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Keats Concordance
 
UP................205
Rippled delighted up the flowery side; Imitation of Spenser, Line 31
To pick up the keep-sake intended for me. To Some Ladies, Line 16
Lifted up her lance on high, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 42
Comes up with ripple, and with easy float, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 20
Came up ,- a courtly smile upon his face, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 125
Adventurous knights take up their dinted shields: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 4
And staidly paces higher up , and higher, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 61
Still scooping up the water with my fingers, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 19
From silv'ry ripple, up to beauty's queen; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 39
Up to its climax and then dying proudly? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 61
On heap'd up flowers, in regions clear, and far; On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 2
And from the heart up -springs, rejoice! rejoice! Sleep and Poetry, Line 38
Paw up against the light, and do strange deeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 166
The fervid choir that lifted up a noise Sleep and Poetry, Line 173
Thought after thought to nourish up the flame Sleep and Poetry, Line 398
And up I rose refresh'd, and glad, and gay, Sleep and Poetry, Line 401
Dry up the moisture from your golden lids, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 49
So keeping up an interchange of favours, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 85
And springing up , they met the wond'ring sight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 227
The Pleiades were up , God of the golden bow, Line 25
He's gone - up bubbles all his amorous breath. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 14
Who loves to peer up at the morning sun, On The Story of Rimini, Line 1
And some kept up a shrilly mellow sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 146
Up -followed by a multitude that rear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 164
And, after lifting up his aged hands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 195
And all ye gentle girls who foster up Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 209
Their summer coolness: pent up butterflies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 258
And gather up all fancifullest shells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 271
Call'd up a thousand thoughts to envelope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 336
Whose eyelids curtain'd up their jewels dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 394
A yielding up , a cradling on her care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 411
Yet dry them up , in bidding hence all fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 475
When he doth tighten up the golden reins, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 550
And they were simply gordian'd up and braided, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 614
And up I started: Ah! my sighs, my tears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 681
Look'd up : a conflicting of shame and ruth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 761
I'd bubble up the water through a reed; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 880
I started up , when lo! refreshfully, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 898
Straying about, yet coop'd up in the den Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 928
Thick, as to curtain up some wood-nymph's home. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 941
Bear up against it: so farewel, sad sigh; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 974
Meander gave me,- for I bubbled up Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 118
But mingled up ; a gleaming melancholy; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 223
In pink and purple chequer, nor, up -pil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 287
A homeward fever parches up my tongue- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 319
Up heaping through the slab: refreshment drowns Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 343
Not hiding up an Apollonian curve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 399
Heal'd up the wound, and, with a balmy power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 483
Even to a moment's filling up , and fast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 489
Up to his forehead. Then there was a hum Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 500
Thou shouldst mount up to with me. Now adieu! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 578
Here must we leave thee." - At these words up flew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 579
The impatient doves, up rose the floating car, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 580
Up went the hum celestial. High afar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 581
Of mighty Poets is made up ; the scroll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 724
He sang the story up into the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 838
On all his life: his youth, up to the day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 887
From the green sea up to my hidden source Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 989
Fire-branded foxes to sear up and singe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 7
Until thou liftedst up thine eyelids fine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 152
For as he lifted up his eyes to swear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 189
A cloak of blue wrapp'd up his aged bones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 197
In beauteous vassalage, look up and wait. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 212
Went arching up , and like two magic ploughs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 222
Then up he rose, like one whose tedious toil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 226
Am I to be burnt up ? No, I will shout, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 267
From where large Hercules wound up his story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 406
Should he give up awhile his penny pelf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 504
She lifted up the charm: appealing groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 518
My fever'd parchings up , my scathing dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 636
I saw grow up from the horizon's brink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 647
Toss'd up the silver spume against the clouds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 655
And, as he pass'd, each lifted up its head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 785
For what poor mortals fragment up , as mere Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 845
Afloat, and pillowing up the majesty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 999
Was offering up a hecatomb of vows, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 39
Shut softly up alive. To speak he tries. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 104
Close up its bloodshot eyes, nor see despair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 308
His heart leapt up as to its rightful throne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 445
The Latmian started up : "Bright goddess, stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 457
Up in the winds, beneath a starry roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 491
Doves will offer up , and sweetest store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 660
Would hide us up , although spring leaves were none; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 672
Up which he had not fear'd the antelope; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 792
A hymning up to Cynthia, queen of light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 828
Had reach'd the river's brim. Then up he rose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 924
Shut up thine olden pages, and be mute. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 4
Past the heath and up the hill; Robin Hood, Line 14
May have crumpt up a pair of Dian's legs, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 9
Vows of my slavery, my giving up , Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 6
Are folded up , and he content to look Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 10
And your shawl I hang up on this willow, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 14
And kick'd up her petticoats fairly. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 6
He with light steps went up a western hill, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 79
When, looking up , he saw her features bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 199
And see the spangly gloom froth up and boil: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 326
And in the dawn she started up awake; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 328
Soon she turn'd up a soiled glove, whereon Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 369
She wrapp'd it up ; and for its tomb did choose Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 413
Spirits in grief, lift up your heads, and smile; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 437
Lift up your heads, sweet Spirits, heavily, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 438
Get up early There was a naughty boy, Line 70
Young Tam came up an' eyed me quick Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 33
Golden aisled, built up in heaven, Not Aladdin magian, Line 8
Up he started in a trice. Not Aladdin magian, Line 24
By following fat elbows up a court. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 19
And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 1
She will mix these pleasures up Fancy, Line 37
Closes up , and forgets all its Lethean care, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 11
From hurry to and fro. Soon, up aloft, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 30
Awakening up , he took her hollow lute,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 289
She lifted up her soft warm chin, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 54
He was a prince, the Fool, a grown up prince, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 33
They saw her highness had made up her mind, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 45
Than he prick'd up his ears and said, "Well done; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 76
Was with its stored thunder labouring up . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 41
"Saturn, look up !- though wherefore, poor old King? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 52
Until at length old Saturn lifted up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 89
Look up , and let me see our doom in it; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 97
Look up , and tell me if this feeble shape Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 98
But it is so; and I am smother'd up , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 106
The rebel three.- Thea was startled up , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 147
Still sat, still snuff'd the incense, teeming up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 167
Insult, and blind, and stifle up my pomp.- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 245
Up to the zenith,- hieroglyphics old, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 277
Lock'd up like veins of metal, crampt and screw'd; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 25
Their heads appear'd, and up their stature grew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 87
Grew up like organ, that begins anew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 126
Thus grew it up - "Not in my own sad breast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 129
Low-ebb'd still hid it up in shallow gloom;- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 136
Shut up your senses, stifle up your ears, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 175
Shut up your senses, stifle up your ears, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 175
With hectic lips, and eyes up -looking mild, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 250
And I was stopping up my frantic ears, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 290
He lifted up his stature vast, and stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 325
Flew from his lips up to the vaulted rocks, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 348
Lift up their heads, as still the whisper pass'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 58
"Thou hast dream'd of me; and awaking up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 62
Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 47
Up the hill-side; and now 'tis buried deep Ode to a Nightingale, Line 77
Look up , look up - I flutter now Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 11
Look up, look up - I flutter now Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 11
You give up Albert to me? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 108a
up Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
I am wound up in deep astonishment! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 117
Till flurried danger held the mirror up , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 80
No, obstinate boy, you shall be kept cag'd up , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 88
Is it for this, I now am lifted up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 20
In such a searching point, were to give up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 29
To cry himself up an ambassador Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 109
I'll chain up myself. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 110b
Waiting but for your sign to pull them up Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 137
Painful, clogg'd up and stagnate. Weigh this matter Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 186
Is to be ashes!- wither'd up to death! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 194
Well, I give up , and save my prayers for heaven! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 255
Silence! Gag up their mouths! I cannot bear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 261
Would you were both hears'd up in stifling lead! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
O wretched woman! lost, wreck'd, swallow'd up , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 77
Whimpering ideot! up ! up! and quell! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 101
Whimpering ideot! up! up ! and quell! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 101
What your quick apprehension will fill up ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 59
Two muffled up ,- one sighing heavily, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 122
To smother up this sound of labouring breath, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 29
I saw the three pass slowly up the stairs, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 11
And fain would I catch up his dying words, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 42
This should cheer up your Highness; the weariness Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 57
Loop'd up with cords of twisted wreathed light, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 38
Yet could my eyes drink up intenser beams Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 42
Draws near when I must make a winding up Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 130
His ignominy up in purging fires! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 136
Bloom'd, and gave up her honey to the lees. Lamia, Part I, Line 143
Eclips'd her crescents, and lick'd up her stars: Lamia, Part I, Line 160
She stood: he pass'd, shut up in mysteries, Lamia, Part I, Line 241
And soon his eyes had drunk her beauty up , Lamia, Part I, Line 251
Alone they can drink up the morning rain: Lamia, Part I, Line 264
How to entangle, trammel up and snare Lamia, Part II, Line 52
And shut the chamber up , close, hush'd and still, Lamia, Part II, Line 143
Kept up among the guests, discoursing low Lamia, Part II, Line 201
When sense of life return'd, I started up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 58
Ere thou canst mount up these immortal steps." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 117
Struck from the paved level up my limbs, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 123
To pour in at the toes: I mounted up , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 134
Was with its stored thunder labouring up . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 343
"Saturn! look up - and for what, poor lost King? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 354
Like sculpture builded up upon the grave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 383
"Moan, brethren, moan; for we are swallow'd up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 412
Still sits, still snuffs the incense teeming up The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 16
Who now, with greedy looks, eats up my feast? To Fanny, Line 17
Loves to beat up against a tyrannous blast, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 30
Now may we lift our bruised visors up , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 1
Dry up your tears, and do not look so blue; The Jealousies, Line 51
In trumping up this match so hastily, The Jealousies, Line 79
Who raked up ev'ry fact against the dead,) The Jealousies, Line 89
An article made up of calumny The Jealousies, Line 104
What 'tis to smother up a prince's flames; The Jealousies, Line 140
Caught up his little legs, and, in a fret, The Jealousies, Line 201
Whose springs of life are all dried up and dead, The Jealousies, Line 228
Whose glass once up can never be got back, The Jealousies, Line 232
Drink up your brandy, and sit down by me, The Jealousies, Line 399
She does not mean it really. Cheer up , hearty - there! The Jealousies, Line 459
"Zooks!" exclaim'd Hum, as up the sash he drew, The Jealousies, Line 542
Lighted our torches, and kept up a shout, The Jealousies, Line 682
As when the sea, at flow, gluts up once more The Jealousies, Line 737
Frill-rumpling elbows brew up many a bother, The Jealousies, Line 773
And fists in the short ribs keep up the yell and pother. The Jealousies, Line 774
 
UPBORNE...........2
No wreathed incense do we see upborne To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 3
Aye, his lull'd soul was there, although upborne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 549
 
UPBRAID...........1
I rather would grieve with you than upbraid . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 36
 
UPBURSTING........1
Stems the upbursting cold: a wild rose tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 55
 
UPCAST............1
Of upcast eye, and tender pondering! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 122
 
UPCURL'D..........1
We rest in silence, like two gems upcurl'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 120
 
UPFLOWN...........1
Their woes gone by, and both to heaven upflown , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 149
 
UPFOLLOW'D........1
In rolling out upfollow'd thunderings, To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 6
 
UPFURL'D..........1
Of silvery enchantment!- who, upfurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 461
 
UPHAPPY...........1
Ah! thou hast been uphappy at the change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 520
 
UPHARSIN..........1
Old "Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin ." Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 54
 
UPHELD............9
And, when upheld , the wine from each bright jar To My Brother George (epistle), Line 41
You too upheld the veil from Clio's beauty, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 68
Upheld on ivory wrists, or sporting feet: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 156
Rich opal domes were seen, on high upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 841
Phoebe, his passion! joyous she upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 987
During the pain Mnemosyne upheld Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 133
With emptied caskets, and her train upheld Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 86
On libbard's paws, upheld the heavy gold Lamia, Part II, Line 185
That seem'd throughout with upheld faces paved; The Jealousies, Line 731
 
UPHOLD............1
I have another steadfast one, to uphold Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 162
 
UPHOLDEN..........1
Some with upholden hand and mouth severe; Sleep and Poetry, Line 143
 
UPHOLDING.........1
Upholding wreaths of ivy; the white dove, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 43
 
UPLIFT............4
With uplift hands our foreheads, lowly bending, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 303
Uplift thee; nor for very shame can own Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 778
With uplift hands I blest the stars of heaven. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 735
Uplift her from the ground, and swiftly flit The Jealousies, Line 521
 
UPLIFTED..........2
So that we feel uplifted from the world, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 139
Uplifted drowsily, and nervy tails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 646
 
UPLIFTING.........3
The light uplifting of a maiden's veil; Sleep and Poetry, Line 92
Uplifting his strong bow into the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 345
And Ops, uplifting her black folded veil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 113
 
UPMOUNTED.........1
I felt upmounted in that region Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 641
 
UPMOUNTING........1
Which eagles cleave upmounting from their nest. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 157
 
UPPER.............2
Smiling, thus whisper'd: "Though from upper day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 433
Their upper lids?- Hist! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 66a
 
UPPERCHED.........1
As does the nightingale, upperched high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 828
 
UPPERMOST.........1
Next Cottus: prone he lay, chin uppermost , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 49
 
UPRAISE...........1
Thy latent talons in me - and upraise To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 6
 
UPREAR............1
Than to be crush'd, in striving to uprear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 40
 
UPRIGHT...........1
The corridor, and scarce upright could reach The Jealousies, Line 625
 
UPRISEN...........2
It was a nymph uprisen to the breast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 98
Uprisen o'er chaos: and with such a stun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 247
 
UPRISING..........1
Just as the sun was from the east uprising ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 80
 
UPROAR............6
Make pleasing music, and not wild uproar . How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 14
O ye whose ears are dinned with uproar rude, On the Sea, Line 11
In wakeful ears, like uproar past and gone- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 19
Flutter'd in the besieging wind's uproar ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 359
Thus in alternate uproar and sad peace, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 1
Draw not the sword; 'twould make an uproar , Duke, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 169
 
UPROSE............2
And, ever and anon, uprose to look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 422
Uprose Iapetus, and Creus too, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 384
 
UPSET.............1
When a milk-pail is upset , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 5
 
UPSIDE............1
He turned it quickly, nimbly upside down, The Jealousies, Line 420
 
UPSOAR............1
Perhaps on the wing of poesy upsoar ,- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 12
 
UPSOARS...........1
Upsoars , and darts into the eastern light, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 2
 
UPSTIRR'D.........1
In many places;- some has been upstirr'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 224
 
UPSWELLING........1
A hymn from Dian's temple; while upswelling , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 197
 
UPSWIMMETH........1
When he upswimmeth from the coral caves, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 51
 
UPTOOK............1
Or, it may be, ere matron Night uptook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 561
 
UPTORN............2
Is like a fallen angel: trees uptorn , Sleep and Poetry, Line 242
Seated upon an uptorn forest root; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 499
 
UPTURN'D..........2
Seem'd sooty, and o'er-spread with upturn'd gills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 695
Out-sparkling sudden like an upturn'd gem, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 777
 
UPTYING...........1
While every eve saw me my hair uptying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 803
 
UPWARD............11
Cast upward , through the waves, a ruby glow: Imitation of Spenser, Line 13
Are upward turn'd to catch the heavens' dew. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 23
Some looking back, and some with upward gaze; Sleep and Poetry, Line 147
For 'twas the morn: Apollo's upward fire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 95
Or upward ragged precipices flit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 266
My sight right upward : but it was quite dazed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 601
Right upward , through the bushes, to the sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 872
Disparted, and far upward could be seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 517
Beam'd upward from the vallies of the east: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 727
Of heaven with upward eyes for all that they desire. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 54
What eyes are upward cast. As I had found The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 271
 
URANIA............1
To the blue dwelling of divine Urania : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 41
 
URANUS............1
Which starry Uranus with finger bright Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 134
 
URCHIN............1
Like puzzled urchin on an aged crone The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 129
 
URGANDA'S.........1
From some old magic like Urganda's sword. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 29
 
URGE..............1
Of that dark gulph he wept, and said: "I urge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1013
 
URGENCY...........1
Because of some great urgency and need Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 227
 
URGING............1
Urging the perfidy of broken faith,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 148
 
URN...............8
Her ebon urn , young Mercury, by stealth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 562
And, silent as a consecrated urn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 32
An urn of tears, as though thou wert cold dead; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 432
Then it is free to him; and from an urn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 534
And see my cool sedge-buried urn , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 32
They pass'd, like figures on a marble urn , Ode on Indolence, Line 5
They came again; as when the urn once more Ode on Indolence, Line 7
In masque-like figures on the dreamy urn ; Ode on Indolence, Line 56
 
URNS..............2
My parents' bones are in their dusty urns Lamia, Part II, Line 94
Ever from their sordid urns unto the shore, What can I do to drive away, Line 35
 
US................89
Who joys to see us with his gifts agreeing, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 33
It comes upon us like the glorious pealing To Kosciusko, Line 3
That breathes about us in the vacant air; Sleep and Poetry, Line 31
Upon the clouds? Has she not shewn us all? Sleep and Poetry, Line 167
Rich benedictions o'er us ; ye have wreathed Sleep and Poetry, Line 222
Then let us clear away the choaking thorns Sleep and Poetry, Line 255
That smile us on to tell delightful stories. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 124
Charms us at once away from all our troubles: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 138
Telling us how fair, trembling Syrinx fled I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 157
And calmest thoughts come round us - as, of leaves After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 9
Let us feed and feed. Hither, hither, love, Line 4
Let us too! - but be our dirge Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 19
A bower quiet for us , and a sleep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 4
A flowery band to bind us to the earth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 7
Pouring unto us from the heaven's brink. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 24
Haunt us till they become a cheering light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 30
Unto our souls, and bound to us so fast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 31
They alway must be with us , or we die. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 33
Hear us , great Pan! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 246
Hear us , O satyr king! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 278
That keeps us from our homes ethereal; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 361
Loiter'd around us ; then of honey cells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 668
Leaving us fancy-sick. No, no, I'm sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 853
Clings cruelly to us , like the gnawing sloth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 907
To make us feel existence, and to shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 158
Cheats us into a swamp, into a fire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 279
Of all these things around us ." He did so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 455
Us young immortals, without any let, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 487
His soul will 'scape us - O felicity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 763
Was quite forgotten, save of us alone! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 786
Let us entwine hoveringly - O dearth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 817
Will shade us with their wings. Those fitful sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 981
Blushing into my soul, and let us fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 986
And let us be thus comforted; unless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1001
"Let us commence," Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 744b
"Thou swan of Ganges, let us no more breathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 465
Let us ay love each other; let us fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 626
Let us ay love each other; let us fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 626
Us live in peace, in love and peace among Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 635
Would hide us up, although spring leaves were none; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 672
Into the hours that have pass'd us by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 825
To meet us many a time." Next Cynthia bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 996
So it is: yet let us sing, Robin Hood, Line 49
Let us two a burden try. Robin Hood, Line 62
Be settled, but they tease us out of thought. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 77
It forces us in summer skies to mourn: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 84
Portion'd us - happy days, or else to die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 332
Unknown, Lethean, sigh to us - O sigh! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 436
From isles Lethean, sigh to us - O sigh! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 484
While the night breeze doth softly let us know Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 33
Teach us , here, the way to find you, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 26
Thus ye teach us , every day, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 35
Of old romance. These let us wish away, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 41
Let us away, my love, with happy speed; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 347
For as among us mortals omens drear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 169
As with us mortal men, the laden heart Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 101
Which comes of thought and musing: give us help!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 166
A power more strong in beauty, born of us Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 213
And fated to excel us , as we pass Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 214
Thereby more conquer'd, than by us the rule Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 216
Above us in their beauty, and must reign Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 227
Let us find out, if we must be constrain'd, If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 4
Let us inspect the lyre, and weigh the stress If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 7
Than Midas of his coinage, let us be If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 11
Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 44
Be cause of feud between us . See! he comes! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 119
He thus avoids us . Lady, is't not strange? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 75
Let us to Friedburg castle. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 132
Not all the gaze upon us can restrain Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 6
The trumpets reach us . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 53a
Detain us ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 54a
Let us be calm, and hear the abbot's plea Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 100
To beard us for no cause; he's not the man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
The cause for which you have disturb'd us here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
By us . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 277a
To crush or save us ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 7a
I hope, resolv'd between us . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50a
Is- Love, forgive us !- cinders, ashes, dust; Lamia, Part II, Line 2
And for the youth, quick, let us strip for him Lamia, Part II, Line 225
Come, lead me to this Mars - and let us move King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 51
That makes thee thus unarm'd throw taunts at us ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 15
But let us leave this idle tittle tattle The Jealousies, Line 118
Let us resume his subject if you please: The Jealousies, Line 122
"Next door but one to us , upon the right, The Jealousies, Line 282
Let us away!" Away together ran The Jealousies, Line 320
Well, let us see,- tenth book and chapter nine,- The Jealousies, Line 640
She frown'd; a monstrous owl across us flies The Jealousies, Line 655
Kept reconnoitring us - doubled our guard- The Jealousies, Line 681
To watch our grand approach, and hail us as we pass'd. The Jealousies, Line 720
 
USE...............10
Summer's joys are spoilt by use , Fancy, Line 10
Every thing is spoilt by use : Fancy, Line 68
No! we must revel it, as 'tis in use Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 54
Put on a judge's brow, and use a tongue Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 147
Use other speech than looks; bidding him raise Lamia, Part I, Line 304
Where use had made it sweet, with eyelids closed, Lamia, Part II, Line 23
Of no use at a need? Take that- King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, A Soldier, Line 39a
And supersedeth quite the use of the glow-worm. The Jealousies, Line 216
That 'tis of modern use to travel in a litter. The Jealousies, Line 234
Use of some soft manoeuvre you must make, The Jealousies, Line 490
 
USED..............8
To stammer where old Chaucer used to sing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 134
To whose cool bosom she was used to bring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 433
Had I been used to pass my weary eves; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 546
Left his young cheek; and how he used to stray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 728
That when through heavy hours I used to rue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 553
When here, a monarch, whose proud foot is used Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
Which never should be used but in alarming cases." The Jealousies, Line 540
And used , as we ourselves have just now said, The Jealousies, Line 627
 
USELESS...........3
So pert and useless , that they bring to mind To My Brother George (epistle), Line 129
Are useless : sure a poet is a sage; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 189
Useless , could find about its roofed home The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 229
 
USELESSLY.........1
Endanger not yourself so uselessly . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 90
 
USHER.............1
To usher back his spirit into life: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1015
 
USHER'D...........1
Eban then usher'd in the learned seer: The Jealousies, Line 334
 
USURP.............1
"None can usurp this height," return'd that shade, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 147
 
USURPER'S.........1
Fain would I know the great usurper's fate. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 8
 
UTMOST............8
Such utmost beauty? Alas, thou dost pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 74
Who had not from mid-life to utmost age Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 228
Of all my life was utmost quietude: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 353
The utmost privilege that ocean's sire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 376
My fancy to its utmost blisses spreads: Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 10
Do this to the utmost ,- though alas! with me Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 19
But of its threat she took the utmost heed; The Jealousies, Line 70
An inch appears the utmost thou couldst budge; The Jealousies, Line 245
 
UTTER.............8
Yet ere thou leavest me in utter woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 586
To utter secrets, haply I might say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 914
Utter a gorgon voice? Does yonder thrush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 129
Will I to children utter , and repent. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 645
Heaven shield thee for thine utter loveliness! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 710
Ask me no more! I may not utter it, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 756
I utter even the shadow of a hint Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 26
And cloud him in such utter banishment, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 72
 
UTTER'D...........4
Of high Olympus utter'd slavish sighs. Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 8
Wherewith disturb'd, she utter'd a soft moan: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 294
He utter'd , while his hands contemplative Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 377
Whose words once utter'd pass like current gold; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 210
 
UTTERANCE.........10
Into the labyrinths of sweet utterance ? To G.A.W., Line 4
With mellow utterance , like a cavern spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 576
Gave utterance as he entered: "Ha! I said, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 951
To that large utterance of the early Gods! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 51
Utterance thus.- "But cannot I create? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 141
The power of utterance . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 72a
Amphion's utterance , toned with his lyre, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 24
The shadows of melodious utterance . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 6
To choak my utterance sacrilegious here?" The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 140
To that large utterance of the early Gods!- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 353
 
UTTERED...........1
No uttered syllable, or, woe betide! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 203
 
UTTERING..........3
These uttering lips, while I in calm speech tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 475
Uttering the while some mumblings funeral. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 748
From uttering soft responses to the love Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
 
UTTERLESS.........1
His tongue with the full weight of utterless thought, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 120
 
UTTERLY...........6
Forgetful utterly of self-intent; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 386
These things accomplish'd:- If he utterly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 696
Shall feel the other half so utterly !- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 310
And freezes utterly unto the bone Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 373
Amazed were those Titans utterly . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 2
Like a sharp spear, went through her utterly , Lamia, Part II, Line 300

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Published @ RC

March 2005