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Keats Concordance
 
TOW'RDS...........1
Tow'rds Thibet. Mem.:- birds fly in the night; The Jealousies, Line 645
 
TOWARD............2
One, loveliest, holding her white hand toward Sleep and Poetry, Line 366
Toward the castle or the cot where long ago was born There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 11
 
TOWARDS...........31
Might turn their steps towards the sober ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 356
Towards a bowery island opposite; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 428
And then, towards me, like a very maid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 634
So saw he panting light, and towards it went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 383
Towards him a large eagle, 'twixt whose wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 658
Towards it by a sandy path, and lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1020
Towards her with the Muses in thine heart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 49
Now as we speed towards our joyous task." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 309
Bewitch'd me towards ; and I soon was near Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 495
Of youth, and destine thee towards a tomb. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 592
They shoulder'd on towards that brightening east. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 835
Towards a crystal bower far away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1018
Anxious as hind towards her hidden fawn. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 43
Towards the ground; but rested not, nor stopt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 334
Now was he slumbering towards heaven's gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 381
With an eye-guess towards some pleasant vale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 396
Towards her, and awakes - and, strange, o'erhead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 434
And Phoebe bends towards him crescented. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 438
Thus sprang direct towards the Galaxy. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 487
He flapp'd towards the sound. Alas, no charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 556
Towards common thoughts and things for very fear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 896
Walk'd towards the temple grove with this lament: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 926
Making the best of 's way towards Soho. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 12
Towards the shade under the castle wall Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 59
Over the pathless waves towards him bows. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 96
Of the garden-terrace, towards him they bent Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 179
To spur three leagues towards the Apennine; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 186
A Cabinet, opening towards a Terrace. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Setting
And towards her stept: she, like a moon in wane, Lamia, Part I, Line 136
Towards the altar sober-pac'd I went, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 93
I hold it towards you. This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 8
 
TOWELS............1
With some towels - There was a naughty boy, Line 10
 
TOWER.............1
But eagles golden-feather'd, who do tower Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 226
 
TOWER'D...........1
That men, who might have tower'd in the van Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 817
 
TOWERED...........1
To where he towered on his eminence. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 386
 
TOWERING..........1
Those towering horses and their mournful freight. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 359
 
TOWERS............16
Clear streams, smooth lakes, and overlooking towers . Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 68
That crowns a lofty clift, which proudly towers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 124
And towers of amethyst,- would I so tease Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 745
The woes of Troy, towers smothering o'er their blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 8
Towers like an ocean-cliff, and whence he seeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 241
Above tree tops and towers play, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 62
When earthquakes jar their battlements and towers . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 200
And from the basements deep to the high towers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 223
Nobly as Nimrod's masons, when the towers Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 133
That blackens northward of these horrid towers , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 148
One while these proud towers are hush'd as death. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 14
To the wide-spreaded night above her towers . Lamia, Part I, Line 354
Of grey cathedrals, buttress'd walls, rent towers , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 67
When earthquakes jar their battlements and towers . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 44
Or that we gave him lodging in yon towers ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 7
From the throng'd towers of Lincoln hath look'd down, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 21
 
TOWERY............1
A vulture from his towery perching; frown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 535
 
TOWN..............4
The town , the churchyard, and the setting sun, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 1
What little town by river or sea shore, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 35
And, little town , thy streets for evermore Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 38
To catch the treasure: "Best in all the town !" The Jealousies, Line 422
 
TOWNS.............1
To two or three towns Two or three posies, Line 24
 
TOWNWARDS.........1
Of one returning townwards late, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 59
 
TOY...............1
No hand to toy with mine? No lips so sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 47
 
TOY'D.............2
Whether they wept, or laugh'd, or griev'd, or toy'd - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 494
That she around him flutter'd, flirted, toy'd , The Jealousies, Line 110
 
TOYING............4
These toying hands and kiss their smooth excess? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 743
A toying with the doves. Then,- "Mighty crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 897
For dainty toying . Cupid, empire-sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 931
With toying oars and silken sails they glide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 249
 
TOYS..............2
That well you know to honour:- "Life's very toys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 128
From a Man-Tiger-Organ, prettiest of his toys ." The Jealousies, Line 333
 
TRAC'D............3
Trac'd by thy lov'd Libertas; he will speak, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 61
The stranger from the mountains, breathless, trac'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 737
Trac'd upon vellum or wild Indian leaf The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 5
 
TRACE.............20
But though I'll gladly trace these scenes with thee, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 9
And when thou first didst in that mirror trace To George Felton Mathew, Line 88
My boundly reverence, that I cannot trace Sleep and Poetry, Line 209
And trace the dwindled edgings of its brim; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 18
And by the wandering melody may trace This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 7
Will trace the story of Endymion. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 35
And that, alas! is death. No, I can trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 514
Of a swallow's nest-door, could delay a trace , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 753
Dazzled to trace it in the sunny skies. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 68
Had zoned her through the night. There is no trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 569
Art thou wayworn, or canst not further trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 651
Without one hope, without one faintest trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 640
Made for the soul to wander in and trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 514
I will entice this crystal rill to trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 699
And think that I may never live to trace When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 7
In letters raven-sombre, you may trace Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 53
Trace me their footsteps! Away! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 139
Indeed, indeed I cannot trace them further. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 17
Were foil'd, who watch'd to trace them to their house: Lamia, Part I, Line 393
Where the close eye in deep rich fur might trace The Jealousies, Line 345
 
TRACED............1
In cool mid-forest. Surely I have traced Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 55
 
TRACES............2
And silken traces tighten'd in descent; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 524
Leave traces in the grass and flowers sweet; Lamia, Part I, Line 97
 
TRACING...........2
Tracing along, it brought me to a cave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 935
Tracing fantastic figures with his spear? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 294
 
TRACK.............2
The summer time away. One track unseams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 74
Along whose track the prince quick footsteps told, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 227
 
TRADE.............4
That he, the servant of their trade designs, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 165
'Twas his trade There was a naughty boy, Line 87
The trade of frightening; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 70
Which to the oil- trade doth great scaith and harm, The Jealousies, Line 215
 
TRADITION.........1
Thus the tradition of the gusty deep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 853
 
TRAGEDY...........3
A Tragedy in Five Acts Otho the Great, Subtitle
Behind enwombed: what high tragedy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 277
A Fragment of a Tragedy King Stephen Subtitle
 
TRAGIC............4
Came tragic ; passion not to be subdued, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 247
Through bronzed lyre in tragic order go, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 443
If I may judge by his so tragic bearing, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 89
And dolorous accent from a tragic harp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 444
 
TRAILED...........1
Some idly trailed their sheep-hooks on the ground, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 145
 
TRAILING..........1
And virgin's bower, trailing airily; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 417
 
TRAILS............2
About old forests; while the willow trails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 43
An hour glass on the turn, amid the trails Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 44
 
TRAIN.............10
Of liny marble, and thereto a train Sleep and Poetry, Line 364
Whereat, methought, the lidless-eyed train Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 598
Into thine arms; to scare Aurora's train , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 696
The tent of Hesperus and all his train ; Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 3
Fix'd on the floor, saw many a sweeping train The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 58
her robes, and a train of Women. She kneels. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
How ghast a train ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Lady, Line 11
With emptied caskets, and her train upheld Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 86
The colours all inflam'd throughout her train , Lamia, Part I, Line 153
Like the old pageant of Aurora's train , The Jealousies, Line 578
 
TRAINING..........1
Thereby in goodly themes so training him, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 6
 
TRAINS............1
To trains of peaceful images: the stirs Sleep and Poetry, Line 340
 
TRAITOR...........3
Cruel! what traitor could thee hither bring? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 330
O cruel traitor ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 143b
Conrad,- traitor ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 159b
 
TRAITOR'S.........1
The gloomy current of a traitor's heart. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 17
 
TRAITOROUS........1
Ah! when I hear each traitorous lying bell, Lines Written on 29 May, Line 4
 
TRAMMEL...........1
How to entangle, trammel up and snare Lamia, Part II, Line 52
 
TRAMMEL'D.........1
Together intertwin'd and trammel'd fresh: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 411
 
TRAMMELS..........4
Of charming my mind from the trammels of pain. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 24
In trammels of perverse deliciousness. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 761
And filch the unpleasant trammels quite away. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 91
And every soul from human trammels freed, Lamia, Part II, Line 210
 
TRAMPED...........1
The meadow thou hast tramped o'er and o'er,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 11
 
TRAMPLE...........1
That cannot trample on the fallen. But his Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 56
 
TRAMPLING.........1
A trampling down of what the world most prizes, On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 11
 
TRAMPLINGS........1
And now the numerous tramplings quiver lightly Sleep and Poetry, Line 129
 
TRANCE............10
Into how sweet a trance his soul was gone, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 83
That when a Poet is in such a trance , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 25
Or when serenely wand'ring in a trance To G.A.W., Line 5
But in the self-same fixed trance he kept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 403
So kept me stedfast in that airy trance , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 585
He woke as from a trance ; his snow-white brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 221
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 201
And as he from one trance was wakening Lamia, Part I, Line 296
Till, checking his love trance , a cup he took Lamia, Part II, Line 241
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 45
 
TRANCED...........5
In tranced dulness; speak, and let that spell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 768
I bow'd a tranced vassal: nor would thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 460
Not a senseless, tranced thing, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 18
As when, upon a tranced summer-night, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 72
As when, upon a tranced summer night, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 372
 
TRANQUIL..........3
And on the balmy zephyrs tranquil rest Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 3
What is more tranquil than a musk-rose blowing Sleep and Poetry, Line 5
Has thy fair face within its tranquil ken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 64
 
TRANQUILITY.......1
His briar'd path to some tranquility . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 723
 
TRANSCENDENT......1
And gave the steel a shining quite transcendent . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 133
 
TRANSFERR'D.......1
Manna and dates, in argosy transferr'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 268
 
TRANSGRESSION.....1
O'er fresh transgression . O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 30
 
TRANSPARENT.......1
Stood a cool vessel of transparent juice, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 42
 
TRAPPINGS.........1
O'er his loins, his trappings glow Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 59
 
TRAVAIL...........2
Three hours they labour'd at this travail sore; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 382
And marble balustrade, and patient travail The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 91
 
TRAVEL............2
That 'tis of modern use to travel in a litter. The Jealousies, Line 234
To travel such a distance through the sky, The Jealousies, Line 489
 
TRAVELL'D.........1
Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold, On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 1
 
TRAVELLER.........1
Young traveller , in such a mournful place? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 650
 
TRAVELLER'S.......1
To melt away upon the traveller's lips. Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 10
 
TRAVELLING........3
And travelling my eye, until the doors Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 581
Of thy combing hand, the while it travelling cloys Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 968
After long toil and travelling , to miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 145
 
TRAVELS...........4
That thou hast never told thy travels strange, To George Felton Mathew, Line 90
And sorrow for her love in travels rude. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 248
But their low voices are not heard, though come on travels drear; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 16
To one who travels from the dusking east: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 375
 
TRAVERS'D.........1
And long he travers'd to and fro, to acquaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 269
 
TREACHEROUS.......1
When that same treacherous wax began to run, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 443
 
TREACHERY.........3
Ah, shouldst thou die from my heart- treachery !- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 469
O treachery ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 797b
It is no treachery . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 804a
 
TREAD.............11
Another, bending o'er her nimble tread , Sleep and Poetry, Line 113
Or to tread breathless round the frothy main, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 270
Who, thus far, discontent, has dared to tread , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 36
Flew a delight half-graspable; his tread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 673
A lover would not tread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 167
Parting they seem'd to tread upon the air, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 73
I tread on them; that all my eye doth meet Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 12
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 1
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 7
No hungry generations tread thee down; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 62
Fair, on a sloping green of mossy tread , Lamia, Part I, Line 181
 
TREADING..........2
I see you are treading the verge of the sea: To Some Ladies, Line 14
He forthright pass'd, and lightly treading went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 431
 
TREADS............2
So on our heels a fresh perfection treads , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 212
Marching a-row, each other slipshod treads ; The Jealousies, Line 769
 
TREASON...........1
No treason 'gainst his head in deed or word! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
 
TREASURE..........5
Than if I'd brought to light a hidden treasure . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 116
Some diamond water drops, and them to treasure To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 9
Though the passion's treasure Hither, hither, love, Line 15
Gave hell his treasure . O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 78
To catch the treasure : "Best in all the town!" The Jealousies, Line 422
 
TREASURED.........2
Bring forth once more my bullion, treasured deep, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 11
Long treasured tears. "This temple sad and lone The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 221
 
TREASURES.........2
These treasures - touch'd the knuckles - they unclasp'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 672
And from their treasures scatter pearled hail; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 264
 
TREASURIES........1
Empty these armouries, these treasuries , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 154
 
TREAT.............3
Strange matters did it treat of, and drew on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 679
There is not such a treat among them all, Lamia, Part I, Line 330
A meek attentive ear, so that they treat King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 11
 
TREATMENT.........1
Loves not too rough a treatment , gentle sir; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 37
 
TREATS............1
This as a falsehood Crafticanto treats ; The Jealousies, Line 631
 
TREBLE............2
To the swift treble pipe, and humming string. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 314
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft To Autumn, Line 31
 
TREE..............35
Which fell profusely from the rose- tree stem! Imitation of Spenser, Line 33
When pleasure's tree no longer bears, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 22
High as the berries of a wild ash tree , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 114
Grateful the incense from the lime- tree flower; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 155
Fresher than berries of a mountain tree ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 20
The frequent chequer of a youngling tree , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 38
More lovely than a wreath from the bay tree ? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 2
To alleys where the fir- tree drops its cone, On The Story of Rimini, Line 13
Edg'd round with dark tree tops? through which a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 86
The fair-grown yew tree , for a chosen bow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 482
Let fall a sprig of yew tree in his path; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 732
Stems the upbursting cold: a wild rose tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 55
Of thy disparted nymphs? Through what dark tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 308
No apples would I gather from the tree , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 147
Sitting beneath the midmost forest tree , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 144
Your nuts in oak- tree cleft?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 231
' For wine, for wine we left our kernel tree ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 232
Beyond the tall tree tops; and in less time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 332
To sit beneath a fair lone beechen tree ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 767
His skill in little stars. The teeming tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 789
And not a tree , beneath whose rooty shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 793
Too happy, happy tree , In drear nighted December, Line 2
A kiss should bud upon the tree of love, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 8
And the hollow tree For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 28
Its swathe is on the cotton tree ; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 21
Hatching in the hawthorn- tree , Fancy, Line 60
You liv'd alone on the forest tree , I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 7
Above tree tops and towers play, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 62
To the knotty side of an old pollard tree When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 84
Or shall the tree be envious of the dove Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 221
The grass, the thicket, and the fruit- tree wild; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 45
There!- as the fabled fair Hesperian tree , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 82
Round bush and tree , soft-brushing, in his speed, Lamia, Part I, Line 43
Between the tree -stems, marbled plain at first, Lamia, Part II, Line 138
Still buds the tree , and still the sea-shores murmur. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 422
 
TREE'S............1
From a tree's summit; a poor Indian's sleep Sleep and Poetry, Line 87
 
TREEN.............1
As daisies lurk'd in June-grass, buds in treen ; The Jealousies, Line 347
 
TREES.............62
To see wide plains, fair trees and lawny slope: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 66
Of easy slopes, and shadowy trees that lean Calidore: A Fragment, Line 10
Its long lost grandeur: fir trees grow around, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 40
Of delicate birch trees , or long grass which hems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 51
Smiling upon the flowers and the trees : Sleep and Poetry, Line 116
To the trees and mountains; and there soon appear Sleep and Poetry, Line 137
Is like a fallen angel: trees uptorn, Sleep and Poetry, Line 242
Coming with softest rustle through the trees ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 154
And hide in cooling trees , a voice will run On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 3
That in a time, when under pleasant trees To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 11
There are plenty of trees , The Gothic looks solemn, Line 13
Trees old, and young sprouting a shady boon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 14
For one short hour; no, even as the trees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 26
Now coming from beneath the forest trees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 148
Broad leaved fig trees even now foredoom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 252
With crystal mocking of the trees and sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 422
Fountains grotesque, new trees , bespangled caves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 458
Bushes and trees do lean all round athwart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 865
At last, by hap, through some young trees it struck, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 931
From the clear moon, the trees , and coming madness. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 218
And here is manna pick'd from Syrian trees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 452
Cover'd with crystal vines; then weeping trees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 615
They sound as through the whispering of trees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 934
O Moon! the oldest shades 'mong oldest trees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 52
Of love-spangles, just off yon cape of trees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 83
Even to the trees . He rose: he grasp'd his stole, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 230
Stole through its verdurous matting of fresh trees . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 420
"Beneath my palm trees , by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 182
"Beneath my palm trees , by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 188
Beneath dark palm trees by a river side? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 192
Warm as a dove's nest among summer trees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 666
And where dark yew trees , as we rustle through, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 673
See, through the trees , a little river go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 680
Pines, and lime- trees full in bloom, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 32
A forester deep in thy midmost trees , Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 2
Nested in trees , which all do seem to shake Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 28
To her, than noise of trees or hidden rill; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 14
To some high noble and his olive- trees . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 168
And she forgot the blue above the trees , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 418
The clouds, the trees , the rounded hills all seem, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 2
Her sisters larchen trees - Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 10
With the whisper of heaven's trees Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 9
Why not live sweetly as in the green trees ? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 10
Where sycamores and elm trees tall, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 44
We are such forest- trees , and our fair boughs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 224
Of fragrance, quietness, and trees , and flowers. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 264
Come with me, o'er tops of trees , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 48
Far, far around shall those dark-cluster'd trees Ode to Psyche, Line 54
That thou, light-winged Dryad of the trees , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 7
Fair youth, beneath the trees , thou canst not leave Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 15
Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 16
For a throng'd tavern,- and these stubbed trees Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 35
This rustle of the trees ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 30a
Of the Wood-Gods, and even the very trees . Lamia, Part I, Line 34
Forth creeping imagery of slighter trees , Lamia, Part II, Line 140
From vales deflower'd, or forest- trees branch-rent, Lamia, Part II, Line 216
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage- trees , To Autumn, Line 5
Methought I stood where trees of every clime, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 19
As if with wings; but the fair trees were gone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 59
Still fix'd he sat beneath the sable trees , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 446
Though it blows legend-laden through the trees . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 6
And vanish'd, bird-like, o'er the suburb trees , The Jealousies, Line 129
 
TRELLIS...........2
With the wreath'd trellis of a working brain, Ode to Psyche, Line 60
Of trellis vines, and bells, and larger blooms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 26
 
TREMBLE...........18
With lips that tremble , and with glistening eye, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 91
With all her limbs on tremble , and her eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 103
Their timid necks and tremble ; so these both Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 328
Was the warm tremble of a devout kiss,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 744
By things I tremble at, and gorgon wrath. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 754
Light hether-bells may tremble then, but they are far away; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 13
He might make tremble many a man whose spirit had gone forth There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 27
No leaf doth tremble , no ripple is there Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 9
Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 308
The Dwarf began to tremble and the Ape When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 18
And made their dove-wings tremble . On he flared, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 217
Tremble ! for, at my nod, the sharpen'd axe Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 86
You make me tremble ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 130b
Your wrath, weak boy? Tremble at mine, unless Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
Go,- I fear thee! I tremble every limb, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 3
With jeers at me! You tremble - faint at once, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 35
And made their dove-wings tremble : on he flared The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 61
Tremble and quake to death,- he feared less The Jealousies, Line 340
 
TREMBLED..........6
Whose lips have trembled with a maiden's eyes. Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 8
They trembled to each other.- Helicon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 716
Of leaves and trembled blossoms, where there ran Ode to Psyche, Line 11
While hurried Lamia trembled : "Ah," said he, Lamia, Part I, Line 368
Trembled ; she nothing said, but, pale and meek, Lamia, Part II, Line 65
Trembled amid the white curls of his beard. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 451
 
TREMBLES..........1
And trembles through my labyrinthine hair.' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 969
 
TREMBLING.........26
And o'er my eyes the trembling moisture shake. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 42
Wraps round her ample robe with happy trembling . Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 18
With all its diamonds trembling through and through? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 58
In which a trembling diamond never lingers. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 20
Telling us how fair, trembling Syrinx fled I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 157
By all the trembling mazes that she ran, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 245
Those who would watch. Perhaps, the trembling knee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 337
Or anxious calls, or close of trembling palms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 401
Trembling its closed eyes and sleeked wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 468
She said with trembling chance: "Is this the cause? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 721
And lifted hands, and trembling lips he stood; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 196
Before that care-worn sage, who trembling felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 290
Stood trembling creatures. I beheld the wreck; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 658
He spake, and, trembling like an aspen-bough, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 746
Scoop'd from its trembling sisters of mid-sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 998
Leant to each other trembling , and sat so Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 329
Trembling or stedfastness to this same voice, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 715
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 3
Soon, trembling in her soft and chilly nest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 235
Then Thea spread abroad her trembling arms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 89
When, past all hindrance of my trembling hands, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 291
Trembling with light upon Mnemosyne. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 123
And then she whisper'd in such trembling tone, Lamia, Part I, Line 301
In trembling dotage to the feeblest fright Lamia, Part II, Line 283
Ply well the rowel with faint trembling heels, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 11
Then turning round, he saw those trembling two: The Jealousies, Line 352
 
TREMBLINGLY.......2
Enchantment softly breathe, and tremblingly expire. Ode to Apollo, Line 35
How tremblingly their delicate ancles spann'd! Calidore: A Fragment, Line 82
 
TREMENDOUS........2
And his tremendous hand is grasping it, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 25
Gently commingling, gives tremendous birth To Kosciusko, Line 12
 
TREMULOUS.........7
What time the sky-lark shakes the tremulous dew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 2
And how they kist each other's tremulous eyes: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 146
How tremulous -dazzlingly the wheels sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 189
Over his waned corse, the tremulous shower Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 482
Languor there was in it, and tremulous shake, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 285
Warm, tremulous , devout, psalterian. Lamia, Part I, Line 114
There stood, or hover'd, tremulous in the air, The Jealousies, Line 2
 
TRENCHER..........1
The black tassell'd trencher and common hat; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 9
 
TRENCHING.........1
Not trenching on our actions personal. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 13
 
TRENT.............2
Down beside the pasture Trent ; Robin Hood, Line 30
The mitred ones of Nice and Trent O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 7
 
TRESPASS..........2
Will trespass down those cheeks. Companion fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 870
Trespass within the circuit of his sword:- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 15
 
TRESS.............6
Downward too flows many a tress Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 19
There stood a marble alter, with a tress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 90
Of gold, and lines of Naiads' long bright tress . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 709
Down through tress -lifting waves the Nereids fair Lamia, Part I, Line 207
Or kiss thine eyes, or count thy locks, tress after tress?" The Jealousies, Line 171
Or kiss thine eyes, or count thy locks, tress after tress ?" The Jealousies, Line 171
 
TRESSES...........6
Or that the evening dew had pearl'd their tresses , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 89
Silent entangler of a beauty's tresses ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 15
And cool themselves among the em'rald tresses ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 82
When last the sun his autumn tresses shook, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 440
These words awoke the stranger of dark tresses : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 462
His very hair, his golden tresses famed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 131
 
TRIAL.............2
Groan'd one and all, as if some piercing trial Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 516
We will make trial of your house's welcome, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 183
 
TRIBE.............5
First onwards in, among the fallen tribe . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 100
What benefit canst thou do, or all thy tribe , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 167
What am I then? Thou spakest of my tribe : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 193
What tribe ?"- The tall shade veil'd in drooping white The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 194
Pendent.- "Art thou not of the dreamer tribe ? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 198
 
TRIBUTE...........1
Take tribute from those cities for thyself! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 153
 
TRICE.............1
Up he started in a trice . Not Aladdin magian, Line 24
 
TRICKLING.........3
That he will seize on trickling honey-combs: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 150
Leaving a trickling dew. At last they shot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 922
Went trickling down the golden bow he held. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 43
 
TRIDENT...........1
At thy fear'd trident shrinking, doth unlock Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 947
 
TRIED.............6
As if to glean the ruddy tears, it tried , Imitation of Spenser, Line 32
I tried in fear the pinions of my will. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 390
I read these words, and read again, and tried Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 682
He tried escaping, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 22
Again she tried , and then again, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 50
Seeing her pleasant, tried her with a pun- The Jealousies, Line 654
 
TRIES.............2
Shut softly up alive. To speak he tries . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 104
He tries the nerve of Phoebus' golden bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 411
 
TRIFLE............4
Here in the antiroom;- that may be a trifle . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 6
trifle to me; his death you shall find none to yourself." Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 58
A trifle mere! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 279b
What may it be? No trifle can take place Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
 
TRIFLES...........1
Or, for such trifles , rob th' adorned world Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 88
 
TRIFLING..........2
More than one pretty, trifling thousand years; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 579
Trifling his ivy-dart, in dancing mood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 210
 
TRIM..............3
And show their blossoms trim . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 12
Glow-worms began to trim their starry lamps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 141
A golden galley all in silken trim ! Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 56
 
TRIMM'D...........1
With April's tender younglings: next, well trimm'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 138
 
TRINITY...........1
My beloved Trinity . Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 6
 
TRIP..............1
Now over them he goes with hasty trip , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 69
 
TRIPLE............6
Making the triple kingdom brightly smile? On Peace, Line 4
Beneath thy drowsy wing a triple hour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 462
I have a triple soul! O fond pretence- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 95
There is a triple sight in blindness keen; To Homer, Line 12
A casement high and triple -arch'd there was, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 208
Made, by a spell, the triple league decrease Lamia, Part I, Line 345
 
TRIPOD............2
Each by a sacred tripod held aloft, Lamia, Part II, Line 177
Throw me upon thy tripod , till the flood To Fanny, Line 3
 
TRIPP'D...........2
Tripp'd lightly on, in sort of deathful glee; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 945
Tripp'd in blue silver'd slippers to the gate When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 70
 
TRIPPINGS.........1
Over the trippings of a little child: Sleep and Poetry, Line 369
 
TRIPPLE...........2
To thee the spring shall be a tripple morn. O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 8
I mean a tripple -Saladin, whose eyes, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
 
TRIPS.............1
Trips it before Apollo than the rest. To G.A.W., Line 14
 
TRITON............1
Till Triton blew his horn. The palace rang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 888
 
TRITON'S..........2
By the dim echoes of old Triton's horn: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 206
One of shell-winding Triton's bright-hair'd daughters? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 691
 
TRITONS...........1
At whose white feet the languid Tritons poured Lamia, Part I, Line 15
 
TRIUMPH...........5
Of triumph calm, and hymns of festival Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 128
With triumph o'er that evil-witted Duke! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 270
And triumph , as in thee I should rejoice Lamia, Part II, Line 60
Of triumph calm, and hymns of festival The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 433
Are envious which shall see your triumph pass. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 27
 
TRIUMPHAL.........1
Beneath the curved moon's triumphal arch. To George Felton Mathew, Line 30
 
TRIUMPHANT........1
Triumphant in the enemy's shatter'd rhomb; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 55
 
TRIUMPHS..........1
The brain, new stuff'd, in youth, with triumphs gay The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 40

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Published @ RC

March 2005