Printer-friendly versionSend by email
Keats Concordance
 
TROD..............2
Round every spot where trod Apollo's foot; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 790
"I touch'd no lute, I sang not, trod no measures: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 338
 
TRODDEN...........3
Under the down- trodden pall Robin Hood, Line 4
With forest branches and the trodden weed; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 43
Might have been trodden out, all sure and hush'd; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 18
 
TROILUS...........1
The close of Troilus and Cressid sweet. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 13
 
TROOP.............4
A troop of little children garlanded; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 110
Known only to his troop , hath greater plea Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 28
A troop of winged janizaries flew; The Jealousies, Line 587
Created an alarm among our troop , The Jealousies, Line 668
 
TROOPING..........1
Again my trooping hounds their tongues shall loll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 480
 
TROOPS............3
Of troops chivalrous prancing through a city, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 46
Who on wide plains gather in panting troops , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 199
Who on a wide plain gather in sad troops , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 43
 
TROPHIES..........1
And be among her cloudy trophies hung. Ode on Melancholy, Line 30
 
TROPHY............1
To raise a trophy to the drama's muses. To George Felton Mathew, Line 7
 
TROT..............2
And off he went, run, trot , or any how. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 96
Trot round the quarto - ordinary time! The Jealousies, Line 638
 
TROTTED...........2
And as they trotted down the glen Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 13
Even as he spake he trotted in high glee When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 83
 
TROUBLE...........6
Between her breasts, that never yet felt trouble , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 91
A lurking trouble in his nether lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 179
Of colour'd phantasy; for I fear 'twould trouble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 642
His beasts to trouble the enchanted spring: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 64
And settle all this trouble . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 28a
Why do ye trouble me? out - out - away! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 184
 
TROUBLED..........2
That broodest o'er the troubled sea of the mind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 454
Even on the moment; so his troubled mind Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 33
 
TROUBLES..........3
Charms us at once away from all our troubles : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 138
A thousand men in troubles wide and dark: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 118
And the flowers in sweet troubles Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 35
 
TROUBLING.........1
Brow-beating her fair form, and troubling her sweet pride. Lamia, Part II, Line 248
 
TROUBLOUS.........1
She should be paler for my troublous days- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 114
 
TROUNCE...........2
"I'll trounce some of the members," cried the Prince, The Jealousies, Line 136
"I'll trounce 'em!- there's the square-cut chancellor, The Jealousies, Line 145
 
TROUP.............1
A troup o' horses- Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 12
 
TROWSERS..........1
His silvery trowsers , and his silken sash The Jealousies, Line 268
 
TROY..............1
The woes of Troy , towers smothering o'er their blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 8
 
TRUANT............1
Will he be truant to you too? It is a shame. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 76
 
TRUCE.............1
Truce with that. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 39b
 
TRUCK.............1
All hail - I would not truck this brilliant day King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 11
 
TRUDGE............2
Open your ears and stay your trudge All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 3
Round to the curb-stone patient dost thou trudge , The Jealousies, Line 247
 
TRUE..............32
To regions of his own his genius true Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 12
A fate more pleasing, a delight more true To George Felton Mathew, Line 4
It has been said, dear George, and true I hold it, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 23
Are emblems true of hapless lovers dying: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 90
At times, 'tis true , I've felt relief from pain To My Brother George (epistle), Line 113
What are this world's true joys,- ere the great voice, To My Brothers, Line 13
As any thing most true ; as that the year Sleep and Poetry, Line 294
True tender monitors, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 13
Look not so wilder'd; for these things are true , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 850
A mimic temple, so complete and true Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 257
And suffocate true blessings in a curse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 370
Ah, smile not so, my son: I tell thee true , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 552
Such power to madden thee? And is it true - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 956
Had died in mutual arms devout and true , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 793
And thou, old forest, hold ye this for true , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 77
Even when I feel as true as innocence? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 474
'Tis true I had no corns - no! thank the fates, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 17
It cannot be! My old eyes are not true ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 28
Here's a true churchman! he'd affect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 37
For faeries be as humans, lovers true . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 4
I love thee true . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 28
Love me, blue-eyed fairy true , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 39
I love thee, chrystal fairy true ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 62
His Psyche true ! Ode to Psyche, Line 23
Full of the true , the blushful Hippocrene, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 16
Is frankness, and a true tongue to the world; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 176
Why this, you'll say - my Fanny!- is not true ; To Fanny, Line 33
'Tis true , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 33b
My Lord of Chester, is't true what I hear King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 24
Poison, as every staunch true -born Imaian ought. The Jealousies, Line 81
Just as it happen'd, true or else a bam! The Jealousies, Line 398
Great Emperor! to adventure, like a lover true ." The Jealousies, Line 486
 
TRULY.............9
O love me truly ! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 5
O love me truly ! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 10
O love me truly ! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 15
O love me truly ! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 20
O love me truly ! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 25
And, truly , I would rather be struck dumb, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 824
Young dove of the waters! truly I'll not hurt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 582
Ensky'd ere this, but truly that I deem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 772
Truly I should not like to be convey'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 35
 
TRUMPET...........7
A silver trumpet Spenser blows, Ode to Apollo, Line 30
Hast thou a trumpet rich melodies blowing? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 11
When the bright warder blows his trumpet clear, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 31
There let its trumpet blow, and quickly dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 60
Nor be the trumpet heard! O vain, O vain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 970
The earnest trumpet spake, and silver thrills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 197
But yesterday? And, at the trumpet sound, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 68
 
TRUMPET'S.........4
A trumpet's silver voice. Ah! it was fraught Calidore: A Fragment, Line 55
Mysterious, wild, the far heard trumpet's tone; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 156
Stepping like Homer at the trumpet's call, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 217
Be rather in the trumpet's mouth,- anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 737
 
TRUMPETS..........14
While the trumpets sound afar; Ode to Apollo, Line 10
Of trumpets , shoutings, and belabour'd drums, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 17
Of trumpets at clear parley from the east Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 553
The silver, snarling trumpets 'gan to chide: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 31
There must be Gods thrown down, and trumpets blown Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 127
Won by the syren- trumpets , and the ring Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 14
The trumpets reach us. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 53a
And bid our trumpets speak a fell rebuke Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 163
Of trumpets - Lycius started - the sounds fled, Lamia, Part II, Line 28
Let me hear other groans, and trumpets blown The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 432
Trumpets sounding a victory. Enter GLOCESTER, Knights, and King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
With clamourous trumpets . To the Empress bear King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 53
[ Trumpets . Enter the EARL OF CHESTER and Knights. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 47
While here and there clear trumpets blew a keen alarm. The Jealousies, Line 576
 
TRUMPING..........1
In trumping up this match so hastily, The Jealousies, Line 79
 
TRUNCHEON.........1
Of boisterous Chester, whose fell truncheon now King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 22
 
TRUNKS............1
From jagged trunks , and overshadoweth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 233
 
TRUST.............8
Trust to my feelings, and write you a letter. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 104
On such a catering trust my dizzy head. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 177
To trust , fair Madeline, to no rude infidel. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 342
Trust me for once. That you may be assured Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 32
Frank, open, generous; Albert I may trust . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 23
Trust me one day more, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 108b
Of all the world to trust in. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 253a
Trust ! to me! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 253b
 
TRUSTED...........1
Wish'd, trusted , hoped 'twas no sign of decay- The Jealousies, Line 714
 
TRUSTING..........1
So trusting in thy love; that should not make Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 117
 
TRUSTS............1
Smiled at each other. Happy he who trusts Sleep and Poetry, Line 358
 
TRUSTWORTHY.......1
Would I hold more trustworthy . Now! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 26a
 
TRUSTY............3
In their affairs, requiring trusty hands. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 228
A trusty soul? A good man in the camp? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 2
"Tis Apollonius sage, my trusty guide Lamia, Part I, Line 375
 
TRUTH.............35
What though, for showing truth to flatter'd state, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 1
A dove-like bosom. In truth there is no freeing Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 36
Whisper'd of peace, and truth , and friendliness unquell'd. To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 14
And where we think the truth least understood, Addressed to Haydon, Line 5
These things are doubtless: yet in truth we've had Sleep and Poetry, Line 230
From majesty: but in clear truth the themes Sleep and Poetry, Line 233
Like good men in the truth of their behaviours. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 86
Yea, every one attend! for in good truth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 212
For the mere sake of truth ; as 'tis a ditty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 829
He had in truth ; and he was ripe for tears. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 288
I lov'd her to the very white of truth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 402
Upon my wild conjecturing: truth had come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 556
Truth the best music in a first-born song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 773
Of jubilee to Dian:- truth I heard? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 876
And so thou shalt! and by the lily truth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 980
Was not embalm'd, this truth is not the less- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 102
For here, in truth , it doth not well belong Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 390
But divine melodious truth ; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 19
All as ye pass swell out the monstrous truth , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 65
If ye will take that comfort in its truth . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 180
Through which I wandered to eternal truth . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 187
Now comes the pain of truth , to whom 'tis pain; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 202
Receive the truth , and let it be your balm." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 243
"Beauty is truth , truth beauty," - that is all Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 49
"Beauty is truth, truth beauty," - that is all Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 49
And, to say truth , in any Christian arm Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
I know the clear truth ; so would Otho see, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 86
Truth is, the Emperor would fain dismiss Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 16
All men may err. In truth I was deceived Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 45
I'll expiate with truth . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 143a
Thy life answer the truth ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 127a
I should desire no better; yet, in truth , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 32
"Sure some sweet name thou hast, though, by my truth , Lamia, Part II, Line 85
They told the truth , though, round, the snowy locks The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 452
Truth ! I think so - by heavens, it shall not last. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 35
 
TRUTH'S...........2
Search my most hidden breast! By truth's own tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 458
For truth's sake, what woe afterwards befel, Lamia, Part I, Line 395
 
TRUTHS............1
O folly! for to bear all naked truths , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 203
 
TRY...............8
For you to try my dull, unlearned quill. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 51
May we together pass, and calmly try To My Brothers, Line 12
mythology of Greece, and dulled its brightness: for I wish to try once more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
Let us two a burden try . Robin Hood, Line 62
Will for thine honor and his pleasure try . Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 14
While she the inmost of the dream would try . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 342
Come, fair Auranthe, try if your soft hands Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
When one can compass it. Auranthe, try Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 46
 
TRY'D.............1
Try'd to look unconcern'd with beating heart. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 44
 
TUBES.............1
In smoothest silence, save what solemn tubes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 206
 
TUBS..............1
In washing tubs three There was a naughty boy, Line 62
 
TUESDAY...........1
To land each Tuesday from the rich Levant, To J.R., Line 10
 
TUFFY.............1
Powder'd bag-wigs and ruffy- tuffy heads The Jealousies, Line 770
 
TUFT..............2
What next? A tuft of evening primroses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 107
His head upon a tuft of straggling weeds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 109
 
TUFTED............1
Green tufted islands casting their soft shades Calidore: A Fragment, Line 46
 
TUFTS.............1
Of basil- tufts in Florence; for it drew Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 428
 
TUG...............1
Where lions tug adverse, if love grow not Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 100
 
TUGG'D............1
That I have so far panted, tugg'd , and reek'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 2
 
TUMBLE............1
For thee to tumble into Naiads' cells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 272
 
TUMBLED...........1
I saw my first-born tumbled from his throne! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 323
 
TUMBLING..........6
Mark the clear tumbling crystal, its passionate gushes, To Some Ladies, Line 7
A pigeon tumbling in clear summer air; Sleep and Poetry, Line 93
Mingler with leaves, and dew and tumbling streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 119
Echoing grottos, full of tumbling waves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 459
No tumbling water ever spake romance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 149
The spite of hell is tumbling to its grave. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 760
 
TUMULT............2
E'en now all tumult from my bosom fades: Sleep and Poetry, Line 315
A tumult to his heart, and a new life Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 528
 
TUMULTS...........2
Haply, like dolphin tumults , when sweet shells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 610
For thou art weak to sing such tumults dire: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 4
 
TUMULTUOUS........2
And then were gulph'd in a tumultuous swim: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 571
Tumultuous ,- and, in chords that tenderest be, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 290
 
TUMULTUOUSLY......1
Her gentle bosom heave tumultuously . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 100
 
TUN...............1
Come from the gloomy tun with merry shine. Lamia, Part II, Line 188
 
TUN'D.............1
The lyre of his soul Eolian tun'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 866
 
TUNE..............11
TUNE - "Julia to the Wood Robin" Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Keats's note to Line 1
To the very tune of love - how sweet, sweet, sweet. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 765
Oh what a wild and harmonized tune Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 170
Lorenzo, if thy lips breathe not love's tune ."- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 30
Now they can no more hear thy ghittern's tune , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 150
Paddles a little tune and sings 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 46
A voice came sweeter, sweeter than all tune , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 292
To tune our jarred spirits. I'll explain. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 281
Of thine harmonious sisters keep in tune Lamia, Part I, Line 266
In solemn tenor and deep organ tune ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 350
Where from the earth we heard a lively tune The Jealousies, Line 687
 
TUNEABLE..........1
Made tuneable with every sweetest vow; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 309
 
TUNEFUL...........2
Nor move till Milton's tuneful thunders cease, Ode to Apollo, Line 22
Of such new tuneful wonder. Is't not strange Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 67
 
TUNELESS..........1
O Goddess! hear these tuneless numbers, wrung Ode to Psyche, Line 1
 
TUNES.............2
To tunes forgotten - out of memory: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 316
For your right noble names, like favorite tunes , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 126
 
TUNINGS...........1
To catch the tunings of a voice divine. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 28
 
TURBAN............1
His turban wreath'd of gold, and white, and green, The Jealousies, Line 278
 
TURBAN'D..........2
Death doing in a turban'd masquerade. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 5
Turban'd with smoke, which still away did reek, The Jealousies, Line 664
 
TURBANS...........2
Turbans and crowns, and blank regality; On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 12
And crowns, and turbans . With unladen breasts, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 12
 
TUREEN............1
A tureen , and three dishes, at one swoop, The Jealousies, Line 670
 
TURF..............10
Of turf and slanting branches: who could tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 84
Stedfast upon the matted turf he kept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 151
The hillock turf , and caught the latter end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 323
And, from the turf , a lullaby doth pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 793
So from the turf outsprang two steeds jet-black, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 343
Her bed it was the brown heath turf , Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 3
When weary feet forget themselves upon a pleasant turf , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 9
Spurn the green turf as hateful to my feet? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 94
From the green turf to heaven.- "Holy Power," The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 136
Or on the open turf their soothed eyelids closed. The Jealousies, Line 693
 
TURFED............2
Sudden from his turfed grave, Robin Hood, Line 39
In the forest,- and the sodden turfed dell, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 295
 
TURK..............1
In sending heathen, Turk , and sect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 41
 
TURKISH...........1
Their glassy diamonding on Turkish floor; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 30
 
TURMOIL...........2
How many days! what desperate turmoil ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 308
The atom darkness in a slow turmoil ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 322
 
TURN..............37
To turn my admiration, though unpossess'd Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 20
Turn to whence they sprung before. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 16
Why westward turn ? 'Twas but to say adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 141
I turn full hearted to the friendly aids Sleep and Poetry, Line 316
But turn your eye, and they are there again. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 80
And as she leaves me may she often turn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 105
Can make their lying lips turn pale of hue, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 13
Might turn their steps towards the sober ring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 356
Nestle and turn uneasily about. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 522
Now turn we to our former chroniclers.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 854
Like this of mine, then would I fearless turn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 962
Turn to some level plain where haughty Mars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 728
By Juno's smile I turn not - no, no, no- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 93
Turn , damsels! hist! one word I have to say. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 909
To speak:- O turn thee to the very tale, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 391
Never to turn again.- Away they went, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 479
O Melancholy, turn thine eyes away! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 481
You gentlemen immediately turn tail- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 9
An hour glass on the turn , amid the trails Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 44
And common Wellingtons turn Romeo boots; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 8
And turn , sole-thoughted, to one Lady there, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 42
Then to my human heart I turn at once- Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 4
So weak a creature could turn off the help Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 257
On sands, or in great deeps, vermillion turn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 20
Zephyr, blue-eyed fairy, turn Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 31
Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 13
I will from her turn off, and put the load Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 143
Will clear itself, and crystal turn again. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 179
Turn , thou court-Janus, thou forget'st thyself; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 248
Of honour battailous! I could not turn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 90
Whether my eyes can ever turn from thee! Lamia, Part I, Line 258
Turn them aside, wretch! or the righteous ban Lamia, Part II, Line 278
And no hand in the universe can turn The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 115
Ere I could turn , Moneta cried - "These twain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 460
But, prithee, do not turn To Fanny, Line 21
Turn to the copious index, you will find The Jealousies, Line 100
"As flowers turn their faces to the sun, The Jealousies, Line 721
 
TURN'D............23
Of thine ankle lightly turn'd : Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 25
Are upward turn'd to catch the heavens' dew. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 23
He turn'd - there was a whelming sound - he stept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1018
Forgiveness: yet he turn'd once more to look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 452
While to his lady meek the Carian turn'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 504
Built by a Lapland witch turn'd maudlin nun- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 46
Because her face was turn'd to the same skies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 22
Half-ignorant, they turn'd an easy wheel, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 119
Soon she turn'd up a soiled glove, whereon Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 369
She turn'd her dazed head full oft, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 29
She turn'd , and down the aged gossip led The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 195
He follow'd, and she turn'd to lead the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 155
A third time pass'd they by, and, passing, turn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 21
In yesterday's hard fight, that it has turn'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
And what you soon will learn, I would have turn'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
Is this clear-headed Albert? He brain- turn'd ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 64
Monster of folly! Ghost of a turn'd brain! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 202
Then, lighting on the printless verdure, turn'd Lamia, Part I, Line 131
Turn'd - syllabling thus, "Ah, Lycius bright, Lamia, Part I, Line 244
Elfinan's back was turn'd , but, ne'ertheless, The Jealousies, Line 335
Princess turn'd dainty, to our great surprise, The Jealousies, Line 652
Turn'd from myself, her partner, in a huff; The Jealousies, Line 701
All things turn'd topsy-turvy in a devil's dance. The Jealousies, Line 756
 
TURNED............4
Some mountain breeze had turned its chief delight, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 9
Those smiling ladies, often turned his head Calidore: A Fragment, Line 129
And turned to smile upon thy bashful eyes, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 213
He turned it quickly, nimbly upside down, The Jealousies, Line 420
 
TURNETH...........1
Northward he turneth through a little door, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 19
 
TURNING...........9
The youth approach'd; oft turning his veil'd eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 263
Before young Bacchus' eye-wink turning pale.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 267
Both turning many a mill, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 9
Turning to poison while the bee-mouth sips: Ode on Melancholy, Line 24
Turning into sweet milk the sophist's spleen. Lamia, Part II, Line 172
Of scent, not far from roses. Turning round, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 24
Turning from these with awe, once more I rais'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 81
Who, turning much his body, more his neck, The Jealousies, Line 255
Then turning round, he saw those trembling two: The Jealousies, Line 352
 
TURNS.............8
While to the rugged north our musing turns To George Felton Mathew, Line 70
And turns for calmness to the pleasant green Calidore: A Fragment, Line 9
And now he turns a jutting point of land, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 64
Vice - that is, by turns ,- The Gothic looks solemn, Line 7
Here by turns his dolphins all, Not Aladdin magian, Line 31
The key turns , and the door upon its hinges groans. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 369
And so by turns - till sad Moneta cried, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 240
For shortest cuts and turns , was nobody knew more. The Jealousies, Line 207
 
TURQUOIS..........1
Gold dome, and crystal wall, and turquois floor, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 595
 
TURRET............1
The lonely turret , shatter'd, and outworn, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 38
 
TURRETED..........1
Aye, and those turreted Franconian walls, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 102
 
TURRETS...........1
With turrets crown'd. Four maned lions hale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 643
 
TURTLES...........1
"O thou, for whose soul-soothing quiet, turtles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 247
 
TURVY.............1
All things turn'd topsy- turvy in a devil's dance. The Jealousies, Line 756
 
TUSCAN............3
Yet as a Tuscan 'mid the snow Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 25
Great wits in Spanish, Tuscan , and Malay. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 136
Or pale Calabrian? or the Tuscan grape? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 122
 
TUSHES............1
No wild boar tushes , and no mermaid's toes: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 16
 
TUSK..............2
Shewing tooth, tusk , and venom-bag, and sting! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 502
So leant she, not so fair, upon a tusk Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 62
 
TUSK'D............1
When the boar tusk'd him: so away she flew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 474
 
TUT...............1
O 'tis a noble boy!- tut !- what do I say? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
 
TUTORESS..........1
A potent tutoress to my wayward boy, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 32
 
TWAIN.............4
Just as two noble steeds, and palfreys twain , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 77
I feel my heart is cut for them in twain ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 97
Ere I could turn, Moneta cried - "These twain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 460
Balanced upon his grey-grown pinions twain , The Jealousies, Line 581
 
TWANG.............1
No, nor the Eolian twang of Love's own bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 973
 
TWANG'D...........1
And twang'd it inwardly, and calmly said: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 848
 
TWANGING..........3
Strikes the twanging harp of war, Ode to Apollo, Line 8
And the dull twanging bowstring, and the raft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 334
And the twanging bow no more; Robin Hood, Line 12
 
TWELVE............8
O were I one of the Olympian twelve , Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 1
From morning, four o'clock, to twelve at noon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 10
And then, from twelve till two, this Eden made is Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 12
Twelve sphered tables, by silk seats insphered, Lamia, Part II, Line 183
"Sire you must be in Kent by twelve o'clock at noon." The Jealousies, Line 495
Then twelve physicians fluttering two and two; The Jealousies, Line 589
"'Twas twelve o'clock at night, the weather fine, The Jealousies, Line 642
From twelve to half-past - wings not fit to fly The Jealousies, Line 646
 
TWENTY............6
Down twenty little falls, through reeds and bramble, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 934
For it containeth twenty thousand punks, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 17
The strength of twenty lions 'gainst a lamb! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 59
twenty -five years of age, that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Not twenty Earls of Chester shall brow-beat King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 35
April the twenty -fourth,- this coming day, The Jealousies, Line 501
 
TWICE.............7
Gluts twice ten thousand caverns; till the spell On the Sea, Line 3
Twice hast thou ask'd whither I went: henceforth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 755
Will each one swell to twice ten times the size Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 63
And yonder twice as many more O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 93
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 2
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 13
So hang upon your spirit. Twice in the fight Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 53
 
TWIG..............1
Peel'd the brown hazel twig to lilly white, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 42
 
TWIGS.............1
Among sere leaves and twigs , might all be heard. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 452
 
TWILIGHT..........13
That through the dimness of their twilight show Calidore: A Fragment, Line 48
Through buried paths, where sleepy twilight dreams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 73
Those twilight eyes? Those eyes!- my spirit fails- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 193
And left him once again in twilight lone. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 587
"When I awoke, 'twas in a twilight bower; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 418
And twilight saints, and dim emblazonings, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 215
Made a dim, silver twilight , soft he set The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 254
Hyperion, leaving twilight in the rear, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 203
And in the morning twilight wandered forth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 33
Twilight for the fays to sleep. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 55
And twilight your floating bowers. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 100
In the calm'd twilight of Platonic shades. Lamia, Part I, Line 236
Hyperion, leaving twilight in the rear, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 47
 
TWIN..............8
Like twin water lillies, born Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 33
Than twin sister of Thalia? Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 38
"We are twin brothers in this destiny! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 713
Twin roses by the zephyr blown apart Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 74
And his twin -sister sleeping in their bower, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 32
Twin picture to your face. Erminia! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
Completed by her twin -arch'd ebon-brows; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 63
Along the mirror'd walls by twin -clouds odorous. Lamia, Part II, Line 182
 
TWINBORN..........1
Marrying to every word a twinborn sigh; Lamia, Part I, Line 341
 
TWINED............1
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers: To Autumn, Line 18
 
TWING'D...........1
And twing'd with avarice strain'd out my eyes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 273
 
TWINKLE...........6
Whose cords are solid rays, and twinkle radiant fires. Ode to Apollo, Line 6
Like those fair stars that twinkle in the heavens. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 44
To twinkle on my bosom? No one dies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 49
Shall be my grief, or twinkle me to pleasure. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 719
At Vesper's earliest twinkle - they are gone- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 915
Had fix'd his eye, without a twinkle or stir Lamia, Part II, Line 246
 
TWINKLING.........3
As do those brighter drops that twinkling stray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 471
Those lips, O slippery blisses, twinkling eyes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 758
To northern seas I'll in a twinkling sail, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 245
 
TWIST.............3
And anxiously began to plait and twist Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 102
Buckled and tied with many a twist and plait? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 88
No, no, go not to Lethe, neither twist Ode on Melancholy, Line 1
 
TWISTED...........2
Loop'd up with cords of twisted wreathed light, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 38
More beautiful than ever twisted braid, Lamia, Part I, Line 186
 
TWITCH'D..........1
Died palsy- twitch'd , with meagre face deform; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 376
 
TWITTER...........3
But sip, and twitter , and their feathers sleek; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 89
Deafening the swallow's twitter , came a thrill Lamia, Part II, Line 27
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies. To Autumn, Line 33
 
TWO...............86
When to thy haunts two kindred spirits flee. O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 14
Nor will a bee buzz round two swelling peaches, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 66
Just as two noble steeds, and palfreys twain, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 77
The purple west, and, two bright streaks between, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 11
I shall roll on the grass with two -fold ease: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 79
We rest in silence, like two gems upcurl'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 120
Between two hills. All hail delightful hopes! Sleep and Poetry, Line 264
The dazzling sun-rise: two sisters sweet Sleep and Poetry, Line 367
Why, you might read two sonnets, ere they reach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 69
Two bending laurel sprigs - 'tis nearly pain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 7
O breathe a word or two of fire! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 21
attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
two last, I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
Along a path between two little streams,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 415
Two bubbling springs of talk from their sweet lips. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 738
Those two sad streams adown a fearful dell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1009
Went arching up, and like two magic ploughs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 222
The two deliverers tasted a pure wine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 801
Behold!"- Two copious tear-drops instant fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 900
So from the turf outsprang two steeds jet-black, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 343
High as the eagles. Like two drops of dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 348
Those two on winged steeds, with all the stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 390
Two liquid pulse streams 'stead of feather'd wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 583
He saw not the two maidens, nor their smiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 969
Let us two a burden try. Robin Hood, Line 62
Two witch's eyes above a cherub's mouth, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 6
P'rhaps one or two , whose lives have patient wings, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 14
The other part two thousand years from him Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 43
With her two brothers this fair lady dwelt, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 105
As two close Hebrews in that land inspired, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 131
So the two brothers and their murder'd man Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 209
Thy life is but two dead eternities, To Ailsa Rock, Line 10
Of late two dainties were before me plac'd Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 1
And then, from twelve till two , this Eden made is Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 12
Had taken captive her two eyes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 27
And still these two were postured motionless, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 85
Their wisdom long since fled.- Two wings this orb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 283
Possess'd for glory, two fair argent wings, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 284
One against one, or two , or three, or all Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 142
Saw two fair creatures, couched side by side Ode to Psyche, Line 9
Two or three posies Two or three posies, Line 1
With two or three simples Two or three posies, Line 2
Two or three noses Two or three posies, Line 3
With two or three pimples- Two or three posies, Line 4
Two or three wise men Two or three posies, Line 5
And two or three ninnies Two or three posies, Line 6
Two or three purses Two or three posies, Line 7
And two or three guineas Two or three posies, Line 8
Two or three raps Two or three posies, Line 9
At two or three doors Two or three posies, Line 10
Two or three naps Two or three posies, Line 11
Of two or three hours- Two or three posies, Line 12
Two or three cats Two or three posies, Line 13
And two or three mice Two or three posies, Line 14
Two or three sprats Two or three posies, Line 15
Two or three sandies Two or three posies, Line 17
And two or three tabbies Two or three posies, Line 18
And two Mrs.- Two or three posies, Line 20
Two or three smiles Two or three posies, Line 21
And two or three frowns Two or three posies, Line 22
Two or three miles Two or three posies, Line 23
To two or three towns Two or three posies, Line 24
Two or three pegs Two or three posies, Line 25
For two or three bonnets Two or three posies, Line 26
Two or three dove's eggs Two or three posies, Line 27
[Enter CONRAD, from the Castle, attended by two Knights and Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
Sullen against the wind! If in two angry brows Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 58
Two ugly monsters. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 69a
The names of those two vipers, from whose jaws Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 153
Two muffled up,- one sighing heavily, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 122
back scene, guarded by two Soldiers. Lords, Ladies, Knights, Gentlemen, etc., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
In the next room; have you remark'd those two Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 9
For two of them, they stay away perhaps, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 56
Some time to any, but those two alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 389
Betwixt two marble shafts:- there they reposed, Lamia, Part II, Line 22
Two palms and then two plantains, and so on, Lamia, Part II, Line 128
Two palms and then two plantains, and so on, Lamia, Part II, Line 128
I heard, I look'd: two senses both at once The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 118
Long, long, those two were postured motionless, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 382
Enter two Captains, severally. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 9
Backwards and downwards from his own two pair: The Jealousies, Line 310
Then turning round, he saw those trembling two : The Jealousies, Line 352
If either of their two Archbishops' graces The Jealousies, Line 537
Then twelve physicians fluttering two and two; The Jealousies, Line 589
Then twelve physicians fluttering two and two ; The Jealousies, Line 589
"From two to half-past, dusky way we made, The Jealousies, Line 658
 
TYING.............1
Old Socrates a tying his cravat; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 9
 
TYPHON............1
Typhon , and Dolor, and Porphyrion, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 20
 
TYPOGRAPHUS.......1
Yclep'd Typographus , the giant took In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 2
 
TYRANNIZING.......1
And tyrannizing was the lady's look, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 507
 
TYRANNOUS.........1
Loves to beat up against a tyrannous blast, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 30
 
TYRANNY...........6
And tyranny of love be somewhat scar'd! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 174
Strenuous with hellish tyranny . Attend! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 687
Who doubly loathes a father's tyranny ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 96
Tell him how feeble is that tyranny , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 97
Was none. She burnt, she lov'd the tyranny , Lamia, Part II, Line 81
So fine, so subtle, felt the tyranny The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 119
 
TYRANT............3
That with its tyrant temper best accords, Ode to Apollo, Line 28
Young feather'd tyrant ! by a swift decay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 730
Without that tyrant temper, you so blame, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 8
 
TYRANT'S..........1
Upon a tyrant's head. Ah! had I never seen, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 72
 
TYRANTS...........1
Oh Europe, let not sceptred tyrants see On Peace, Line 10
 
TYRIAN............2
To seas Ionian and Tyrian . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 363
Blue, silver-white, and budded Tyrian , Ode to Psyche, Line 14
 
TYTHE.............1
Saving a tythe which love still open kept, Lamia, Part II, Line 24

About this Page

Published @ RC

March 2005