till the flood To Fanny, Line 3
Till from this hated match I get a free release. The Jealousies, Line 63
Nor till fit time against her fame wage battle. The Jealousies, Line 120
Where, till the porter answer'd, might be seen, The Jealousies, Line 276
Nor rested till they stood to cool, and fan, The Jealousies, Line 322
Shook with her agony, till fair were seen The Jealousies, Line 395
Till this oracular couplet met his eye The Jealousies, Line 454
Till he sheer'd off - the Princess very scared- The Jealousies, Line 683
 
TILT..............2
Who at each other tilt in playful quarrel, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 28
We did not tilt each other,- that's a blessing,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 53
 
TIMBER'D..........1
Many old rotten- timber'd boats there be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 18
 
TIMBRELS..........2
Amid the timbrels , and the throng'd resort The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 67
What pipes and timbrels ? What wild ecstasy? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 10
 
TIME..............98
What time the sky-lark shakes the tremulous dew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 2
Some tale of love and arms in time of old. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 18
Just like that bird am I in loss of time , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 15
For I have long time been my fancy feeding To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 80
To mark the time as they grow broad, and shorter; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 89
What time you were before the music sitting, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 113
How many bards gild the lapses of time ! How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 1
Who stood on Latmus' top, what time there blew I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 194
Still time is fleeting, and no dream arises On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 9
That in a time , when under pleasant trees To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 11
Wasting of old time - with a billowy main - On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 13
Of shepherds, lifting in due time aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 162
What time thou wanderest at eventide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 249
Such as ay muster where grey time has scoop'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 649
The disappointment. Time , that aged nurse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 705
And winnow from the coming step of time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 819
That time thou didst adorn, with amber studs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 924
The summer time away. One track unseams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 74
Who, when this planet's sphering time doth close, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 251
An unknown time , surcharg'd with grief, away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 292
Each summer time to life. Lo! this is he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 478
Long time in silence did their anxious fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 733
Question that thus it was; long time they lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 734
Long time ere soft caressing sobs began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 736
In sowing time ne'er would I dibble take, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 153
Had time to keep him in amazed ken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 216
She took me like a child of suckling time , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 456
"Thy vows were on a time to Nais paid: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 899
Subdued majesty with this glad time . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 964
Beyond the tall tree tops; and in less time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 332
For the first time , since he came nigh dead born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 371
Had he left more forlorn; for the first time , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 373
With the slow move of time ,- sluggish and weary Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 922
To her for the last time . Night will strew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 933
To meet us many a time ." Next Cynthia bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 996
About the frozen time . In drear nighted December, Line 16
Leave to an after time Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 25
And we have the prime of the kissing time , O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 15
On the fairest time of June Robin Hood, Line 19
To thee the spring will be a harvest- time . O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 4
So time itself would be annihilate; To J.R., Line 6
In little time a host of joys to bind, To J.R., Line 11
In its ripe warmth this gracious morning time ." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 68
Upon the time with feverish unrest- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 244
Time after time, to quiet her. Their crimes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 261
Time after time , to quiet her. Their crimes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 261
Of the late darken'd time ,- the murderous spite Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 293
Therefore they watch'd a time when they might sift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 465
Fade away where old time is retreating. Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 4
Blue tides may sluice and drench their time in caves and weedy There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 18
At such a time the soul's a child, in childhood is the brain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 23
Long time this sconce a helmet wore, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 49
Beyond this world, this mortal time O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 63
Of passion-flower;- just in time there sails Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 45
'Tis the "witching time of night"- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 1
But let me laugh awhile, I've mickle time to grieve." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 126
Her own lute thou wilt see: no time to spare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 175
Was parcel'd out from time to time: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 98
Was parcel'd out from time to time : The Eve of St. Mark, Line 98
The Princess grasp'd her switch, but just in time When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 20
O aching time ! O moments big as years! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 64
A little time , and then again he snatch'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 140
His spirit to the sorrow of the time ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 301
Darkling I listen; and, for many a time Ode to a Nightingale, Line 51
Thou foster-child of silence and slow time , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 2
A third time pass'd they by, and, passing, turn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 21
A third time came they by;- alas! wherefore? Ode on Indolence, Line 41
O shadows! 'twas a time to bid farewell! Ode on Indolence, Line 49
I pr'ythee why? What happier hour of time Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 7
I cannot square my conduct to time , place, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 3
Make not your father blind before his time ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 122
Short time will show. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 147a
Why has he time to breathe another word? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 106
Condoling with Prince Ludolph. In fit time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 72
Imperial? I do not know the time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 87
What horrors? Is it not a joyous time ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 20
Fit time be chosen to administer. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 5
Indeed full time we slept; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 51b
Patience, good people, in fit time I send Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 75
Upon a time , before the faery broods Lamia, Part I, Line 1
Now on the moth- time of that evening dim Lamia, Part I, Line 220
For the first time through many anguish'd days, Lamia, Part I, Line 303
Some time to any, but those two alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 389
For the first time , since first he harbour'd in Lamia, Part II, Line 30
Of their own power. A long awful time The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 384
Even to the hollows of time -eaten oaks, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 408
My salutation as befits the time . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 54
Nor till fit time against her fame wage battle. The Jealousies, Line 120
"At the same time , Eban,"- (this was his page, The Jealousies, Line 181
"At the same time , Eban, this instant go The Jealousies, Line 187
It was the time when wholesale houses close The Jealousies, Line 208
To-morrow, or the next day, as time suits, The Jealousies, Line 355
When the time comes, don't feel the least alarm; The Jealousies, Line 520
Trot round the quarto - ordinary time ! The Jealousies, Line 638
About this time ,- a sad old figure of fun; The Jealousies, Line 656
His Majesty will know her temper time enough. The Jealousies, Line 702
"About this time ,- making delightful way,- The Jealousies, Line 712
In after time a sage of mickle lore, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 1
 
TIME'S............4
Time's sweet first-fruits - they danc'd to weariness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 321
Time's creeping shall the dreary space fulfil: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 706
Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 1
Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 1
 
TIMES.............38
But there are times , when those that love the bay, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 19
With after times .- The patriot shall feel To My Brother George (epistle), Line 73
At times , 'tis true, I've felt relief from pain To My Brother George (epistle), Line 113
But let me think away those times of woe: Sleep and Poetry, Line 220
Yeaned in after times , when we are flown, Sleep and Poetry, Line 257
And, for those simple times , his garments were Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 171
In times long past; to sit with them, and talk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 387
And minstrel memories of times gone by. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 435
Circled a million times within the space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 752
Of heaven! Oh Cynthia, ten- times bright and fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 170
No! loudly echoed times innumerable. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 296
Of happy times , when all he had endur'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 591
Of those dusk places in times far aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 625
Oft- times upon the sudden she laugh'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 509
One million times ocean must ebb and flow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 694
His wand against the empty air times nine.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 753
Flutter'd and laugh'd, and oft- times through the throng Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 932
Many times have winter's shears, Robin Hood, Line 6
And many times they bit their lips alone, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 170
But to throw back at times her veiling hair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 376
Who seven times a day All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 46
There is a joy in every spot made known by times of old, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 5
New to the feet, although the tale a hundred times be told: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 6
Will each one swell to twice ten times the size Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 63
As she had heard old dames full many times declare. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 45
Could bend that bow heroic to all times . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 75
The same that oft- times hath Ode to a Nightingale, Line 68
You have intrigued with these unsteady times Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 45
Who seem'd to me, as rugged times then went, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
In these rough times . Brave soldier, as you pass Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 19
Of times past, unremember'd! Better so Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 6
Something has vext you, Albert. There are times Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 122
Remembering, as I do, hard-hearted times Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 20
In times of delicate brilliant ceremony: Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 55
A verdict ten- times sworn! Awake - awake- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 146
Into times past, yet to be echoed sure King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 4
They kiss'd nine times the carpet's velvet face The Jealousies, Line 343
She clapp'd her hands three times , and cried out ' Whoop!'- The Jealousies, Line 673
 
TIMID.............9
And she would not conceive it. Timid thing! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 403
Their timid necks and tremble; so these both Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 328
She bow'd into the heavens her timid head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 502
"Lorenzo!"- here she ceas'd her timid quest, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 55
So said, his erewhile timid lips grew bold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 69
Her cheek was flush wi' timid blood Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 27
Which, lifting sweet abroad its timid green, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
Whose snowy timid hand has never sinn'd Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 24
Her wild and timid nature to his aim: Lamia, Part II, Line 71
 
TIMIDLY...........2
So timidly among the stars: come hither! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 603
Thus wording timidly among the fierce: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 251
 
TIMOROUS..........2
Cherishingly Diana's timorous limbs;- Sleep and Poetry, Line 373
So far her voice flow'd on, like timorous brook Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 300

Published @ RC

March 2005