Tin-Tou - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

Printer-friendly versionSend by email
Keats Concordance
 
TINCT.............1
And lucent syrops, tinct with cinnamon; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 267
 
TINDER'S..........1
Tinder's a lighter article,- nitre pure The Jealousies, Line 294
 
TING'D............1
Diversely ting'd with rose and amethyst, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 386
 
TINGE.............6
With universal tinge of sober gold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 56
Have seen a new tinge in the western skies: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 727
Our gold and ripe-ear'd hopes. With not one tinge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 8
To tinge , on syren shores, the salt sea-spry? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 157
With the tinge of love, panting in safe alarm.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 314
Of some gold tinge , and plays a roundelay Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 252
 
TINGED............1
Its sides are tinged with a resplendent glow, To Lord Byron, Line 10
 
TINGING...........1
Tinging it with soft crimsons! Now below The Jealousies, Line 554
 
TINKLING..........1
Who as they walk abroad make tinkling with their feet. Character of C.B., Line 27
 
TINSEL............1
With most prevailing tinsel : who unpen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 2
 
TINT..............2
To tint her pallid cheek with bloom, who cons Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 368
And like a rose in vermeil tint and shape, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 209
 
TINTED............4
Coral tinted teach no blisses, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 12
Blush- tinted cheeks, half smiles, and faintest sighs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 619
And coverlids gold- tinted like the peach, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 396
And shaped and tinted her above all peers. Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 4
 
TINTING...........2
A tinting of its quality: how light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 754
Tinting with silver wan your marble tombs. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 440
 
TINTS.............1
More warm than those heroic tints that fill a painter's sense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 36
 
TINY..............2
To bind them all about with tiny rings. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 60
Or tiny point of fairy scymetar; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 499
 
TIP...............4
I stood tip -toe upon a little hill, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 1
Here are sweet peas, on tip -toe for a flight: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 57
A steady splendour; but at the tip -top, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 805
Thy tail's tip is nicked off - and though the fists To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 11
 
TIPPED............1
With ebon- tipped flutes: close after these, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 147
 
TIPPING...........1
Tipping the wink to him was heathen Greek; Character of C.B., Line 20
 
TIPPLED...........1
Have tippled drink more fine Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 5
 
TIPS..............3
And still, a sleeping, held her finger- tips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 445
Whose tips are glowing hot. The legend cheers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 841
Or is't thy dewy hand the daisy tips ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 151
 
TIPSILY...........1
Tipsily quaffing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 217
 
TIPSY.............1
And dead as a venus tipsy . Over the hill and over the dale, Line 16
 
TIPT..............1
Tipt round with silver from the sun's bright eyes. Sleep and Poetry, Line 132
 
TIPTOE............7
How tiptoe Night holds back her dark-grey hood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 831
And, just beyond, on light tiptoe divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 261
This sleepy music, forc'd him walk tiptoe : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 358
Came many a tiptoe , amorous cavalier, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 60
Tiptoe with white arms spread. He, sick to lose Lamia, Part I, Line 287
The tiptoe marquis, moral and gallant, The Jealousies, Line 150
Eban then paid his fare, and tiptoe went The Jealousies, Line 262
 
TIPTOP............1
Their tiptop nothings, their dull skies, their thrones- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 15
 
TIR'D.............1
O ye who have your eyeballs vext and tir'd On the Sea, Line 9
 
TIRE..............3
And thus: "I need not any hearing tire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 457
Snuff at its faint extreme, and seem to tire , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 365
Though it's a pretty weight, it will not tire , The Jealousies, Line 516
 
TIRED.............4
When they have tired their gentle limbs with play, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 84
With his delights; for when tired out with fun On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 7
And havens of repose, when his tired wings Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 9
Tired out, and weary-worn with contumelies. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 116
 
TIS...............1
" Tis Apollonius sage, my trusty guide Lamia, Part I, Line 375
 
TISSUE............1
A silver tissue , scantly to be seen, The Jealousies, Line 346
 
TIT...............3
Destroy'd?- how many tit bits stolen? Gaze To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 3
I must - I shall - I meet not such tit bits, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 40
Tit -bits for Phoebus!- yes, you well may smile. The Jealousies, Line 563
 
TITAN.............2
And the bright Titan , phrenzied with new woes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 299
Will you make Titan play the lackey-page Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 60
 
TITAN'S...........1
What is there to plain of? By Titan's foe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 943
 
TITANIA...........3
When lovely Titania was far, far away, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 27
As is the wand that queen Titania wields. To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 8
From the sequester'd haunts of gay Titania , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 40
 
TITANS............7
The Titans fierce, self-hid, or prison-bound, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 161
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 4
" Titans , behold your God!" at which some groan'd; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 110
O Titans , shall I say ' Arise!'- Ye groan: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 157
Speak! roar! shout! yell! ye sleepy Titans all. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 316
Amazed were those Titans utterly. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 2
The Titans fierce, self-hid, or prison-bound, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 10
 
TITIAN............1
Some, Titian colours touch'd into real life. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 19
 
TITIAN'S..........1
Of Titian's portraiture, and one, though new, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 68
 
TITLE.............1
If not in title yet in noble deeds, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 44
 
TITLES............1
I lisp'd thy blooming titles inwardly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 733
 
TITTLE............1
But let us leave this idle tittle tattle The Jealousies, Line 118
 
TITTLEBAT.........1
Tittlebat There was a naughty boy, Line 76
 
TO'T..............2
When mad Eurydice is listening to't ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 165
Take lawyer's nose and put it to't All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 15
 
TOADS.............1
A brace of toads , than league with them t' oppress Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 164
 
TOASTS............1
Nibble their toasts , and cool their tea with sighs, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 2
 
TOE...............6
I stood tip- toe upon a little hill, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 1
Here are sweet peas, on tip- toe for a flight: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 57
Red-Crag, there lies beneath my farthest toe Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 48
A fay of colour, slave from top to toe , The Jealousies, Line 182
Feeling, with careful toe , for every stair, The Jealousies, Line 308
Toe crush'd with heel ill-natured fighting breeds, The Jealousies, Line 772
 
TOES..............3
Than the light music of her nimble toes I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 97
No wild boar tushes, and no mermaid's toes : Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 16
To pour in at the toes : I mounted up, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 134
 
TOGETHER..........19
May we together pass, and calmly try To My Brothers, Line 12
To summon all the downiest clouds together Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 364
Together intertwin'd and trammel'd fresh: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 411
His empty arms together , hung his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 858
A copious spring; and both together dash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 919
Into the vallies green together went. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 765
I do love you both together ! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 4
Fair and foul I love together ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 7
Both together , sane and mad; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 19
Both together ,- let me slake Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 28
But O on the hether to lie together Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 11
She will bring thee, all together , Fancy, Line 31
Rose-bloom fell on her hands, together prest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 220
He press'd together , and in silence stood. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 378
And Phorcus, sea-born, and together strode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 385
Together had he left his mother fair Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 31
It seem'd you were in deep discourse together ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 84
As those who, safe together met alone Lamia, Part I, Line 302
Let us away!" Away together ran The Jealousies, Line 320
 
TOGITHER..........1
They went togither . Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 24
 
TOIL..............22
Spreads awfully before me. How much toil ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 307
To lose, at once, all my toil breeding fire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 537
As if, athirst with so much toil , 'twould sip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 88
After long toil and travelling, to miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 145
Yet, for him there's refreshment even in toil ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 147
Amid his toil thou gav'st Leander breath; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 97
Then up he rose, like one whose tedious toil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 226
Whereat was heard a noise of painful toil , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 522
Of seamen, and stout galley-rowers' toil : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 248
Such men to honor thee, who, worn with toil , To the Nile, Line 7
It is impossible to escape from toil Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 9
That when a man doth set himself in toil Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 3
A straying from his toil ? Hot Egypt's pest Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 140
Thinking on rugged hours and fruitless toil , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 324
In the passion of his toil , Not Aladdin magian, Line 6
Of all the toil and vigour you have spent Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 45
After so many hours of toil and quest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 338
"They toil not, neither do they spin." Ode on Indolence, Epigraph
Toil hard, ye slaves, and from the miser-earth Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 10
To count with the toil the innumerable degrees. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 92
Prodigious seem'd the toil ; the leaves were yet The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 121
Spread deeper crimson than the battle's toil , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 2
 
TOIL'D............2
Long toil'd in foreign wars, and whose high deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 26
Or nature's rocks toil'd hard in waves and winds, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 69
 
TOILING...........3
Of stedfast genius, toiling gallantly! Addressed to Haydon, Line 10
'Tis young Leander toiling to his death. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 9
That toiling years would put within my grasp, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 524
 
TOILS.............3
For lo! the toils are spread around your den, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 67
Though I alone were taken in these toils , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 61
Now I thank heaven I am in the toils , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 27
 
TOITY.............1
And see what hoity- toity airs she took:) The Jealousies, Line 707
 
TOLD..............34
Bards, that erst sublimely told Ode to Apollo, Line 3
I marvel much that thou hast never told To George Felton Mathew, Line 84
That thou hast never told thy travels strange, To George Felton Mathew, Line 90
O what wonders had been told Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 2
(For knightly Spenser to Libertas told it,) To My Brother George (epistle), Line 24
The wrong'd Libertas,- who has told you stories To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 44
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 5
So felt he, who first told , how Psyche went I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 141
Nor was it long ere he had told the tale I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 179
Of loggerheads and chapmen;- we are told Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 11
And shar'd their famish'd scrips. Thus all out- told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 392
When I have told thee how my waking sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 859
A wonder, fair as any I have told - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 894
Along whose track the prince quick footsteps told , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 227
Not of these days, but long ago 'twas told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 830
And then the forest told it in a dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 832
Long years of misery have told me so. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 325
I told thee of, where lovely Scylla lies; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 720
And I have told thee all thou mayest hear. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 272
Before three swiftest kisses he had told , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1001
They told their sister how, with sudden speed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 225
New to the feet, although the tale a hundred times be told : There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 6
Numb were the Beadsman's fingers, while he told The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 5
They told her how, upon St. Agnes' Eve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 46
But soon his eyes grew brilliant, when she told The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 132
The Beadsman, after thousand aves told , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 377
The chilly sunset faintly told The Eve of St. Mark, Line 7
Stay'd in their birth, even as here 'tis told . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 295
Told of his rage, ere he thus sank and pined. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 43
And many else whose names may not be told . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 81
Well! hast told Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 1b
Of cups and goblets, and the store thrice told Lamia, Part II, Line 186
suburbs of Corinth, and told him she was a Phoenician by birth, and if he would Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
They told the truth, though, round, the snowy locks The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 452
 
TOLERABLE.........1
And made a very tolerable broth- The Jealousies, Line 651
 
TOLL..............6
The church bells toll a melancholy round, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 1
Still, still they toll , and I should feel a damp, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 9
Whose passing-bell may ere the midnight toll ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 156
Upon the first toll of his passing-bell, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 173
To toll me back from thee to my sole self! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 72
Upon the first toll of his passing bell: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 22
 
TOM...............3
This is your birth-day, Tom , and I rejoice To My Brothers, Line 9
Do you get health - and Tom the same - I'll dance, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 110
He sipp'd no olden Tom , or ruin blue, Character of C.B., Line 21
 
TOMB..............12
A chill as from a tomb , did I not know Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 10
Of youth, and destine thee towards a tomb . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 592
And my couch a low grass tomb . Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 33
Lorenzo stood, and wept: the forest tomb Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 275
And it shall comfort me within the tomb . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 304
Why linger at the yawning tomb so long? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 386
She wrapp'd it up; and for its tomb did choose Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 413
Her book a churchyard tomb . Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 8
Pale, lattic'd, chill, and silent as a tomb . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 113
Carve it on my tomb , that, when I rest beneath, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 132
"When from this wreathed tomb shall I awake! Lamia, Part I, Line 38
And in the icy silence of the tomb , This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 3
 
TOMBS.............4
Then old songs waken from enclouded tombs ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 787
Dark regions are around it, where the tombs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 516
Of flowers, rush of rivers, and the tombs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 642
Tinting with silver wan your marble tombs . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 440
 
TOMORROW..........1
Persist and you may be an ape tomorrow ." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 40
 
TONE..............14
The sweet majestic tone of Maro's lyre; Ode to Apollo, Line 14
Mysterious, wild, the far heard trumpet's tone ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 156
Let me write down a line of glorious tone , On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 11
Of the wide spheres - an everlasting tone . To Kosciusko, Line 4
Faints into sleep, with many a dying tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 950
He kept an anxious ear. The humming tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 916
Through the wide forest - a most fearful tone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 323
But in her tone and look he read the rest. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 56
Affray his ears, though but in dying tone :- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 260
In solemn tenour and deep organ tone : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 48
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone : Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 14
And then she whisper'd in such trembling tone , Lamia, Part I, Line 301
"Fool!" said the sophist, in an under- tone Lamia, Part II, Line 291
Warm breath, light whisper, tender semi- tone , The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 3
 
TONED.............3
Amphion's utterance, toned with his lyre, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 24
"Lamia!" he cried - and no soft- toned reply. Lamia, Part II, Line 261
Sweet in the air a mild- toned music plays, The Jealousies, Line 725
 
TONES.............10
The tones of love our joys enhance, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 15
Hadst caught the tones , nor suffered them to die. To Lord Byron, Line 5
The dying tones that fill the air, Ode to Apollo, Line 45
Revive the dying tones of minstrelsy, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 32
Whose tones reach nought on earth but Poet's ear. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 32
The seed its harvest, or the lute its tones , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 840
Tones ravishment, or ravishment its sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 841
Amid the fierce intoxicating tones Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 16
Smooth, without clashing cymbal, tones of peace Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 48
With sad low tones , while thus he spake, and sent The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 410
 
TONGS.............1
Robes, golden tongs , censer, and chafing dish, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 79
 
TONGUE............52
And echo back the voice of thine own tongue ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 52
O kindly muse! let not my weak tongue faulter Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 128
Were dead and gone, and her caressing tongue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 340
That never tongue , although it overteem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 575
My foolish tongue , and listening, half afraid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 960
Himself along the grass. What gentle tongue , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 96
A homeward fever parches up my tongue - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 319
Thine honied tongue - lute-breathings, which I gasp Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 820
Writ in the tongue of heaven, by those souls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 130
Or I am skilless quite: an idle tongue , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 909
The mellow ditties from a mourning tongue ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 160
Felt not more tongue -tied than Endymion. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 444
Search my most hidden breast! By truth's own tongue , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 458
No tongue shall ask, whence come ye? but ye shall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 822
For to thy tongue will I all health confide. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 864
And then his tongue with sober seemlihed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 950
And by old Rhadamanthus' tongue of doom, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 953
Says I, hold your tongue , you young gipsey. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 14
So she held her tongue and lay plump and fair Over the hill and over the dale, Line 15
To stead thee as a verse in English tongue , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 159
For there was striving, in its piteous tongue , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 282
Persuade her sacred tongue All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 50
More parching to the tongue than all, of more divine a smart, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 8
What whining bit of tongue and mouth thus dares Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 21
Were not so tongue -tied,- no, they went O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 8
On his ear like mother- tongue ; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 15
And scarce three steps, ere Music's golden tongue The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 20
Some mourning words, which in our feeble tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 49
As with a palsied tongue , and while his beard Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 93
Too huge for mortal tongue or pen of scribe: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 160
A serpent's plashy neck; its barbed tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 45
His tongue with the full weight of utterless thought, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 120
In murmurs, which his first-endeavouring tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 171
Ye would not call this too indulged tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 298
Thy name is on my tongue , I know not how; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 83
A burning forehead, and a parching tongue . Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 30
Though seen of none save him whose strenuous tongue Ode on Melancholy, Line 27
I blush to think of my unchasten'd tongue ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 123
Is frankness, and a true tongue to the world; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 176
By Peter's chair! I have upon my tongue Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 67
From adoration, and my foolish tongue Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8
Will make thy bold tongue quiver to the roots, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 87
A foolish tongue , that I may bethink me Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 4
The little thunder of your fretful tongue , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 60
To know thee sad thus, will unloose my tongue Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 14
Put on a judge's brow, and use a tongue Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 147
The leaves of willow and of adder's tongue ; Lamia, Part II, Line 224
And been well nurtured in his mother tongue . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 15
I had no words to answer; for my tongue , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 228
Some mourning words, which in our feeble tongue The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 351
Too huge for mortal tongue , or pen of scribe. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 9
Return'd the Princess, "my tongue shall not cease The Jealousies, Line 62
 
TONGUED...........2
O golden- tongued Romance, with serene lute! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 1
Bedded in tongued flames will be. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 92
 
TONGUELESS........2
But ye, poor tongueless things, were meant O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 11
As though a tongueless nightingale should swell The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 206
 
TONGUES...........5
Until their tongues were loos'd in poesy. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 235
Again my trooping hounds their tongues shall loll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 480
If smiles, if dimples, tongues for ardour mute, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 441
Suffering a daily death from evil tongues ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 45
Light flags stream out like gauzy tongues of fire; The Jealousies, Line 572
 
TONIGHT...........1
Why did I laugh tonight ? No voice will tell: Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 1
 
TOOK..............56
Took happy flights. Who shall his fame impair Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 13
When bright processions took their airy march To George Felton Mathew, Line 29
Nor when reluctantly I took my hat; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 120
And the tann'd harvesters rich armfuls took . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 441
And took a lute, from which there pulsing came Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 491
Dream within dream!" - "She took an airy range, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 633
Through autumn mists, and took Peona's hand: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 991
At the youth's slumber; while another took Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 423
The eagle landed him, and farewel took . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 669
Stretching his indolent arms, he took , O bliss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 712
Along the ground they took a winding course. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 926
Took silently their foot-prints. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 314a
She took me like a child of suckling time, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 456
Anon she took a branch of mistletoe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 514
The sea-swell took her hair. Dead as she was Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 625
And having done it, took his dark blue cloak Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 751
Through which this Paphian army took its march, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 853
Ripe from hue-golden swoons took all the blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 861
Then Love took wing, and from his pinions shed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 891
Sick hearted, weary - so I took a whim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 269
By which he took his first soft poppy dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 786
Each step he took should make his lady's hand Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 5
Resolv'd, she took with her an aged nurse, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 343
In anxious secrecy they took it home, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 401
He took There was a naughty boy, Line 5
He took There was a naughty boy, Line 30
(Here the lady took some more whiskey and was putting even more to Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
Took to the cowl,- then rav'd and swore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 53
She took their cream of beauty, fairest dyes, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 3
Where Porphyro took covert, pleas'd amain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 188
Awakening up, he took her hollow lute,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 289
He was so very ugly: then she took When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 51
She took it in her head to see the place. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 56
The Princess took it and, dismounting straight, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 69
As Hermes once took to his feathers light, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 1
Instead of sweets, his ample palate took Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 188
Fain would he have commanded, fain took throne Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 290
To all my empire: farewell sad I took , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 239
And sat me down, and took a mouthed shell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 270
She took me to her elfin grot, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 29
No, you are not deceiv'd. You took me for Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 136
I took compassion on her, bade her steep Lamia, Part I, Line 106
A deep volcanian yellow took the place Lamia, Part I, Line 155
Against his better self, he took delight Lamia, Part II, Line 73
His passion, cruel grown, took on a hue Lamia, Part II, Line 75
From fifty censers their light voyage took Lamia, Part II, Line 180
Till, checking his love trance, a cup he took Lamia, Part II, Line 241
house, and all that was in it, vanished in an instant: many thousands took Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Sipp'd by the wander'd bee, the which I took , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 43
To whisper, there's the man who took alive King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 31
But of its threat she took the utmost heed; The Jealousies, Line 70
Tied in a burnish'd knot, their semblance took The Jealousies, Line 269
To such a depth!" The Emperor took his robe, The Jealousies, Line 410
Whereat a narrow Flemish glass he took , The Jealousies, Line 415
And see what hoity-toity airs she took :) The Jealousies, Line 707
Yclep'd Typographus, the giant took In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 2
 
TOOTH.............2
Shewing tooth , tusk, and venom-bag, and sting! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 502
We have not one sweet tooth out. O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 16
 
TOOTHED...........1
The sluggish wheels; solemn their toothed maws, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 644
 
TOP...............15
From the worn top of some old battlement Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 15
Upon some mountain- top until I feel Sleep and Poetry, Line 50
Who stood on Latmus' top , what time there blew I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 194
Branch down sweeping from a tall ash top , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 335
A steady splendour; but at the tip- top , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 805
Around thine aged top , and thy clear fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 722
Thou wast the mountain- top - the sage's pen- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 164
I was to top the heavens. Dear maid, sith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 110
Or from old Skiddaw's top , when fog conceals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 394
Upon the top of Nevis, blind in mist! Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 2
Upon the little cradle's top 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 35
My top has henceforth slept in faery land. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 32
That is the top of sovereignty. Mark well! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 205
A fay of colour, slave from top to toe, The Jealousies, Line 182
Reach the hill top , and now throughout the valley shines." The Jealousies, Line 558
 
TOPER.............1
A toper this! he plied his glass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 25
 
TOPMOST...........2
My goblet full of wine - my topmost deed:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 168
They hung his bridle on a topmost bough, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 95
 
TOPS..............7
Edg'd round with dark tree tops ? through which a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 86
Beyond the tall tree tops ; and in less time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 332
Until the poplar tops , in journey dreary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 923
And the black-elm tops 'mong the freezing stars, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 3
Above tree tops and towers play, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 62
Thick night confounds the pine- tops with the clouds: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 80
Come with me, o'er tops of trees, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 48
 
TOPSY.............1
All things turn'd topsy -turvy in a devil's dance. The Jealousies, Line 756
 
TORCH.............3
No light in the darkness, no torch in the gloom, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 15
A bright torch , and a casement ope at night, Ode to Psyche, Line 66
While the torch -bearing slaves a halloo sent The Jealousies, Line 392
 
TORCH'S...........1
To where he stood, hid from the torch's flame, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 93
 
TORCHED...........1
In torched mines and noisy factories, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 108
 
TORCHES...........3
Her dazzling torches ; nor the music breathe Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 47
By strewn flowers, torches , and a marriage song, Lamia, Part II, Line 109
Lighted our torches , and kept up a shout, The Jealousies, Line 682
 
TORCHES'..........1
Amid the pages, and the torches' glare, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 109
 
TORE..............1
He tore it into pieces small as snow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 749
 
TORMENT...........4
All torment from my breast;- 'twas even then, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 927
Yet do not so, sweet queen; one torment spar'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 175
Ere the God of Torment taught her Fancy, Line 82
More grievous torment than a hermit's fast:- Lamia, Part II, Line 4
 
TORMENT'S.........1
Worse than the torment's self: but rather tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 177
 
TORMENTED.........1
Voiceless, or hoarse with loud tormented streams: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 362
 
TORN..............3
That such fair clusters should be rudely torn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 44
A viol, bow strings torn , cross-wise upon Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 40
A curious volume, patch'd and torn , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 25
 
TORRENT...........3
And torrent , and ten thousand jutting shapes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 628
A torrent crosses, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 10
Than I to meet the torrent of my foes. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 31
 
TORRENTS..........2
Of thunderous waterfalls and torrents hoarse, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 8
And all the headlong torrents far and near, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 364
 
TORRID............1
To the torrid spouts and fountains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 81
 
TORTUR'D..........2
And, for my tortur'd brain begins to craze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 116
O I am tortur'd by this villainy. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 72
 
TORTURE...........5
Shrieks, yells, and groans of torture -pilgrimage; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 524
Some chain'd in torture , and some wandering. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 18
Put to the torture for confessional? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 24
Her eyes in torture fix'd, and anguish drear, Lamia, Part I, Line 150
And mention ('tis as well) the torture of the wasp." The Jealousies, Line 198
 
TORTURED..........3
Once more been tortured with renewed life. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 919
Though old Ulysses tortured from his slumbers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 26
Often with more than tortured lion's groan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 861
 
TORTURER'S........1
Of a curs'd torturer's office? Why shouldst join,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 87
 
TORTURES..........3
Tortures hot breath, and speech of agony, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 257
Death!- and slow tortures to the hardy fool Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 69
In unimagined tortures , or breathe through Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 12
 
TORTURING.........2
From human pastures; or, O torturing fact! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 5
From torturing jealousy. To Fanny, Line 48
 
TOSS..............1
No one to see my Persian feathers toss , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 12
 
TOSS'D............1
Toss'd up the silver spume against the clouds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 655
 
TOSSING...........2
Tossing about on Neptune's restless ways, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 348
And left me tossing safely. But the crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 352
 
TOST..............2
Most piously;- all lovers tempest- tost , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 703
Thou, Carian lord, hadst better have been tost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 52
 
TOTAL.............1
A total opposition? No one. So Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 693
 
TOTTERING.........1
Gave mighty pulses: in this tottering case Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 305
 
TOUCH.............43
Or e'en the touch of Archimago's wand, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 6
Could hear your footsteps touch the grav'ly floor. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 124
Play with their fingers, touch their shoulders white Sleep and Poetry, Line 107
O let me for one moment touch her wrist; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 103
Why touch thy soft lute God of the golden bow, Line 21
Whose else? In this who touch thy vesture's hem? To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 10
Ah! through their nestling touch , Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 4
Gives it a touch ethereal - a new birth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 298
Methought I fainted at the charmed touch , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 637
And with a sympathetic touch unbinds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 785
The crystal spout-head: so it did, with touch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 89
But, at that very touch , to disappear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 92
For 'tis the nicest touch of human honour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 436
By any touch , a bunch of blooming plums Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 450
Touch raptur'd!- See how painfully I flow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 948
Or will he touch me with his searing hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 261
I am too flinty-hard for thy nice touch : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 573
As doth a flower at Apollo's touch . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 786
To touch this flower into human shape! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 67
His first touch of the earth went nigh to kill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 614
That doth enfold and touch thee all about, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 5
And touch the strings into a mystery; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 444
And why it flourish'd, as by magic touch ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 459
Dares to touch audaciously Not Aladdin magian, Line 37
To see Ben Nevis and to touch his nose? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 46
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth, Fancy, Line 3
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth Fancy, Line 77
Perchance speak, kneel, touch , kiss - in sooth such things have been. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 81
Meantime touch piously the Delphic harp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 10
Touch the very pulse of fire Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 84
Is blighted by the touch of calumny; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 137
His touch an immortality, not I!- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 43
I touch her not. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 172a
Made close inquiry; from whose touch she shrank, Lamia, Part II, Line 103
At the mere touch of cold philosophy? Lamia, Part II, Line 230
Lycius then press'd her hand, with devout touch , Lamia, Part II, Line 249
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue; To Autumn, Line 26
Soft showering in mine ears, and, by the touch The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 23
Her planetary eyes; and touch her voice The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 281
Touch has a memory. O say, Love, say, What can I do to drive away, Line 4
Let none else touch the just new-budded flower; To Fanny, Line 54
He sat and cursed a bride he knew he could not touch . The Jealousies, Line 126
His son shall never touch that bishopric; The Jealousies, Line 146
 
TOUCH'D...........32
And her first footsteps touch'd a verdant hill; Imitation of Spenser, Line 2
Had touch'd her plaintive lute; and thou, being by, To Lord Byron, Line 4
First touch'd ; what amorous, and fondling nips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 144
Whose mellow reeds are touch'd with sounds forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 205
He had touch'd his forehead, he began to thread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 266
One, kneeling to a lyre, touch'd the strings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 420
"I touch'd no lute, I sang not, trod no measures: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 338
These treasures - touch'd the knuckles - they unclasp'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 672
He with his wand light touch'd , and heavenward Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 336
Some, Titian colours touch'd into real life. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 19
Whisper'd I and touch'd his brow. Not Aladdin magian, Line 20
And touch'd the wards; the door full courteously When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 71
No brush had touch'd his chin or razor sheer; Character of C.B., Line 7
No care had touch'd his cheek with mortal doom, Character of C.B., Line 8
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 24
She touch'd her fair large forehead to the ground, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 80
And touch'd with shade of bronzed obelisks, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 178
Upon its own producer, forthwith touch'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 196
His bright feet touch'd , and there he stay'd to view Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 368
Whose strings touch'd by thy fingers, all the vast Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 64
Their lips touch'd not, but had not bade adieu, Ode to Psyche, Line 17
What mood is this? Hath fortune touch'd thy brain? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 99
So rainbow-sided, touch'd with miseries, Lamia, Part I, Line 54
Could e'er have touch'd there. Sounds AEolian Lamia, Part I, Line 386
But when the happy vintage touch'd their brains, Lamia, Part II, Line 203
One minute before death, my iced foot touch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 132
The lowest stair; and as it touch'd , life seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 133
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 329
And touch'd with shade of bronzed obelisks, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 26
While little harps were touch'd by many a lyric fay. The Jealousies, Line 36
I see the dawning touch'd upon your face; The Jealousies, Line 481
Touch'd a spring-lock, and there in wool, or snow The Jealousies, Line 511
 
TOUCHED...........1
I hope I have not in too late a day touched the beautiful Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
 
TOUCHING..........5
Have become indolent; but touching thine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 5
Touching with dazzled lips her starlight hand. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 419
Close to her ear touching the melody;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 293
You had a letter from me touching him? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 62
Your purpose touching her. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 143a
 
TOUCHWOOD.........1
Of moulted feathers, touchwood , alder chips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 882
 
TOUGH.............1
Gone, the tough -belted outlaw Robin Hood, Line 35
 
TOUR..............1
With random friar, or rake upon his tour , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 21
 
TOURNAMENT........1
Leaps to the honors of a tournament , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 28
 
TOURNEY...........2
A tourney ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 36b
Of your large bounties. A tourney , is it not? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52

Published @ RC

March 2005